State College News ALUMNI LOSE TO VARSITY IV; No. 19

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State College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF
VOL.
IV; No. 19
1918
ALBANY, N. Y M FEBRUARY 26,
1920
$2.00 PER YEAR
ALUMNI LOSE TO VARSITY
Juniors and Frosh Win Preliminary Game
COLLEGES FAVOR
TREATY COMPROMISE
Faculty and Students Vote Same
On January 13 mure than four
hundred colleges and universities
participated in a straw vote on the
ratification of the Treaty of Versailles. The result of our vote, 261
students and 25 faculty for a compromise between the positions of
the Democrats and the Lodge
reservations, compares with that of
the majority of other colleges in
the country, especially those in the
Eastern Stales. A few southern
colleges gave a plurality to ratification without any changes whatsoever, while Michigan and some
other colleges and universities of
the Middle West supported the
Lodge program. In almost every
instance the advocates of rejection
were a poor fourth. An interesting phase of the straw vote lies in
the fact that the faculty members
of the colleges and universities distributed their votes in the same
ratio as the students at the same
institutions.
Senators Lodge and Hitchcock
both approved of the form of the
questions and ballots, and the
presidents of Columbia, Harvard,
Princeton and Yale acted on the
Advisory Committee of the movement. Both men and women students voted.
Yale, Princeton and Harvard
overwhelmingly favored comproContinned on page 4
ANNOUNCEMENT
Kappa N'u sorority announces
thait it will henceforth be known as
the Chi Sigma Theta sorority.
DEMAND FOR STATE
COLLEGE TEACHERS
IS LARGE
Salaries Increased 25 Per Cent.
The demand for teachers from
State College is unusually large for
this time of the year according to
a statement made recently by Dr.
A. R. Brubacher. The demand for
teachers of French, Spanish and
science is particularly heavy, and
an increase of at least 25 per cent,
over the salaries offered last year
is noted. Last year the average
salary for graduates of State College was under $1,000; to-day it is
$1,200.
Last year 137 students
were graduated; this year the class
numbers 160. Twenty members of
the class to graduate in June have
received offers, Small towns and
villages are paying more than the
cities.
The minimum
salary
offered in Albany is $800; in Hudson $840, and in many villages
$1,000.
The Stale College team defeated
the Alumni live last Saturday iu
tlie Albany High School gymnasium by a score of 25 to 17 in the
most interesting game
of the season. The " gratis,'1 although a little out of training, displayed a
brand of basketball which made the
Varsity travel at high speed in
order to come out on top.
Manager Francis Fitzgerald, who
is also captain of the Alumni team
and holds down one of the forward
positions, presented a strong line
tip, Slanley Fitzgerald, who has
a record for foul shooting, played
the other forward position. O'Connell put up a good game at center
and Hohaus and Cnrtin formed a
strong defensive,
Springmann started >the scoring
in the first half when he counted on
a foul shot.
Hohaus opened up
for the 'old timers'' with a neat
overhand basket.
Lo'bdcll came
back for the winners with a field
basket from the side of the court.
Cnrtin retaliated for the Alumni
and Stanley Fitzgerald's foul goal
and field basket put the Alumni in
front. Cassavaiu came back, however, before the end of the period
with two field baskets and two foul
points, sending the Varsity ahead
by a score of 12 to 11.
Continued on page 4
SOPHS BEAT JUNIORS
Game Closely Contested
One of the most exciting games
of the season was witnessed in the
gym Friday night when the sophs
.beat the juniors by a score of 12
to 11. Due to the absence of the
juniors' clever forward both teams
were evenly matched and fought
hard for supremacy.
The sophomores kept I he lead
throughout, the score at first half
being 5 to_ 4, - *
The junior guards worked hard
but it was impossible to get the
ball past the soph center, Knickerbocker, who, with flying leaps,
caught the ball again and again
and sent it to her forwards.
SOPHS Forwards, Tela Cackciier, Helen
Walsh.
Center, Clara Knickerbocker.
Side-center, Arline Wirth.
Guards, Pauline George, Gladys
Lodge.
Continued on page 4
NO COLLEGE CAMP IN
JUNE
Miss Bennett has announced that
because of the insufficiency of registration for the camp on Lake
George for the month of June the
project will be abandoned. However, it is expected that the matter
will be taken up again at a future
date,
The junior-freshman quintet defeated the senior-sophomore live
in a hard fought preliminary game
Saturday night by a score of G to 4.
Castellauo started the scoring
for the losers from the foul line.
Sherlock then came through with
a field basket for the winners. Another foul point by Castellauo for
the "evens " and a successful free
throw by Bliss for the " o d d s "
ended the scoring of the half.
In the second period Sherlock
scored another basket from the
field and Bliss added another point
from the penalty line. Linck made
the only field goal for the seniors
and sophomores.
The period
ended with a score of 6 to 4 in
favor of the juniors and freshmen.
Sherlock starred for 1921-23 and
Linck for 1920-22.
Score:
Continued on page 4
DR. THOMPSON
PRESENTS PROGRAM
Selections from " Hiawatha "
Dr. Harold W. Thompson will
give a number of piano selections
from " Hiawatha," which has been
set to music by Coleridge-Taylor,
at the Milne High chapel in the
college auditorium to-morrow at
12.25.
ORCHESTRA HAS
FIRST REHEARSAL
Eunice Rice Appointed Secretary
On Wednesday evening, February 18, the first orchestra rehearsal
Dr. Thompson is to
was held.
have charge of the rehearsals and
act as director. Castclla fIces is
chairman, and at the meeting
FACULTY MEMBERS
Eunice Rice was unanimously
GIVE PROGRAM elected secretary.
Those who came out for pracAt the regular Home Time Hour tice were as follows:
Castclla
service of the First Presbyterian Hces, 1st violin; Kathcrine MeChurch last Sunday Miss Gcraldine Garrahau, 1st violin; Herman
Murray gave the watch-word. She Staub, 2nd violin; Dorothy Mulholread a selection of Tolstoi's. Miss land, 1st mandolin; Alida Curry,
Heleue Bennett sang. Dr. Harold 1st mandolin; Lela Cackener, 1st
Thompson was at the piano.
mandolin; Marian Vosburgh, 2nd
mandolin; Beatrice Chrislield, 2nd
mandolin;
Eunice Rice, guitar;
ARMY ESSAY CONTEST
Agnes
Underwood, guitar; Gladys
JUDGES CHOSEN
Lodge, guitar; Thomas Castellauo,
flute; Katharine Ball, piano; DoroDean Harlan II. Horner, Pro- thy Dangremond, piano; Louise
fessor Richmond II. Kirlland and Persons, piano. Others will probProf. David Hutchinson, of State ably be added to the list soon, for
College, will be the judges in Al- everyone could not attend the first
bany of the essays written by pub- rehearsal.
lic school children on the subject,
" What Are the Benefits Derived VESPER SERVICE
from an Enlistment in the Army?"
SUNDAY
Hundreds of children in Albany
schools to-day wrote their essays.
The best essay written at each
Sunday afternoon the Y. M. and
school will he submitted to the Y. W. C. A.'s will have a vesper
judges, who, in turn, will select service at 4 p. m. in the college
one essay to represent Albany in auditorium.
Dr. Moldenhawcr
the national essay contest.
will be the speaker. Do not fail
to be there.
Sunday, February 29, is celeG. A. A. HAVE SLEIGH- brated
by all the Student Christian
RIDE AND DANCE
Associations in colleges throughout the country as a universal day
G. A. A. enjoys itself under all of prayer and intercession. Intercircumstances so, while everyone cession is the soul of service,
else growled about the cold siiap, " You can do more than pray after
the 6. A. A.'s reveled in a sleigh- you have prayed but you cannot
ridc Friday night; four sleighs do more than pray until you have
bore the jolly crowd for a just- prayed."
" He that savcth his time from
long-enough ride around the city
and out to Hursts. Returning to prayer shall lose it, and he that
the gym at ten o'clock they found loseth his time for communion
their little friends, the doggies, with God shall find it again in
awaiting them accompanied by added blessing and power and
rolls, coffee and lolly pops. A fruitfulness,"
"Commit thy way unto the Lord;
short program was given by Miss
Card and Miss Bennett.
Miss and he shall give thee thy heart's
Bennett sang " By the Sky Blue desire."
Waters" and "Look Down, Dear
John R, Mott said in speaking of
F<yes." Miss Card gave a most the power of prayer; " W e are in
pleasing solo dance,
The re- the greatest need of help i ^ w h a t
mainder of the evening was spent I believe in my inmost soul is the
in dancing.
Continued on page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 26, 1920
Page Two
State College ACIDS
Vol. I V S , FEB. 26, 1920
No, 19
Published weekly, oh Thursday*,
during the college year, by the Student Body of the New York State
College for Teachers, at Albany,
New York.
The subscription rate is two dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
Business manager.
Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the Editor before
Monday of the week of publication.
Editor-in-chief,
Kenneth P. Holben, '20
Managing Editor,
Elsie W. Hanbury, '20
Business Manager,
Ellen C. Donahue, '20
Subscription Manager,
Bertha West, '20
Assistant Business Manager,
Edna Lowerree, '21
Associate Editors,
F, Reginald Bruce, '21
Florence Stanbro, '21
Mary E. Whish, '21
Marjorie Potter, '21
Louise Persons, '22
Elisa Rigouard, '22
AN EXPLANATION
The reason for last week's lateness in issuing the " News " was a
delay in getting the copy to the
printer.
It left the publication
office on time but the hitch occurred between here and Hamilton
street.
THE CUT SYSTEM
For the past week or so a preponderance of the small talk indulged in during leisure moments
has been upon the attendance rules.
More than half the student body
have already been compelled to use
their precious cuts, due to the
recent weather conditions and illness.
The thought of wasting
such perfectly good excuses seems
distressing to the economical soul.
Then, too, there is the attitude of
the faculty to be considered, How
are they to know whether one is
unavoidably or intentionally absent? It is generally understood
that a cloud of discredit hangs over
the intentional absentees.
The
tendency now is to use the cuts
immediately so as to take advantage of them. It seems fair that
a student should have the privilege
of a certain number of cuts, but it
has also 'been suggested that excusable absences should not take
up these cuts.
•22.
THE LIGHTS
Coleman has 'been provoked to
the point of anger a number of
times lately because the lights in
the locker rooms persist in remaining on for two hours or more
every night. Those who use the
/'•'Jibe'" evenings have been asked
to switch off the lights in the lockers when they are through with
them. This is a reasonable request.
That " we-should-worrywe-don't-ipay-for-'em" attitude is
not commendable. Such a spirit
could not be carried to its logical
conclusion without disaster. It is
to the best interest of every individual to guard the property of the
State as he would his own. Let's
remember the lights then, and do
our bit toward cultivating anew
that thrift incss which was the
watchword of our New England
fathers.
'21
NOTICE
The students are invited to I he
Saturday Tea, February 28, from
three to five o'clock,
Hostesses — M r s . Frcar, Mrs,
Brubacher, Mrs. Decker, Mrs.
Douglas, Mrs. Coughlin, Miss Bennett, Miss Card.
AN ATTEMPT
This week we arc attempting a
liew venture filling a seemingly
long-felt need, We shall endeavor
to maintain a column in this paper,
.similar to that of large city dailies,
in which delicate, general ami personal questions may 'be asked, and
upon consultation with authorities
we shall attempt to answer. We
ask that all communications be addressed to "Miss Annabelle Ebel "
and delivered' at the publication
office before noon of each Monday.
The name signifies nothing — simply a nom de plume in general for
a committee of several catering to
the students and faculty of State
College. Published below will be
found some items indicative of
what we profess to attempt in the
future.
Dear Annabelle:
Excuse this seeming familiarity,
but 1 feel as though I had known
you ever since I came to college.
This column offers me an opportunity to broach a question which
hitherto.I have kept hidden in my
diary.^ " T o be or not to b e " is
the gist of it all. Do not answer
this plea hurriedly but deliberate
over it nights on your pillow.
Should a really nice girl of a
discreet age allow an unusually attentive and very young man to stay
later than 10.30 when calling on
Sunday evening?
Senior Prue.
Your inquiry is typical of State
College seniors. Before answering
your question definitely we must
know if this is not your first gentleman caller. Very likely he feels
the need of a guiding sister hand. ;
Is he, by any chance, a Union
freshman?
i
Dear Annabelle Ebel:
I am a freshman but I believe I
have attracted the attention of an
upper-classman. What shall I do?
Perplexed Dido.
If the young man continues his
attentions find out from reliable
sources his financial status and, if
satisfactory, go to it; if not, ignore
him and seek further.
Dear Annabelle Ebel:
Should a senior in college (my
room mate) dye her hair? And am
f expected to pay the taxi driver
when I ask a young man to accompany me to a formal party?
•21.
If that is your room mate's only
chance of salvation advise her to
use sage tea daily. Your second
question is difficult to answer. It
all depends on who the young man
is — your brother or some other
girls'.
Dear Annabelle Ebel;
What would you do in a case like
this? I went to a tea riot long ago.
A faculty member handed me some
tea and crackers. I hit a cracker
which was stale. Should f have
eaten it? Would social obligation
cause me in such a case to risk
indigestion?
- Me.
We desire some detailed information before we can risk answering such a query,
MUSIC CLUB
The regular meeting of Music
Club was held Monday afternoon,
February 23, at 4 p. ni. The following program was given:
Piano Solo, 1-1 ope Persons, "22,
Vocal Solo, Katherinc Stratton,
'22,
.Reading, Agnes Nolan, '20.
Vocal Duel, Elsie Leonard, '23,
Florence Dorscy, '23.
Piano Solo, Dorthy Dangremond, '23,
,_
CHEMISTRY CLUB
Chemistry Club met Friday at
four o'clock. William Strain, '21,
read a paper on " Cocoanuts," After describing the appearance of
the cocoanut tree he gave a detailed account of the different uses
made of the plant. Rope is made
from the fibre, and the leaves are
used for thatch. The juice distilled from the flowers is made into
cocoauut wine. The cocoanut itself was then considered. During
the war cocoanut shells were used
as a source of carbon for gas
masks. An interesting and novel
feature of the cocoanut was explained. It seems pearls are often
found in cocoanuts having the
same chemical composition as
those found in oysters. Mr. Strain
remarked 'that this was a very
timely subject.
After a short business meeting
the club adjourned.
Professor Bronson has been
home a week with a severe attack
of laryngitis.
Dorothy Banner, Edna Parshall
and Earl Dorwalclt have charge of
classes in chemistry and general
science at the Albany High School.
The second issue of the " Hormone " will be ready in a week or
two.
It has been found advisable
to charge a subscription fee of fifteen cents, or five cents per copy,
for the rest of the semester. The
issue will be limited to those who
have paid on or before the date of
publication.
SYRACUSE CONFERENCE
Many Teachers Needed
Yes,
" Dcs Moines again at
Syracuse!" Some folks laughed
when the bulletin iboard said that,
but it was quite true. The Des
Moines message was brought to
us in several ways many of the
students at the Syracuse convention had been out there; Dr. Sherwood Eddy and others of the
speakers spoke to us; we had access to part of the much-talkcd-of
and mysterious "Exhibit."
Saturday night at the banquet
we were very thankful that we had
had a cheer contest. You should
have heard those colleges yell!
Eighty Cornell delegates, twenty
Elmira girls, twenty-five Union
men, and all the rest —thev matte
a great showing.
Our chance
came when Colgate gave State
College a rousing cheer and we
responded with " Hoi-ya. Rah!
Rah! Rah! — Colgate." We used
most of our yells, Elmira's clever,
peppy songs made us green with
envy.
There were only eight of us
State College people, Helen Fay,
V
'19, Marguerite Aldeii, '20, Lovisa
Vedder, '20, Helen Chase, '21,
Frances Stils.o'iij '22, Marion Hunter, '22, Beatrice Crislield, '23, and
Ruth Ki-mnicy, '23. If you want
to see our pictures look on the
Y. W. 'bulletin board for the conference group taken on the steps
of the Ag, building.
Don't try
to recognize the men holding the
banner. At the"" last minute the
photographer said that if we expected banners to show they
should all be on the first row, so
we passed ours down, The tall
man just 'behind it is Paul Van
Camp, of Cornell, president of the
N. Y. Stale Student Volunteer
Union. The newly elected president is Alex Stuart, of Union. We
heard about many teaching vacancies. Do you know how desperately Home Economics teachers,
music and
drawing
teachers,
physical education teachers, and
all kinds of teachers are needed in
China, Japan, Africa and South
America?
Syracuse entertained us royally.
It was another "wonderful conference."
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
The student assembly program
for last Friday morning was quite
varied in its character. After the
members of Myskania had taken
their seats, Mr. Schiavonc read the
notices of student activities for the
coming week. Then, Miss Archibold came forward to lead in practising the new air of the "Alma
Mater." She asked all the students to watch the bulletin board
for the posting of two new State
College songs. Gus Crable led a
short cheer practise, and urged all
the students — the men, especially
—-to support State at the basketball games. Mr. Schiavonc then
announced that the rest of the
hour would be devoted to class
meetings, so the assembly adjourned to the rooms assigned to
the different classes.
CANTERBURY CLUB
The Rev. Lawrence R. Kelly,
vicar of St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, Albany, en'tcrta'ined members of Canterbury Club, Monday
evening, with a lively talk on
Arizona.
His accounts of ghila
monsters, cacti that produced
everything from candy to hair upholstery for automobiles, his yarns
of tenderfoot a'dventurcs with polar
bears that come down from the
mountains in 130 degrees of heat
to lick up the ice from the refrigerator, his more serious investigation of wretched conditions among
Mexicans and Indians, made the
time pass quickly.
Theodore Cassavant, '21, then
read a paper written by Mrs. Katherinc Ingwire, of Albany, on St.
Augustine's College, Canterbury.
Pictures of Canterbury's quaint
gardens and rich old buildings were
of deep interest to the club.
At a short business meeting the
following key members were appointed for the rest of the year:
St. Andrew's.
St. Paul's.
Cathedral of All Saints.
Grace.
St. Peter's.
Freshman Class.
Sophomore Class.
Junior Class.
*
Senior Class.
The next meeting will be held at
St. Andrew's, Monday evening,
March 22, at eight o'clock. Corporate communion will be administered at Grace Church, Sunday,
March 7, at nine o'clock,
i
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 26, 1920
WHO'S WHO
<f
The following girls will be in the
Practice House February 29 to
March 14; Jane Sclvnitzler, '20;
Hazel Brimmer, '20; Kaitherine
Dcitz, '20, and Alice Richmond, '20.
The conference of Vocational
Touchers of tlie Capital District
will take place February 27-28.
Miss Rose Hughes is chairman of
the meeting. The Home-Making
section will meet in room 260.
Miss Marion Van Liew will discuss tiic following topics: ''A Survey of Home Economics in New
York State," " H o m e Making for
the Part Time School Room."
Miss Weir, head of the Household
Department at Ktisscl Sage, Troy,
will talk on " Improvements of
Teachers in the Service." The discussions will IK: led by Miss Kiel,
superintendent of Home Keonoin6-ic in Troy. The meetings are
open 'to all students of the department.
Miss Bessie Harris was a recent
visitor at the Russell Sage College,
Troy,
Mrs. Allen I''. Williams, nee
Caroline Burgc, 'IS, of Buffalo,
•yisited the department last week.
A n
Lovisa Vedder, '20, and Marion
Hunter, '22, attended the Student
Volunteer Conference at Syracuse,
Marion Moore, '20, and Florence
•Stubbs, '20, passed the week-end in
.Athens as the guest of Edith Morrison, '19, who is teaching in the
Athens High School.
Marguerite Ritzcr, '20, passed the
week-end at the I louse.
Jessie Clifford, '20, passed the
week-end at her home in Canaan.
II <I>
Olive Woodworth, '19, spent the
week-end at the House,
A luncheon was given at the
House Sunday evening in honor of
Myfanwy VViHams, '21.
Olive
Woodworth, '18, and Margaret
Kirtland, '22, were guests.
Louise Perry, '21, has been at her
home in Melrose for the past week
because of illness.
Margaret Kirtland, '22, spent the
week-end at the House.
*r
Ruth Patterson, '19, spent last
week-end at the House.
Alta Sahler, '18, spent the weekend in Albany.
Wc are glad to have all the
House girls back again after their
illness.
_., . ,,
Alice and Augustus Stripling
spent the week-end in Albany as
guests of Mary Stripling, 20.
K A
Viola Brovvnell, '19, spent Friday
•night at the House.
Dorothy Roberts, '19, and Clara
Holder, '19, attended the game
Saturday and visited College MonOlive Gage, of Johnsonvillc, visited her sister Mabel.
Elsie Hanbury was the guest of
Helen Guldi Sunday evening.
X S®
Aileen Russell, '19, was a weekend guest at the Lodge recently.
Mildred O'Malley, '18, spent last
week-end in Albany.
,
Elizabeth O'Connell, '20, visited
her home last week.
Agnes Dennin, '19, visited her
family in Albany for a few days
recently.
•
,.„
, „ ..
Mary Kinsella, '18, and Katharine McGarrahan, '21, were guests
at the Lodge last Friday night,
• Mae Cronln, '20, spent last week. end at her home.
Marion Baldwin, '19, was a vis-
itor in Albany over last week-end.
Marian
Haskins, '20, Ethel
Hogan, '20, Margaret Vangtini, '21,
and May Baxter, '22, attended a
coasting party last Saturday,
K A P
Ray O'Connel, '16, " T r u c k "
Ho'liaus, '17, and Gerald Curtin,
'19, played on the alumni team
against the varsity last Saturday.
" A r t i e " Woodward, '18, and Bob
Elliott, '19, were in town over the
week-end.
An informal dance will be given
at the Aurania Club to-morrow
evening.
Ensign R. W. bloody, '18, visited
College Tuesday.
I£. C, Baker, of West Englewood,
K. J., visited his brother, Ralph
Baker, '21, over the week-end,
t N K
Stanley G, Fitzgerald, '17, and
Francis Fitzgerald,'19, played with
the alumni Saturday night.
Merril Sauerbrci, '18, and Francis
Connors, '17, attended the game.
Dear Egg;—
Yours of last week received.
Don't be teliin' me no more about
• Marie Wool-worth—I don't like
. her, Our sevvin' club had a party
last Thursday afternoon an we
Iho't we'd get our glimmers on a
- few girls we'd seen hangin' around
Pearl street.
They call that
,! "rushin"' in college, but I don't know
why less it's cause we're such a
;
fast bunch. Gee, Fgg, -they're some
bunch. They all (5 of 'em) come
chewin' gum an blushjn' in some
spots 'u gcttiit' pale in others —
nice girls! J Iho't Marie must be
one of 'cm but 1 didn't know there
names so I walked by them an
says " E g g " softly, but it didn't
seem to make any impression on
them, so Marie couldn't been there.
I'm glad you got your marks,
it kinda cheers me up a little. If
you think you got by, I must have
gotten A's at least, if not more.
[ was kinda skecred fer awhile
here. I'll admit the dean is always a sociable fella but lately he's
been a little more intimate with
some. Why he ain't satisfied unless he's got a hole bunch outside
his door an' then, after waitin' that
long for him, he tells 'em they're
apt to go skatin' too fast on such
thin ice, an they better go home
'till they grow some 'more, or, to
wait till the rest of the place
ketches up with 'cm. He's always
makin' such personal remarks.
You'd like'the teas wc have down
here, Egg. They call 'em student
activities or sornethin' like that.
Gee, there swell. Some girls flit' tcrs away on the piano an' a couple
I more are tcachin' the fellas 'how to
i lead. I guess by the looks most
' of the fellas down here are used to
be-in' lead, cause if you say anythin' to 'em when they're dancin ,
they have to begin to count 7 all
over again. I heard them teachers
get about 25 cents learnin' the rest
how to shimmic, but I wouldn't
give my feet away for 25 dollars
an' neither would you, Egg. We
got candy an' cookies an' tea fer
nothin' tho', so it didn't turn out
so worse. You can play cards too,
Egg, but you got to do it quiet,
cause if you get boisterous an
slammin' your fists on the table or
rattlin' your cuff buttons or takin'
off your coat, they're apt to get
suspicious an' ask you what your
playin'.
I'm glad to hear you been
shovelin' snow — that will be good
for you later, Egg, But don't get
in the habit of doin' it all night
cause you'll have to have a better
excuse than that, Yes, I see it's
part out ol charity your doin' it,
but when it comes 3 a. m„ remember what Pat. Henry said, " Char-
ity begins at home or least comes
back there,"
I don't see why you got G.
Washington's birthday off an' wc
didn't, Gee, they don't give you
nothin' you don't take down here.
I bet George was awful mad when
he heard we wasn't cellcbratin' his
birthday, but I'm go i n ' t o have one
soon an' maybe we're goitt^ to have
that off.
Of course, Egg, we
kinda specialize in brain development down here so's we couldn't
be acspected to have so much vacation as you, could wc, eh, Egg?
They hail a picnic from here to
Syracuse last week-end.
Conference er sornethin' like that, they
called it, Somebody come up to
me an' says, "your invited." But
then I found out later you had to
pay. an' 1 had my suitcase all
packed, loo. Anyway I. says to
myself, well, anyway, all the decent
Gospel team fellas are engaged s.Q.
there's no sense in me go-in', eh
Egg? So I unpacked it an' began
life anew in this dump.
I hope you been sick, Egg, Most
everybody has so you may as well
be too. I come up on the car with
a man an' be was sayin', " Yes, 5
times from 4 a. m, to 9." So many
people been feelin' like that a lot
lately. Jt must be the high cost
of living—there's an' epidemic of
that 'here too. I felt awful sick the
last 3 days but I don't know what's
the matter. One of the neighbors
been brimgin' me broth 'n stuff —
I guess that made it worse. She
said someIhin' about flew, I don't
remember first what, but I guess
did, cause 1 ain't felt that way
since.
I hate to talk about myself, Egg,
but birthdays will be birthdays an'
they will come on the same day
each year an' — mine comes next
Tuesday. I got cnuf stockings but
I do like gloves,
Yours rcpressedly,
Rose.
P. S. — Some of the fellas up
where you are come down to see
their girls ucashunally, Egg — yes?
Remember, don't tell me about that
10 cent girl no more. I never
could stand girls which said, "My
Gawd" — that's plajerizin', Egg.
R.
Page Three
GOOD CLOTHING
HATS anJ SHOES
Altai*
Fearey's
for Shoes
2 3 N o . P e a r l St.
Cotrell & Leonard
Makers of
GAPS, GOWNS, and Hoods
Broadway, Albany
DAWSON'S
259 Central Ave*
Men's Furnishing*
Skint
Hat,
L. G .
SCHNEIBLM
PHARMACY
ScHOOi-
Buppuma
ON
OOLLEQE
CORNER
PARTY
Favors, Noveltiet, Place and
Tally Card; lee and Nut Cup*
Table Decoration,, Jack Horner Piety
School Suppliei
Fountain Pen*
MRS. LEAKE'S SHOP
78 Maiden Lane
EYRES
FLORIST
SAY IT W I T H FLOWERS
SMILES
A Giveaway
Every Worm Has His Day
Caller—So Miss Beatrice is your
oldest sister.
Who comes after
her?
Cuddy—Nobody aint yet, but pa
says the first fellow that comes can
Revenue Man (helping lienpeck
with his income tax report)—Are
you the head of a household?
Menpcck—I'll swear I am—my
wife to the contrary notwithstanding.—Buffalo Express.
U 3 l [ 3AT!l(
A Tough Proposition
Indispensable
Mr. Wade—What is this stuff?
Mrs, Wade—The butcher said it
was spring lamb.
Mr. Wade—He's right, I've been
chewing on one of the springs for
10 minutes.
" P o p ! Why do they call a ship
she?"
" I suppose it is because she always seems to require a mate, my
boy."—Detroit Free Press.
Distressing Subject
" What would you like to drink,
sir?" the waiter suggested.
" Now, see here," the patron exclaimed peevishly, " what is the use
of wasting my time in telling you,
merely to satisfy what can be only
an idle curiosity, what I would like
to drink? Just 'bring whatever unhappy wetness you arc afflicting on
a helpless public at this time, and
say nothing about it."—Judge.
Each for His Own
" I am, like any other man, entitled to my own opinion."
"Of
course,"
replied
Mr.
Groucher, " the same as I'm entitled to this dog of mine.
It
doesn't follow, however, that the
dog is any good,"—Washington
Star.
Poetry of Motion
" Who paid your carfare coming
home to-night?"
" H o w did you know any one
did?"
" You said you never knew the
cars to run so smoothly."
"W'hat are the passengers looking out of the window for?" asked
a nervous lady of the conductor.
" W e ran over a cat, Madam,"
said the conductor,
" Was the cat on the track?"
" Oh, no, ma'am," assured the
conductor,
" The
locomotive
chased him up an alley."
Prof.—''As a success, you have
been a failure."
Student—"Yes, but as a failure,
I have 'been a success."
Page Four
Sunday School Superintendent—
" W h o led the children of Israel
into Canaan?
Will one of the
smaller hoys answer?" (No reply.)
Superintendent—" Can no one
tell? Little boy on that scat next
to the aisle; who led the children
of Israel into Canaan?"
Little boy ('badly frightened)—
" It Wasn't me. I-I just moved
ycre last week. I'm Mizzoury."
" You'd better marry trie. Eligible
men are scarce."
" I suppose I could offer that as
an explanation," said the girl reflectively,
" Your cousin's medical practice,
I suppose, doesn't amount to much
yet."
" No, we relatives (In alf we can,
but of course we can't be ill all the
time."
You're
Constable—" Say, sir
private
pinched for fishing
waters."
Culprit (caught in the act)—I
ain't liishihg, I'm only trying to
teach this poor worm now to
swim."
STATE COLLEGE NEWS; FEBRUARY 26, 1920
For the winners Springmann and
Cassavant lead in securing points,
the former making 12 and the latter 9; For the Alumni Stanley
Fitzgerald scored 9 points and
Hohaus 4,
Score:
ALUMNI
Name and pos.
Fb, J'p. Tp,
F. Fitzgerald, If. . . . .
1 0
2
S. Fitzgerald, rf. . . .
3
3
9
O'Connell, c
0
0
0
Curtin, rg
Hohaus, lg.
1
2
0
0
2
4
7 ~3
17
I'rosh—" How long can a person
live without brains?"
Soph—" ( don't know. How old
are you?"
I stole a kiss the other night;
My conscience hurt, alack!
I think I'll have to go to-night
And give the darned thing back!
Lecturer—"If you're going to
succeed, you can't keep your hands
in your pockets."
Student (in rear of auditorium)—
" No, you've got to keep them in
the other fellow's pocket."
" D o you love me? " a s k e d the
paper bag of the sugar,
"Just wrapped up in you, sweetness," replied the sugar.
" Now, then, my men," cried the
gallant captain.
" Fight like heroes till your powder's all gone, and then run for
your life, I'm a little lame so I'll
start now."
ALUMNI LOSE
Continued from page 1
The " grads" fell behind in the
second half. Springmann opened
the attack for the winners with a
field basket, " Big Fitz " came back
with a foul point, but Springmann
found the basket again from the
side line, Hohaus dropped a field
goal for the Alumni and Johnson
came through with a neat basket in
return.
Springmann made three
double-headers and Cassavant a
free throw before the losers were
able to score again. S, Fitzgerald
finally broke away for a field
basket, and the half ended with a
score of 25 to 17 in favor of the
Varsity.
Campbell Carrlnston, Secretary
Ernest A. Barvoets, Vice-President
Edward C. Carrtngton, Treasurer
J. B. Lyon Company
STATU COLLEGE
,
Name and pos.
Fb, Fp. Tp,
Cassavant, rf
3
3
9
Masson, If
0
0
0
Springmann, c
5
2 12
Lobdell, rg.
1
0
2
Polt, lg
0
0
0
Johnson, If.
1
0
2
10
5 25
Summary; Score at half time —
State College, 12; Alumni, 11.
Referee — lloyson. Timekeeper —Hofman,
Time
of
periods —
twenty minutes.
General Printers and Publishers
Albany, N. Y.
A Compltte Plant for Composition, Electrotyping, Engraving, Presswork,
Binding, and Blank Book Manufacturing
TREATY COMPROMISE
Continued from page 1
Faculty Yell Uncovered
misc. Amherst and Cornell voted
for unreserved ratification. Elmira
He! he! he! Rah! Kali! Rah!
was slightly in favor of ratificaWe'll flunk sonic seniors, 11 all! tion without reservations and the
Hah! Hah!
University of Buffalo preferred the
Lodge reservations. R. P. I. and
Judge—" f don't know whether Brown favored the compromise
to give you ten (lays or ten dol- between the Lodge program and
the Democrats.
lars."
The straw vote will be as interTramp—"If it's all the same to
you, judge, I'll fake the ten dol- esting six months .from now as it
would have been six months ago,
lars."
Prof. Hastings—"What docs the
poem mean?"
Student (supposed to be explaining the poem')—" Well, I wondered
at that myself,"
Charlai M. Winchester, President
SOPHS BEAT JUNIORS
Continued from page 1
JUNIORS
Forwards, l<ranees Laurence, Lillian Hopper.
Center, Beulali Cunningham.
Side-center, Nellie Parkhurst,
Guards, Winnie Darling, Kathcrine Ball.
Score at half-time, 6-5. Referee
— Miss Beiinet. Scorer and timekeeper — Ellen Donohue.
THE
2
2
C
Summary: Score at half-time —
juniors and freshmen, 3; seniors
and sophomores, 2.
Referee —
Baker. Timekeeper — Hill. Scorer
— Springmann. Time of halves —
fifteen minutes.
VESPER SERVICE
Continued from page 1
most important thing next to
prayer itself, that we ever have to
do, and that is the enlisting of
men in the exercise of real prayer.
The church has not yet discovered,
still less begun to realize, the
limitless possibilities of intercession, every other consideration and
plan and emphasis is secondary to
that of wielding the forces of
prayer."
I t is hoped that as many students as possible will attend this
service. Remerrtber the time — 4
p. m,— Sunday, February 29,
PRINTING
CO.
PRODUCERS OF T H E BETTER C L A S S O F
BOOKLETS, CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS AND
DIRECT BY MAIL ADVERTISING
TBffl
PRINTERS
OF THK BTATB OOLLKOK NKWB
2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
S. E. MILLER
Men's Outfitter and Custom Tailor
SENIORS AND SOPHOMORES
Name and pos.
Fb. Pp. Tp.
Nicholson, rf
0
0
0
Linck, If
1
0
2
Castellano, c
0
2
2
Force, lg
:
0
0
0
Hofmann, rg
0
0
0
1
2
4
JUNIORS AND FRESHMEN
Name and pos.
Fb. Fp. Tp.
Sherlock, rf.
2
0
4
Bucci, If
0
0
0
Fiscus, c
0
0
0
Bliss, lg
0
2
2
Riley, rg
0 ' *0
0
Gray, rg.
0
0
0
HAMILTON
ALBANY, N. Y.
F R A N K H.
EVORY & CO.
Printers
3 4 - 3 6 MAIDEN LANE
1 3 8 Beaver Street
ALBANY, N. Y.
OPPENHEIM & McEWAN CO., Inc.
SAY IT W I T H
FLOWERS
DANKER
40
AND 4 2
MAIDEN LANE
OUR BUSINESS IS GROWING"
Wholesale Grocers
Albany, N. Y.
42 Hudson Ave.,
HORTON & WADE, Inc.
Specialists in Equipping Complete
Lunch Rooms and Cafeterias
"Everything Under One Hoof"
615 BROADWAY, ALBANY, N. Y.
Diamondi •Watches - Jewelry
A Special Offer of 10% Discount
to all College Student!
SEGAL'S JEWELRY SHOP
KATTREIN
Engraver Printer Stationer
Wadding Stationery a
Specialty
5 Maiden Lana,
WILLIAM
Confectionery
Albany, N. Y.
SPEIDEL
.
Periodicals
Cigars and Tobacco
CENTRAL AVE.. C a r . QUAIL ST.
ALBANY, N. Y,
171 Central Ave.,
Albany, N. Y
PHONE WKST 2334
OSHER'S GOODYEAR SHOE
REPAIR WORKS
2 8 CENTRAL AVE.
ALBANY. N. Y
Good Printer*
The Gateway Press
Phone Wut
2037-W
336 Central Ave.
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