State College N e w s Gertrude Crissy Valentine

advertisement
State College N e w s
N E W
1TORK
STATE
ESTABLISHED
VOL.
IV
No. 4
COLLEGE
HY
THE
ALBANY, N. Y.,
CLASS
FOR
OF
TEACHERS
1918
OCTOBER 9,
$2.00 PER YEAR
1919
Student Body Pays Tribute To
Gertrude Crissy Valentine
Dr. Richardson Gives Memorial Address
DOROTHY
P.
MAVIIKW
JUNIOR
WINS
FRENCH
UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIP
Sails F o r France
October 11
Dorothy F, Mayliew. '21, has won
a
French
University
fellowship
offered by the Society for American
fellowships in French Universities,
She is planning to sail for France
with five oilier candidates on Saturday, October 11. .Miss .Mayliew, who
did exceptional work in French in
the Schenectady llie.li School, was
advised by the principal of that
school to try for one of the fellowContinued on Page 4.
PROFESSOR
RISLEY
LECTURE
TO
First of Series on Current E v e n t s
The first program to be presented
by the literary department of the
Woman's Club of Albany will lake
place this afternoon, al 3:30 o'clock
hi the clubhouse, 725
Madison
\vcnue. This marks llic opening of
a series of six lectures on " Current
Events " lo be given by Professor
Adna W. Risley, head of the history
department of State College.
The
lectures are under the general heading of " History in the Making."
STUDENT BOARD
FINANCE
Complete List of
OF
Members
One faculty member, elected by the
sludenl
body — Professor
A. W .
Risley.
One
faculty
member,
alumnus of State College, appointed
bv the President — Professor C. A.
Ilidley (treasurer). T w o Seniors —
h'thel
Rooney, Arthur
Ferguson.
T w o Juniors — Catherine Wansboro,
Frank
Bliss.
One Sophomore —
Alexander Levitt. To the treasurer
of this board arc lo he submitted
the budgets of the " N e w s , " the
" Q u a r t e r l y , " the Athletic Council, the
Dramatic and Art Council, Mvskania,
and G. A. A.
Student Assembly Friday morning,
October 3, was devoted to a memorial
service in honor of Gertrude Crissy
Valentine, both a student and teacher
at Stale College, who gave her life
in service. Dr. Brubachcr spoke of
her desire to help in the war. " There
is no niie in our family lo go," she
had sairl, " a n d 1 feel that I can do
something."
Dr. Richardson as a close friend
and associate id' Miss Valentine, told
of her pure, noble, and inspiring life.
She had formerly gone in Vlhany
.Vormal School as a student. Later
to obtain her degree she went to
Vassar, where she was distinguished
by her spirit of friendship, her wit,
humor and keen desire fur knowledge, There she won the love and
admiration of the students, faculty
and trustees. " H e r wit," said Dr.
W. ENTERTAINS
STUDENTS
Reception H e l d in Gymnasium
On Friday evening, October 2, the
Y. VV. C, A gave a reception in the
college gymnasium
especially in
honor of the Class of 1923. The entire student body and the women of
the faculty were invited. There was
a very large crowd present.
Thi' gymnasium was very prettily
decorated with Japanese trimmings.
The large letters, Y. VV. C. A., were
lighted with electricity and were
placed on one side of the gymnasium.
A large part of the evening was
given up to dancing, hut a program
was given first.
Florence Stuhhs,
'20, gave a vocal solo; Miriam Smith,
'20, recited " T h e Littlest Rebel"; a
Japanese scene was shown which was
called " Singing in Toy-Land," in
which Nellie Parkhurst, 21, and
Katherine Merchant, '21, danced; and
Mrs. Chamherlayne gave I wo piano
CHEMISTRY CLUB
Meeting Tomorrow
Afternoon
First
regular
meeting of
the
Chemistry Club will be held in room
250, on Friday of this week at 4:15
P. M.
" C u r r e n t T o p i c s " will be discussed, and it is expected a large
number of members will be present.
There ars about thirty-five members of (lie Club in college this year,
and applications for membership have
been received from about twentyfive students. Tt is expected that
this will be a banner year for the
Club.
Richardson, " w a s as brilliant and
keen as the French — her sense of
humor akin to that of Charles Lamb."
After graduating from
Vassar,
Miss Valentine returned lo State
College, where she look a number of
methods courses, meanwhile assisting the Dean and Registrar. She was
then engaged as assistant in the Department of Ancient Languages. As
a teacher she ever "inspired her students lo seek perfection." She was
serving in ibis capacity when she
decided to join the service.
She went first lo Plymouth, England, where she spent many months
as a canteen worker in the V. M. C.
A. Octagon, administering to the
needs of [he soldiers and sailors.
She did all kinds of i.ianual labor
obligingly and willingly.
In every
Continued on Page -I.
G. A . A . H I K E T O
LADDER
INDIAN
Surely the sun shines for G. A. A.!
In spile of the dreary looking day,
two bus loads of G. A. A.'s rolled
away from Stale College at 12:45.
By 2:00 o'clock the bunch was just
starting up the mountain full of vim
and pep—• with the sun shining as if
it bad never intended to do otherwise.
Mountain climbing took about an
hour and a half of lime and five hundred puffs of enerev. It's merely incidental ihat not a person had remembered the " e a t s , " hut there were
plenty of willing freshmen to trot
obediently down the mountain to
bring the " doggies " up to sec the big
bonfire someone had built. The "eats"
disappeared in record time, and, rumors have it, in record-breaking
quantities.
One bus left at 5:30, soon after the
banquet, but many of the hikers
stayed until 7:00. Even the weary
seven o'clockers had enough energy
to sing and cheer all the way home—
and G. A. A. can cheer. Much of
the fun was due to (he jolly chaperones, Dr. Douglass, Miss Card, and
Miss Scotland, and G. A. A.'s lively
president, Harriet Woolsey, '20.
Ask the slock salesman if he will
guarantee you your money back with
interest on ten days' notice.
lie
won't. The Government will. Buy
War Savings Stamps.
FIELDER AT
WORCESTER
Walter G. Fielder, formerly one of
the second lieutenants in charge of
Company A, S. A. T. C„ State College, is playing right half-back on
the varsity football team at Worcester Tech.
PROFESSOR
DOUGLASS
VISITS VOCATIONAL
SCHOOLS
Observes Equipment in the W e s t
Professor Herbert M. Douglass,
head of Industrial Education Department, has returned from the West,
where he was called by the death of
his brother-in-law.
Before be returned
Fast, Professor
Douglass
spent some lime at the Dunwoody
Inslilule al Minneapolis, Minn., and
the Stout Institute at Menominee,
Wisconsin.
Dunwoody Institute is a vocational
school which was established about
three years ago by a man named
Dunwoody, and was by him heavily
endowed.
It is now under the direct ion of Dr. C, A. I'rosser, a leading figure in vocational education in
I he United Stales. The registration
al the inslilule totals approximately
live hundred.
Plans are already
under way lo erect three more buildings in anticipation of a larger enrolment.
The school gives instruction in machine-shop practice, automobile repair— this was an exceedingly large
class, Professor Douglass reported —
carpentry, cabinet making, printing,
electrical work, .sheet metal work,
plumbing, commercial photography,
and baking. During the war Dunwoody Institute trained seven thousand soldiers and sailors.
Stout Institute is supported entirely
by the Slate of Wisconsin.
It is
unique in that it docs just I wo things
— it trains teacher.0, of home economics and teachers of industrial
subjects.
The equipment of this
college is splendid. T h e Dome Economics Building is double the space
of our entire Science Building, and
connected with it is an auditorium
thai will seal eight hundred people.
This auditorium is lilted out with a
stage similar to those in modern
tin aires, and a complete motion
picture outfit.
Both
departments
have a splendid gymnasium with upto-date swimming pools.
Professor
Douglass especially emphasized the
thoroughness with which the Industrial Department is equipped, l i e
found there a carpenter shop in
which could be built a small onefamily house which could later be
moved out through movable walls.
T h e city high school is attached
to the main building and there they
find difficulty not in getting the students to elect work in the two departments of the college, but in obtaining enough practice teachers to
accommodate the students.
LOST, STRAYED OR
BORROWED
The new dictionary
from the " News " office.
It's needed every day.
Please return.
Please return it immediately.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 9, 1919
Page 2
State College tteu)$
Vol. IV
OCT. 9, 1919
No. 4
Published weekly, on Thursdays,
during the college year, by the Student Body of the New York State
College tor Teachers, at Albany,
New York.
The subscription rate is two dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
Business manager.
Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the Editor before
Saturday of the week preceding
publication.
Editor-in-chief,
Kenneth P. Holbcn, '20
Managing Editor,
Elsie VV. Hanbury, '20
Business Manager,
Ellen C. Donahue, '20
Subscription Manager,
Bertha West, '20
Assistant Business Manager,
Edna Lowerree, '21
Associate Editors,
F. Reginald Bruce, '21
Florence Stanbro, '21
Mary E. VVhish, '21
Marjoric Potter, '21
Louise Persons, '22
Elisa Rigouard, '22
ARE W E W A K I N G UP?
In last week's " News " an article
called "We Are Waking Up" was
published. We may lie —along certain lines, but so far, developments
in some other directions are absolutely lacking. Take, for instance,
the matter of our blanket tax, Of
course, we realize the delay necessary in the election of our new Finance Board, but it is now a week
since the members were elected and
no developments have as yet been
evinced. Nothing can be carried on
without money, and the expenses of
college activities are secured thru the
Hoard of Finance. No request for
budgets . has been received; therefore we suppose nothing has as yet
been done towards calculating the
amount of the tax.
Another line in which activity is
at a standstill is underclassmen
rivalry. Where are the caps and buttons that belong to the restless
Frosh? Why are the members of
'23 allowed to break every rule in
the " Bible" and escape with no
chastisement whatsoever? A little
more pep, please, '22!
The one branch in which we all
seem to be making most headway is
that of studying. Very good, Eddie,
but' that is taken for granted. We
would-be school teachers must necessarily delve into pedagogical depths
regularly, but we must also revive
our' Jagging mentalities just as regularly with social affairs. What lias
happened to our former lunch-period
dansants? And is it a new rule that
even on Friday nights our gym must
be darkened at 10:30 o'clock instead
of the former half-hour later?
Please, everybody out to maintain
our standard of equality of work and
play, and let's go — in every direction I
This issue of the " N e w s " might
lie called the revival number. We
hope every member of the faculty
and student body will " hit the trail"
and stay hit.
NO EXCUSE
From now on there will be absolutely no cause for every student not
knowing his Alma Mater, With the
current issue of the "News" is a
supplement, slightly smaller than a
page of the College Song Book, on
which is printed the new tune, "Try
it on your piano " and learn it and the
three verses that go with it.
" PEP "
i Yes, it's an old, old subject; but,
since there is no one who has too
much "pep," and Economics 4
teaches us that " suggestion is
powerful in proportion to its mass
or volume." we venture to add this
modest bit to what has already
been said.
We hope you will not make the
mistake of thinking that we consider State College lacking in
"peii." She, as a College, and her
students, as classes and individuals,
have shown abundance of it. And
where much has been done, more
can be doiic,_ but satisfaction is a
dangerous thing. We must not be
entirely satisfied.
State College has grown in spite
of cramped quarters and inadequate equipment. Last year she
put a winning basketball team on
the floor, and competed in the
Inter-collegiate track meet, although she had only forty men and
no basketball court or a track of
her own. There's " p e p ! " But
with a little mure of the same vim
.'Hid punch she can force stubborn
executives to grant her more room,
and she can register enough men
so thai she will be recognized in
all sports.
And as for I be classes, '20 has
always set a good pace. This year
she can show us how to leach, so
that, when she is gone, '21, cannot
help bill follow her brilliant example.
And '21's slogan has always
been:
"Full of life, full of pep,
Nineteen Twenty-one, you bet!' 1
She is going to show us what
big sisters can do for the Frosh
and how a From should be conducted,
'22 has been a good class, but
this year, as Dr. Painter would
say, the odds are against her. She
will need to lie "on her toes" all
the time in order to keep Minerva
from being desecrated and the
campus from being trampled down.
And now, '23, vvc are hardly acquainted with you, but we feel sure
that in spite of your numerals you
will be here after mid-years, and
that you will keep the Sophs
worrying all the while.
So much for the classes, but it
is for the individual that we really
wrote this. VVc cannot analyze all
the students in college to sec if
they have " pep," but we can ask
questions. Are you going out for
athletics? Arc you helping run
things in your class, or are you
" too busy "? _ Are you taking part
in college activities, or dn you let
some one else do it? Maybe in days
gone past you have taken part in all
three, but because you have won no
official title, you feel discouraged.
If so, you should read this verse
from Grace G. Bostwick's poem, entitled " P e p " :
" Sand and grit in a concrete
base —
That's pep!
Friendly smile on an honest face —
That's pep!
The spirit that
helps when
another's down,
That knows how to scatter the
blackest frown,
That loves its neighbors, and loves
its town —
That's pep! "
—'21,
DID IT DIE?
During a discussion among a
number of uppcrclassmen recently,
the subject of "Promethean" was
brought up. ft is only among
uppcrclassmen that such a subject
can be discussed, for Promethean
seems to have just faded out of
existence some time during the
past two years. Fond memories of
jolly meetings of this literary and
music society arc still cherished.
These meetings were held on alternate Thursday evenings in the
auditorium, and the programs presented furnished attraction for a
large majority of the students in
college. Both faculty and students
took part, and the initiation of new
members always afforded a great
amount of fun.
Of course, we have Music Club
now which, in a way, takes the
place of Promethean, but we believe there is room and need for
both. A field in which Slate College has had no part in recent
years is that of debating. Cannot
Promethean be revived to its old
extent and vigor, and be broadened
so as to include active debating
teams?
There must at present be many
members of the old Promethean
in college. They should form the
nucleus of a new organization, and
should start active campaigns
early. Let's hear from them!
With as much talent as we have
here in literary and musical lines
a live program should never be
wanting. Think over the matter
of inter-class, and possible intercollegiate debates, and express
your opinion " via " the " News,"
SENIORS
This year's " Pedagogue" is
coming out on time — no dottbl
about it. Some Seniors have already signed up to have their
pictures taken this week.
See
Agnes Rabo for your date. All
pictures must be taken by Thanks
giving vacation. Watch for the
Senior table in the hall. Officers
o_f other classes get appointments
right away. Everybody star! saving all kinds of material for (he
" Pedagogue."
GYM F R O L I C
Here it is at last! You've heard
so much about this big affair— Remember, " Sign for Frolic October
10."
All Freshmen girls arc invited. Wear your bloomers and
sneakers and come to the gym at
7:30 ready for anything. Freshmen, wear your hair down!! All
ye Seniors, fall in the G. A. A. line
and forget practice teaching for a
little while! Everybody pay your
dues and enjoy the Frolics, Hikes,
Basketball Games and everything
that comes along!
WHAT'S
DOING AT
"Y"
THE
Come on over to 747 Madison
and see what a splendid " Y "
House we have! It's just a short
walk from college, and we're allaws glad to have visitors. We're
almost all settled and to quote one
of_ the house girls, "We look
spiffy." Of course, you'll forgive
us if our awnings a r c still up, and
our parlor is a temporary store
room. Conic anyway —a warm
welcome awaits you!
An informal house meeting was
held
Saturday
evening.
Ethel
Rooney, '20, was unanimously elected
House President.
Other officers
chosen were Helen Reitz, '20, Treasurer; Beatrice Haswcll, '23, Proctor;
and Charlotte Lynch, '22, and
Dorothy Plum, '22, Joint Secretary
and Reporter.
A schedule for " K. P. duty" has
been arranged and a definite time lias
been appointed for house meetings.
The " Y " is very fortunate indeed
in having Mrs. Margaret Blevis for
bouse mother.
Mr. Makin was a guest Sunday.
Marion Moore, '20, and Elisa
Rigouard, '22, attended the Student
Volunteer meeting held at the city
Y. VV. C. A, on .Sunday afternoon,
Helen Reitz, Ruth Callison, and
Elisa Rigouard hiked to Indian
Ladder on Saturday with the G, A.
A. girls,
Many good times have been
planned, so come around and get acquainted !
The house accomodates eighteen
girls with the house mother, and her
little daughter. The girls living at
the house are: Ethel Rooney, House
President; Marion Moore, Helen
Reitz, Winifred Glezcn, Madeline
(huiard, Elizabeth Makin, Elsa Miller, Flsie Kennedy and Jean .Ames
Connors of 1920, Ruth Callison,
Gladys Dupre, and Charlotte Benedict of 1921, Dorothy Plum, Elisa
Rigouard and Charlotte Lynch of
1922; and Mildred Blcnis, Beatrice
Haswcll, and Mary Allen of 1923.
PUBLIC SPEAKING IN
MILNE HIGH SCHOOL
A new course in public speaking
is being given in Milne High School
this year under the direction of the
English
Department.
Elizabeth
Archibald is to have charge of it this
semester and Florence Sttibbs, the
second, The course is open in
Juniors anil Seniors and a short
dramatization is to be given at the
end of each term.
NEWMAN
CLUB
Sunday morning an important
meeting of the Newman Council was
held at the home of Father Dunney,
on Western Avenue. Plans for the
coining year were discussed and
will be voted upon al the firsl meeting of this society. The proposed
plans concern a formal reception
and initiation of the Freshmen members, the date of which, though not
definitely settled, will probably be
late in October. Before this time the
councilors of Newman will endeavor
to sec personally each Freshman intending to become a member of this
club. Plans arc under consideration
for the club to receive Communion
in a body on Sunday, October IP, and
afterwards breakfast at the Cafeteria.
A more definite announcement will
be made later. However, keep the
date open, for every Newmanite will
have an excellent opportunity to
meet the new members of the club,
at this time. October 16 the men
of the club will have a smoker at
Father Dunney's residence, 454
Western Avenue.
Wednesday, October 8, a meeting
of all the present members of Newman was held al: 4 o'clock in room
211.
Show your spirit ! Get in line,
be a Newmanite! This club must
have every member back of it, every
member out for every meeting, every
member out for every social affair.
The plans for the meetings this year
promise to be most interesting, and
the social affairs arc to be numerous
and real.
We \vant_ you, Freshmen! Be
ready to join when the councilors
come around. We arc going to have
pep this year and lots of it. Don't
stand on the side lines. Join the
game, or rather, the club. But it
Jakes spirit to play this game, that
is,_ to be a real Newmanite, so join
with that intention and keep in the
front ranks. You will always be indebtcded to the club for the benefit
and fun you get out of it, but go in
for it strong, and we'll call it square.
Join, Freshmen! " P E P " is the
abbreviation for Newman this year.
Be peppy.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. OCTOBER 9, 1919
Page 3
Refererence Books and Student
Helps
Fountain Pens — Waterman, Conklln
and Moore, $2.50
to $6.00
Skinner's Book Store
44 No. Pearl Street
Opposite IVhitmu's
Silks, Woolens, Velvets and
Fine Cotton Fabrics
Upstairs Prices
Courteous treatment and willingness to show
goods assured you here
Hewett's Silk Shop
The "Constitution" of To-day — Electrically Propelled
T
Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-GenerH E U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first battleators of 400 horsepower each, supply power
ship of any nation to be electrically profor
nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, fans,
pelled, is one of the most important achievements
shop machinery, and kitchen and laundry appliof the scientific age. She not only develops tho
ances, etc.
maximum power and, with electrical control,
has greater flexibility of maneuver, which is a Utilizing olectricity to propel ships at sea marks
distinct naval advantage, but
the advancement of another
also gives greater economy.
phase of the electrical indusFigures that tell the
At 10 knots, her normal cruistry in which the General ElecStory of
Achievement
ing speed, she will steam on
tric Company is tho pioneer.
less fuel than the best turbineL c n c t h - 6 2 4 foot
Of equal importance has been
W
i
d
t
h
—
97
Icet
driven ship that preceded her.
its part in perfecting electric
Displacement—32,00(1 t o n s
F u e l capacity—u million g a l lons (fuel oil)
Powcr-2B,U00 electrical h o r s e power
Speed—21 knots.
The electric generating plant,
totaling 28,000 horsepower,
nnd the propulsion equipment
of thegreat super-dreadnaught
were built by the General ElectricCompany. Theiroperation has demonstrated
the superiority of electric propulsion over oldtime methods and a wider application of this
principle in the merchant marine is fast making progress.
transportation on land, transforming the potential energy
of waterfalls for use in electric motors, developing the
possibilities of electric lighting and many other similar achievements.
As a result, so general are the applications of
electricity to the needs of mankind that scarcely
a home or individual today need be without the
benefits of General Electric products and service
Over Krcflgca 5 and 10 cent Store
15-17 N o . P e a r l S t .
Albany, N. Y,
ESTABLISHED IB20
JAMES M I X
JEWELER
34
SOUTH
PEARL
STREET
Fearey's
for S h o e s
2 3 No. Pearl St.
Cotrell & Leonard
Makers of
CAPS, GOWNS, and Hoods
Broadway, Albany
An illustrated booklet describini! the "New Moxtca,"
entitled,
"Tho Electric Ship," will be sent upon request.
Address
New York.
Gotmmi Electric Company, Desk 44, Schenectady,
EYRES
FLORIST
•SAY IT WITH F L O W E R S '
General Office
Schenectady, NY.
Sales Offices in
all large cities.
perience in both public and private
KAPPA DELTA RHO
schools. She will have charge of the
Practice
Teaching and Methods
Classes, taking the place of Miss
Brother George R. Ayres, '16, of
Mary E . Smith w h o recently reAlpha Chapter, Middlebury College,
signed. Miss Smith is now studying
F R I D A Y , O C T O B E R 10:
Vermont, visited college Monday.
for a Master's Degree a t Columbia.
9.00 a. m.— Student A s s e m Brother Ayres was until recently
Due to unexpected conditions the
b l y — Auditorium.
overseas with tl.c A. E. P., where he
Practice House will not open until
served for eighteen months as a
4.00 p . m.— M e t h a m a t i c s
Monday, October 13.
lieutenant of the infantry.
club M e e t i n g .
7.30 p . m.— G. A. A. G y m
Ed, Springmann, '20, a n d Hugo
F r o l i c — Gymnasium.
Polt, '21, a r e instructors in Physical
Training
at Milne High School, the
S U N D A Y , O C T O B E R 12:
DELTA OMEGA
work being under the supervision of
4.00 p . m.— V e s p e r s — Y.
the New York Military Training
W . C. A. — Auditorium.
Commission,
Mr. and M r s . George Anderson
" T h e Scroll," the fraternity magaof Round Lake called at the House
zine, has again put in its appearance.
last week-end,
During the war, the publication of
HOME ECONOMICS
Caroline Bennett, '17, called at the the " S c r o l l " ceased, but at the NaHouse last Saturday..
tional Convention last spring a r rangements were made for its reMiss Bessie Harris of the New Edith Morrison, '19, spent Sunday
sumption.
at the Delta House.
Britain Normal School and Pratt
Brother Springman, '20, has been
Delta Omega is glad to welcome
institute lias been added to the
appointed Special Instructor in V o Catherine Drury, '22, and Nellie
faculty. Miss H a r r i s has also taken
cational Training at Chatham, N . Y,
work al Columbia and has had ex- Parkhurst, '21, as new members.
OFFICIAL CALENDAR.
Oct. 10 — O c t . 13, 1919.
DA WSON'S
259 Central Ave.
Men's Furnishings
Shots
Hats
EYE
GLASSES
5 5 SOUTH PEARL STREET
L. G.
SCHNEIBLE
PHARMACY
ON COLLEGE
CORNER
Page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 9, 1919
Junior Wins Fellowship
Continued from Page 1.
ships,
After receiving' favorable
word from the Society, Miss Mayhew was required to go to Clinton,
N, Y., to interview a Mrs. Chase,
wife of one of the Hamilton College
professors, in order that Airs. Chase
might make a report to the Society
on the personality of the applicant.
Two weeks later, a telegram came
instructing Miss Mayhcw to go to ilie
French Commission in Washington,
D. C, to^ receive her appointment and
further instructions. Later she was
notified to sail for France October
11 with the other candidates.
The school thai Miss Mayhcw will
enter will be a Lyccc, bul in what
part of France, she docs not know.
She will probably be required to
study Latin, mathematics, music,
French literature and history. The
Lycces of France, though very much
like boarding schools, are under
government control.
The purpose of the Society for
American Fellowships in French
Universities is three-fold: First, to
perpetuate through a body of university students the friendship that
exists between France and the United
States; secondly, to develop a better
appreciation of the contributions of
French Universities to science and
learning; and thirdly, lo offer for
open competition among the graduates of American colleges and others
with experience in the technical fields
opportunities for advanced study in
the French Universities.
The Society was organized last
spring, and it was decided In launch
the plan at once, partly in order to
enable the selected candidates lo enter
upon their studies at the beginning of
the forthcoming academic year,
partly lo meet the wishes of some of
the French educational authorities
who are cooperating in the plan, even
though the lime for securing the
desired publicity was not adequate.
The first awards were made in Seplemher, bul in future it is intended
thai applications shall be made before
January first of each year and to
announce the awards in the following
month,
Tribute to Miss Valentine
Continued from Page 1.
capacity she was ready to help,
Occasionally, she had opportunity to
visit Oxford and Cambridge, where
she had so often planned to go, in
the days before the war, for her own
cultural development,
Later, Miss Valentine was assigned
lo work in Paris. While there she
received word of her father's death
in America, Her request to be relieved to return to her mother was
refused, so she continued her work
with a deeper understanding of the
troubles of those about her.
fn June of the past year, Miss
Valentine was finally released from
service. She had made all plans for
returning home and expected lo leave
France very soon, when the automobile accident qecured which cost her
her life. While rifling with some of
her Vassar associates the car skidded
and threw Miss Valentine out, causing injuries from which she never recovered.
Miss Valentine bad many firm
friends and admirers at State College. Her life was and always will
be a source of inspiration to all who
knew her. Dr. Richardson's beautiful tribute so freely deserved moved
the students deeply.
ETA PHI
Eta Phi
welcomes Margaret
Meyer, '22, as a pledge member.
Ethel ITuyck, '22, and Helen Van
Akin, '22, spent Sunday with friends
in Rensselaer.
Edith Chandler, '18, visited at the
House Saturday.
Helen Lcitzcll, '20, spent a few
days at the House the past week.
KAPPA DELTA
Marjorie Bryant, '20, spent the
week-end, at her home at Johnstown, N, Y,
Kappa Delta extends congratulations to Jean lliutgcrford, '20,
on her election to Omicrou Nil.
Marjorie Potter, '21, and Bertha
West, '20, were guests at the
House over the week-end.
Clara Holder, '19, was a caller at
College on Friday,
KAPPA NU
Kappa Nu welcomes as members
Clara Lavery, '20; Anne Quigley,
'20; Mary A. Baxter, '22; Eleanor
llyland, '22; and Marion Newell,
'22.
Agues Deniiin, 'IS spent the
week-end in Albany.
Magdaleua Andrae, '19, visited
the Lodge recently.
Pearl Armstrong of Rochester
was flic guest of Edna Manelh
for a few days the past week.
Antic Quigley and Mary Baxter
are living at the Lodge.
SALE
National Simplex Covers, 3801-3802-3804-3806
4 9 Cents Each
Brennan's Stationery Store
Cor. Washington and Lake Avea.
Near State College
We will be glad to show you how to take the H. C. L.
out of clothes buying for fall
Home of Hart Schaffner & Mark
and Style Plus Clothes
Dolan Clothing Co., Inc.
23-29 So. Pearl St.
SIGMA NU KAPPA
Arthur Ferguson was elected a
member of the Student Finance
Hoard by the Senior Class.
Merrill Sauerbrei, 'US, was in Albany Saturday,
Francis Connors, '17, is teaching in
Maltcwan, N. J.
Lieut. Theodore Cassavant, cx-'B),
has 1returned to Camp Lee, Va.,
when be will receive his discharge.
After being discharged, he will resume his course at State College.
A daughter was born on September 30 lo Rev, and Mrs. A, ]. Miller
at North Collins, X. V. "A! " Miller is ex-'19.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The class basket ball teams are
having their initial practice ibis
week. Great rivalry exists among
the various classes and we may
look forward to some exciting intra mural games.
Track men are out during every
opportunity afforded from classes.
Considering our small registration
of men it is necessary that everyone Iry out to help get ready for
those intercollegiate meets.
.All men interested in hikes
should see Coach Clark.
KAPPA NU — T H E T A
Theta welcomes George Davidson, '21, as a pledged member.
Max Pearlman, MS, is head of the
History Department at the Arlington High School, Arlington, N, J.
He has also received his M. A.
Degree at Columbia,
Irving L, Chcsspii, 'IS, has an
excellent position as head of the
Industrial Department at Lambcrtville High School, Lamberlville,
New Jersey.
Jack Waldman, '22; Sebastian
Littauer, '19; and Jack Carpc of
the R. P. I. Chapter, spent the
week-end at the home of Harry
Schwadclson, '21.
Theta
congratulates
Bernard
Shore, '21, of the N. Y. U. chapter
upon receiving a Phi Beta Kappa
key.
Theta had a get-together at the
home of Isadore Levine, '20, last
Sunday evening.
Refreshments
were served. The violin solos
rendered by Herman Staub, '21, accompanied by Al Brody, '20, at the
piano, were enjoyed immensely.
Palm reading every afternoon
from 3.00 to 4.00 o'clock on the
table outside the " News " office.
— P. G. A. —Adv.
Opposite High School
Albany Art Union
Distinctive
44 No. IN-iirl St.
Photography
Albany, IN. Y.
M i l l n !I!H
THE
HAMILTON
PRODUCERS OF THE
PRINTING
BETTER C L A S S
CO.
OF
BOOKLETS, CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS, AND
DIRECT BY MAIL ADVERTISING
PRINTERS O F T H E STATE COLLEGE
240 HAMILTON STREET
NEWS
ALBANY, N. Y.
P e r k i n s Silk S h o p
The Pioneer Specialty Shop
in Capital District
Monty Savmd On Every Yard
PERKINS SILK SHOP
2 8 State Street
The
White Lintie Tea Rooms
44 North Pearl Street
Albany, N. Y.
mmm>mm<mm>m
PSI GAMMA
Psi Gamma welcomes the following new members; Mary Stripling,
'20; Alice Graham, '20; Isabcllc
W'halcy, '21 ; Lela Cackener, '22.
Doris Sweet, 'IS, of Hillsdale,
spent lasi week-end at the House.
Miss^ Sweet is at the head of the
English Department in Fort Plain.
Alice Briggs, '21, spent the weekend in Poughkecpsie.
We welcome Alida Currey, '22, as
a pledge member.
Alberta Silkworth, '21, was a dinner guest of the House Saturday
evening.
Amy Clubley attended the Rensselaer-II obart game at R. P. 1. last
Saturday.
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