State College News II' No. 27

advertisement
State College News
NEW
VORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR
TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OP 1918
VOL.
II'
No. 27
FRESHMAN CLASS HAVE
NOVEL MEETING.
J he hrcshmen had a very enjoyable class-meeting Saturday night,
.May 4, 1918. When the Freshmen
had all assembled, the class banner was unfurled with due ceremonies. Then a basket ball game
between flic old maid " Giants"
and the old maid ''Shrimps'' sent
everyone into gales of laughter.
The old tuaids were very appropriately gowned. The next stunt
was a very touching wedding given
by the men of the class. The blushing Miss Sine, a veritable " daughter of the gods, divinely tall" (6 ft.
3 in.), became the bride of Mr.
Co-Secant, a madly chap of 4 ft.
10 in. Later an Agony Duet Was
" rendered " by two members of the
class. Following this a very vivid
description of how Socary set his
blue hen, was given.
A rousing
class sing concluded the program.
Between the stunts, there was
dancing, the music being furnished
by members of (he class. Miss
Pierce, Miss Futtcrer and Mr. Alexander were guests of the class.
PRUYN PRIZE
SPEAKING CONTEST
The annual prize speaking contest for the Robert C. Prttyn medal
was held in the College Auditorium
Thursday evening, May 2, 1918, by
the students of Milne High School.
Those taking part in the contest
were: Dorothy Hamburger, Francis Hagadorn, Constance Kimmey,
Kenneth Shufclt, Marie King, Margaret Kirtland, Stanley Taylor,
Elenore Perry, John Glenn and
Madeline Pre'iss. The prizes were
awarded to Margaret Kirtland and
Tohn Glenn. Mrs. Maynarcl X.
Clement, Miss Elizabeth Smith and
Prof. Barnard S. Bronson were the
judges.
PEDAGOGUE BOARD
FOR NEXT YEAR
APPOINTED
The following 1919 students have
been appointed by Dorothy Roberts, Editor-in-Chief, to serve on
the 1918-19 Pedagogue Board:
Business Manager, F, Phtsch.
Subscription Manager, G. Schermerhorn.
Literary Editors, L, Knox, M.
Major.
Photo Editors, R, Patterson, A.
Beardslcy.
Art Editors, H. Poole, F. Sevcrnc.
Advertising Editors, ', D. Ross
Root, A. Russell, K, Pollock.
Athletic Editors, C. Fitzgerald,
G. Curtin..
'
'
Joke Editor, M. FJynn;
ALBANY, N. Y.; MAY 7, 1918
MR. DAVIDSON ADDRESSES STUDENTS ON WAR
PROHIBITION
Democracy and World Peace
Mr. Becker Tells of Camp Life
Dean Horner Gives the Eight Lecture
Student Assembly on Friday
morning, May third, was in charge
of Myskania, and opened with the
singing of Alma .Mater. After .preliminary announcements, Mr. Joseph Walker introduced John A.
Becker. Mr. Becker was until recently a student at State College,
lie has just completed successfully
a course in training at Camp
Devens, Ayer, Massachusetts, and
is now eligible for a second lieutenancy.
Mr. Becker spoke primarily on
the changes wrought on an individual by camp life. Although, as
he said, he had no thrilling front
line experiences to tell of, still he
had felt all the knocks of camp
training, lie gave an exceedingly
entertaining as well as pertinent
account of life in camp as he had
known it. The fact that Y. M.
C. A. has made camp as near like
home as possible was. emphasized,
Mr. Becker said in conclusion that
one of the most valuable lessons he
had learned was that the best way
to get something out of the game
was to put all you have into it.
The next speaker of the day was
Mr. Davison, who has spent much
time recently in France and at
home in Y. M. C. A. work at army
cantonments. Mr, Davison spoke
particularly of the need of war prohibition, or the elimination of one
of the most wasteful influences of
the war. Since the President cannot wipe out the liquor traffic, as
a war measure, until the people of
the United States want it, it is our
place to show that we do want
it. In England it is impossible for
nation-wide prohibition to become
a law, since the country is so beset
with traditions. But we are a bolder
people. The government is but
waiting to- execute our will. In
closing, Mr. Davison called for a
rising vote of t'hosc among the
students who would be willing to
communicate with their representatives at Washington in regard to
the matter of prompt legislation on
the Question.
COMING —A DANCE
Terpsichoreans of S. C. May
Attend Music Club Final
__ The last .function .of .the; Music
Club for this year is to be a "real
function," You. are all most cordially, invited to a "concert!" to be
held May 11th in the Auditorium
at 8:00 o'clock. A very good prograirTis 'being'arranged,' Miss Futterer's Eng. HVefas.r furnishing reciNIGHT CLASS
tations ;of a ' •lnimor.oiis- typo, and
IN DRAWING war poems, also, a scene from
•" Prunella:" Members of the Music
The night- cjass in Mechanical .Club will furnish vocal, !pia,no,. vioDrawing, under, instruction of Mr. lin and flute solos. Dancing in the
Alexander, finished its winter gymnasium will follow the procourse last Thursday night, A new m-am. Everyone come, both stucourse in drawing concrete forms dents and faculty, to enjoy a good
was started last Saturday morning. evening's entertainment and fun.
41 -
$1.50 P E R YEAR
Friday afternoon the Dean delivered a very interesting lecture
on
" Democracy
and
World
Peace." For the most part the
speaker was optimistic, hoping for
a real world peace. But he stated
emphatically that he believed such
a peace could be gained and preserved only by the sword, In part
the Dean said:
lair, and to enthrone right and justice and to bring freedom to all
peoples throughout the world. We
have sent the Stars and Stripes to
Europe and we have joined hands
with oilr allies for no other purpose. Clod grant that this nation
of ours may be His chosen agent
in changing the current of human
history. Qttr democracy, which we
thought invincible, is to be put to
"A thousand agencies were at its supreme test by this war.
work throughout the world that
" I. choose to call the forces ill
made for peace; The twentieth
century has dawned upon man in conflict the ' will to power' and the
'
will
to serve.' The ' will to power '
possession of many marvelous new
secrets of nature, and nations creates God in its own image, deshowed a singular generosity in clares that a prince should have no
their free exchange of discoveries religion save his own interest and
which looked to the. bettering of glory, believes in a policy of' blood
human conditions the world over, and iron,' elevates the ' superman '
Here in this country we were beyond bis fellows and knows no
quietly,
persistently
at
work rights of common man, sets the
against 'all the ills that human State supremely above the citizen,
flesh is heir to,' and the secrets of knows no moral obligation, keeps
our medical laboratories in New no solemn covenants, studies
York and Baltimore and Boston treachery, refines cruelty, listens to
to-day were the possessions of sis- no dictate of conscience — lacks
ter laboratories in Paris and Vien- that human quality — makes bagna and Berlin to-morrow. The gage of womanhood, tramples upon
whole world was coming happily children, has no concern for human
to believe — barring the (louse of life, or for the priceless treasures of
llohenzollerii — that no little cor- mankind, observes no rule in_ warner of it dared create a monopoly fare, robs, lies, plunders, poisons,
in anything that contributed to deceives, worships force and aims
fuller and better living among men. to conquer the world.
We, we Americans and other lib" The ' will to serve ' bows before
erty-loving peoples, somehow had the God of the Universe, claims no
the pleasant but inherently un- alliance with Him, seeks to know
founded conviction that there was, His will and to make it prevail
without the prospect of conllict,
a upon the earth, believes that the
comfortable 'place in the sun 1 for State exists not for itself but for
every people on the earth.
its people, hales war and fights
only for honor, justice and peace,
" We have overlooked the one believes that nations as well as
great fact of all history. How men are bound by their moral obmankind shall be governed is the ligations and their solemn coveissue of the ages: That should l' limits', employs mercy, promotes
have foretold the present war to brotherhood, exalts womanhood,
the,man in the street. Tt is in no refuses bread to no hungry child,
sense a new conflict except in its drops no bombs upon schoolvolume and in its intensity. The houses, puts no cup of poisoned
destinies of mankind throughout water to the lips of an enemy,
the history of the world have large- values human life second only to
ly been controlled by wars, and human liberty, prays for peace and
almost every great physical con- aims by force to make the world
flict among nations has determined habitable for man.
whether a higher or a lower phil"This thought I would drive
osophy of life and government home.
conflicting currents
should .preside over, the future of of humanThese
life can never go forthe race, This is only the repro- ward together.
One must overdection of the drama of the ages. whelm or absorb the
other. ' T said
The stage is vaster than it has ever in
the
beginning
that
the world had
been before, the streams of human never had peace. Tt never
will have
blood are more turbulent, the rethis isslic of the'ages is deterfined cruelties of science more atro- until
mined.'
The
'Prussian
Beast
must
nizing. the. lust for power and the devastate' the earth or the_ forces
extension of domain less restrained, 6f
democracy
•nlus't
make
it
fit
but the issue has come. down place for men to live. These aconthrough'the centuries unchanged.
clusions seem- to mc'inevitable:
. " T h e only ray of hope that finds
"These conflicting ways.of life
its way through, this awful mias- have met after centuries of strugmatic cloud of .war is tin's: Tt may. gle in .mortal combat. . The .world
be that a.new. volume.in the world's will never witness equilibrium behistory is about to be indited', that tween them again,,, There .can now
the whole current of.the record 'of i be no peace, temporary' or end.urmankind, is . about to be changed, iiig, by adjudication, .Thci;e can
and that the issue, of.the ages, how, how .be no honorable conclusion
mankind shall be n-ovenicd...is.about .for us and our. allies save, hy the
to be determined, .after all those sword; There can bc'.n'o enduring
centuries of struggle and blood-' peace save through the unqualified
shed, bv free men the world oyer triumph of the forces that will
who have ioined toeether to drive
Continued on page 4
the Beast of the earth from his
Page Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MAY 7,1918
the ball. The score stands 8-7 in
APPOINTMENTS FOR
favor of the upper classmen, YonNEXT YEAR.
der dishevelled Freshman is gritting his teeth and making an iron
The
following
Seniors have obNo. 27 resolve to throw a field basket, tained positions for
Vol. II
May 7, 1918
next year:
The game begins with a rush, His
Mabel
Albec—Satigcrties.
teeth still are set; his heart leaps
Esther Aldrich—Patchoguc,
as
he
catches
the
glorious
prey
in
Published weekly, on Wednesdays, during the college year, by the his arms, For a bare instant he
Glena Allen—Avoca.
Committee on Publishing a College Weekly Newspaper, New York State hugs it to him, so glad is he to
Dorothy Austin—Richfield Spgs.
College for Teachers, Albany, N. Y.
Marian Bannister—Cherry Valley.
possess it, so sure of success, He
The subscription rate is one dollar and a half a year. Advertising bounces it once, twice, three times,
Laura Barrett—Mohawk,
rates may be had on application. Articles, manuscripts, etc, intended and pauses before the basket. He
Grace Clapp—East Orange.
for publication must be in the News Box before Saturdays of the week slips under his guard and with a
Mary Cornelius—Monroe.
preceding publication.
bound throws the ball. Just as the
Myra Faucett—Dansvillc,
crowd see it fall gracefully through
Caroline Ganger—New Jersey.
the net the timekeeper's whistle anRose Goldsmith—Lake Placid,
SENIOR EDITORS
nounces that the game is over.
Stanley Heason—Montclair,
Stanley Heason, '18
Kathryn Cole, '18
Mildred [forth—Cherry Valley.
There are two classes of people
Mildred L. McEwan, '18
Nina Johns—Greenport,
in that hall and they are divided by
Pauline ICinnc—Friendship.
a line of demarcation more distinct
REPORTERS
Eloise Lansing—Amity ville,
than any human power could draw.
Dorothy Banner, '20
Bernice Bronner, '19
Marie
Lee—Southampton.
I
heard
a
lecturer
last
week
say
Edward Springmann, '20
Caroline E, Lipes, '19
Vcrna McCann—Roxbury,
that there is no class of people
Dorothy Wakerly, '20
Donald Tower, '19
Celia Mair—-Brasure Falls,
divided so distinctly as a class in
Edna Mcrritt—Tuxedo Park.
geometry. This class, he said, is
Managing editors of this issue:
Katherin Miner—Spring Valley.
divided into two clean-cut parts —
Mildred McEwan
those
who
sec
and
those
who
do
Marjorie Mitchell—Patchogtie,
Dorothy Banner
Dorothy Wakerly
not see. In my mind, it is much
11 attic Ogle—Woodbury.
the same at an athletic game.
Florence Quinlavin—Chirks Mills.
There arc those who sec, and cheer;
Lclia Reynolds—Chester.
and those who do not sec, and do , Dorothy Robinson—Chester,
P r o h i b i t i o n - W h a t It M e a n s
not cheer. The noii-cheercrs atHelen Ross—Edmeston.
tend the game for some unknown
Alta Sahlcr—Millbrook,
reason,
and
do
not
sec,
do
not
unWlieatlcss
days.
Eloise Shafer—Rockvillc Center.
It must be confessed that that
derstand, the spirit of the game.
Elsie Shanks—East Syracuse.
hackneyed expression, " prohibi- Lightless days—Burglary, crime.
Grace Smith—Amity ville.
tion," is becoming somewhat of a Meatless days.
But the cheerers — they of the
War
bread—Less
bread.
Ethel Snider—Picrmont.
bore, However, if wc class this
happy hearts and valiant lungs, who
Norma Thompson—Hamilton.
word under "conservation" we be- Food riots—Coal riots.
dare and love to exhaust their
Bums at home—a menace, unfit for voices in lauding skill, whether of
gin to sit up and take notice.
Joseph Walker—Schcnevus.
military or other service.
Janet Wall—Mainaroneck,
their fellows or rivals — let us speak
Do you realize as you read the
Marion Weir—Tuxedo Park.
following facts — absolute truths — A long war followed by poverty, of these. They arc the flower of
degeneracy, and business de- the college; they are the alumni-tothat they arc the kind that rise up
pression.
bc who will return to alma mater
and strike one between the eyes?
Must we be forced to pay that in love and reverence long after the CHEMISTRY CLUB TO
Do you realize that this question
of prohibition — conservation, if price for our failure to do " the non-checrers 'have forgotten they
HAVE ANNUAL
you prefer the other term—means right thing at the right time?" were college-bred. The cheerers
JOLLIFICATION
These
arc
not
idle
statements,
but
are
they
who
later
will
make
their
that we must regard it seriously,
and stop ignoring it as we have real, live facts that are clamoring names felt and known in their naThe
annual
outing and picnic of
for
our
attention
now.
Let
us
all
tive spheres. They are the ones
done heretofore?
in the movement, and help who, as they were loyal to their the Chemistry Club will take place
just think! In 1917, the brewers join
on
Saturday,
May
11, 1918, at the
one
of
the
greatest
victories
gain
college, will also be to their counof the country used over 3,000,000 that ever confronted us.
try. Blessed are the cheerers, for " Devil's Den," Watervliet, A large
tons of coal. And our factories,
they shall be cheered. College number of the members of the
business places, and homes needed,
yells are for the students, and of club have signified their intention
and need it! Then it requires over
of going, and it is expected that
SARCASM
the
students, therefore let them b
200,000 freight cars during the year
many more will sign up. Those
by the students.
to haul the products used and prowho sign are requested to pay 30
duced by the breweries. " The
One or two so-called witty nocents to Mi»s Ethel Snider, "Comshortage of labor due to drink is a tices have been put up on the stumanding Officer, Commissary DeMOVING-UP DAY
big factor in the freight tie-up."
dents' bulletin board lately and
partment," before noon on Friday,
PROGRAM.
Secondly. The breweries use have caused considerable comment,
May 10th.
64,000,000 pounds of grape sugar, mostly adverse. No one should
The start will be made at the
and we arc short of sugar.
forget that strangers are continu- I. Evening of May 22d, Soph-Fresh Post
Office at 1 p. m. sharp, arrivbanner rush,— limited to the
Thirdly. " There1 are over 300,000 ally in our halls. Sarcastic, mean
ing
at Eighth street, Watervliet,
men of the classes — no paint
employed in the making, handling, spirited notices on our boards will
1:40; from here there is a
about
to
be
used
on
any
parts
of
the
and.selling of the brewery products. do much lo unfavorably impress
building. The Hag and flagpole short walk to the Den. Round trip
This is a time that the country is these visitors. Our own students
carfare
from Albany will be 20
to
be
forbidden
premises.
are
crying out for labor for useful in- read the boards, .and these notices
cents. Special weather has been
dustry. If the drink supply were serve only to cause contempt for II, May 23d, 10.50 o'clock, exer- ordered, the club " axe " lias been
cises in the Auditorium.
stopped a large number of idle the writer. Probably the action has
sharpened so that wood can be cut
a. Speakers.
workers would be restored to the been merely thoughtless on the part
easily, and lots of good " e a t s "
b. Music.
ranks of workers." Would not the of the offenders and will cease
will be provided.
c. Selection of Myskania.
result be evident in more efficient when attention is called. Sarcasm
and wit at another's expense are II f. Planting of the Ivy.
and steadier workers?
Class stunts on the campus,
Fourthly. " The annual retail the tools of the boor. Let us be TV, under
the direction of class STATE COLLEGE
drink bill of the United States be- well bred.
committees.
JUNIOR WEDS OFFICER
fore the war was $2,400,000,000!
V. Lunch.
This would take up our first LibVI. 2.30 o'clock, students will meet
COLLEGE YELLS
erty Loan, and in addition pay the
Miss
Delia Lathrop Ross, daughat College and parade to the
entire cost of the Panama Canal.
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ross
Athletic Field.
This waste of money now makes the
You may judge a college by the
of Cooperstown and a member of
a. Tnterclass contests.
financing of war vastly more dif- tone, the number and the variety of
the Junior class at the State Col1. For girls and boys.
ficult. The country's annual fire its yells. A college yell is an everlege for Teachers, was married
b.
Push
ball
contest,
Sister
loss is about $250,000,000, but the lasting toast to that of which we
Saturday
afternoon at 2:30 o'clock
Classes vs. Sister Classes.
direct cost of liquor is nearly ten hear so much — college spirit. No
in the home of her parents to Serc. Tug of war.
times_ as great, and the indirect other means of expressing loyalty
geant Arthur Root, son of Mr. and
d. Obstacle races; baseball.
cost is beyond computation."
is more simple; no other so effec- VTT. 7.15
o'clock, on the College Mrs. W. Scott Root of CoopersFifthly. " If drink were abol- tive. The student who always
town. The Rev. E. C. Petrie percampus.
ished, labor conditions on farms as knows the college yells, and always
formed the ceremony. There were
1. Decisions of afternoon
well as with farm machinery, fer- returns hoarse from athletic games,
no attendants. Sergeant Root has
contests.
tilizers, and transportation would is the one who is well liked by both
been
attending the officers' train2. Step singing.
be so improved as to increase pro- faculty and student body. He is
camp at Camp Devens and is
3. Tnterclass contest singing. ing
duction at least five per cent. This the one who is alive, who lives, not
now awaiting his commission. He
would add 34.000.000 bushels of because he chanced to be born, but
is a member of the class of 1918 of
PAY FOR YOUR PEDAwheat, or 232,000,000 bushels of all because he loves life and its inHamilton College, a member of Phi
terests.
kinds of grain."
Psi Fraternity and pitcher of the
GOGUE.
Lastly. If we fail to enforce this
All students who have signed up varsity baseball team. Sergeant
_ Tn our college the majority of
branch of conservation it will rivalry games seem to he intcrclass- for Pedagogues are requested to Root and Mrs. Root left for a short
mean that we must have with us
Picture a basketball game where it pav for them at once. The date of wedding trip to New York, after
Meatless davs — Idleness, loss of is a half minute till time is up for publication depends upon the which Mrs. Root will complete her
studies at State College.
production and profits.
the second half. The referee tosses promptness of payment.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MAY 7, 1918
Fearey's
for S h o e s
CAMOUFLAGE
OFFICIAL CALENDAR
23 No. Pearl St.
College Supplies
Engraved Cards and Booklets
for all occasions
Fine Stationery, Magazines and
Confectionery
Brennan's Stationery Store
Washington and No. Lake Avei.
Near Slat* Calhgt
Cotrell & Leonard
Makers of
CAPS, GOWNS, and Hoods
Broadway, Albany
Neckwear our Specialty
JOHN H. |§AUSEN,Jr.
Gents Furnisher
Op.n Eveaingi
1 5 5 ^ CENTRAL AVE.
Phone Weit 2823
P. H . RIDER
CLEANSER AND DYER
"The Cleaner that Cleans"
105 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
Agents For
Hart, Shaffner & M a r x
Clothes
TO-DAY, May 8:
3:55 p. m., Democracy Discussion Group, Room
108.
3:55 p. m., Democracy Discussion Group, Room
100.
4:00 p. m„ Newman Club,
Room 211.
4.50 p. m., Y. W. C. A.
Meeting, Auditorium.
4:00 p. m., French Club,
Milne H. S. Chapel.
THURSDAY, May 9:
11:00 a. m., Democracy Discussion Group, Auditorium.
1:00 p. m.-5:00 p. m., Red
Cross, Surgical Dressings, Room B-l.
2:05 p. m„ Y. W. C. A.
Democracy
Discussion
Group, Room 100.
3:00 p. m., Y. W. C. A.
Democracy
Discussion
Group, Room 109.
7:30 p. m., Promethean Literary Society, Auditorium.
FRIDAY, May 10:
9:00 a. m„ Student Assembly, Auditorium.
1:45 p. m., Democracy Discussion Group, Room
109.
3:15 p. m., Democracy Discussion Group, Room
108.
4:00 p. m., Lecture, " Industrial Democracy," Professor Harry B. Smith, Auditorium.
SATURDAY, May 11:
8:00 p. m., Dramatic Class
and Music Club Concert,
Auditorium.
MONDAY, May 13:
3:00 p. m.-5:00 p. m., Red
Cross, Sewing, Room B-l.
4:00 p. m., War Cookery
Demonstration, Room T.
7:30 p. m., Red Cross, Sewing, Room A.
7:45 p. m., Faculty Women,
Red Cross, Green Room.
Regal Shoes
^owinl taciturn
KAPPA NU NOTES
The first of May has. conic and
gone and we are now (irmly established in our new home at 193 Lancaster street.
We arc glad to have Florence
Quinlavin '18 back with us after
her recent illness.
Mrs. O'Connell visited the house
NEWS DEALER
last week.
Eileen Keefe '18 spent the weekCigars, Candy and Stationery
end at her home in Kingston.
PRINTING and DEVELOPING
Mae Cronin '19 has been called
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
CAMERA FILMS
home by the serious illness of her
2 1 5 Central A v e .
N. Y. Phone Weil 3937 father.
John J. Conkey
PRICE. SERVICE AND QUALITY PRINTERS
4h.
Mi
How is tlits clipping from the
"Times-Union" to be explained?
" William Earl Southerland, a
teacher in the State College at Albany, and DeVVitt B, Townsend, a
pupil in Professor Southerland's
class, both of Carmcl, enlisted in
the United States Murine Corps
this morning,"
PRINTING
COMPANY
Win. Pattinson '18, teaching in
Utica, spent last week-end in Albany.
,
Not every knitting bag holds knitting I
GYM EXHIBITION
The Sergeant-Major had trouble
in finding an accountant for his
captain, but at last brought in a
private for trial.
"Are you a clerk? " demanded the
captain.
" No, sir," replied the man.
"Do you know anything about
figures?" asked the captain.
" I can do a bit," replied the man,
modestly.
" I s this the best man you can
find?" asked the officer.
" Yes, sir," was the reply.
" Well," growled the captain, " I
suppose I'll have to put up with
him!"
Turning to (he private, he
snapped, "What were you in civilian life?''
" Professor of mathematics at the
State College, sir," was the unexpected reply.— The Taller.
The annual gym exhibition took
place Friday night in the Albany
High School gymnasium.
But it
was not like any exhibition before.
1918 starts a new cycle in gym workin State College. From start to
finish the program was one grand
success—no mistakes, no hitches—
the entire work went on oiled
wheels. The two lower boards of
the bleachers were reserved for the
partakers, and still there was not
room for them. At the signal from
Miss Gray the girls came down the
stairs, one line on each side of the
room. The men followed. After a
very effective marching formation
the performers sat down, Marching tactics were first, the girls and
then the men. Both were excellent
— not a discordant note in either
group.
The first of the three drills was
the dumbbell drill by the girls.
Miss Ellen Donohue '20 and Miss
Katharine MacGarahan '21 were
leaders in all three drills. Miss
Dorothy Banner '20 was at the
piano. The drill was clone by over
a hundred girls and took well with
the enthusiastic audience.
The English country dance was
very pretty and interesting. The
girls all seemed so enrapt in their
work and apparently had a wonderful time.
The Indian club drill was done by
the men and girls at the same time.
Perhaps the most spectacular
number was the work of the men
on the. long horse. Awe inspiring
break neck handsprings, and somersaults forward and backward, made
the audience clap and shriek its approval. The girls' apparatus workwas good, but was overshadowed
by the fact that the men were doing more exciting work at the same
time.
The relay was a potato race
among the four classes, with two
girls running for each class. The
audience cheered the aspirants for
first place, and the race resulted in
a tie between the Seniors, and the
Juniors.
The biggest bit of the evening
was the aesthetic dancing. The
audience clamored for an encore,
but none was given. The entire
Junior gym class took part, and the
whole performance was very pleasing.
Miss Gray and Mr. Maroney deserve the credit of the success.
They have worked all year long,
with every faculty possible, to make
the exhibition a good one. But they
could not have dreamed of such a
landslide as they had Friday night.
The Albany gym was never before
so crowded. The poise and assurance of the two instructors were reflected in the students with whom
they have worked. They may well
be proud of their success. State
College is certainly proud.
When the end of the program
came dancing was enioyed until 11.
Dorothy Banner and Leon Woodruff played for the others to dance.
A Jokevitch.
First JVIoujik— "Ifurrahsky, for
the great Russian revolution! We
nicked Nick Romanoff, let the
Huns chase us till they arc out of
breath, and soon we will turn and
wallop the Kaiser, and there will
"
be free vodka and
Second
Kvass-imbibcr — "Cut
but the Buiishivikil "
JOTTINGS
Miss Agnes Fiitterer will read
" Lady Windermere's Fan " May 21
at the springtime musicalc to be
given by the students of St. Joseph's Seminary in Troy.
Sixty young men were awarded
degrees at Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute, Troy, recently, and honorary degrees were conferred upon
six of the leading engineers of the
United States by the institute, one
of the men honored being Lieutenant-Colonel Henry W. liodge,
United States Engineering Corps,
manager of roads with the American expeditionary force under General Pershing in France.
The Senior class at Vassar College have unanimously voted to
give up class day, third ball play
and all other exercises of commencement week with the exception of the baccalaureate sermon
and the presentation of diplomas.
The students expressed the desire
that the money which would have
been spent by the families of the
students on the final visit to Vassar, estimated $60,000, be put, as
far as possible, into some war fund.
All Seniors who have not paid
their class clues must do so immediately. See the treasurer, Margaret Shevlin, or she will see you!
Spanish Club will meet this af-
2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
Many interesting aild artistic
Liberty Loan and Red Cross post?
crs by the members of Fine Arts 5
are being displayed, one at a time,
on the official bulletin board. The
Blue Bird Shop on Steuben street
is using one of the best in their
display window.
We simply cannot understand
The men of the electrical wiring
Why girls with limbs like these: ( ) class are installing a new motor in
Wear shorter skirts upon the street the wood shop.
Than girls with limbs like these: I !
Printers of Stale College J\>»»
HAMILTON
Page Three
A L B A N Y . N. Y. ternoon at 4:00. Nomination of
officers will take place.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MAY 1,1918
Page Four
Cotrell & Leonard
472 to 478 Broadway
Hats and Shoes for Men
Womens Outer and
Under Garments
Woman's Footwear, Furs
and Fur Coats
Fine Qualities — Reasonable
Prices
Bring Your Prescriptions to
SCHNEIBLE'S
COLLEGE
PHARMACY
W e s t e r n arid L a k e A v e s .
Compare our Candies with others and
Taste the difference
KRAEMER'S
HOME-MADE
ICE CREAM and CANDIES
129 Central Avenue
M. S. KEENHOLTS
Groceries,
Fruit, Vegetables, etc.
T e a s and Coffees a Specialty
Telephone
253 Central Ave.
ESSEX LUNCH
The Restaurant favored by
College students
Central Avenue
DEMOCRACY A N D PEACE
Continued from page I
peace. T h e r e can be no safety in
the world for peacefully disposed
p e o p l e s so long as the peril of P r u s sianism exists. If the world is ever |
to sec peace, the forces of d e m o e - t
racy m u s t not only t r i u m p h in t h e
i m m e d i a t e issues of this conflict, !
h u t they must go a r m e d to the
teeth so long as t h e r e - i s a B e a s t
a b r o a d a n y w h e r e on t h e earth, A
league of nations devoted to world
peace may c o m e ; it will be a purposeless thing if it is not prepared
b y force to assert its will, T h e way
for us to ' a c h i e v e and cherish a
j u s t and lasting p e a c e ' with all nations lies hopefully in the willingn e s s of every patriotic A m e r i c a n
to give ' t h e last full m e a s u r e of
devotion ' to that noble end.
"In
his
famous
Springfield
speech in 1858, e m p l o y i n g the
S c r i p t u r e s , as he often did, Lincoln
s a i d : 'A house divided a g a i n s t itself c a n n o t s t a n d !
I believe this
g o v e r n m e n t cannot e n d u r e p e r m a nently half slave and half free.'
T h e very spirit of t h a t g r e a t disciple of human freedom — pole s t a r
of d e m o c r a c y , which has hovered
so tenderly over the American nation for the last S3 y e a r s , tells us
in u n m i s t a k a b l e t e r m s to-day that a
w o r l d divided against itself c a n n o t
s t a n d , t h a t the peoples of the earth
c a n n o t exist p e r m a n e n t l y half slave
and half free, that the ' w i l l to
p o w e r ' and the ' will to serve ' cann o t abide t o g e t h e r indefinitely upon
the earth, thai there can be no
c o m p r o m i s e between peoples who
believe, on the one hand, in the I
holiness of Might, and on the o t h e r
in the holiness of Right, and that
peace for the world d e p e n d s not J
u n o h the triumph of the alleged |
' d i v i n e right of kings,' but in the ,
justification by force of the theory j
p r o c l a i m e d bv our forefathers upon
this western hemisnhere'. that ' g o v e r n m e n t s derive their, just, p o w e r s
from the consent of the g o v e r n e d , ' "
2 b l o c k s from Robin Street
DRAMATICS CLASS
PERFORMANCE
STUDENTS
For Laundry Work quickly
and well done come to
CHARLEY JIM
71 Central Ave.
THE UNION TRUST CO.
O F ALBANY, N. Y.
Invites
Your Personal
Main Office
47 State Street
Accounts
Park Branch
200 Washington Ave.
T h e d r a m a t i c s class will give its
second s e m e s t e r function Friday,
M a y 24, at 8:15 p, m., in the College Auditorium. T h r e e plays will
be g i v e n — " T h e P l a y g o e r s , " by
P i n e r o ; " T h e Clod," by Mackey,
and " M a r g a r e t , " by Ruth Fischer.
T h e various cligiblcs are t r y i n g out
for the parts, some of which have
been already assigned. T i c k e t s will
be issued the end of this week.
Miss F u t t c r c r is d o i n g great
w o r k in p r e p a r i n g a good e n t e r t a i n m e n t for the college, She will be
well s u p p o r t e d , as she h a s always
been.
STUDENTS
DEPARTMENT O F '
HOME ECONOMICS
If youa wish a Really Fine Suit
See
SIDNEY GARBER
T h e organization of the College
Farm Units is p r o g r e s s i n g rapidly.
Before the fifteenth of tins m o n t h
all a r r a n g e m e n t s will p r o b a b l y be
made.
Many g r a d u a t e s and students of the D e p a r t m e n t
have
signed up to serve in this work, ft
is expected that the u n i t s will be
located near Albany.
Tlie Annual Conclave of O m i e r o n
Nil will be held May 10th, 11th and
12th at Perdue University, Lafayette, Indiana. T h e local c h a p t e r
will send Harriet Church '19 a s a
delegate,
O n Friday afternoon, May 3d,
Miss Pierce received the i n c o m i n g
and o u t g o i n g Y. VV, C. A. C a b i n e t s
at tea in the. Faculty Room. T h e
J u n i o r c o o k e r y class served.
T h e F r e s h m a n s e w i n g class, u n der the direction of Mrs. P e t e r s o n ,
is m a k i n g infants' layettes for Belgian Relief W o r k u n d e r the Red
Cross. Airs, Frear will c o m m e n c e
war relief work in her classes this
week.
Miss Steele's advanced c o o k e r y
class recently visited the A l b a n y
Tee Cream C o m p a n y .
TAILOR
235 Central Ave.,
Albany, N. Y.
WANTED
A Shoe Salesman for
Saturdays Only :
at
FEAREY'S
EYRES
Jffhntirru
106 STATE ST.
A L B A N Y , N, Y.
ALBANY D R U G CO.
251 Central Avenue
We Make Our Ice Cream
We Make Our Candy
FRESH EVERY
DAY
K i P
Rcinhard H o h a u s '17 has r e c e n t ly received a commission as ensign.
W e are glad to welcome K e n neth l-lolhcn '20, J a m e s VVilhur '20
and Martin Barry '21 into full
membership,
F o u r more stars have been added
to our Service Flag.
DeWitt
T o w n s e n d '18 and Earl S u t h e r l a n d
'19 a r c to receive t r a i n i n g at P a r i s
Island at S, C : Ray T o w n s e n d 'IS
is to a t t e n d the M e c h a n i c s I n s t i t u t e
at R o c h e s t e r ; George Gordan '18 is
in t r a i n i n g at the W e n t w o r i h I n stitute, Boston.
W a l t e r F r a s e r '18 and N e l s o n
F o r c e '19 have left the college for
farm work.
Marston & Seaman
Jewelers
2 0 So. Pearl Street, Albany, N. Y.
Four Hundred College Graduates
Wanted Immediately
for high salaried high school positions
in some of the best schools in the east
No fee unless appointed. Write at once
EMPIRE TEACHERS' AGENCY
University Building
Syracuse, N. Y.
NEWMAN CLUB
ELECTS OFFICERS
N e w m a n Club held their elections
for 1918-19 last week. T h e final result follows:
P r e s i d e n t — K. F i t z g e r a l d '19.
V i c e - P r e s i d e n t — E. M c K e n n a .
S e c r e t a r y — M. F i n n .
T r e a s u r e r — M. Major.
Gustave Lorey
Photographer to the Class of
1918
Special rate* to all itudmntt
176 State St.,
Albany, N. Y.
PROMETHEAN
T h e r e will be a •meeting tom o r r o w iiicrht in the college Auditorium.
T h e p r o g r a m w a s postponed last week on a c c o u n t of the
g v m exhibition. A good p r o g r a m
is planned and a full a t t e n d a n c e is
desired. • C o m e yourself and b r i n g
y o u r friends. D o n ' t go to a cheap
movie, but come to P r o m e t h e a n
and h e a r , a good e n t e r t a i n m e n t , . • ',
Neckwear," Hosiery, Shirts,
Sweaters and Gloves
Dawson's Men's Shop
.•
259 Central Ave.
N*ar Lakm Aomnut
ALBANY UP-TO-DATE CLOAK MFG. CO.
Manufacturers and Retailers of
Cloaks, Suits, Waists
and
High Grade Furs
PSI GAMMA NOTES
M a / I d e i n e - H a r t w e l l and Cecile
Conklin spent the week-end in1
Hillsdale. ••• '
W e enjoyed a visit from G e r t r u d e
Swift '17 last week.
63and:63
N. Pearl St.,
Albany, N. Y.
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