OF THE

advertisement
OF THE
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January 25, 1865.
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ANNUAL REPORT
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OE THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE STATE NORMAL
SCHOOL.
To the.legislature :
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Pursuant t o chap. 211 of the Laws of 1844, the undersigned
,
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transmit the annual report of the Executive Committee of the
State Normal School, which has been received and approved:
which report also contains a full statement of the receipts and
expenditures of money under the same act.
V. M. RICE,
Superintendent of Public Instruction.
f
JOHN V. L. PRUYN,
Chancellor of the Unive~sity.
ALBANY,
January 25th, 1865.
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% the Superintendent of Public Inslruction .
and the Regents of th,e University:
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The Executive ~ o m m i t i e eof the State Normal School respectfully feport as follows :
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#umber of Pupils uud Grudwttes.
During the past year, embracing the thirty-ninth and fortieth
terms, the whole number of pupils in attendance has been three
hundred and one, of whom sixty-four vere males and two hundred
and thirty-seven were females.
The graduates of 'the past year have numbered sixty-five. Of
-these, nineteen were males and forty-six were females. The whole
number of graduates since the commencement of the school is
thus increased to one thousand four hnndred and thirty-eight.
During the year all the counties in the State, except Cortland,
-Hamilton, and Richmond, have been represented in the school.
Thirty-eight con,nnties were represented in the gra-dnating classes.
Two hundred and two candidates for admission have been examined,'and one hundred and ninety have passed the preliminary
examinations, and entered on the prescribed course of study. The
average age of these pupils is nineteen and one-sixth years, and
they had taught a n average period of eight and three-fourth
months previous to entering the school.
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Jrumber of Pupils and Graduates in F0rrn.e~.Years.
GRADUATES. '
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C--JC--?
Puuils.
First year .--,
-- - - 1st term- - - 98
- - 185
2d
- Sd " - - 197
Second jiear ,-,4th "- - - - 205
Third year . - - . - - - 5th " .--178
221
6th " Fourth year - - - - - - 7th
- - - 198
8 t h " - - - 208
- - - 9th "
175
Fifth gear .--10th " - - - 196
Sixth year - - - - - - - 1 1 t h " - - - 223
12th " - - - 219
Seventh year ,,,. -13th " - - - 232'
14th " - - - 236
Eighth year ---.
- - l 5 t h ': ,
232
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16th "
227
Ninth year
- -.17th " - - - 276
18th " - - - 273
253
-- - - -19th "
Tenth year -,
20th ." - - - 265
Eleventh year .,-2 l s t " - - - 250
22d "
228
Twelfth year,- -.-23d " - - 238
24th
- - - 231
Thirteenth year- - -25th ' L - 270
26th
- - - 252
233
Fourteenth year- -27th '' - - 28th " - - - 211
29th " - - - 241
Fifteenth year .--,
30th "
260
Sixteenth year-, - .31st " - - 253
32d " ,,, 246
seventienth year - - 33d " - - 215
34th '' - - - 212
Eighteenth year. - -35th " - - - 208
36th " - - - 212
Nineteenth year-- -37th " - - - 198
38th " - - - 219
Twentieth year*, -39th " - - - 210
40th ' \ - 202
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Males.
bi
- - - ,
a
---a
-_-.
---
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29
3o
37
27
37
25
17
22 .
19
12
21
12
1P
13
19
13'
17
13
17
14
11
10
12
13
10
9
11
1.4
7
14
18.
14
13
9
13
4
7
9
1Q
Total.
Females.
0
5
17
26
19
25
25
29
21
18
20
15
14
17
13
18
26
25
25
33
27
26
3!.
20
I5
30
14
24
17
22
24
17
23
16
15
17
24
25
18
28
-
0
34
47
63
46
62
50
46
43
37
32
34
26
28
26
37
39
42
38
50
4'1
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41
32
28
40
23
35
-31
29
38
35
3'1
29
30
28
32
27
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. Present JVicmb~rand CZass$cation of Pupils.
The forty-first term (the first of the twent_v-first year of the
State Normal School,) commenced on the third Nonday of September last, and the number of pupils in attendance is 1'75.
They are divided into four classes, Sub-J.uniors, Juniors, SnbSeniors and Seniors, making a course of studykxtending through
two years.
Tllese classes are again arranged in divisions to suii, the convenience of recitations. The sex and classification will be seen
from the foIlowing table :
-179
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Pressing demands are made on the under graduates to teach
in the winter schools, thus making an unusual reduction in the
number of pupils during the present term.
We l ~ a v ehad occasion in former repdrts to notice the decreaoing number of male pupils. The continued demand for young
men in the national service, and the heavy drafts thus made on
the labor and business of the-country, have withdrawn large
numbers from the work of teachicg. The demands for first class
teachers and especially for the,gr&duates of the school, are consiant and pressing, but the committee r e g l ~ to
t be obliged to say
that the increased wages offered for the serviixh of such teachers
are not proportioned to the increased expenses of living or to the
advance of other departments of labor. -Under such a condition
of things, young men of talents and energy cannot be expected
t o remain, i n this comparatively unrernunerated employment.
Women must become the teachers of our public schools, and
when justice is done, by paying them equal wages for equal labor
with men, the services of those who possess the highest talents
and schplardlip will be secured, aild i t may confidently be expected that the cause of education will not suffer.
' Faculty.
The following changes have occurred in the ~ a c u ! t ~ :
On the 19th of September last, the Principa1,Prof. D.H. Qochran
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[ASSEMBLY:
resigned his position t,o accept the Presidency of the Brooklyn
Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute. H e continued in charge of
the school until December 8th, when he mas succeeded by Mr.
Oliver Arey, who ~.iasunanimously elected Principal on the 24
of December. Mr. Arey had been many years Principal of the
Buffalo Central Scbool, and brings to,the duties of his new position ripe scholarship, large experience, and entire devotion to his
- profession.
Mr. Marean, tutor in Algebra and Penmanship, resigned on the
4th cf November last, and was succeeded by Capt: Albert N.
Husted, who having honorably completed his two years term of
service in the army, returnedto his former position-in the school.
- James E. Perring, teacher of Vocal Music, was on the 4th of
Pebruaiy succeeded by T. Spencer Lloyd, and Miss Lydia K.
Keyes, superintendent of t h e Primary Department was on the
11th of April succeeded by Miss ~ b a n d aP. Punnelle.
The following is a full list of the present officers of the school :
OLIVER AREY.
Principal, and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy.
Rev. FREDERICK S. JEWELL, A. M.,
Professor of the English Language and Literature.
RODNEY G. KIMBALL, A. M.,
Professor of Mathematics.
L E ROY 6. COOLEP, A. M., .
Professor of Natural Science.
'WILLIAMS D. HUXTLEY, A. M.,
Superintendent of the Experimental School.
' * ALBERT N. IIUSTED,
Teacher of Mathematics.
,T. SPENCER LLOYD,
Teacher of Vocal &hisic.
LOUISA OSTROM,
Teacher of Ristory and Drawing.
MARY E. BUTLER,
Teacher of Reading, and Mental Arithmetic.
,<
MARY E. HOWELL,
Teacher of Arithmetic and Grammar.
AMANDA P. E'UNMELLE,
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No. 52.1
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Experimental and Primary $chools.
T h e schools of practice connected with the institution and
denominated the Experimental a ~ Primary
d
Departments, furnish
ample opportunities for illustrating methods of instruction, and*
testing the ability of pnpils to instruct and manage schools.
A11 pupils of the Xorrual School are required to teach a t least
one month nnder constant arid watchful supervision, in these departments, preyions to th$r graduation. Dlzring this time, they
are wade responsible, as.far as practicable, for the advancement
of their pupils and the good order of the schools. The Superintendents are also required to criticise their work, correct whatever is inconsistent with the instrnctions given in the Normal
School, and to report the results to the Principal. These re:
ports, i n connection xyith scholarship, determine the fitness of
candidates for graduation..
The Experimental Department numbers one hundred and five
pupils, between the ages of eight and sixteen. In the lowest
class, the pypils pay a tuiti,on fee of $10 per term. I n the higher
classes, a tuition fee of $12.50 is charged. The income of this
school for the past year has been $2,493.
The Primary Department numbers forty pupils between the
ages of five and riine years. "Each pupil pays a tnition fee of
$10 per term. The amoullt received for tuition in this depa;tment during the past year is $'7'74.21.
The applications for admission far exceed the capacity of these
departments. They are not only self-snstainiog, but coitribute
somewhat to the support of the Normal School ; and experience
proves thew to be indispensible means in the training of teachers.
Libraries and &pparafus.
During the past year two hundred and sixty-seven volumes
Eare been added to the text. book library to replace books too
much morn for longer service. The miscellaneous library remains
as a t the date of last report. All the apparatus belonging to the
school has been examined,and found to be in good condition.
A statement of 2-11 receipts and expenditures for the year ending September 30, 1864, is appended to this report, and the
vouchers for every payaent are in the hands of the committee.
The committee are constrained to call the attention of the Snperintendent and Regents, and through them the Legislature, to
the present inadequate appropriation for the support' of the,
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[ASSEMBLY
school. Twelve thousand dollars has been annnally appropriated
since 1855, and the fixed salaries of the teachers have continued
unchanged since t h a t time. F o r the last two years a small addition has been made t o some of the salaries from the unexpended
balance a t the close 'of those years. A t the close of the present
year, all the means a t the disposal of the committee will be
exhausted in current expenses. I t is scarcely necessary t o allnde
t o the greatly increased cost of all the necessary expenditures,
such as for fuel, repairs, stationery, Books, &c.
It would be manifestly uzjust t o the teachers totask them t o
,perform their duties for the salaries which they receiveds t&
years since. It would subject them to an absolute contribution
t o the public service which they are unable t o make.
The ordinary repairs of the school building have usnally been
made from the annual appropriations for th6 supaportof the school.
Some extraordinary repairs will b g required during the present
year. From all these considerations the committee are of opinion
- t h a t a n extra appropriation ill be required t o meet the expenses
of the preskrlt year, and that the regular appropriarion for the
support of the school should be increased t o sixteen thousand
dollars.
Respectfully submitted,
FRhKKLfN TOWNSELUD,
8. B. WOOLWORTH,
,
JOHN Td. ,L. PRUYN.
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Dated January 11, 1865,
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DOCUMENTSACCOMPANYING THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE EXECJTTIVE COMMITTEE.
-A, Annual Regibter and Circular of the State Normal School for
the year eniiing July 10, 1864, with the names of the Executive Committee, faculty, and pupils, and a list of the graduates for-the j same period ; also an account of the qnalifications for admission, the sums allowed for traveling expenses,
and other matters important to be understood by the pupils
and others, with the- form of the diploma granted t o graduates.
B, Full programme of the class ~xercises,as adopted a t the beginning of the year. ,
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@, Fourth Quinquennial Catalogue.
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(A.
.Annual Register and Circular of the State Normal School,
Albany, N. Y.; for the year ending July 10, 1864.
-Executive Committee.
.
Hon. V. M. RICE,
Superintendent of Public Instructioa.
CHAIRMAN.
CHARLEE L. AUSTIN,
FRANKLIN ,TOWNSE~D,
SAMUEL B. WOOLWORTH, Secretary and treasure^.
JOHN V. L. PRUYN.
pa cult^.
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DAVID H. COCHRAN, A. M., Ph. D.,
Principal, and Professor of Moral and Mental Philosophy.
REV.FREDERICK S. JEWELL, A. M.,
Professor of the English Language and Literature.
LE ROY C. COOLEY, A. M.,
Professor of Natural Science.
BODNEY C. EIMBALL, A. N.,
Professor of Nathematics.
WILLIANS D. HUNTLEY, A. M.,
Superintendent of the Experimental School.
JOSIAH T. MABEAEJ,
Teacher of Algebra and Penmanship.
T. SPENCER LLOYD,
Teacher of Vocal Music.
LOUISA OSTROX,
Teacher of History and Drawing.
MARY E. BUTLER,
Teacher of Reading and Mental Arithmetic.
M~RY
E. HOWELL,
Teacher of A-thmetic and Grammar.
AMANDA P. FUPU'NELLE,
Superintendent of [he Primary School.
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STUDENTS:
FEMALES.
Names.
Towns.
-
Counties.
Myra Abel- - - - - - -- ,,.-L, ,, Bath ,--,
. . - - - - Sceuben
,--,-Frankfort - -,-,-Herkimer
Fannie Adams: ,-,-,,
Anna Agnew .-_,
,,,,,,,,,
, Ogdensburgh
- _ - St. Lawrence
Annie X . Alexander-, ,-_.
,-Albany - .-,
.---Albany
Helen A. Alford-, ,,-,
-,-,
-,Buffalo ,,,.-- - Erie
_ - ,,,,- - Rutlqnd ,,- ...- -,Jefferson .
Patience L. Allen- ,Mirriam C. Avann-, ,,,- - - - Albany - .-,,- - -,Albany
Anna L. Babcock -,-- - - - - - Southampton -,-,Suffdk
Frances A. Bacchus- - ,- - -, Waterford.. - ,,, Saratoga
- - Albany., .-,,-,
,
.. Albany
Margaret L. Bardwell, .- -,
Harriet 0. Barlow ,,,,,-,,,,
Ames-, .- - - - - - - - Montgomery
- - - -,Putnam
Abbie I. Barrett .. ,- - - - ,,-.,, Keat - - -- -,
Kate A. Barrett ,,,--,,,-. F o r t Ann -,,,,,,Washington
Helen I. Bartley- - - - , ,,,., Albany . ,,, , , Albany
Lucy Bateman , - - -,
,,- Greenbush ,,- - - - Rensselaer
Lemira M. Beaty -,-,, - - Salem -,
-,,
- -,
-,
Washington
Ellen Hakernan..- - - j-,-,- - Greenbush ,,,- - Rensselaer
Bertha L. Blanchard-, _.
,
,,. Troy - - ,,- ,,-,,Rensselaer
Abbie Bockes
- - - - - ,-,.- , P o r h i l l e .- -.-,
-,Cattaraugus
-,Livingston
Julia J. Boies - - -- -.',-.,. - - Leicester - - -,
Henrietta Boyce - - ---,,
-,
-,
Dover Plains .,,- Dutchess
Emily Broadbent- .--.- - - - - - Houndsfield - .,,, Jefferson
Nary I. Brolley-- _ --,
- - - - - - Albany - -,-..--.,Albany- - ,-,- - Schenectady- - - - - Schenectady
Kate Brothers -,--,
Sophia E. Brown - -,
-,
-- -.- . Canajoharie - ,.- - Montgomery
Emma R. Rudd-- ,,-,
,--,
-Turin-, - -.,,-Lewis
Ellen Byrnell-,-_ ,--,
,-,
- - Cooperstown --,,
Otsego
- - ,- -.. - ,, Albany ,-,
- ,,.-,Albany
Anna Cain - - - -,
, Cazenovia,
,,-,Madison
Josephine E. Can6eld. -,-,
Hannah Carey- - - ,--,
.--,
,-Esperance_-_.--Schoharie
-,Cazenovia- - - - - ,, Madison
Elizabeth Carpenter - ,-,,
Jane Carpenter- - .- -,
,- - - - , Little Falls- -.
,-.Herkimer
,,-,~ i t t l e p a l l,
s,,-,,Herkimer
Sarah J. Chase-, - - - - -,
Josephine Clement - - .,- - -,
- Albany - ,,,, - ,, Albany
Ann N. Clift- .,--- .--.- - - - - Java ,--.
,,,.--.
Wyoming
Clara L. Cochran- ,--,- - ,
-,, Concord .- -- - - -,Erie
Mary A. Cochran- ,,,-,-- . -Warsaw ,- ,,--. Wyoming
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Names.
Towns.
Connties.
Agnes McFadden, -,
-- I , _:
-,Delhi. ,,- - -,
,,
, Delaware
---- --,,
Albany - - - - - - - - - Albany
Lydia McGrath ,-,Anna K. McBamara - - -,
-Albany
,
- - -_
-,
- - Albany
Uvid - - . . - - - - .-.Seneca
Mary McNeil--_--- .,-----,
H. Frances Milligan-- -- - - - _ Somers - - - - - ---.
Westchester
Mary E. Mills- - .--, -- -.- - -Mount
,
Eopk- --,,Orange
Jennie L. Moore-, ,,,--,..- ,, Hudson- -- - - ,--,Columbia
Emma J. M ~ r l e y- - - - - - - - --.
- Stuyvesant- ,, C ~ l ~ u m b i a
- - -,,-- ' Cobleskill- - - -- -,Schoharie
Mary Myers .. - - - -,
Maria L. Nellegar - - - - ,,- - - - Albany - - - 2 . -- Albany
_.
- - - - 2 - - - - -,- Watkins - --:
- - ,-Schuyler
~ a r a Nicholkh
Flora C. Niven- .--.
-,
.--- - -~,h o m ~ s o--,,
n - - Sullivan
Jennie L. Northrup- .- -,_ -- -,Ontario- - - -- .- -- Wayne
Mary Nourse . _ - .--,
--_
.--Hinsdale . - - .--,
Cattaraugus
Elnrna Osterhout- - - - - - - l, Albany - ,--.-. -,Albany
Jennie Owens- - - - -- - - -- - - -, Albany - ,--,-- -- Albany
Jane Palmer-, - -- -,
- - - - .-- _ F o r t Covington-, Franklin
Ellen C. P a r k - - - - -,- - - - -- -,Oswego- - -.- - -,Oswego
Florilla E. Parker- - - - -,, Stockbridge - ,,-Madison
Mary E. Parker ---. - - - - Manlius- ,--.
--Onondaga
,
Galen
,
-- :-- - -,,, Wayne
Mary E. Peck., ..- ,,., ,,- - _
.--;, - -Utica
- - - ,-_
- Oneida
--Mary E. Pcrry -.--Martha W. Pinckney - -,.. - -,
, Albany ,- - - - .- ,
, Albany
Sarah A. Pine- - -,
-,---.
Hector- - - -,
-Schuyler
,
Julia L. Plumb. - -_,- - -- - - _ New Hartford , - -Oneida
Margaret B. Porter- - - - - - - - - Cambria - - -- .,-, Niagara
Harriet A. Potter,, - - -..--.Otsego. - - .., -- - - - Otsego
Nariette Preston - - - - -,- - - Stanford - - ,- -,Dntchess
Josephine E. Price- .--- - ,, New Fane- - - .--,Niagara
Hempstead --.--,
Queens
H a r y L. Prink- -- -,-- -Amelia Putnam - - - - - - - - - - -- Lyme - -- -, -- Jefferson
- - -, Hamilton - .-1, -,Madison
Mary 33. Pyne-- ,-- - - - -,
Montgomery
Kate Quackenbush- -- - - -.- - Fonda - - .-;.-Kate 9. Qninn - - - - ---,
- ,Albany-.-----,Albany
Ellen M. Ransom- - -- ,,,- Massena ,,-- - -St.
,
Lawrence
Julia E. Ransom ..
- -- - - Lloyd, - - - -,
- - ,, Ulster
---.
, ---- Albany - - - - - ---,
Albany
Huldah Reame? - - --Albany,
--. --,,Albany
Mary A. Richards-, .--,
- - - - - - - - Litchfield: --,- - Herkimer
Eliza C. Rider -.-,.
Julia A. Robinson - - - - .-,- Sing Sing --,,
- - - Westchester
- - - - Brooklyn --,
--,Kings
Elizabeth L. Savage .-_Delia Scriber - - .,-- - - .- -- - Schroeppel - - - - _:
Oswego
- _,- - - '- Corning - - - - Steuben
Julia A. Seamen - - Adelaijie 3.1.Sheak ---.
,-,
- - New York.- -,- - New York
Margaret B. Sheffield- - - - - - - Watertown .---,Jefferson
Rosette 4. Sheldon --,.
--- Leicester
,
- .-,-,,Ei&nf;ston
_,
,,-Albany _-,,
- ---,
Albany
Anna I(, Shepard - -.--_
- -,blexander - - -,- Genesee
Esther K. Showerman.. -,
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Names.
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Towns.
[ASSEMBLY
Counties.
Harriet Shultes,, ,,,,_
,
,
,
, Berne . --,,
,--.
- , Albany.
Matilda Shultes,, ,--,.,,- _,Berne -- ,,.-,. ,, Albany.
Mary E. Sidey -,,,,-,
_-,,
, - Flushing _ - - -_ -Queens.
_,
-- -,Saratoaa.
-,,, Ballston ;,-,
Julia M. Smith.--: ,--,
Elizabeth Smith ,,---,,,--,
Albany ---,- - - - Albany.
Louisa 31. Smith ,-- - - ,,- - - Bedford- ---,
,-- Westchester.
Mary E. Smith,, ,.- - , - - -,
- New York .- -;
- - - New York.
Mary W. Southwick ,--,-,.,
Albany -,-.
- - - - - Albany.
Rhoda A. Stevens.- -,
,-,,
- Oswego - - - - - - - - - Oswego.
-,- ,--,
:
Mount Hoee- - - - - Orange.
Sarah Stickney - - -,,Fort Copington ,, Franklin,
Mary Stiles.-- - - - - --:,
-,
Jamestown
,
_
---Chautauqua.
-,
Kate Stoneman - - - -Rmma E. Striker .-,,, - - ,_
- New Pork.- ,.- - New
,
York.
Mary E. Supple - - - - ,-,,- ,. Lyons - - - - - - - - - - Wayne.
F. Swain-- -,
_- --,
,
- New P o r k - - - - - .. - New Pork.
Jessie Sweeney ,--.-_,
--Bath
,
- - - - ,,-- - Rensseleer.
,
Caroline E. Tetherly - - -,
-,
- - Chatham .--_
- - - - Colnmbia.
Helen R. Thayer -- - - - - ..-, ,-Broadalbin .-,-- Fulton.
Alma L. Thompson ---,,,--,
Kingsbdry :----,
Washington.
, - Hope- .--Orange.
Mary J. Thorn - - - - .- - - - _ -Mount
Julia F. Tibbals - - - - - - ' - - -,,Wiudham -..,---- Greene.
Xaria M. Townsend - - - - --,,
~ a w r e n h e-;-- - St.
,
Lawrence.
Frances L. Traver-- -- - - -,- Albany ,,-,
- - - - - Albany.
Eenrietta B. Trembly- - - - - Naples ..- - - , - - --Ontario.
Harriet
Tmoguns .--_-,,
Collins .--,
_,,,-Erie.
Harriet S. Tyler .,,, - _._
,, Troy
,
- ,,,,,,,:,-Rensse'taer.
Nary D. Tyrrell,,, - - _ -- ,-- _ Batavia - - - - -- - - - Genesee. '
Mary J. Udell---- - - - - ., - - - - Bethlehem - - -- .- Albany,.
- - - - -,Albany ,- .. - - - -. Albany.
Pannie Van, Alstyne -,
Josephine Van Derwerker- .. Milton - - -,,- - - - Saratoga.
- -,- Eaton - - - - .- - - - - Madison.
Nary E. Van Densen - _-- - Diana - - - - - - - - - - Lewis.
Nary L. Van Deusen-- ,,,Lavina Van Schaack - -,
,- - Albany .-- _- - - -Albany.
,
Kate Van Schaick-- - - ,-,- - Sharon ,-,-- .---Schoharie.
._
,
,-,Sharon - - -.- - - .- Schoharie.
Nary Van Schaick- - -,
Nargaret Van Vranken ., ,
- - Schenectady- - - - - Schenectady.
Margaretta Vedder - - - --.- - - 8choharie - - - _ - - - . Schoharie.
Leah M. Vernooy- - - - - ' - -- - - Wawarsing-- - - - - *Ulster.
Calista Watson ---- - - - - --,Cuba - - - - - - - - - - - B'llegany.
Cora F . Watson. ,-,- -,,-. Middleburgh .-- - Schoharie.
- - - - ,-Cuba --,.- - - - - -,Allegany. .
Louisa M. Watson --,.
Ebsora E. Wells ---.
--- -,
- - Walworth. - ,--.waynet
Julia E. Wemple .--,,,_
- .- New York- i -,_
-,
New York.
- lllegany.
Mary Wheeler - - - .- - - - - - ,, Angelica - - ,- - -,
Kate Whitlock - - - - .----,- Lyons ,--..,,- -,Wayne.
Louisa Whitney - - -..- ,. ,Fort Govingfon- - F r a ~ k l i n .
dlmeda A. Wilcox-- -,.---', - Albany . -,- _ ,
-,
Albany.
Ilensselaer.
Frances H. Wiltse :- -,,- ,- - - Gzeenbush ,,,,_,
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Names.
Towns.
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Counties.
Broome.
Charles W. Loomis .,--, - - Binghamton
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Luther M. Narsh-- -.- - - - - - - Houndsfield - - ,,- Jefferson.
Judiah H. Matheson - - - - - - - - Albion - - - - ,--,
- - Oswego.
George S. McCrillis --,.
- .-- - Holley .--- - - - - - Orleans.
- - Chenango Forks- - Broome.
Almon A. McDonald - - -,-,
- ,--. Orange.
James F. Patterson .-,, - - - .- Walkill .--Daniel F. Payne- .--- - - - - - -- Westport , - _ --,Essex.
Orlando If. Record- ---.
.-- Smyrna:- - - - - - - . Chenango.
-,Jefferson.
John Ressegnie -- - - - - -.- - - Eoundsfield - ,-.-- -,Northumberland , Saratoga. .
Lucian W. Rice .-- - -,
William Roberts - - - - ,-,. -,
- Varick-- - - - _-- - - Seneca.
Thomas Robinson -- -- - - -,- - Hudsou - - - - - ,--,Columbia.
Van Ruren Sarles-- -,, - -,
-Stillwater- ,- - -Saratoga.
,
Alfred 8. Schooley-, - - - - - - - Ovid -- 1- ,-,,- - - Seneca.
Stephen I. Scriber - - - .. - - - - ,- Schroeppel - - -,- - Osmego.'
John B, Springsteel.. ..- .... Ramapo ........ Rockland.
John D. Sullivan., -,- - - - - - - Bethel - - -- - - L- ,-Sullivan.
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No. 52.1
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GRADUATES
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Of the Thirfy-Mnth Term, ending February 4,1864.
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FEMALES.
Names.
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Post Offices.
- Ludlowville .- - _
Tompkins.
,
Helen S. Brown-_ -- .--_
Helen 3.Dickinson - -.
--,- , Cleveland ,- _.-,-Oswego.
Harriet E. Distin- .-,.--;, Fulton- .- -- -- Oswego.
Lucy A. Goring -,--,,-,_
-,Wappinger's Falls Dutchess.
Mary A. G p n t - _,
..- ,,,_-,
- Caroline Center, Tompkins.
Adriannie L. Gregory.. --,-,Napanock - - , ,
-Ulster.
Madaline Hayden, - - -__ -,,- Syracuse - - .--,Onondaga.
Sarah W. Eeeler ,.,, .-.--L , Candor - ,--- _ - Tioga.
Sarah A. Lyon. ... ..,,,- - Stanfordville .,-,Dutchess.
Agnes McFadden- ,,,,,l - Delhi . ,,- - - - Delaivare.
Maria L. Nellegar .....,-.-,AJbany ....,.--,
Albany.
Mory E. Perry - ,- --_
--,- - Utica- - _- - - - .--,Oneida.
Margaret B. Porter .,_.
, Lockport .-,
- - -- Niagara.
Albany.
Mary A. Richards ,,.-,- , Albany - .Esther R. Showerman- ,- - ,, Alexander- _,
-,
Genesee.
Louisa A. Van Schaack- --.New Salem - , - -Albany.
-Emily Qoorhess., - - - - , _ - _
Shin Creek,, ,,,, Sullivan.
Kate Whitlock, ,..- ,_ -_- ,Lyons -_,-,,
-- -,Wayne.
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MALES.
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Post Offices.
Counties.
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Alonzo L. Bardin,-_,
, Glens Falls,,
, Warren.
Robert' L. Brougham - ,.- -., Root - : ,, _,
Montgomihy.
George W. Crane- .,,, ,,--,,
Union -_,-,.
.,-, Broo&e.
Merritt B. Fairchild _,
,,- Munsville ,,,..,_
Jefferson.
Archibald Grant .. ..- - _.-,,,, Mumford ., ,,,-,,Monroe.
Champion H! Judson-, - - ,,
,Livingstonville .,
Schoharie.
Charles W. Loomis - ,,-,
,,- Binghan~ton ,,_
Broomez
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Sand Bank ,,,,,, Oswego.
Judiah Matteson - --,,- - _,
Thomas Robinson ,,,,,,,, Hudson ,-,,Columbia.
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GRADUATES
Of the Fortiet'z Term, endi?$gJuly 14, 1864.
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PEDIIBLES.
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No. 52.1'
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Post Office.
Names.
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Counties.
William H. B. Roberts ,-,
,-East Varick - - - Seneca.
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Peter Sutphen - - ,--- ., - - - - Owasco - ---_
Cayuga. .
Gordon L. Weeks- -- -.- - - - - - Ellery Center -- -.Chautauqua.
.
Benjamin E. Wells-- -,
,-,
-,Glens Falls, - _ --,*Warren.
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Exercises of the Graduating Class, 39th Term, Thursday, February 4, 1864.
Order of Exercises.
1. Anthem ,- - " Blessed be the Lo%d God- of Israel,"
2. Prayer -,-Rev.
,_
Ray Palmer, D. D.
3, Essay -,
-- ,-." Popular Under-Esfimation of Teachers."Thomas Robinson, Hudson, Columbia CO.
4. Essay ,,-- -," T h e Beautiful, Unseen."--Mary
A. Grant,
Caroline Center, Tompkins Co.
5. Essay ,,,,-,'"Cultivation of Mind."-Sarah
'W. Keeler,
Candor, Tioga Co.
6. Essay ,,,,- - " The. Yankee School Mistress."--Lucy
A.
Goring, Wappinger's Palls, Dutchess Co.
7. Chorus ,-,
-," Light17 trip and gaily bound."-Nercadante.
8, Essay ,-. - " The Burials of war."-Madaline
Hayden,
Syracuse, Onondaga Co.
9. Essay - ,,,-," Poetry Unappreciated."-M.
Louisa Nellegar, Albany, Albany Co.
10. Essay ,,,,,- " Human Fossils "and Fossilization."-Charles
W. Loomis, Binghamton, Broome Co.
11. Chorus .-- -,L L When the e ells rang out their Midnight
Chime."--T.
Moore.
12. Address _ - - - Hon. A. D. White.
13. Potpourri ,- From " La Piglia del Regin1ento."-DoGizetti.
14. Diploma conferred. The Principal.
,, '; While about the brow of Night."-flercadante.
15. Chorus - ,_
16. Benediction.
.
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Exercises ofithe Graduatirig'Class, 4Qth Term, Thursday, July
14, 1864.
Order of Exercises
1. Anthem ,- - " The Earth is the Lord's."-.Mason.
2. Prayer - - -Rev.
- , Henry Darling, D. D.
5. Chorus ,,-,," Voices from Ocean."
4. Essay ,,-,
,, " Education and Politics."--E.
Amenzo Davis,
Perry, Wyoming Co.
5. Essay ,,,,,, " Certainty of Consequences."-Annie N. Alexander, Albany, Albany Co.
, 6. Essay ,
,
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,,, L 6 Necessities of Mind.--LL~ J. Maltby, Rome,
Oneida Co.
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No. 52J
'7. Essay
25
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8. Chorus
9. Essay
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Aspiration after Ex~el1ence.~'-Mary E. Pyne,
Hamilton, Nadison Co.
the
gallant Comrades."-From
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,- - " T o horse,
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Reals ankl Ideals "-Elizabeth
Smith, 81bany, Albany C6.
10. Essay ,,,,,," National E~perience.'~-Harriet L. Tyler,
Troy, Rensselaer Co.
McNeil, Farmer,
11. Poem-, ,-,,, " Now' and Then."-Mary
Seneca Co.
The Eloquence of Decay."-Benjamin
E,
12. Essay :_
, ,,
Wells, Glens FalIs, Warren Co.
13. Chorus ,,,,, National Song-Words by Prof. F. S. Jewel1 ;
Music by Prof. T. S. Lloyd.
14. Diploma conferred. The Principal.
15. Music ,,
,,
, Music-"
Soldier's Chorus," from Faust.Gounod.
16. Benediction.
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ESSAYISTS.
.SENIORS.
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Writers seleclidfor the Public Reodings ofthe 39th Term.
A
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Mr. 3. E. House-- ,. - -..--,- _ 1 Miss A. McFadden - - - - , - -1_
Mr. C. S. Judson--- - - - - ..- ... 1 Miss M.L. Nellegar - - ,:
,2
9h. C.--H. Loomis - - - - - - 2 Xiss M. B. Porter .,,, .--.2
Xr. Thomas Robinson- - - - - - - 4 Xiss Elizabeth Smith- - - -. 1
Miss H. B. Dickinson , - _
.--_2
Miss L. A. 'Van Schaack- ,, 1
Miss H. E. Distin --,--,_
.---E Xiss K. Whitlock .,--,--,1
Miss L. A. Goring- - - - - - - -2,
SUB-SENIORS.
Mr. E. &. Davis - - - - - - --,,
,
3 Miss E.,M. Ransom ,-,,_,
, 1
Mr. B. E. Wells - - - - ---.
--,2 Miss $1. E. Smith
,_
-- 1
Niss H. 9. Bartley - - - - - - - - - - 3 Miss H. B. Trembly - - , - -1_
Miss E. Byrnell - - - _- - - - - - - - 2 Miss H. E. Tyler - - - - - - - -2,
Miss E. 3. Malt'by -,,,- - .--2 Miss P. C. Watson --,,
-- - - 1
---.
1
i s M. c
e - - - - - - 1 Xiss E. Whitney - .--.
Miss M. E. Pyne .,,, . - - - , - -1
- Miss C. Wygant-- - - - - -,,-1
Miss J. E. Bansom-- , - - --- - 1
---,.
Mr. Charles W. Eoomis,
Mr. Thomas Robinson,
Hiss Mary A. Grant;
Miss Lucy A. Goring,
Miss Madaline Eayden,,
14liss Sarah W. Keeler,
Bliss M. Louisa Nellegar.
The Normal School of the State of New-York was established
, ~ an
y act of the Legislature, in 1844, " for the instruction and
practice of Teachers of Common Schools in the Science of Education and the a r t of ~eachink." I t was first established for five
years, as an experiment, and went into operation on the 18th of
December, 1844, in a building provided gratuitously by the city
of Albany, and temporarily fitted up for t h a t purpose. The first
term .opened with twenty-nine pupils, and closed with ninety.seven. The nurinber in &tiendance the secdnd term, was about
two hundred. The a v e F g e number is now about t k o hundred
and fifty.
I n 1848, an act was passed by the ~ e ~ i s l a k "for
r e the pernanent establishment of the State Normal ~ c h b o l , 'appropriating
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$15,000 towards the erection of a suitable building. The following year, an additional appropriation of $10,000 was made .for its
completion. A large and commodious edifice, conteiniAg a dwelling house for the Principal, was accordingly erected on the corner of Lodge and Howard streets, adjoining the State Geological
and Agricultural rooms. To this building, the school was removed qn the 31st of July, 1849.
The design of this'institntion i s t o improve the condition of
, common schools, by providing a class of teachers superior in
professional scholarship and practical skill: to those ordinarily
furnished by iustitutions not having this end specifically in view, '
and i t is confidently believed from experience, t h a t the conditions of admission, the course of study adopted, and the class drill
pursued, are well calculated to secure this object.
Each county in the State is entitled to send to the school a
number of pupils (either male or female) equal t o twice the number of members of the assembly in such county. The pupils are
appointed by the assembly district schoal commissioners, a t a
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No. 52.1
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meeting called by the Superintendent of Public Instruction, on
the first Mondays of February and September in eash year. A
list of the vacancies a t the close of each term i s forwarded t o
the commissioners.
Persons failing to receive appointments in their respective
counties, may: upon presenting testimonials of character and
talents, and sustaining the prescribed examination, receive appointments from the executive committee, provide$ any vacancies
exist. I n such case, the pupil will not receive mileage.
Pupils once admitted to the school mill be entitled to its privileges until they graduate, unless they forfiit that right by voluntary absence,,by improper conduct, or by failing to kxhibit evidence of scholarship and fair promise of success as teachers.
The following is the form of certificate of appointmenf which
i s to be given by the commissione!rs' to each pupil agpointed :
A t a m e e t i ~ gof the school commissioners of the county of
, held a t
on the
day of
for the purpose of filling vacancies i n - t h e State Normal School,
mas duly appointed a pupil of that institution.
(Signed by the Coiumissioners.)
QuaL~jkationsof Applicants.
Females sent to the school must be a t least sixteen years of
age, and males eighteen, and i n all cases decided maturity of
mind is indispensable.
Candidates for admission to the lowest class must sustain a
thorough examination i n rkading, spelling, t h e geog-aphy of the
western continent; intellectual arithmetic (equal to one-half of
the ordinary treatises), written arithmetic (through interest),
and so much of English grammar as to be able fo analyze and
parse any ordinary prose sentehce.
P o r admission to the advanced classes, in addition to those
required for entrance examination, all the studies of the preceding
classes must have been accomplished, The time required to cornplete the course will depend on the attainments,- habits and talents
of the pupil. I t ought never to exceed four terms, or two years.
All the pupils, on entering the school, are required t o sign the
followi~lgdeclaration :
We, the subscribers, hereby D E C L A R E , that it is our intmtion to
devote ourselves to the business of tiaching the schools of the State,
and that our sole object in resorting to this Normal School is the
better t o prepare ourselves for this important duty.
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I t is expected of the commissioners t.hat they will select such
pupils as will sacredly fulfill their engagements i n this particular,
and they should be made acquainted with its import before t6ey
are appointed.
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The followine: extracts from a circular issued to the school
commissio~ers,by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, clearly present the qualifications which are deemed esseitial:
".The school commissioners are directed to give the most extended notice in their power of vacancies, and to interest themselves in finding proper pupils to be appointed.
" I n making the selections, those who from past successful
experience have proved their aptness to teach, or from traits of
character, clearly developed, give fair promise of future success,
should be preferred: Talents not below,mediocrity, unblemished
rnorals and sound health, are regarded &sindispensable. I n your
visitations of the schools, you will sometimes findoteachers who
only need the instruction which this school is designed to give,
t b insure their highest s'uccess and nsefulness; or pupils who
have given proof of good scholarship, which, b y being properly
directed, may be made of great value i n the cause bf education.
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Such teachers and scholars yon will encourage t o seek these
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7'2- ivileges of the Pupils.
[P
All pupils receive their tuition free. They are also furnished
with the use of text books without charge. They are, however,
held responsible for their loss =or injury. If they already omll
the books of gie course, they will do well to bring them, together
with,auch other books for reference as they may possess. Besides
this, each student receives the amount designated in the following table, to defray travelyng expenses from, his county seat t o
Albany. No pupil will receive mileage, unlegs the a p p o i n t ~ e n t
i s obtailied from the county in which said pupil resides, such
appointment beiug regularly made by the co~missioners. This
money is paid at the close of each term.
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Besides an abundant supply of text books upon all the branches
of the course of study,% well selected miscellaneous library has
been procured, to which all the pupils &ay have access, free of
charge. I n the selection of this library, particuIar care has been
exercised to procure most of the recent works upon education, as
well as valuable standard works upon the natural sciences, history, mathematics, &c. The State Library is also freely accessible to all.
Terms and Vacations.
The Fall Term will begin on the third Monday in September,
and continue twenty meeks.
The Spring Tern* will begin on the last Monday in February,
and continue twenty weeks.
Prompt Attendance.
As the school will open oil Monday, i t is desirable that pupils
reach Albany on the Friday or Saturday preceding the day of
opening. The faculty can then,zaid them in securing suitable
places for boarding.
' Students arriving on those days will find i t to their ad-vantage
to proceed directly to the school building, situated 011 Lodge
street, near State, retaining their checks until after they have
secured their boarding places, when their baggage will be delivered free of charge.
A s the examination of the pupils preparatory to classijicati?n wilJ
commence on the jrst day of the term, it i s exceediltgly important
that all should repok themselves on the Jirst morning, Those- who
arrive a day after the time, will subject not only the teachers to
much trouble, but themselves also to the rigors of a private examination. After the$rst week, no student, except for the strongest
reasons, will be ai'lowed to eater the school.
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Price of Bodrd.
he price of board in respectable families varies from $3.50 to
$5, exciusive of washing. Students wishing to board themselves
can procnre ready furnished rooms a t $1. per week. Many pupils,
by so doing, reduce their entire expenses t o about $2.50 per
week.
Pupils of different sexes are not allowed to board in the same
families. Parhicular care is taken to be asiured of the respectability of the families who propose to take boarders, before they
are recommended to the pupils.
b
Course of 8 f u d y and Text Books.
The following is the course of study prescribed for the school,
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KO.52.1
33
and a thorough acquaintance &th t h e whole of i t on the h a r t of
the male pupils, is made a condition of graduation.
SUB-JUNIORS.
--
Text Books.
----
Reading. ,,, ,,.,,,,,, , , , ,,,,, JMandevilZe.
Spelling.
Elementary Sounds of the Letters, ,,, Page's Normal Chart.
Writing.,
Quacken~oss.
English Prose Composition ,,,-,,..-,,
Geography and Outline Maps .-,, .-,, ~7lcJfally.
Intellectual Arithmetic,, .,,, ,,,,.,,, Davies.
Elementary Arithmetic .,,,,,,,,,,,,, 1Davies.
E g i s m
a,
, ,,
Clark.
History -,- - - - ,,,- ,,,- ,,,.- -,,,, Wilson.
Elementary Algebra, begun_, .,. ,,,,, Davies.
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JUNIORS.
..- - -
IntelIectuaI Arithmetic, ,,,,.,,,
Davies.
Arithmetic - ,...- -.- - ,, - -,
- ,, -,
,- Davies.
Geography and Map Drawing .,,, ,,,, JLlcNuZly.
Writinc.
_
_
Burveying and Xensuratbn, .,,.,.,,, Dctvies.
Physiology ,-..,-_.
,
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,.,-,,
.-,.-,- Hook
Astronomy --..- .--,.-,,,,-,
-,,,
,
,
,
, Broc
Intellectual Philosophy,., - - -... ,,,
Moral PhiSosoph y - - ,,,,,,- - ..,,,, ..,
8
Chemistry __-.,
- -;
,-.
,- - - .--.
-,-,.
- - -.-,- Yo~cr/~ans.
A !gricultural Chemistry-, .- -,
_,
- ..,, Norton.
Wells.
o l o g ., - ,
- .- - .
. , - -) Lectures, P a g e , Russel; ctnd atA r t of TeachGg .........-..
tendance. in the JGxperimenfqt
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I t is not claimed that in order-to-me&-tbe present demands of
ordinary district schoo1s;'a -stud"eiit iiiust complete the entire
-$he
. - -Normal
- - School
claims to
course of study above specified.
exert its most direct and p-owe-rfiil inflwnce by supplying a supe?
rior grade of scholarship for the higher public schools in i t s
graduates, but a t the same'time t o supply the wants of a 1,ower - I
grade of schools; i t provides'an ~ulaergi.acluate course safficiently
- "moderate i n its requisitions.- - - Thc studies of the Jynior class are designed t o prepare B, higher
oraer of teachers for the colnmotl school^ generally ; those who
are looking for schools of a- still- b e t t e ~grade, have befcse t1ie.m
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the Sub-Senior 6ourse ; and-for tl~olosettrho-dim2%atore important
position's in the higher scliools, or at' principalshjps, the ,Senior
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studies are belieied t o be none too ~o.m,pleteor severe. T o extend or elevate the course beyond what i t now is, would be to-put
'its completion beyond the time and -beans - o f - m t of those who
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now iracluate ;, and more, i.t would. SiinpTy e?uca'te the few who
could complete i t beyond
-thk-reach
- - - - of t $ ~ ~ j g h e ~ _ s c h c o04
ls,
account of the limited demand f ~ sncb
r te.a.cheys,.and fbe. insuEi-,
cient compen~ati'on~
offered khem. On. the other h ~ n d ,to modi$
i t so as t o make i b less severe- n-pon-bhe pupils a t any one time,
I
of the true prb- would be t o d'isregard the h c t A t 8 a ti t is hb
vince of the Normal S ~ h o o li o afford a purely academic iwtrucI
tion in the a r t s aud sciences.. TI& is the 'prop& work of our
rnany~excelkathigh schqds and acadbmiesj ;and i$ through their
means'tEe pupa h8s p r ~ p e r i yprepared- h$mself for the k0rm~a1
Schcol course, as i t mnst be presumed he'has, no more
is,rqquir<eed
" of him than he oaght t o perform:
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- -- -
..-]-
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* - -
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&;en
"
"
~ x ~ e & n e n t aSchool.
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The object -ofrthis, departmeut' is ta- give the pupiYs ~f ther
~enior
qn opp,art&itjr
- - to qqlJ; ip,@~qti*, wder the d&w~,
c'@&
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tion of an experienced teach&, the hzethods of instruction and
disccpline inculcated in the Normal School. 'It has one permanent teacher, denominated the Superintendent of tke Experimtm
t a l School, whose labors are devoted to its management.
There are one hundred and five pupils i n this departmnf,
whose ages range from eight to sixteen years. This school i s
divided, according to the acquirements of t3e papils, into -five
classes ; and to give opportunity for a l t e ~ n n t estudy a ~ recitad
tion, and a more complete class<fication, each class is fufthen:
divided into two divisions, making in all ten distinct grades.
The pupils of the lowest class, having learned a little of reading
and spelling before entering the school, commknce mental ariihmetic and geography. The course of study i~ this department
embraces the subjects usually taught in our public schools.
To give each member of the Senior c1sss.a suitable oppdrtnnity to fix permanently in the mind the most approved methods
of illustrating the subjects here taught, and to afford an opportunity for practice in school manageme~t,,the Senior class is divided
into sections of five pupils eaih, corresponding to 'the number of
classes of the Experimental School. Each section is exercised
i n this school during a t least two weeks; and each teacher is
expected to exert all his tact, energy and skill, to advance the
pupils of the class p&ed in his c h a r 6 - O i entering the department and having his class assigned ,to him, the teacher remains
as " obeerver '' two or three days before the class is fully committed to his charge. During this time he is to learn the condition of his class and his duty, and prepare himself as well as he
is able to discharge that dutr. He is furriished with written instructions, embodying as far as possible, general principfes i g
teaching applied to his specific duties, mhich instructiolis h'e ii
to study carefully, and apply in practice. $ha Sdperintendent
nz'eets these teachers every morningJ(hsulf a n hour belfore~scho'ol;
. t o r'eriaovb any difficulties they may have fouiid in the discharge:
of their duties, and to cri-tic& fully aad freely theirjedring ad.
teachem; t h e 2 rnanlwr of tsachih&,{andthe matter taught. Each
teacher, upon leaving this departrnei?t, makes s report of tfie condition of his class, and a"coneise s.tatemellt of tKc mgthods hs
~vouldemploy in teaching the vstrioos subjects. Theie reports
are preserved and bound for future refere~oea s to t h e success of
the teachers respectively in this school. The length of time each
teacher. is employed in th.e Expsrimental Department i&[email protected] B&Y
to three weeks, depending upon t h e number of the Senior class.
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Primcry Scdool.
The object of this school is to illustrate the organization, management aud i n ~ t r u c t ~ i oofn primary schools. I t is cowposed of
pupils between the ages of five and seven years, who are taught
for the most part., orally by means of sensible objects, in accordance with Pestalozzian principles. The fedale pnpils spend a t
least one week of the Sub-senior term in this department, and
they are engaged for six weeks of the Senior term, bne hour each
day i n the discussion and practice of methods of primary teaching.
Examinations.
STATE OF NEW YORK,
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NORMAL
SCHOOL,
ALBANY,
I?.Y., [Date.]
To whom it may concern:
This certifies that A. B., having been a member of the State
Normal School, and having completed the prescribed course of
study, is deemed by the Faculty of the Institution to be well
qualified t o enter upon the duties of a teacher.
[Signed by each member of the Faculty.]
I n accordance with the above certificate, me the Executive
Committee have granted this DIPLOMA.
[Signed b y each member of the Executive Committee.]
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[By an act of the Legislature, passed April 11,1849, "every teacher shall be deemed s
qualified teacher who shall h w e in'possession a Diploma from the State Normal School."]
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The following are the Programmes of Exercises of the fall
term. They remain the same for t h e spring term,
- except t h a t
the exercises commence one hour earlier :
PROGRAMME :
FOR FIRST THIRD O F THE TERM-SIX.
9 A. M. to 9.20..
Opening $xercises,
WEEKS.
.................
.. Geology.. .............. Prof. Cooleg.
.Seniors.. ..............
Sub-Seniors, Na. 1.. ... Geometry .........;.... Prof. Rimball.
Snb-Seniors, No. 2.. ....Gi-ammar ....'.......... Prof. Jewell.
9.20 to 10.05.. Juniors, No. 1.. ....... Reading ............... Miss Butler.
Juniors, No. 2 ......... Arithmetic ............. Miss Howell..
Sub-Juniors ........... History ................ Miss Ostrom.
10.05 to 10.15. ...............Rest and Change of Classes.
Seniors ............... Intellectual PhiIosophy.. PrinBipal.
Sub-Seniora, No. 1.. ... Drawing .. .......... Miss Ostrom.. :
Sub-Seniors, No. 2. .... Geometry .........-....Prof. Kimball.
10.15 t:, ll... .Juniors, No. 1.. ......, Arithmetic. .;. ... ... Miss Howell.
Juniors, No. 2. ........ Grammar .............. Prof. Jewell.
Sub-Juniors.. ......... Gran~mar.............. Miss Butler.
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11to 11.10..
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................Rest and Change of Classes.
............... Logic of Mathematics.. . Prof.
Seniors
Sub-Seniors, No. 1.
Sub-Seniors, No. 2
11.10 to 11.55.Juniors, No. 1..
Juniors, No. 2.
. Sub-Juniors.
11.55 to 12.15
Seniors
Sub-Seniors, No. 1.
Sub-Seniors, No. 2.
12.15 to 1.. Juniors, No. 1.
Ju,niors, NO.'^.
Sub-Juniors
Rimball.
.... Science of Government.. Prof. Jewell.
..... Natural Philosophy.. ... Prof. Cooley.
....... Algebra.. .......... 1,. . Mr. Mnrean.
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......... Reading. .............. Miss Butler.
.......... Geography ............. Miss Howell.
.......................Recess.
....... .'....... Theory and Practice.. .. Principal.
.... Natural Philosophy. .... Prof. Cooley.
.... Grammar........
.:...... Prof. ICimball.
...
......... Algebra
....:.......... Prof. Jewell.
....:... Algebra .......~..
:. .... Mr. Marean.
........... Composition ............ Xis$ Ostrom.
1 to 1.10
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....................Rest and Change of Classes.
.....'.........
"
~
.............
:..........
...............
Seniors,.
C$emjstry
Prof. Coolefl
Sub-Seniors, No. 1.
Arithmetic..
Prof. Kimball..
Sub-Seniors, No. 2;. ;. ~ r a v i n g
Miss Ostrom.
1.10 to 1.55.. .Juniors, No. 1.:.
Intellectual ~ ~ i t h m e t i c 'MisslButler.
.
Juniors, No. 2.
Geography.
Mr. Marean.
Sub-Juniors,
Arithmetia..
Miss Howell.
1-55 t o 2..
:
....,.Dismission.
:...
...‘...
........
..........
... ..............,.
............
...........
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PROGRANME :
SECOND THIRD OF !FHE TERN-SIX
WEEKS.
/
................'Opening Exercises.
................ Geologyand Physiology.. Prof. Cooley
..... Grammar. ........;.. .....Prof. JewelI.
..... Algebra. ................ Prof. KimbaII.
.......... Arithmetic.. ............Miss Howell.
.......... Xistory. ................ Miss Ostrom.
.......... InteIfectaal~.AriBhmetic ..Miss Butler.
10.05 to 10.15. ............ .;..Rest m&Change of 'CPss'sea.
~.
. ~.
Seniors ................ Moral Philosophy.. ..... Principal.
Sub-Seniors, No. 1. ..... Geometry'. ...............PYoF. KtmBaR.
Sub-Seniors, No. 2 ..... Nktural Philo.s,oppbS,. .... Prof, Cooley.
10.15 to 11.. ..Juniors, No. 1 .......... Bistory .................. Mi$$ Ostrom.
Juniors, No. 2 ...........Algebra ................ Nr. Rusted.
Sub-Juniors ............ Geography.. .........
, . Hi& Hbmell.
11 t? 11.10.. .................-.Rest and Change of Classes.
9 A. M. to 9.20..
Seniors
Sub-Seniors, No. 1
Sub-Seniors, No. 2
9.26 to 10.05. .Juniors, No. 1
Juniors, No. 2
Sub-Juniors..
Seniors
+
................ Higher @thematics. .... Prof. Rimball:. .
...
... { Book-keeping ........... Mr. Husted.
........ Grammar. ............... Pwf. Jewell.
........ Reading ................ Miss Butler.
............. Arithmetic ...............Miss Howell.
Sub-Seniors, No'
Sub-Seniors3 No. 2
11.10 to 11.55. Juniors, No. 1..
Juniors, No. ,2..
Sub-Juniors
....................... Recess, .
Seniors ................ Intellectual Philoso~hy.. *Principal.
Sub-Seniors, No. 1 ..... Nmtursl Philosophy ....:. Prof. Cooley.
Sub-Senior9, No. 2 ..... Geometry. :......... ..:. Prof. KimbaII.
12.15 to 1.. ...Juniors, No. 1.. ........ Reacting ................ Miss Bntler.
Juniors, Nd. 2.. .;;..... 'Grammar ..:
............... Prof. Jewell.
Sub-Juniors,. ........... ramm mar ............... &iss 0stroG.
..
11.55 to 12.15..
1 to l.,l0.
................. ..,Rest and Change of f k s e s .
.
1.10 to 1.55..
1.55 to 2.
...A. .......... ChemisBr~r............... Pxof, Gooley. .
..... Algebra.. ...............
. .Prof. Kimball.
..... Rhetoric.. :.............
Prof. Jewell.
.....:.. Blgebra.. ................ Mr. Rusted.
...;:.. Arithmetiq.. ....;....... Miss Howell.
..........
History.. 2 ...
. ;.....::. . Miss OshYoin.
.........
Seniors
Sub-Seniors, No. 1
Sub-Seniori,.No. 2
Junioa, No: 'I..
Junio~s,No. 2;:.
sub-hnior~..
.
...................... ,..,,..,Dismissiod,
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PROGRAMME:
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FOR THE LAST TRIRD O F TRE-TEBJI--SIX
II
WEEKS,
................. Opening Exerctes.
................ Physiology .............. Erof. Coolcy. .
..... G.eometry ............... Prof. Ki&&
..... Science of Government.. . Miss Howekl. .
....."...Grammar ...-.......-..., Pro-f. J e m l l .
,. .... Histpry.. ,..............
..
Miss Ostrom.
..........- - Intellectual Arithmetic .. Niss Butler.
10.05 to lo&. ......,...................
- - Rest.
Seniors ................ Mar$ Philosophy ........ Principal.
Sub-Seniors,No. 1...... Natural ~ h i l o s o ~ h.....
~ . - Prof. Cooley.
sub-Seniors, No. 2.. .... &?ometry. .......;...... Prof. Kitu4.mIL
10.15 t o 2 1 ....Juniors, No. 1.. ...,.... Histpry-. ,.............., Miss Ostrom.
Juniors,, No. 2 . . ....,... Algebra. ................Mr. Husted,
Sub-Juniors ........... Arithmetic.. ............ Miss Howell.
11to 1I.la.. ..........................Rest.
Seniors ................ Grammatical Analysis.. .. Prof. Jewell.
Mr. Rusted.
Sub-Seniors, No. I.. .... Algebra.
Sub-Skiors, No. 2:. .... Drswing ...........
Mi?s Ostrom.
&LO to 11.55.Jmiors, No, 1.. .......
.,. .. [ writing. ................
Juniors, lo.
Sub-Xuniors.. .......... Arithmetic ...........,.. ~ f i s s * B m e ~ ~ .
11.55 to 12.15.. .................: ......Rest.
.
Senior Gentremen. ......'Hfgher Mathematied. .! ... Prof. KimbalI.
Senior Ladies .......... Primary Teaching ....... Miss Fqnnelle.
Sub-Seniors, No. 1 ..... Rhetoric .....-.......... Prof. Jewell.
Sub-Seniors, No. 2 ..... Natural Philosophy. .... Prof. Cooley. .
32.15 bo 1.. ..*Juniors, No. 1....,. r., . Geography .............. Miss Osbrom.
Juniors, No. 2 . . ........ Intellectual Azithmetic.. . Miss Butler.
Sub-Juniors ............. Algebra ................Miss Howell.
1 tol.10 ..............................Rest.
Seniors ................ Agricultural Chemistry .. Prof. C,ooley.
'E: Sub-Seniors; No. I.. .... Drawing ................ Miss Ostrom.
Sub-Seniors, No. 2 ...... Higer Arithmetic.., .... Pmf. KimbaB.
1.10 to 1.55 ...Juniors, No. 1.......... Algebra.. ............... Mr. Husted.
Junicrs, No. 2 , . ........ Grammar ............... Prof. Jewell. .
Sub-Juniors.. .......... Grammar ............... Miss Butler.
9 A- l\e. ta 9.20.
Seniors
Sub-Seniors, No. 1
Sub-Seniors, No. 2
9.20 to‘10.05.. Juniors, No. I..
Juniors, No. 2 . .
Sub-Juniors..
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1.55 to 2,.
............................Dismission.
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AFTERNOON EXERCISES.
A11 the afternoon exercises of the Fall Termcommence a t 34
and closa a t 44. I n the Spring Term they take place one hour
later.
Instrnction i n vocal music :
Senior and Sub-Seniors on ~ o n d a and
p F r i d a p , MI-. ~ ~ o y -d .
Juniors and Sub-juniors on Tuesdays and Fridays,
Compositions are required from each pupil once in three weeks,
commencing with the third week, and ending with the eighteenth
week, thus making six compositions during the term.
The compositions are corrected as,follows :
The Seniors7-- , -,-,
-,
,- ,,L,,.
,,
,- -,
, By Prof. Jewell. .
Sub-Seniors' No. 1- .,-,-,,.,,,,,-.,., Prof. Cooley.
Prof. Kimball.
-- ,,-,
, -'-,,
SubSeniors' No. 2 - -,,Juuiors: No. I ., ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, - Mr. Hnsted.
. ' ,,
Miss Ostronl.
Juuiom' No. 2
,
,,-,
,
,,,*
Juniors' No. 5 ,,,,
,
,
,
,-,
- - -,,,,, Miss Howell.
I - J u n i o r s ' ,-- ,- , . ,
Miss Butlei
Selected compositioiis aye read publicly overy third
day, commencing the fifih meek. and e;lhing with the twentieth,
thus making six times. A t tliis exel-cise, 'all the teachers, a s ,
well aspupilc, are required to be present.
Field. exercises, with surveying and engineering instruments,
are given t o the gentlemen of the Senior class, by the Professor
of Mathematics. These exercises consist of land surveying, with
trigonometrical and other methods. of .areas, and heights and
distances-taking levels for railroads and canals, calcnlatious for
excavations and embankments, and locating and describing
curves. ' The object of these exercises is to make the pupils familiar with the use of instruments, and their application t o thoGurposes for which they .>re designed. '
I n the afternoon of those ~ e d n e s d a which
~s
are not otherwise
occupied, lectures are giv.en by the several teachers; t o the classes;
on such subjects as are peculiarly appr'opfiate tb their duties in
the school, and those of the piofession forewhich they are pre..
paring.
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The Chickering Piano used on this occasion is furuished by the politeness
of Mr. J. H. HIDLEY.
1. ABTHEEi-'The
2.
Earth is the Lords."
-
PRAYER.
3. IUBIC-"Boices
fro= the Ocean."
4. E58AK-"Edacation
and Politics."
E. A m s s o D a r ~ s Pcrry,
,
Wyoming Co.
5. EBBBY-"'Crtaintg
of Consequences."
ANXIF.11, L ~ E S . \ S D E R , Albany, Albnn?; Co.
6 EBB BY-"
Becsssities of Eind."
Lrcr- J. M A L . ~ Y
Rome,
,
Oneida Co
7. E8BAY-" Aspiration sfter Excellence."
MARY E. Prss, Hamilton, llfadisori Co.
9. $$SAY-"
Reala and Ideals."
Ihrzans~13SYTTH,
A 1 bany, Albany (1:o
10. E88AY-"
Bational Experience."
H A R R I ES.
~ TYLER,Troy, l k l i s s e l a ~ rC l ) .
Jdason.
ORDER
OF
3
EXERCISES.
11. POEH-" Mow and Then."
MARYNCSEIL,Farnm, Seneca Co.
12. ESSAY--"The Eloquence of Becay."
BESJAYIX
E. T T T ~ ~ ~ Glen's
,s,
Falls, Warren Go.
13. MUSIC --Natioaal Song,
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T S. Lloyd.
Words hg Prof. I?. S.JEWELL.
Like the yea1 of mighty thunders,
Con:er the call of Liberty ;
Ilonre ye, from your peaceful slumbe~s,
Rouse ye millions of thefiee!
Sleep no longcr. illy dr>aming,
That your patriot work is done.
'1% the d a v n of bat t!e beaning,
And the strifeie but begun.
CllORlJ3.
Like the peal of mighty t h u u d c ~ ~ .
Comes the call of Lbei ty ;
Rouse 1 e, from Tour peaceful slumtci-,
Eouse 1 J e millions of the free 1
I:ouse I to dceds of desthles< glorj ;
\Tin thc patriot-hero's crown,
And Four fame in song and story,
Shall, to c ~ d l e - sprays, go down
Gather from the inountdin val!es,
From the sweeping prairie's breast:
From tho sca girt ialands lalls,
From the rivers of the West ;
Stripling 3 oung, and grands;re hoary,
I n one high heroic tidc,
Round the old flag's starrj- ~ l o l . r ,
Sneep in patiiot pomp and pride.
Lllie a rousei nud angry ocean,
Seating on thc wasted shore,
V i t h a tireless mi& and motion,
On t h e recreant legions pour;
'Jlidst the conflict's roar and rattle,
Place in God, your hope and trust,
And with sturdy blows of battle,
neat dovu treason to thedust.
On till every arm is broken,
Llfted'gaiust our nation's pride,
On till yonder ladiaut token,
Ploats triumphant, far and widc;
IIeaveu will crown your high eudea~or,
To restore 1our countrp's fame;
One again, her stars fore7 cr,
Shall with cloudless s p l e ~ ~ d flame!
or
For our cauw shall he vietorions-;
7Ye can see the rosy light,
Of the d a r ~ nof triumph glorious,
Beaming o'er t h r rlouds of night;
And anidst the blendinas tender,
Of the purple and the gold,
Wc can catch the noontide splendor,
O'cr our laud. in glory rolled.
14. DIPLOKAS CONFERRED.
15. BIUSIC-" Soldiers' Chorus," from 'Taust."
-
Go?tnod.
POSTOFF~CEADDRESS.
NAXE.
ANNIEM. ALEXASDER,.
..................
MARGARET
L. BARDTELL,...............
EXMAR. BUDD
,..........................
ELLENBYRNELL,.
.......................
CLARAL. COCHRAS,.
....................
MARYJ. Dox,..... ......................
LYDIAJ. GLADDISG,.
....................
JGLIAE. EUGHES,..
.....................
HELENE. HUTTON,.
....................
SUSANH. Jacsso~r,.....................
MAEYC. LAWYER,.
.....................
LUCYJ. MALTBY,.
.......................
MARYA. RICCLURE,.
....................
MARYB~cXEL,.
.................. ....
MARYWOURSE, .........................
MARY E. PARKER
,... ....................
MAXTHAW. PIPFCKNEY,
.................
HARRIETA. POTTER,...,................
.MARYE. PYXE,.........................
ADELAIDE
SEEAK,.......................
ELIZABETH
SPITH,........................
NARYE. S ~ T H ......................
,.
HENRIETTA
B. TBEXBLEY,:. ............
EARRIETS. TYLER,.....................
MARYD. TYRRELL
,......................
YARGARET
A. VAN VRAXEEX,..........
I.'. CORA'NATSOX,.
......................
....................
JULIAE. 'GVEXPLE,.
..
Aibany, Albany Co,
Albany, Albany Co.
Coustableville, Lewis Co.
Cooperstown, Otsego Co.
Spring~ille,Erie Co.
Albany, Albany Co.
Waterville, Oneida Co.
Cary, Geuesee Co.
Maloile, Franklin Co.
Brooklyn, Kings Co.
Fultonham, Sc1;oharie Co.
Rome, Oneida Co.
Dobb's Ferry, Westchester Co.
Farmer, Seneca Co.
Hinsdale, Cattsraugus Co.
Fayetteville, Onondasa Go.
Albany, Albany Co,
Cooperstown, Otsego Co.
Hamilton, hfadison Go,
New Pork, New York Co,
Albany, Albany Go.
Albany, Albany Co.
Naples, Ontario Co.
Troy, Rensselaer Co.
Baiavia, Geuesee Co.
Scheuectady, Schenectady Co.
hiidtileburgh, Schoharie Co.
Albany, Albany Co.
28
Eibs, Genesee Co.
Perry, Vyoruing Co.
Ballston Spa, Saratoga Co.
Amber, Onondaga Co.
Griffin's Corners, Delaware Co.
Wadham's Mills, Essex Co.
East Varick, Seneca Co.
Omasco, Cayuga Co.
Ellery Ceuter, Chautauqua Co.
Glenn's Falls, Warren Co.
10
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