the State Nor anittee of 2%

advertisement
anittee of the State Nor
2% the Legislature:
~ u r s u a n'to
t the act, chap. 311, of the ~ a a of
s 1846, the undersigned have the honor to state that Samuel B. Woolworth
has been appointed one of the executive committee for the care,
management, and government of the State Normal School, in
the place of Dr. T. Romeyn Beck, deceased. We herewith
transmit the annual report of'the committee of the school, which
has been received and approved; which report also contains a
, full statement of the receipts and expenditures of money under
the same act.
V. M. RICE,
Superintendent of Public Instruction.
G. Y. LANSING,
Chancellor of the University.
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ISenate, No. 40.1
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To the State Superintendent of Common Schools,
and the Begents
of the University:
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The Executive Coinrnittee of the State Wormal School
RESPECTFULLY
REPORT:
That the present condition of the institution, compared with
previous periods, will be best understo~dby noticing under distinct heads, such matters as may seem most worthy of particular
notice. They are accordingly so presented.'
Num6er of pupils and graduates i.n formw years.
-GRADUATES-
First year
. )
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.
Second year..
Third year..
Fiflh year.
.. 1
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Sixth year.
.{
Seventh year
1st term,
2d
LL
....
Females.
TOM.
Pupils.
Males.
98
185
0
29
0
5
34
223
219
232
236
12
21
12
11
20
13
P4
17
32
0
4th
3d
5th
6th
9th
Oth
11th
12th
13th
14th
" ...
...
CL
L6
...
...
34
26
28
The whole number of pupils who have enjoyed the advantages
of the school, for a shorter or longer period, up to September,
1855, is 2,455.
Present Xumber of Pupils.
The 23d term (or the 1st of the 12th year of the State Normal
School) commenced on the third Monday of September last, and
the number of pupils in attendance is 240. They are divided
into four classes : Sub-juniors, Juniors, Sub-seniors and Seniors;
thus making a course of study pursued during two years. These
classes are again arranged in divisions, to suit the convenience
of recitations. The relative standing a n d advancement of the
pupils will b e seen from the following table :
Males.
Females.
......................... 14
...................... 16
........................ 26
Seniors,
Sub-seniors,
Juniors,
58
~ G % T Sof~
36
34
71
.
182
-
Total.
50
50
97
240
-
#hdy.
This remains essentially the same as at the date of,the last
report. As then proposed, an effort has been made to elevate
the standard of studies required for admission, and thns prepare
the graduates for the higher demands which the advancing progress of education is constantly ;aking upon them. This effort
has been so far successful that the committee are quite confident
of the increased qualifications for the high duties of the teacher's
profession of those who will hereafter be sent forth into the
wide field oi educational labor.
.
Sex and .Mode of Selection of Pupils.
The proportionate number of young men in the school has
continued to diminish since the last report. The causes oithis,
which were then allnded to, still operate, and we cannot hope
that they will be f ~ ~ l counteracted
ly
until a inore intimate connection between this school and other parts of the educational
system of the State shall be established. The mode of appoint-
Ro. 40.1
5
ing pupils, the oply one perhaps which can under the exisfing
system of local superintendence be adopted, is not calculated to
awaken the deepest interest in education, or to call to the ranks
of the teacher the highest order of talent. Should the Legislature adopt the recommendations of the Superintendent of Public
Instruction, and provide for the appointment of county or assemby district superintendents, it is confidently expectkd that a
body of men of enlarged views and a just appreciation of the
ends and means of education will be brought into active service,
They will see the limited attainments and the low qualifications
of a large number of teachers, and in their visitations of the
schools will dizect those who exhibit talents and aptness for
the profession to the means which the State has provided with
a liberal m~~nificence
for their education. The plan of visitation
of the higher institutions, which i t is understood your body
propose among other important results, we regard as well calculated to promote harmony between those institutions and this
school; to improve the teachers' departments which now exist
in many of' them, and to make these departments valuable
nurseries to the Normal $chool. While their influence on the
schools about them is conceded, it must be claimed of the Norma1 $chool, that i<s 'course of professional training shall be
more thorough and extended, as its object is more specific and
its means more ample. The visitors of the academies will be
brought into direct intercourse with the pupils who are preparing to become teachers, and being intimately acquainted with
the means of instruction which this school furnishes, will direet
to its halls those' who will give honor to its character and extended usefulness to its instructions.
'
.
Several changes have occurred in the faculty since the last
report. At the close of the year ending July llth, Miss Elizabeth-BI. Hance, who had been connected with the school *since
its first organization, presented her resignation. Miss Hance9s
health had been such during the year, that her duties had been
much interrupted; but the committee regarded her connection
with the school so important, that they did not hesitate to perI
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mit her labors to be-occasionally relieved by other members of
the faculty, who very cheerfdly undertook to perform some of
her duties, and they only accepted her resignation an the condition that she should resume them after a year7&absence, provided her health should be so far restored as to render it proper
for her to do so. Mr. Devolson Woad, at the same time,
resigned his position as teacher of Arithmetic and Algebra. A
short time before the opening of the present term, Mr. Sumner
C. Webb, who entered the school and was appointed teacher at
the same time with Miss Mance, was invited to a prominent
'situation in the Normal School of New-Jersey. While the cornmittee regretted to lose the valuable services of Mr. Webb, they
could not refuse the call of a sister State for aid In the organization of an institution essential to the suecess of a recently
established system of public education, and especially after he
had so long and faithfully served his natiye State.
In supplying all these vacancies, the committee felt themselves placed under much embarrassment, They are, however,
happy to be able Po say, that the interests of the school have not
suffered under the instruction of those who have been appointed
to supply them. The teachers who have thus been introduced
into the school are Mrs. Henrietta B. Hewes, a graduate of the
fifth term, and who had been uninterruptedly engaged in teaching wit11 great success almost from the day of her graduation;
U r . Albert N. Rusted, a graduate of the twenty-first term, and
Miss Emily E. Rice, a graduate of the twenty-second term.
On the 28th of November last, the Professorship of Mathematics became yacant by the resignation of Professor George Wq
Plympton. The classes were in the middle of the term, and
provision was to be made to continue the bourse of instruction
then in progress.
The commi'ctee were 'thus brought to consider, whether soma
new arrangements could not be made, that would give to the
department greater perrnankncy, ensure to it a system of instrnction not depending ou a single individual, and be bepond
the routine of ordinary recitations.
.
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No. 40.1
7
The committee haye long felt that the highest grade of talent
and skill which they could command should be brought into
the faculty of the school, and they have somewhat modified the
organization of the mathematical department to effect that
object. The Professor of Xathematics has heretofore been so
much occupied in his own class-room, that he has not been able
to extend his supervision to the lower classes of the school.
The modes of instrnctio~have consequently been various, and
the system has been deiicielzt; in the unity which one controlling
mind would be able to give to it. In the expectation of accomplishing a result whi& the cclmmittee deem most desirable,
they have appointed to this professorship Charles Davies, LL.D.,
long known as a distinguished professor in the Military Academy
a t West Point, who, subordinate to the Principal, will take the
entire charge of the department, mark out the system and prescribe the methods of instruction, give at least eighty lectures
in each term on thLprinciples and applications of mathematical
science, attend all the examinations, be present in the school at
least two naorrt'hs in each term, and receive a compensation for
the time actually emploj-ed, at the same rate as is paid to tho
other professors. The committee are happy to say that Prof.
Davies is nopi regarded as a permanent oEcer of the school;
and, as such, is discharging his duties with great acceptance and
-profit to the pupils.
The committee have also appointed, as Assistant Professor of
Mathematics, Mr. Rodney Q. Kimball, ml~oseduties will be to
carry out in detail the prescribed system of mathematical instruction; the Profe6sor being responsible, under the Principal,
for all that appertains to the management of the department.
They desire, in reference to this arrangement, oldy to add, that
it involves no incriased expense over that of a single professor.
The following is a full list of the present officers of the school :
Samuel B. Woolworth, LL.D.,
Pincipd and Professor of Intellectual and X o ~ a lScience.
Gharlds Davies, EL.D.,
Professor of Nathematics.
\
David H. Cochran, A.M.,
Professor of XaturaZ Sciences.
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Frederick S . Jewell, A. M.,
Professor of the English Language and Literature.
l&os M. Kellogg,
fupe~intendent of the Experimental Schoot.
Rodney G . ,Kimball,
Assistant Professor of Matkematics.
Tully C. Estee,
Teacher of Vocal MusiC'and Penmanship.
Albert M. Husted,
Teacher o f Arithemetic and Algebra.
Louisa Ostrom,
Teacher of History and Drawing.
Henrietta B. Hewes,
Teacher of Arithmetic and 'Geography.
Emily E. Rice,
Teacher of drithmetic.
'
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Library and Apparatus.
Of the text book library it is scarcely necessary to spba%,
farther than to say, that it embraces a full snpply of the class
books used in the school, and that as these become too much
worn to 5e proper for use, or superceded by improved editions,
they are laid aside, and the library from time to time replenished as the necessities of the school require, The supply of so
large a number of pupils as are constantly in this sohool, with
text books, necessarily involves a very considerable expenditure.
While the committee would not, by a parsimonious fr~xgality,
refuse to supply whatever is necessary in this department, .they
are careful not to permit a lavish expenditnre.
The miscellaneous library has been increased by a few volumes, for reference on the subjects taught in the school, or on
the general subject qf education, and by a second donation of
23 volumes by Mr. William F. Philps. This library has been
carefully oo&pred with the catalogue, and with the exception
of a few volumes is found in good condition.
No. 40.1
9
The chemical, philosophical and acatomical apparatus, is in
good condition, and has been in all respects carefully cared for,
by the professor to whose charge i t is c6mmitted.
Experimental 8chooi.
This scI10o1 continues to accomplish its purpose and to maintain
its high character. Urgent applications for the admission of
pupils are constantly made, and if our rooms were suBciently
ample, its n~xmberscould be more than doubled. Under the
system of gradually^ reducingTt>e free seats, two years since
adopted by the committee, its one hundred pupils within a year
from this date, mill annually bring into the treasury of the
school, two thousand dollars, thus creating a reven& which
will exceed its expenditure by some six hundred dollars.
The pupils in the school at this time are,
............................
.............................
Pay pupils..
Free pupils
87
18
.
T%eBuilding.
No changes beyond ordinary repairs, have been made in
the building, except the uniting of two sma,lI rooms into one,
the better to acconirnodate the classes of the experimental
school. Serious inconrience is experienced in the want of
a more perfect ventilation; but the coinwittee have not been able
wiih the means at their command, to make s u c l ~provision in
this respect, as would perfectly secure the object or be satisfactory to them. They hope at no remote day to be prepared to
submit a plan which will fully and satisfactorily accomplish the
important object.
A statement of the receipts and expenditures froin Sept. 1854,
to Sept. 1855, is appended to this report, and the vouchers for
every payment are in the hands of the committee.
It will be seen that the expenditures have exceeded the
receipts by the sum of one hundred and seventy-eight dollars
10
[SENATE
and thirty-eight cents. This has arisen from the increased expense of every.thing pertaining to the school. The balahce has
s
been carried forward to the expenses of the current year, and it
is confidently expected that the increased appropriation made
by the last Legislature will enable the committee to meet all the
necessary expenses of the year.
The committee cannot close this report, without expressing
their deep sense of the loss which education and science have
sustained in the death of their late ass&iate, Dr. T. Bomeyn
Beck. In all their associations with him; they have admired
the enlarged liberality of his 1-iems, the wisdom of his counsels,
the beautiful simplicity of his character and the kindness of his
heart. In common with all who knew him, they will. ever,
sacred17 cherish his memory.
CHAS. L. AUBTIN,
FRANKLIN TOWNSEND,
S. H. HAMMOND,
5. B. WOOLWORTH.
B approve of the above report.
V. M. RICE,
Supt. of Public G~stmction.
Albany, Jan. 9,1856.
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FINANCIAL REPORT, 1855.
[email protected] State JVormal School in acccunt with the Executive
Committee.
a
DR.
1851.
Oct. 1. To balance in hands of treasurer, as per
last annual yeport,.
1855.
To cash from Comptroller on 24th Oct,
OG~.
24, Nov. 15, and Deo. 11,,1854, being
annual appropriation,
To cash received for tuition in experimental school,.
To interest on deposits,
Advanced -by Treasurer,.
...............
$470 11
.............
10,000 00
...................
.............
............
Cn,
1855.
\
Oct. 1. By cash paid salaries of principal a d
teachers,.
By support of experimental school, including teacher's salary,.
By cash paid students for mileage,.
By stationery, text books and chemicals,
By repairs to building,
By cash paid for fuel,.
By insurance on building,.
By contingents, inchding treasurer's &
janitor's salaries, cleaning, postage,
and other incidental expenses,.
.........................
..........
...
..............
...............
...........
.....
I
A, Annual Register and Circolar of the State Normal School for
the year ending July 11, 1855, with the names of the Executive Gommittee, faculty and pupils, and a list of the graduates
for the same period; also an account of the qualifications for
admission, the sums allowed for travelling expenses, and other
matters important to be understood by the pupil and others,
*
with the form of the diploma granted to graduates.
'
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B, Full programme of the class exercises, as adopted at the beginning of the year.
C, Lithographic engravings of the building, and arrangement of
the rooms in each storp of the same.
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( A. )
ANNUAL
REGISTER AND CIRCULAR
QB THE
I
dLBANY, N. Y.,
'
FOR THE YEAR ENDING JULY 11, 1855.
=ON.
VICTOR M. RICE,
Superintendent of Public Iizstruction,
CHAIRMAN.
CHARLES L. AUSTIN, Esq.,
T. ROMEPN BECK, M.D., LL.D.,
SECRETARY AND TREASURER.
HON.FRANKLIN TOWNSEND.
SAMUEL H. HAMMOND, Esq.
SAMUEL B. WOOLWORTH, LL.D.,
Principal, and Professor of Intellectual and MoraJ fkience.
GEORGE W . PLHMPTON, A.M.,
Professor of Mathematics.
DAVID N. CQCHRAN, A.M.,
Professor of the Natural Sciences.
REV. FREDERIGK 8. JEWELL, A.M.,
Professor of the English Language and Literature.
SUMNEiR C. W E B B , M.D.,
Teacher of Arithmetic and Book-keeping .
AMOS' M. MELLOBG,
-
Superintendent of the Experimental School.
DEVOLSON WOOD,
Teacher of Arithmetic and Algebra.
TULLH @.ESTEE,
- Teacher of Vocal Nusic and Penmanship.
ELIZABETH C. HANCE,
~ea'cherof Reading and Hz"story.
LOUISA OSTROM,
Teacher of Geography and Drawing.
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STUDENTS
FEMALES.
.
Names,
Deborall L. Adams,
Sophronia E. Allis,
Kate M. Allen,
@.Sane Ackerman,
Margaret J. Brown,
Sarah A, Burbidge,
Frances E- Benton,
Amanda P. Baldwin,
Esther Bennet,
Celestine Burtis,
Sarah B. Bedell,
Mary L. Bodwell,
Sarah 3. Brownell,
Belen M. Bacon,
Frances A. Bacon,
Mary E. Bennett,
CaMine A Brace,
Emma M. Brace,
Delia A. Bristol,
Sarah Mi Brooks,
Fanny Baxter,
Matilda A. Brown,
Kate L. Bovee,
Harriet L. Baker,
Polly M. Benedict,
Laura E. Bunker,
[Senate, No. 40.1
T&S,
Cou?2tGs.
Albany,
Albany.
Syracuse,
OnondagaStuyvesant Falls, Columbia.
Brownsville,
Jefferson.
Albany,
Albany.
Utica,
Oneida.
Ballston,
Sai-atoga.
New-Pork,
Me=-Pork,
Danby,
Ton~pkins.
Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer.
Grand Island,
Erie.
Pork,
Livingston,
Pittstown,
Rensselaer.
Albany,
Albany.
Albany,
&baay.
Veteran,
Chemung.
Salina,
Onondaga,
$alina,
Onondags.
Macedon,
Wayne.
Morris,
Qtsego.
Buffalo,
Erie.
Conquest,
Cayuga.
Tioga,
Tioga.
'
Coxsackie,
Breene,
Victory,
Cayuga.
Ghent,
Colun~bia.
2
,
Jlrame9.
h t h A. Birch,
Hmnah J. Xessing,
Eliza Baber,
Sara5 Barker,
Tarah 3. Banker,
Ellen 3. Blau~elt,
Anna H. &own,
Nary 3. Boss,
Mary Buckelew,
Margaret Birch,
Elizabeth M. Brown,
Laura F. Beecher?
Charity Barnett,
SEnldah M. Card,
Mary IZ. Colburn,
Louisa Campbell,
Julia E, Carpenter,
Emily L. Carpenter, .
Amelia A. Christie,
Carrie A. Crosby,
Sarah A, Cook,
Caroline A. Cbrclr,
Margalia Case,
Frances M. CI~eney,
Evelyn Gary,
Ra,&el A. GaIverlp,
E d e n M. Cadwell,
Catharine Conde,
Rosamond J. Chesebro,
Hnghina Cameron,
Angelina A. Conkex,
Ellen M. Chesebro,
Louisa Crapo,
Lucy 6'. Case,
Mary I;. Gondon,
Eleanor F. Ibickson,
Frances A. Dake,
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Towns.
Coun&es.
Clifton Park,
Saratoga.
Albany,
Albany.
Skaneateles,
Onondaga.
North Elector, Tompkins.
Rochester,
Monroe.
Orangetown,
Bockland.
Milford,
Otsego.
Milton,
Saratoga.
BrookI-p, '
Kings.
Arnsterd:m,
Montgomery,
Brookhaven,
Suffolk.
N'th ~roadalbik,Fulton.
Stamford,
Delaware.
Dryden,
Tompkins..
Albany,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany.
Rochester,
Monroe.
Rochester,
Monroe,
Middlesex,
Pates.
Spencerport,
Momoe.
Albany,
Albany.
Fort Ann,
Washington.
Albany,
Albany.
Syracuse,
Onondaga.
Knox,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany.
Mounthope,
Orange.
Glenville,
Schenektady.
Whitesboro',
Oneida.
New-Pork,
New York.
Rome,
Oneida.
f$dderland,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany.
Milddlesex,
Yates.
Albany,
Albany.
Albany,
&bany.
Stockholn~:
Saratoga.
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Names.
Martha A. Davidson,
Candace A. Denison,
43. Joanna Dickson,
Olive Draper,
Mary E. Dill,
Ellen Dunbar,
Amelia A. Dyer,
Clara E. Davis,
Mary E. Duesler,
Susan 6. Doty,
Sarah E. Darling,
Lucy H. Establrook,
, Emma Edsall,
Marguirite Exili,
Elizabeth B. Ensign,
Laura A. Fuller,
Henrietta L. Forman,
Josephine Fett,
Dortha French,
Jnlia A. Fravor,
Anna M. Fowler,
Lotrisa M. Groom,
,BnnaE. Gilbert,
Adelaid E. Gregory,
Ursula Chiswold,
Emeline 6. Gladding,
Lydia H. Gale,
Brenda O. P4ml1,
Proselle ISilton,
Emeline 6. Halloek;
Alice J. Hepinstall,
Mary F. Hallenbeck,
Charlotte A. Maight,
Eliza M. Hatch,
Frances L. Harrington,
Mary J. Hatfield,
Elizabeth E. Hunt,
Totp.
Counties.
Albak,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany.
Westford,
Otsego.
Walkill,
Orange.
Albany,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany.
New-Yo~k,
New-Pork.
Albany,
Albany.
Schoharie,
Schoharie.
Brookhaven,
SufTolk.
Ballston Spa,
Saratoga.
Madrid,
St. Lawrence.
Hew-Pork,
New-Hork.
kidgeway,
Orleans.
Williamsburgh, Kings.
New-Pork,
New-Pork,
Ulster,
Sangerties,
Wright,
Schoharie.
Albany,
Albany.
Skaneateles,
Onondaga.
Clifton Park,
Saratoga.
New-Lebanon, Qolumbia.
Albany,
Albany.
Spencertown,
Columbia.
Tyrone,
Steube~.
Watervliet,
Albany.
Black Rock,
Erie.
Knox,
AISany
Soutlmld,
Suffolk.
Albany,
'.
Albany.
Hudson,
Columbia.
Croton Point,
Westchester .
Oswego,
Oswego.
Middlesex,
Pates..
Mount Pleasant, Westchesfer.
Sehaghtieoke,
Rensselaer.
.
20
flames.
Uarriet J. lXeustis,
Sarah A. Heustis,
Mary L. Holdridge,
Elizabeth Hopperton,
Rachel A. Bait,
Jane A. Hillman,
Mary E. Howard,
Elizabeth Hasbrouck,
Elizabeth B. Haswell,
Anna RI. Hamilton,
Mary A. Mubbell,
Sarah A. Houghtaling,
Hannah M. Worton,
Laura Sarris,
Rebecca J. Hindman,
Mary F, Hurdis,
Jane E, Judson,
Mary R, Jones,
Mary Jack,
Caroline Jones,
Marriet Jones,
Mary A. King,
Mary F. Kirby,
Ann M. Mildccy,
Louisa J. Knapp,
Barbara A. Liddle,
Sarah W. Long'worth,
Arietta A. Lansing,
Amelia J. Eyddon,
Mary J. Latham,
Elizabeth Loucks,
Harriet 0. LamouG,
Charity Mattice,
Ruth A. Moore,
Sarah A. Morehead,
Cornelia A. Mead,
Anna J. Mathies,
T m s.
.White
Plains,
SEXA ATE
CountGes.
Westchester.
White Plains,
Westchester.
Albany,
Albany.
~yraiuse,
Onondaga.
Virgil,
Cortland.
Albany,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany.
Tuthill Town, Ulster.
' Albany.
Albany,
Albany,
Albany.
Bedford,
Westchester,
Bethlehem,
Albany.
Bethel,
Sullivan.
Albany,
'
-4lbany.
Albany,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany .
Conquest,
Cayuga.
Westfield,
Richmond.
Xilton,
Saratoga. '
Mohawk,
Moatgormery,
Mohawk,
Montgomery.
Albany,
Albany.
Troy,
Idensselaer. Sparta,
Livingston.
Kent,
Putnam.
Duanesburgh, Schenectady.
Williarnsburgh, Kings.
Albany,
Albany.
Brooklyn,
Kings.
New-York,
New-York.
New-Scotland, Albany.
Wome~ter,
Otsego.
Middleburgh,
Sohoharie.
Rochester,
Monroe.
Albany,
Albany.
Smyrna,
Chenango.
Rochester,
Monroe.
21
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JVitmes.
Ximena A. Nickel,
Irene T. Metcalf,
Mary E. Metcalf,
Elizabeth McCue,
Anna Mearns,
Leah A. Marsh,
Emma S. Montgomery,
Laura Morris,
Martha E. McNutt,
Frances A. McNutt,
Clara McDougall,
Helen J. Monk,
Sarah A. Murphy,
Mary Orr,
Susan C. 09Neill,
Martha E. Qstra-nder,
Ann E. Purdy,
Elizabeth Powell,
Mary H. Phelps,
Sarah A. Plumb,
Margaret Pringle,
Louisa A. Purmort,
Sarah W. Purmort,
Lydia E. Powell,
W. Maria Pearse,
Lydia Patterson,
Sarah R. Patten,
Marianna Provoust,
Jemima Pieme,
Hannah D. Purcel.
Mary E. &&by,
Susan Quinby,
Eliza I. Rose,
,
Julia A. Root,
Maria E. Ransom,
Emily A. Biee,
Almira E. Rke,
,
Towns.
New-Lisbon,
Gorham,
Gorham,
Albany,
Westpoint,
Whitesboro',
Albany,
Syracuse,
Warrensburgh,
~1ban-y~
Lee,
Albany,
Greenbush,
Xew-York,
China,
Guilderland,
Livonia,
West Milton,
Schroon,
Scriba,
.
New-Hartford,
Jay,
Jay,
Richford,
Watervliet,
Clarendon, '
Saratoga,
Portchester,
Durham,
New-Baltimore,
Mew-York,
Ballston,
Southampton,
Syracuse, '
Buffalo,
Buffalo,
Macedon,
'
Counties.
Otsego.
Ontario.
Ontario.
Albany.
Orange.
Oneida.
Albany.
Onondaga.
Warren.
Albany.
Oneida.
Albany.
Rensselaer.
New-York.
Wyoming.
Albany.
Livingston.
Saratoga.
Essex.
Oswego.
Oneida.
Essex.
Essex.
Tioga.
Albany.
Orleans.
Saratoga.
Westchester.
Greene.
Greene.
New-York.
' Saratoga.
Suffolk.
e
Onondaga.
Erie.
Erie.
Wayne.
6
22
[SENATE
d
-
Names.
Permelia R. Rood,
Abby L. Russell,
Arenath Rollin,
Jernima B. Randall,
fsabella 6. Rawson,
Luvan Rawson.
Mary _Russell,
Catharine M. Shants,
Harriet A. Sleight,
Elizabeth S. Smith,
Emma L. Salisbury,
Anna M. Sweet,
Julia A. Strickland,
Magdalene Slingerland,
Abbie Sexton,
Mary H. Sickler,
Eliza E. Sickler,
Jane E. Short,
Sarah E. Scherinerborn,
Jemima Stoller,
Louisa P. Teall,
Emma V. Taylor,
Fanny M. Taggart,
Caroline J. Tyler,
Augusta A. Tayntor,
Frances A. Tuthill,
Frances K. Tra'sk,
Martha Turner,
Mary C. Ten Eyck,
Lydia A. Thomas,
Lavina Taylor,
Frances A. Van Buren,
Julia Van Emberg,
Sarah A. Visschh,
Sarah E. Verrinder,
Sarah A. Vandenburg,
Margaret A. Vandenberg,
Towns.
Harford,
Albany,
Hanover,
Middle Island,
Albany,
Albany,
Canton,
Sand Lake,
Galen,
Catharine,
Albany,
Sandy Hill,
Ogden,
Bethlehem,
Hanover,
Albany,
Geneva,
Madrid,
Schodack,
Amsterdam,
Albany,
New-York,
Lawrenceville,
Butler,
Eaton,
Auburn,
Albany,
Brownville,
Albany,
Albany,
Schoharie,
Saratoga,
Norwich,
Albany,
New-Y ork,
Albany,
Watervleit,
Counties.
Cortlandt.
Albany.
Chautauque.
Suffolk.
4lbany.
Albany.
St. Lawrenee.
Rensselaer.
Wayne.
Chemung.
Albany.
Washington,
Monroe.
Albany.
Chautauque.
Albany.
Ontario.
St. Lawrence.
Rensselaer.
Montgomery.
Albany.
New-Pork.
St. Lawrence,
Wayne.
Madison.
Cayuga.
Albany.
Jefferson.
Albany.
Albany.
Schoha~ie.
Saratoga.
Chenango.
Albany.
New-Bork.
Albany. [email protected]
Albany.
.
f,
.Names.
Mahalia Weathemax,
Julia A, BCTalwork,
Eorinda J. Whipple,
Susan B, Wetherell,
Mary E. Wilson,
Elizabeth waggoner,
\
Harrfet E. Wilcox,
Susan B. Worcester,
Maria 1,. Woodru3,
Eliza A. Wdsh,
Julia Warriner,
Shehe E. Warner,
Ann E. Wilcox,
Fanny M. Weaver,
Helen A. Wood,
Anna Wilson,
Amanda M. Watson,
Hannorah Walsk,
Fannie Q. Wright,
Emma Wygant,
Mary F. Weed,
Kate Wilson,
Mary A. Wood,
Anna S. Williams,
Julia A. Wright,
Num es.
~ d & n n A.
d Austin,
David P. Austin,
Brrin L. Abbotl,
Henry Babcock,
Marcus A. Beers,
Charles H. Brown,
Towns.
Sand Lake, .
Marcellus,
Brooklyn,
Albany,
Hndson,
Guilderland,
Karpersfield,
Albany,
Albany,
Albany,
Buffalo,
Riverhead,
@onquest,
Watervliet,
Smyrna,
N. Hempstead,
Bolton,
Chili,
Otsego,
Kingston,
~lban~,
Albany,
Albany,
Royalton,
Benn Pan,
Albany,
Towns.
Black Rock,
Albion,
West Seneca,
Persia,
Danby,
Antwerp,
Counties.
Bensselaer.
Onondaga.
Kings.
Albany.
Columbia.
Albany.
Delaware.
Albany.,
Albany.
Warren.
Monroe.
Otsego,
Ulster.
Albany.
Albany.
Albany.
Niagara.
Yates.
Albany.
~ouniies.
Erie.
Oswego.
Erie.
Names.
Thomas M. ~Brome,
Samcel D. Brorue,
Joseph Rib. Beaman,
Comfort S. Brown,
Gurdon S. Berry,
Cornelius, J. Blauvelt,
Eugene Beach,
Edward P. Brown,
John K. Bulkley,
Isaac F. Bangs,
Edwin A. Burlingame:
Alfred S. Barry,
William G . Carr,
David E. Chase,
Edwin .G. Chilcott,
Samuel Culfsertson,
Aaron Clzadwick,
Leroy C. Cooley,
John W. Cole,
John V. Champion,
George T1 Crounse,
Nilton Draper,
Edward Donahoe,
George B Dean,
Bathan Estabnooks,
Avery FiFch,
Asa P I French,
Alfred H. Freeman,
Edwin A. Fry,
William ,W. Fisk,
Joel T. Gilbert,
Frederick A. Gee,
A113ert N. ~ u ; t e d :
Mervin Plollister,
Seymour J. Hall,
Barna XIorton,
Leonard F. Hardy,
Tourns,
Counties.
Thornson,
Sullivan.
Thornson,
Snllivan.
Antwerp,
Jefferson.
Elmira,
Ghemung,
Moreau,
Sarztoga.
Orangetown,
Bockland,
Cairo,
kene.
;%.
Lorraine,
Jefferson.
Chili,
Nonroe,
Ridgeway,
O~lezms.
Warford,
Cortf and,
Yates,
Yates.
Albany,
- 4lbany.
Maryland,
Otsego.
East P-Iamburgb, Erie.
Groveland,
Livingston,
Benssslaerville, Albany.
Eyme,
lesii'erson.
Rhinebeck,
Dutchess,
Ballston,
$aratoga.
Guilderland,
Albany.
Westford,
Otsego.
Albany,
Albany,
Maryland,
Otsego.
Herkimer,
Herkimer ,
New. Lotland, Albany.
Richland,
Oswego.
Saratoga,
Saratoga.
Marcellus,
Onondaga.
Mayfield, Fulton.
New-York,
New-Pork.
Homer,
Blortland.
Pleassnt Valley, Dutchess.
Palmyna,
3Vay.m.
Lee,
Oneida.
Monnt Hope,
Orange.
Pxeb!e,
Cartland,
No. 40.1
JYum es .
Henry Hogan,
John 49. Hiller,
Francis Hasbrook,
Lansingh Hotaling,
Allen B. Hill,
John L. Harper,
Carlos A. Hull,
George W. Jones,
Chauncey Jemison,
Norman C. Judson,
Nathaniel M. Jones,
Manly W. Keonedy,
John Kelly,
Samuel Kerslake,
Malon W. Leonard,
Charles Loucks,
David R.Mattiee,
Merritt Moore,
David MeDougall,
Darwin N. Mason,
John 6. Mosher,
Henry Meech,
John D. Oddl,
Charles Parker,
Alfred Pierce,
William Phillips,
Elisha W. Parks,
Ezra B. Palmer,
William H. Purcel,
James C. Boss,
William C. Robinson,
Hiram L. Boekwel~,
Jonas C. Ransom,
Dwight Spaff'ord,
William F. Smith,
Henry T. Sprague,
George Spooner
,
Towns.
Counties.
Dickson,
Frznklin.
Hanover,
Chautauque.
Tuthill Town, Ulster.
Albany,
Albany.
Putnam.
Carmel,
Maine,
Broome.
Bergen,
Genesee.
Mohawk,
Montgomery.
Versailles,
Erie.
Conquest;,
Cayuga.
Boston,
Erie.
Checktowega,, Erie.
Oreene,
Ghenango.
Stafford,
Genesee.
Pierpont,
St. Lawrence.
Bath,
Stenben.
Middleb~~rg, Schoharie.
Java,
Wyoming.
Lee,
Oneida.
Portland,
Chaatanque.
Schroeppel,
Oswego.
Parma,
Monroe.
Hopewell,
Ontario.
Watervalley,
Erie.
Middlefield,
Otsego.
New Albion,
Cattaraug-us,
Le Roy,
Genesee.
Berne,
Albany.
Mew Baltimore, Greene.
Ogden,
Monroe.
Rome,
Oneida.
Mannsville,
Madison.
Chazy,
Clinton. '
Bergen,
Genesee.
Mecklenbnrg,
Tompkins.
East Bloomfield, Ontario.
Brandon,
Franklin.
.
'
JITames.
Asaph E. Shute,
Thomas Pa. Stone,
Remy J, Stetson,
Morgan Stephens,
Abram D. Sternberg,
Lewiq Spauldinq,
Gawn M. Smith,
John Tobey,
Alburtns C. Trevett,
George C. Thomas,
Robert F. Todd,
Nelson Tuttle,
David W. Thomas,
Richard D. Traver?
Martin Van Buren,
Samuel Wright,
Isaac B. Wilcox,
Caleb Wright,
Wheaton A. Welch,
Spencer Wood,
Henry A. Wiloox,
John C. Wood,
Lemuel Hates,
Towns.
Guilderland,
Ogden,
Persia,
Grafton,
Brownville;
Borodino,
Catlin,
Charlton,
East Hamburg,
Albany,
Albany,
Cape Vincent,
Bangor,
Clifton Park,
Albany,
Hempstead,
Harpersfield,
Greenwich,
Tully,
Clarkstown,
Conquest,
Conquest,
Owego,
CountiesAlbany.
Monroe.
Cattaraugus.
Rensselaer.
Jefferson.
Onondaga.
Chemung.
Saratoga.
Erie.
Albany.
Albany.
Jefferson.
Franklin.
Saratoga.
Albany.
Queens.
Delaware.
Washington.
Onondaga.
Rockland.
Cayuga.
Cayuga.
Tioga.
.......................................... 238
............................................ 102
Total, ........................................... 320
-
Females,
Males:.
GRADUATES
Of the Twenty-first Term, ending February 1, 1855.
FEXALES
flames.
Frances A. Bacon,
Celedtine Burtis,
Sarah B. Bedell,
Mary 4;. Bodwell,
Julia C. Carpenter,
Id.Louisa Campbell,
C. Jane Dayton,
Elizabeth 43. Ensign,
Brenda 0. Hull,
Sarah A. Huestis,
Harriet J. Huestis,
Elizabeth E :Hunt,
Frances E. Harrilzgton,
Mary A. King,
Hannah J. Moakler,
Sarah W. Purmort,
Louisa H. Purmort,
S. Amelia Plumb,
Margaret Prin'gle,
Mary H. Phelps,
Anna E. Purdy,
Almira E. Rice,
E l k a E. Sickler,
Elizabeth S. Smith,
Fanny M. T a g a r t ,
Harriet E. Wilcox,
Cath rine Wilson,
Post Otjices,
Counties.
Albany,
Albany.
oosick Falls, Bensselaer.
Grand Island,
Erie.
Inverness,
Livingston.
Rochester,
Monroe.
Albany,
Albany.
Stony Creek,
Warren.
North Ridgeway, Orleans.
Black Bock,
Erie.
white Plains,
Westchester.
White Plains,
Westchester.
Schaghticoke, pt. Rensselaer.
Rusl~ville,
Pates.
Albany,
Albany.
Albany,
Albany.
Jay,
Essex.
Essex.
Jay 7
Scriba,
Bswego.
New Hartford, Oneida.
Schroon River, Essex.
,
Livingston.
Livonia,
Wa p e .
Xacedo~~
Geneva,
Ontario.
Mecklenbzrgh, Tompkins.
Eamrenceville, St. Lawrenee.
PlarpersGePd,
Delaware.
A1bany
Albany.
,
MALES.
flumes.
LeRoy C. Cooley,
David E. Chase,
E. Austin Fry,
Leon F. Hardy,
John D. Hiller,
Albert PaT. Husted,
Henry H. Bogan,.
M e r ~ i Moore,
t
John D. O'De11,
Charles H. Parker,
William M. Phillips,
Thomas N. Stone,
Wheatorz A. Welch,
Isaas B..Wilcox,
. Females,.
Males,.
Post OBces,
Counties.
LY=%
Jefferson.
Westford,
Otsego.
South Marcellus, Onondaga.
Homer,
Cortlpd.
Smith's Mill,
Chautauque.
Pleasant Valley, Dutchess.
Diekinson,
Franklin.
Java,
Wyoming.
Chapinsville,
Ontario.
Water Valley, Erie.
.
Ne& Albion,
Cattaraugus.
Adam Basin,
Monroe.
Tully,
Onondaga.
ZIarpersfield,
Delaware.
27
14
...................................
.....................................
Total, ....................................
41
-
P
GRADUATES
Of the Twenty-second Term, ending J u l y 11, 1855.
FEMALES
Xam es.
Post O$ices.
Xudson,
Pillar Point,
'
Macedon,
Veteran,
South Danby,
Albany,
New-York city.
Menmoocl,
Rochester,
Middlesex,
Al'lany
Albany,
Albany,
Oswego,
Albany,
Mount Pleasant,
Albany,
Rochester,
Albany,
Buffalo,
Buffalo,
Galen,
Albany,
Conquest,
Albany,
Brooklyn,
Kate M. Allen,
Jane C. ~ c k e r m a n ,
Delia A. Bristol,
Mary C. Bennett,
Esther Bennett,
ele en‘^. Bacon,
Amanda P. Baldwin,
Margaret J. Brown,
Emelie L. Carpenter,
Amelia A. Christie,
Sarah A. Cook,
Eleanor F: Dickson,
Julia A. Fravor,
Eliza M. Hatch,
Anna M. Namilton,
Mary J. Hatfield,
Alice J. Hepinstall,
Annie 6. Mathies,
Elizabeth Powell,
Maria E. Ransom,
Emily A. Rice,
Harriet A. Sleight,
Sarah A. Visscher,
Ann E. Wilcox,
Susan R. Witherell,
Lorinda J. Whipple,
,
Counties.
Columbia.
Jefferson.
Wayne.
Chemung.
Tompkins.
Albany.
Albany.
Monroe.
Yates.
Albany.
Albany.
Albany.
Oswego.
Albany.
Westcbester.
Albany.
Monroe.
Albany.
Erie.
Erie.
Wayne.
Albany.
Cayuga.
Albany.
Kings.
\
\
-
,
MALES.
Arum es .
Edmund A. Austin,
Milton
hlervin Hollister,
Norman Judson,
John Melley,
James C. Boss,
Hiram L. Bockwell,
Dwight 8. SpaEord,
Henry T. Sprague,
William F. Smith,
Samuel Wright,
Females, ......
Males,
rape;,
I
r
Post O l c e s .
Counties.
Black Bock,
Erie.
Westford,
Otsego.
Palrfxyra,
Wayne.
Conquest,
Cayuga.
Greene,
Chenango.
Spencerport,
Monroe.
Nlunsville,
Madison.
Bergen,
Genesee.
East Broomfield, OnBrio.
Meeklenburgh', Tompkins.
Woekville @entre,Queens.
26
............................
......................................
Total, ....................................
11
7
I
The Normal ~ c h o o of
l the State of New-Pork was established
by an act of the Legislature, in 1844, "for the instruction and
practice of Teachers of Common Schools in the Science of Education and the art of Teaching." I t was first established for five
years, as an experiment, and went into operation on the 18th of
December, 1844, in a building provided gratuitously by the city
of Albany, and temporarily fitted up for that purpose. The
first term opened with twenty-nine pupils, and closed with ninetpseven. The number in attendance, the second term, was about
two hnndred. The average number is now .about two hundred
and fifty.
In 1848, an act wraspassed by the Legislature, '' for the perma- .
nent establishment of the State Noma1 School," appropriating
$15,QW towards the erection of a suitable building. The following year an additional appropriation of $10,000 was made for its
completion. A large and commodious edifice, containing a dweling-house for the Principal, was accordingly erected on the corner of Lodge and Howard streets, adjoining the State Geological
and Agricultural rooms. To this building the school was
removed on the 31st of July, 1849. .
The design of this institution is to improve the condition of
common schools, by providing a class of teachers superior in
professional scholarship and practical skill, to those ordinarily furnished by institutions not has-ing this end specifically in
view, and it is confidently believed from expe~ience,that the
condition of admission, the course of study adopted and the class
drill pursued are well calculated to secure this object.
Each county in the State is entitled to send Lo the school a
number of pupils (either male or female) equal to twice the num-
32
[SENATE
ber of members of the Assembly in such county. Thepnpils are
appointed by the town superintendents, at a meeting called by
ic
on the first Mondays of
the superintendent of p ~ ~ b linstruction,
February and September in each year. A list of the vacancies
att he close of each term is forwarded to the town superintendents, and published in the papers of the city of Albany.
Persons failing to receil-e appointments in their respective
counties, may upon presenting testimonials of character and
talents, and sustaining the prescribed examination, receive appointments from the executive committee, provided any vacancies exist. In such case the pupil will not receive mileage.
Pupils once admitted to the school will be entitled to its
privileges until they graduate, unlesj they forfeit that right by
I
voluntary absence, by improper conduct or by failing to exhibit
good evidences of scholarship and fair promise of success as
teachers.
The following is the form of certificate of appointment which
is to be given by the town superintendents to each pupil appointed.
At a meeting of the town superintendents of the county 0%
,held at
on the
day of
for the purpose of filling vacancies in the State
was duly appointed a pupil of that
Normal scliool,
institution.
(Signed by the chairman and secretary.)
OF APPLICANTS.
QUALIFICATIONS
Females sent to the school must be at least sixteen years of
age, and males eighteen, and in all cases decided maturity of
mind is indispensable- -
Candidates for admission to the lowest class, must sustain a
thorough examination in reading, spelling, the geography of the
western continent, intellectual arithmetic, equal to one half of
the ordinary treatises, written arithmetic, throu& interest, and
so much of English grammar as to be able to analyze and
any ordinary prose sentence.
For admission to the advanced classes, in addition to those
required for entrance examination, all the studies of the preceding classes must have been accomplished. The time required
&o mmplate t$e course will depend on the attainments, habits
and talents of the pupil. It oarght never to eseeed fmr terms,
QP two years.
A11 the pupils, on enteriog the school, are required to sign the
following declaration :
'c We, the subscribers, hereby DECLARE, that it is ozjr intentioa to
deeote ourselves to the busintss of teaching the sclwols of the State,
and that our sole object in res&ting Go this Normal School is the
better to prepare oursehes for tl& important duty."
It is expected bf the superintendents that they will select such
pupils as will. sacredly fulfil their engagements in this particular,
and they should be made acquainted with its import, before they
m e appointed.
The following extracts from a circular lately issued to the.
town superintendents, by the State Superintendent of Publicf
Instruction, clearly present the qualifications which are [email protected]
essential :
C6 The town superintendents are directed to give the most extended notice in their power, of vacancies, and to interest them.
ftelves in finding proper pupils to be appointed.
fn making the sdections, those who from past successful
experienee have proved their aptness to teach, or from traits of
character, clearly develo$ed, give fair promise of future snccess,
shonld be preferred. Talents not below mediocrity, unblemished morals and sound health, are regarded as indispensable. Tn
pour visitations of the schools, you will sometimes find teachers
who only need the instruction which this school is designed to
give, to ensnre their highest suecess and usefulness; or pupils
who have given proof of good scholarship, which, by being
properly directed, may be made of great value in the canse of
education. Such teachers and scholars yon will encourage to
seek these appointments."
3
[Sena!e, No. 40.1
PRIVILEGES
OF THE PUPILS.
All pupils receive their tuition free. They are also furnished
with the use of text-books without charge. They are, however,
held responsible lor their loss or injury. If they already own
the books of the course, they will do well to bring them, together
with such other books for reference as they may possess. Besides this, each student receives three cents a mile on the distance from his county seat to Albany, to defray travelling
expenses. No pupil will receive mileage, unless the appointment is obtained from the county in which said pupil resides,
such appointment being regularly made by the town superintendents. This money is paid at t h e close of each term.
MILEAGE.
The foljowing table will show the sum a student of each county
will receive at the end of the term as travelling expenses :
Counties.
1
~
Amount paid to
each pupil.
.........................................
.......................................
.........................................
.....................................
..........................................
......................................
.......................................
Ghenango, .......................................
Glinton, .........................................
Columbia, ........................................
Cortlaad, ........................................
Delaware, .......................................
Dutchess, ........................................
Erie, ...........................................
E s s a , ..........................................
Franklin, ........................................
Fnlton, .........................................
Genesee, ......................................".
.
Greene,. .........................................
Hamilton; .......................................
Herkimer, .......................................
Jefferson, ........................................
Albany,
Allegany,
Broorne,
Cattaraugus,
Cayuga,
Chautauque,
Ghemung,.
$0
7
4
8
00
68
35
76
5 16
PO 08
5 94
3 30
4 86
0 87
4 20
2 31
2 19
9 75
3 78
3 36
1 35
8 49
1 02
2 46
2 37
4 80.
'
Counties.
Amount paid to
each pupit.
................... ....................
..........................................
........................................
........................................
.........................................
....................................
......................................
.........................................
................................... ;.. . .
...........................;...........
......,.. ................................
.........................................
.........................................
.........................................
..........................................
.........................................
.........................................
......................................
......................................
.......................................
........................................
.....................................
.......................................
........................................
....................................
........................................
.........................................
........................................
..........................................
.......................................
..........................................
.........................................
......................................
.............:...........................
.....................................
.......................................
............................................
Kings,
Lewis,.
Livingston
Madison,
Monroe,
Montgomery,
New-York,
Niagara,
Oneida,
Onondaga,
Ontario,
Orange,.
Orleans,
Oswego,
Otsego,
Putnam,
Queens,
Rensselaer,.
Richmond,
Rockland,
Saratoga,
Schenectady,
Schoharie,
Seneca,.
St. Lawrence,
Steuben,
Suffolk,.
Sullivan,
Tioga,
Tornpkins,
Ulster,
Warren,
Washington,
Wayne,.
Westchester,
Wyoming,
Yates
4
4
7
3
7
1
4
9
2
4
6
3
7
38
26
14
03
53
26
35
00
19
38
66
15
71
5 01
P 98
%
3
5
0
4
3
18
Dl
18
74
66
0 90
0 45
0 96
5 91
6 18
6 48
6 78
3\39
5 01
5 PO
P 74
1 86
P 50
5 43
3 90
9 09
636
\
,
A well-assorted apparatns has been proenred, sufficientlj?
extensive to illustrate all the impostant principles in Natwal
Philosophy, Surveying, @hemistry and Human Physiology,
Extraordinary facilities fbr the study of Physiology are afforded
b~ the museum of the Medical College, which is open at aff
bows for visitors;
LI~ARY,
Besides an abundant supply of text-books u p o ~all t h s
branches of the course of study, a well-selected misc&meous
library has been procured, to which all the pupils may have
wcess free of charge. I n the selection of this library,particular
w e has been exercised to procure most of the recent works
rapon education, as well as several valrzable standard works
rapon the Natural Sciences, History, Msthematics, &e. The
State Library is also freely accessiMe to all.
TERMS
AND WACATIOMS.
The Fall T e m will begin on the third Monday in September,
and continue twenty weeks.
The &'ping Term will begin the last Monday in Februe~y,arr&
O~ntinuetwenty weeks.
PROMPT
ATTEND AN^.
I
As the srbool will open on Monday, it voald be %Y the
Bdvantage of the pupils if they should reach Albany by the
griday or Saturday preceding the day of opening- The k c u l q
a n then aid them in securing suitable places for boarding. ,
As the examination of the pupils preparatory for elassificaEfon will commence on the first day of the term, it is exceedb g l y important that all should report themselves on the &s&
morning. Those who arrive a day after the time, will snbjset
not only tho reachers to mu& trouble, but themselves also to
$he rigoss of a ghira~eexamination. After the first week, ne
atadent, except for the strongest rezsors, ail1 be allo%wd W.
e&teP the school.
The price of board, in respectable families, vades from $ 2 3 5
,
ko $83.OO exclusive of washing.
The ladies and gentlemen are not allow-ed,to board in the
same families; and gentlemen of the school are not allowed to
@allupon ladies of the school after six o'clock P.81- Particulw
care is taken to be assured of the respectability of the families
who propose to take boarders, before they are recommended t~
the pupib.
EXPERIMENTAL
~HOOL.
Convenient rooms in the building are appropriated to the
accommociation of this school. It is uneer the immediate
supervision of a permaraent teacher.
The object of this school is to afford each Norlnal pupil an
opportunity to practice the methods of instruction and discipliq
inculcated at the Normal School, as well as to exhibit his '' aptness to teach," and to diseharge the various other duties pertaining to the teacher's responsible office. Each member of the
graduating class is required to spend at least tsw weeks in this
depastanent,
S
'%
[SENATE
38
Course of Study and Text Books.
'H'he following is the course of study prescribed for the school,
and a thorough acquaintance p i t h the whole of it, on the part
of the male pupils, is made a condition of graduation.
SUB-JUNIORS.
TEXT BOOKS.
............................ .Made.~.ille.
..:... Pcge3sNormal Cha.r.5,
.......... flitchell.
............... Stoddard.
............... Perlcins.
.................... Clark.
............................. Worcester.
............. Niss Peabody.
............ Perkins.
JUNIORS.
Intellectual Arithmetic,. ............... Stoddard.
Practical Arithmetic,. ................. perlcins.
Geography and Map Drawing, .......... flitchell.
Writing.
Elementary Sounds of the Letters,. ...... Page's jlrnrn~utCAarb.
Reading, ............................ JMandeville.
History, ............................. Worcester.
English Grammar, .................... Clarlc.
Elymentary Algebra, .................. Perlcins.
Beading,
Spelling.
Elementary Sounds of the Letters,.
Writing.
Geography and Ontline Maps,.
Intellectual Arithmetic,
Elementary Arithmetic,.
English Grammar,
History,
Chronology, Bem's system,
Elementary Algebra, begun,.
SUB-SENIORS.
Book-keeping,
English Grammar, reviewed,.
Higher Arithmetic,.
Geometry, six books,
Rhetoric and English Composition,
Drawing.
Elementary Algebra reviewed,.
Natural Philosophy,.
;
Perspective Drawing,.
&thematical Geograpl?y and use of Globes,
........................
........... Clark.
................... Perlcins,
.................. Perkins.
...... Quackenboss.
......... Perlcins.
......... ........ Olmsted.
................. Lectures.
Lectures.
SENIORS.
Higher Algebra,
Perlcins.
Davies' Legendre.
.....
Plane Trigonometry, as contained in,
Surveying and Mensuration,.
Perlcins.
Constitutional Law, with select parts of the Young's Science of
Government; ReR. Statutes, most intimately connected
vised Statutes.
with the rights and duties of citizens,.
Thomson's Seasons,.
Boyd.
Physiology,
Gutter.
Astronomy,
Robinson.
Intellectual Philosophy,.
Abercrombie.
Moral Philosophy,
Waylctnd.
Chemistry,.
Silliman.
Agricultural Chemistry,
Xrton.
Lectures, Page, and
Art of Teaching,
:.
attendance in the
( Experim'l School.
......................
...........
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..........................
..........................
...............
....................
.........................
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DIPLOMA.
I
STATE OF NEW-PORK,
NORMAL
SCHOOL,
ALBANY,
N. Y [date.]
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To mhom i t may concern:
This certifies that A. B., having been a member of the State
Normal School, and having completed the prescribed course of
study, is deemed by the Faculty of the Institution to be we41
qualified to enter upon the duties of a teacher.
- [Signed by each member of the Faculty.]
I n accordance with the above Certificate, we, the Executive
Committee, have granted this D~PLOMA.
[Signed by each member of the Executive Committee.
[By an act of the Legislature, passed April 11,1849, 'C every teacher shall be deemed a
qualified teacher, who shall have in possession a Diploma from the State Normal School."]
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The following are the Programmes of Exercises bf the fail
term. They remain the same for the spring term, except that
the exereies commence one hour earlier :
iI
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42
PROGRAMME :
FOR FIRS'J! THIRD OF THE FALL TERM-SIX
I
9 to 9.20..
-
.................
.
9.20 to 10.05..
II
10.15 to 11.d
,
...
Opening Exercises.
..................
.................
...........
.........................
........................
.....................
Seniors, Intellectual Philosophy,
Sub-Seniom, No. 1, Arithmetic,
Sub-Seniors, No. 2, Natural Philosphy,.
Juniors, No. I, Algebra,.
Juniors, No. 2, Reading,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, History,
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, Intellectual Arithmetic,
.............
10.05 to 10.15..
WEEKS.
.......
Principal.
Prof. Plympton.
Prof. Cochran.
Mr. Husted.
Mrs. Hewes.
Miss Ostrom.
Miss Rice.
...............................
...................
........
..........
.. .........
...................
........
Prof. Goohran.
Prof. Plympton.
Prof. Jewell.
Mrs. Hewea.
Mr. Estee.
Mr. Husted.
Miss Rice.
Rest and change of classes.
Seniors, Geology,.
Sub-Seniors, No. 1, Geometry,
Sub-Seniors, No. 2, Gpmmatical Analysis,
Juniors, No. 1, Iotelleatual AriihmeJuniors, No. 2, Practical Arithmetic,. >.
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, Grammar,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, Practical Arithmetic,.
................ keat and change of c b e s .
11to 11.10..
11.10 to 11.55
..
11.55 to 12.15..
12.15 to 1 . .
1to1.10
1.10 to 1.55..
..
Recess.
......... Principal.
........ Prof. Jewell.
................... Prof. PPlympton.
......................... Mr. Estee.
........................ Mr. Husted.
................... Mrs. Hewes.
..................... Miss Ostrom.
Seniors, Theory and Practice of Teaching,.
Sub-Seniors, No. 1, Grammatical Analysis,
Sub-Seniors, No. 2, Geometry,.
Joniors, No. 1, Writing,
Juniors, No. 2, Algebra,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, Reading,
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, History,
....................
I
.
.............
....
............. Prof. Plympton.
........................ Mrs. Hewes.
.......... Prof. Cocbrau.
.................... Miis Ostrom.
............. Mr. Estee.
....................... Prof. Jewcll.
..... Miss Rice.
................... Mr. Husted.
Seniors, Gentlemen, Higher Algebra,.
Seniors, Ladies, Reading,
Sub-Seniors, No. 1, Natural Philosophy,.
Sub Seniors, No. 2, Drawing,
Juniors, Nol 1, Practical Arithmetic,.
Juniors, No.. 2, Grammar,
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, Intellectual Arithmetic,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, Grammar,
Restandchangeofclasses.
............................. Prof. C o c h n ,
...................... Mr. Estee.
....................... Prof. JewcE.
......................... Miss Ostrom.
......... Mr. Husted.
.................. Mrs. Hewes.
Seniors, Chemistry,.
Sub-Seniors, Book-keeping
Juniors, No. 1, Grammar,.
Juniors, No. 2, History,
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, Practical Arithmetic,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, Geography,.
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PROGRAMME :
I
FOR SECOND TBIRD OF THE FALL T E R X - S I X WEEKS.
..................
9 to 9.26..
Opening Exercises.
.................
...................
9.20 to 10.05
...
10.05 to 10.15..
10.15 to 11..
Seniors, Geology and Physiology,
Sub-Seniors, No. 1, Geometiy,
Sub-Seniors, No. 2, Drawing,.
Juniors, No. 1, Written Arithmetic,
Juniors, No. 2, Grammar
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, Written Aridxnetic,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, Geography,.
....................
...............
.........................
..........................
.............
...
I
Prof. Cochran.
Prof. Plympton.
Miss Ostrom.
Mr. Estee.
Prof. Jewell.
Mr. Hute*
Mrs. Hewes.
.
Rest and change of classes.
......... Principal.
.......... Prof. Cochran.
................... Prof. Plympton.
....................... Prof. Jewell.
.._. .......... Mr. Estee.
................... Mr. Hust&.
................... Mrs. Hewes.
Seniors, Intellectual and Moral Philosophy,
Sub-Seniors, No. 1, Natural Philosophy,.
Sub-Seniors, No. 2, Geometry,.
Juniors, No. 1, Grammar,.
Juniors, No. 2, Written Wthmetic,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, Grammar,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, Reading..
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.................. Rest and change of clauses.
Seniors, Hisher Mathematics,. .................... Prof. Plympton.
Sub-Seniors, No. 1, Drawing, .................... Miss Ostrom.
Sub-Seniors, No. 2, Natural Philosophy,. ......... Prof. Cochran.
11.10 to 11.55 .. Juniors, No. 1, Algebra, ........................ Mr. Husted.
Juniors, No. 2, Writing, ......................... Mr. Estee.
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, Geography, ................. Mrs. Hewes.
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, ~nt&lectnalArithmetic, ....... Miss =ce.
11.55 to 12.15.. ............. Recess.
11to 11.10
....
12.15 to 1..
1 to 1.10..
Seniors, Theory&Practice, and Science of Gprernment,
Sub-Seniors, No. 1, Rhetoric,
Sub-Seniors, No. 2, Algebra,
Juniors, No. 1, Reading,
:.
Juniors, No. 2, Algebra,
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, flistory,
Sub-Juniors, NO. 2, Written Arithmetic,.
Seniors, Chemist~y,,
Sub-Seniors, No. 1, Algebra,.
Sub-Seniors, No. 2, Rhetoric,&.
Juniors, No. 1, History,.
Juniors, No. 2, Intellectual Arithmetic,.
Sub-Juniors, No. 1, Intellectual Arithmetic,
Sub-Juniors, No. 2, Grammar,.
....................
..................
.........................
...........
.......
...................
1.55to2....
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Principal.
................ Dismkion.
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Rest and change of classes.
.............................
....
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.................... Prof. Jewell.
.................... Prof. Plymptun.
............. ......... Mrs. Hewes.
......................... Mr. Husted.
..................... Miss Ostrom.
.......... Miss Rice.
..................
1.10 to 1.55
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Prof. Cochran.
Prof. P l p p t o n .
Prof. Jewell.
Miss Ostrom.
Mrs. Hewes.
Miss Rice.
Yr. Huated,
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PROGRAbfME O F AFTERFOON EXERCISES.
All the afternoon exercises of the Fall Term commence at 33
and end at 44. In the Spring Term they take place one h o x ~
later.
\
...................
Instruction in vocal music,.
)
Seniors and Sub-Seniors, on Tuesdays and Fri- I
days,..
Mr. Estee.
Juniors and Sub-Juniors; on Mondays and Thursdays,..
....................................
....................................
1
Compositions are required from each pupil once in three
weeks, commencing with the third week and ending with the
eighteenth week, thus making six compositions during the terra.
The compositions are corrected as follows :
.......................... by Prof. Jewell.
1,. ...............
Prof. Plympton.
2,. ...............
Prof. Cochran.
................... Mr. Estee.
................... Mr. Wood.
1,. ...............
Miss Otrom.
2,. ...............
Miss Rice.
The Seniors',
Sub-Seniors', No.
Sub-Seniors', No.
Juniors', No. 1,.
Juniors', Xo. 2,.
Sub-Juniors', No.
Sub-Juniors', No.
Selected compositions are publicly read every third Wedn,esday, commencing the fourth meek and ending with the nine
teenth, thus making six times. At this exercise all the teachers, as well as pupils, are expected to be present.
Field exercises, with surveying and engineering instruments,
are given to the gentlemen of the senior class, by the Professor
of Matl~ematics. These exercises consist of land surveying, with
trigonometrical, and other methods of areas, and heights and
a. 1OnS
distances-taking levels for railroads and canals, ca1cu.l-t'
for excavations and embankments, and locating and describing
curves. The object of these exercises is to make the pupils familiar ~ 4 t the
h use of instruments, and their application to the
purposes for which they are designed. *
In the afternoons of those Wednesdays which are not otherwise occupied, lectures are given by the several teachers, to the
classes, on such subjects as are peculiarly appropriate to their
duties in the school, and to those of the profession for which
they are preparing.
;
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