RECALL DENTISTRY COLLEGE OF 2009

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APRIL 2009
COLLEGE OF
DENTISTRY
RECALL
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
University of Saskatchewan
Room 332
Dental Clinic Building
105 Wiggins Road
Saskatoon SK S7N 5E4
Dean:
Dr. Gerry Uswak
Associate Dean:
Dr. Paul Teplitsky
Assistant Dean:
Dr. Alan Kilistoff
Recall Copy-editing and
Proofreading:
Wanda Drury
If you read something in this issue of Recall that you would like to respond to, please send your comments to Janet Sklarchuk
at the address above or [email protected]
DEAN’S MESSAGE Dr. Gerry Uswak
It is the middle of February and I am in Sandy Bay, a
First Nations community of 1200 people in Northern
Saskatchewan 600 kilometres north of Saskatoon, a
place of natural beauty amidst rolling hills, lakes, and
forests, and alongside the Churchill River. But beneath
this beautiful veneer exist many health and social
disparities. For three weeks, I will supervise senior
students from the College and the National School of
Dental Therapy (NSDT) on a joint field clinic and after my
stint up north, Dr. Alan Kilistoff will follow to supervise
for the program’s remaining three weeks. Three dental
therapy students are here for two months, while two
dental students will rotate in and out every two weeks.
In addition to Sandy Bay there are three other field
clinic locations: Fort Simpson, NT; Garden Hill, MB; and
Fond du Lac, SK. Our students will work in Sandy Bay
and Fond du Lac. In all, fourteen of our College dental
students will participate in these northern field clinics
this year.
example of a unique Made-in-Saskatchewan solution to
improve the oral health of a community, while providing
students with enriched social and clinical experiences.
When I was in dental school I was fortunate to have had
a field clinic experience in Whale Cove, a community of
200 people in what is now Nunavut, and I was a better
student for it. Why? The answer is the same for these field
clinics today as it was then: freedom. The student quite
simply is allowed access to the freedom to practice, much
like the access they will have earned when they graduate
a few short months later. The learning curve during the
transition from dental school to dental practice can
be steep. Experiences
xperiences such
as field clinics
cs help flatten
that curve, at least
east in clinical
terms. Students
ents are given
the freedom to
o make clinical
decisions, and
d to seee
more patients
ts and
more diseasee and
nd
pathology
and do more clinical
liniccal
treatment in two
wo
weeks than he or
she
would ever do in
months back in
n
the College clinic.
nic.
It is the freedom
m
to grow as a
Community-based field clinics have been a hallmark of
the NSDT curriculum since it was founded in the 1970s.
The College also has a history of community-based
experiences but little in that direction has occurred since
the move from a five-year to a four-year program. This
is the third year of joint College/NSDT field clinics, and
this year we have expanded the dental student experience
from one to two weeks. The benefits of this co-operative
venture are unique and manifold. Nowhere else do
dental therapy and dental students have opportunity
to work together as a dental team. This is yet another
2
provide more direct hands-on service to the community
than do any other health professional education programs.
I believe a more distributive dental education model is the
key to our future; a program approach that will see our
students work in a variety of community-based settings
ranging from our on-campus clinics to rural, remote,
and inner-city placements. In this way we both will enhance
our students’ education and also will expand our service
to the community in a dimension where no one else
currently does.
practitioner and
to confirm and
apply what students have already learned. But it is also the
freedom to be humbled by the realization that we do not know
it all. We occasionally need to be reminded that dentistry
is a life-long learning experience. (There is no experience
quite like trying to extract a three-rooted mandibular molar
when you weren’t expecting to have to do so!) There is the
freedom to realize that soon only you will be responsible
for your patients’ care. Overall, it’s our hope and plan that
these various “freedom experiences” will build confidence,
competence, and humility.
We are proud to work closely with all of our stakeholders in
trying to promote oral health for all in the province. We have
strong relationships with individuals and communities; with
all of the provincial oral health professional associations;
with NSDT and the regional health authorities’ dental
public health programs as well as the Northern Oral Health
Strategy Working Group. We are proud to be associated
with the Regina and Saskatoon Long-term Care Oral Health
pilot projects. Our ultimate goal is to interact with all dental
professional training programs in the province. If this
proves not possible, we will continue to move forward with
our existing partners. Perhaps now is the time to articulate
a fresh vision for our College:
Beyond the clinical learning experience, these joint field
clinics will promote communication and understanding.
Students will better understand each other’s professions
and how to work effectively as members of a dental team,
especially now that dental therapists are working more
and more in private practice. Communication is the key to
successful and harmonious dental practice, whether between
members of the dental team or between the dental team and
patients. To effectively communicate, we must appreciate
and understand other people’s points of view. Cultural
competency is the measure of our ability to understand
the cultural and social determinants of health, and the field
clinic experience is instrumental to encouraging this ability
by exposing students to patients with unique cultural and
social backgrounds.
The University of Saskatchewan College of Dentistry
Education Service
Research
Leadership for Saskatchewan and Beyond
The dental professions have a responsibility to serve the
community during the process of educating our students.
In fact, we should be proud that College and NSDT students
GIVING BACK
There are many ways to support a mission that you believe in, but one of the most meaningful and rewarding ways
is through contributing your time and talents. The College of Dentistry salutes those part-time faculty who have
made a difference by giving of their time and expertise to the undergraduate program, by acting as supervisors in the
Dental Clinic. We are fortunate to have had that participation by the following faculty members for the 2008–2009
academic year:
Dr. Reg Anholt
Dr. Daniel Avram
Dr. Bryce Bahrey
Dr. Margareta Berin
Dr. Rhonda
Berthiaume
Dr. Colin Bowerman
Dr. Shaun Brakstad
Dr. Kirby Cadman
Dr. Don Campbell
Dr. Sujata Choubal
Dr. Fatima Coovadia
Dr. James Dessouki
Dr. Geoffrey Dice
Dr. Holly Dunlop
Dr. Darryl Gillings
Dr. Kristin Goos
Dr. Keith Hamilton
Dr. Mike Hammer
Dr. Dave Hastings
Dr. Chris
Haunsperger
Dr. Doug
Hildebrand
Dr. Frank Hohn
Dr. Todd Jarotski
Dr. Stephen Jen
Dr. Don Johnson
Dr. Stephen Korol
Dr. Greg Kost
Dr. Joanne Kudryk
Dr. Kelly Kudryk
Dr. Perry Kurz
Dr. Regan Kurz
Dr. Parm Lalli
Dr. Dennis Lanigan
Dr. Paul Louie
Dr. Doug Meier
Dr. Laura Metcalfe
3
Dr. Brian Meyer
Dr. Christine Miller
Dr. Kamrin Olfert
Dr. Abe Patel
Dr. Dave Plosz
Dr. Matthew Pruden
Dr. Carman Rabuka
Dr. Ross Remmer
Dr. David Saganski
Dr. Mona Shoman
Dr. Alysen Sopotyk
Dr. Matt Soroski
Dr. Stephanie
Soroski
Dr. David Stark
Dr. Ron Starzynski
Dr. John Steel
Dr. Hiliary Stevens
Dr. Jay Stevens
Dr. Blayne
Thibodeau
Dr. Ed Underwood
Dr. Bernie White
Dr. Jim Wilson
Dr. Doug Woo
2009
WHITE COAT CEREMONY
(Fourth row L-R) Mark Talbot, Tyson Allred, Eric Knouse, David Baker, Lance Huber, Michael Gavelis, Chester Young (Third row L-R) Shawn Mamer, Jenna Gogolinski,
Jin Hwa Lee, Mark Berscheid, Chad Stoll, Srdjan Dautbegovic (Second row L-R) Chelsea Price, Meghan Betnar, Brett Langill, Joonyoung Ji, Christopher Dinh, Jennifer Li,
Leemai Lafontaine (Front row L-R) Sok Sun, Allison Atchison, Jill Kulyk, Jolanta Przepiorka, Crystal Linfitt, Nicole Povey, Sean St. Marie
From November 2008 Recall:
In the past, the College’s White
Coat Ceremony has occurred at the
beginning of Year 1, with little fanfare
and less notice. The “low profile” that
this ceremony has to this point held
within our College has failed to reflect
the very strong significance of the
occasion that the event is intended to
commemorate.
White Coat ceremonies are held by
many health science programs to mark
the important transition of students
from the classroom to clinical treatment
and patient care. It provides a moment
to reflect upon and reconfirm the
values that Dentistry aspires to, namely
professionalism, ethical integrity, service
to society, and respect for our patients.
For our students this transition occurs
in the second term of Year 2, when they
begin to treat patients in the clinic.
Increasingly, we have been feeling that
4
our College should move the ceremony
to correctly coincide with when this
transition actually happens, and as a
result this year our Year 2 students will
be the first cohort to participate in our
new format.
We feel that the new scheduling of our
College’s White Coat Ceremony will
allow the occasion to stand as a more
clear milestone for this very important
transition in our students’ education
and lives.
While I know the importance to dentistry of personal
characteristics such as honesty, integrity, respect, empathy,
and trust, I am not sure how to evaluate or whether I can
teach them. These thoughts led me to reflect on our
White Coat Ceremony. What follows is first a repetition
of the remarks I put together for the ceremony’s written
programme; then my description of the occasion itself;
then finally my thoughts following the ceremony. These are
of course my personal opinions – I would certainly enjoy
hearing from you as to yours regarding these issues.
A PREAMBLE: SOME THOUGHTS
LEADING UP TO THE WHITE COAT CEREMONY
I have come to the conclusion that aging is not all that
pleasant an experience. If the disintegrating physical
status isn’t depressing enough, for me the deteriorating
mental side is even more distressing. My condition is
exacerbated by the fact that I had little mental capacity in
the first place. There is, however, a ray of optimism that I
cling to: one thing that has remained constant—a bedrock
characteristic, if you will—is namely, my lifelong belief that
I am never wrong. Do not confuse me with the facts; I’m
right. Period!
MY PRE-CEREMONY THOUGHTS
(The following is Dr. Teplitsky’s article as appeared in the
written programme distributed to those attending the
January 8 White Coat Ceremony)
Please keep the aforementioned in mind as I relate the
following observation/opinion to you. I have formulated
this opinion via analyzing every graduating class since
1974 (I conveniently left out my own Class of 1972, and
we did not graduate a class in 1973). I have offered this
opinion verbally for about ten years, but this is the first
time I have put it on paper. I tell each incoming class of 28
students the following:
v There is a Category A wherein there are 3 of you whom
I cannot help. You are fortunate enough to have the
necessary magical combination of “wits and mitts”
(superior intellect and manual dexterity) that will allow
you to breeze through dental college. You have the
potential to surpass both me and also many other of
the faculty in knowledge and competence.
v There is a Category B wherein there are 3 of you whom
I also cannot help. The reason is that you don’t
possess, nor wish to acquire, the moral and ethical
fibre necessary to conscientiously practice dentistry.
You will act unprofessionally, and you eventually will
be an embarrassment both to yourself and to your
profession.
v The third category encompasses everyone else.
Faculty can be of enormous benefit to students in this
category, if these students choose to work diligently,
treat their patients with respect, and maximize their
potential.
Personally, I have very ambivalent feelings in regard to a White
Coat Ceremony. On the one hand, my cynical side questions
whether character weaknesses can be altered by symbolic
rituals or oratorical persuasion. On the other hand, my
optimistic side leads me to believe that young intelligent minds
can recognize that a professional dental career embodies more
than just self and is fundamentally linked to values such as
integrity, compassion, empathy, and trust. In truth, I feel the
core foundational values have been established, embedded,
and nurtured by your parents. This ceremony, hopefully, is
but a reminder.
The coat is a symbol that the wearer is worthy of respect and
trust. I would encourage you to earn that respect and trust
by learning as much as you can, by supporting each other as
friends and colleagues, and by giving your patients the best
care possible. If you develop your altruistic side, the personal
psychological rewards will replenish your spirit throughout
your career and beyond.
THE JANUARY 8 CEREMONY AT CONVOCATION HALL
The ceremony itself proved to be a well-organized and
worthy occasion. We all must understand and appreciate
that such events can happen only if supported by significant
effort from a number of people. For that occasion, Jacquie
Fraser provided the structural framework and received
immeasurable support from staff, namely Cheryl Fehr,
Nolan Paul, Rhonda Lenton, and Gloria Luedtke. Thanks
also to the fourth-year students who acted as student
mentors for the cloaking portion of the ceremony, and to
This rather harsh opinion has a most interesting aspect,
namely: while the students are within the College, I can
rarely discern what category they fit into. History has shown
that at times a student in Category A also has qualities that
put him or her into Category B. The bottom line is that I,
and I assume many other faculty, are easily fooled.
CONTINUES...
2009
WHITE COAT CEREMONY
5
2009
WHITE COAT CEREMONY
CONTINUED
the first-year student ushers Alan Chernosky, Dyar Bikey,
and Dan Troung. We owe debts of gratitude both to the
speakers and to the musicians, and I am most appreciative
of everyone who came out to support the event. I know the
ceremony was made more meaningful for the second-year
students by having in attendance not only their friends
and families but also those people in whom they have
entrusted their educational aspirations, namely faculty
and staff. The turnout was great. Thank you!
and especially keynote speaker George Peacock.
[Ed. note: Dr. Teplitsky also spoke.]
FINAL THOUGHTS
Now that I have experienced the “revamped version” of the
White Coat Ceremony, I will admit I am much more a fan
of it than I have been in the past when it was the somewhat
low-key event held at the beginning of students’ Year 1. I
think reinforcing the concepts of ethics and professionalism
does have potential to influence an intelligent mind, and
thereby to modify behaviour. Fundamentally, I realize that
I must be optimistic about this for if I do not think that
reasonable thought, persuasive dialogue, and exemplary
role modelling have effects on our students, then why am
I a teacher? Surely the repetition of wholesome principles
must convince some that this is indeed the path they will
wish to follow.
Dr. Jim Stakiw and Dr. Dean Kolbinson must be given
credit for bringing the White Coat Ceremony concept
to Saskatchewan, and January 8 was our first attempt
to “raise the bar” and make it a more broad-based
experience. I am of course biased, but I think the program
went well. The musical accompaniment and interlude –
comprising College musicians Thomas Yu (Class of 2003)
and Carman Rabuka (Class of 2007) – were spectacular
(I wish they had played another piece). Similarly, all the
messages were of excellent quality: on topic, succinct, and
delivered eloquently. Thank you to all who spoke: Dean
Uswak, Bernie White, Ernie Barber, Heather Magotiaux,
Dr. Paul Teplitsky
Associate Dean
UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
CODE OF PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT
I will uphold both the spirit and the letter of this code.. Ass a mem
member
mbe
b r of tthe
he den
he
dental
e tal comm
community:
mm
mun
u it
ity:
y
I will practise personal and academic
demic integrity.
integr
grit
ityy.
I will respect the rights and dignity
gnity of patients,
patieents,
s, students,
stu
tud
dents,
s, faculty,
facul
ultty,
ty and
and support
su
upp
ppor
porrt staff
s af
st
aff
ff and
an
nd treat
trea
trea
tr
eatt all
all
al
persons with honesty, respect, fairness,
airness, and
and
d compassion.
com
ompa
pass
ssio
on..
I will not make disparaging remarks
arks about
abou
ut students,
stu
udents
ts,, faculty,
faccultty, or
or support
supp
su
ppo
ort staff
staf
st
a f or
or their
tthe
h irr work.
he
work
orrk.
I will place the well-being of patients
ents ah
ahea
ahead
e do
off p
personal
erso
ona
n l aad
advancement.
dvancemen
ent.
t
I will set patient-care as the highest
hest priority
prioritty in the
the
h clinical
cliini
nica
c l setting.
ca
sseettttin
ng.
g
I will maintain patient confidentiality
ialityy and wi
will
ill llimit
im
miitt d
discussions
iscu
is
cuss
sssio
ssio
i ns o
off pa
p
patients
tiien
entss to
o appropriate
ap
pp
prropriatte settings.
sseett
ttin
ings
gs.
I will maintain high standards of ethical
eth
hicall behaviour
behavi
viiou
ourr and
an
nd conduct
co
ond
n ucct myself
myse
my
se in
self
se
in a manner
mann
ma
nner
er b
befit
befitting
itting
ng m
myy
profession at all times.
6
MESSAGE FROM THE
ASSISTANT DEAN, CLINICAL AFFAIRS
The fall has passed in a blur—and here
we are once again, facing graduation!
The fourth-year students are busy
finishing their work and preparing for
board exams and finals. All too soon
they will be finished and moving on to
bigger things. This is a stressful time
of career, one we can all remember,
but it too will pass and then a bright
future opens to view. I wish all the best
to the fourth year-class.
are supervising the Fond du Lac clinic,
and I’ll travel there to supervise the
final week and the pack-up.
At the College back in Saskatoon, our
new axiUm clinic computer system is
well into implementation. We have just
returned from Vancouver and the annual
“Summit” meeting of all the schools
that have installed/incorporated the
axiUm system. There are now 51 of a
possible 64 North American dental
schools that either have adopted or are
currently implementing this system.
This meeting is an opportunity for all users to get
together and discuss how things are working, and
the resulting input has led to an extremely dynamic
computer system that is evolving at a prodigious rate.
(There is enough new information that a separate Recall
article will be written by the axiUm Communication
Committee–see pages 10-11 this issue.)
Our outreach program to northern
Saskatchewan continues this year with
a few changes. We have purchased four portable
operatories that this year will be employed in the two
far-northern communities of Sandy Bay and Fond du
Lac. We have students placed in these two locations
and each student will remain posted there for two
weeks instead of the previous placements of one week.
This is in accordance with what students from past
field clinics have requested. The settlement of Sandy
Bay, located on the Manitoba border approximately 110
kilometres north of Flin Flon, is a community where we
have been well received in the past, and we look forward
to another successful year here. I say “here” because
as I write this article I am “on location” in Sandy Bay,
as field clinic supervisor, taking over from Dean Uswak
who was here in this capacity for the clinic’s first three
weeks. Fourth-year students have worked at Sandy Bay
field clinics for two of the past three years.
Student activity continues to increase and with that
comes additional challenges. Our Central Sterilization
Room is rapidly nearing capacity and so plans must be
put in place to deal with this situation. Space continues
to be a concern as we incorporate new faculty and staff
to help with the increased activity. The curriculum
needs constant attention as we strive to keep up with
the rapidly changing field of clinical practice. But this
is as it should be; change and growth are constantly
underway, and fitting ourselves into that process keeps
us all on our toes.
Fond du Lac is a new field clinic destination for us.
The community is located close to Uranium City near
the border with Northwest Territories. Because it is a
remote location, all our students and supplies must
be flown in. The Fond du Lac clinic was slow to get
started this year as there was a problem with one of
the water pumps so water was not always available.
This caused a slowdown at the school which in turn
interfered with the work of our students. A power
failure also occurred, that shut down the school entirely
for a period of time. Such are the realities of remote
Dentistry! The students posted there still are managing
to have an enjoyable time, though, and are finding the
Fond du Lac experience to be worthwhile. At this time
all seems to be going fine. Drs. John Steel and John
Santoro from the National School of Dental Therapy
In closing, I would like to sincerely thank all who have
helped in supervising in the clinic this past year. We
quite simply could not train future dentists without your
generous contributions of expertise. The students, as
well, are ever so appreciative of learning from those
who are in private practice. If any others of you out
there are interested in clinical teaching on a part-time
basis, please feel free to contact me at the College of
Dentistry.
Dr. Alan Kilistoff
Assistant Dean, Clinical Affairs
7
k,
son, Dr. Gerry Uswa
(L-R) Dr. Gord John
Dr. Mitch Taillon
–
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I
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AL
R
E
V
U
O
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N
A
V
lighted to
The College was de
ception in
host an Alumni Re
ch 5, 2009,
Vancouver on Mar
the Pacific
in conjunction with
/Canadian
Dental Conference
n Conference.
Dental Associatio
c turnout of
There was a terrifi
alumni at the
College of Dentistry
g that this will
reception, ensurin
event! Take
become an annual
the candid
a look at some of
on film.
moments captured
8
d Janet Sklarchuk
Dr. Gerry Uswak an
9
NEW DENTAL CLINIC
COMPUTER
Many of you may recall from your days here that the
old system was very cumbersome and stored only
limited information, chiefly patient demographics,
payment history, and treatment notes. And while
treating patients in the clinic, the actual (physical)
patient charts had to be at your fingertips in order to
refer to past treatment notes and/or medical histories,
as there were no computers in our operatories. This
all will very soon change!
As reported in the April 2008 issue of Recall, the
College is in the process of obtaining a new Dental
Clinic computer system. At that time, it was reported
that we had received Board of Governors approval to
purchase new software. That first step was completed
in June with the signing of a contract with Exan
Academic Software, Inc. Exan’s “axiUm” system is
the leader in clinical systems for dental schools, with
over 70% of the North American market. (Further
information is available at http://www.exanacademic.
com/.) So since September we have been planning
and configuring the software to meet the specific
needs of the U of S College of Dentistry.
The new system contains a complete Electronic
Health Record, which means there is no longer a need
to have the physical patient chart in the operatory.
In fact, there will no longer be a paper copy of the
patient chart – all patient information will now be
stored in axiUm. In addition, axiUm includes all of
the usual administrative functions such as patient
demographics, scheduling, and billing. It can also
track students’ progress through their programs,
complete with faculty approvals and assessments,
and eventually will interface seamlessly with a Digital
Radiography System (to be installed within the next
few years). The axiUm system takes us a huge step
closer to the ultimate “paperless office,” and will
help keep the College on the leading edge of dental
education.
The specific steps that we have taken are:
1. Reviewing Business Processes.
2. Installing and retrofitting network lines
to accommodate all users of the system,
including students during actual treatment of patients in clinic operatories.
3. Forming an axiUm Advisory Group who
are responsible for advising and testing
the software set-up and ensuring that the
final product is best configured to meet
our needs.
4. Exan initial training for a large group of
College faculty, staff, and students.
5. Reviewing the configuration of each
axiUm module to ensure that it will best
serve the College of Dentistry.
6. Migrating historical data (e.g., patient
demographics, financial data, treatment
information) from the former system.
7. Designing the operatory configuration to
have a functional, efficient workspace to
accommodate using the axiUm system.
We are currently in the process of setting up a prototype computerized operatory in our First-floor Clinic
(formerly referred to as Diagnosis and Emergency).
This will comprise a computer that includes a flatscreen display on an articulating arm that can be either
used by the student at the back of the operator or
swung out beside the patient for patient consultation.
Digital radiographs ultimately will be available for
viewing on the display rather than by using the viewbox
at the rear of the operatory. The computer set-up will
also include a keyboard and a mouse for data input
and navigation through the software. We are also
hoping to make medical resources such as CPS and
pubmed available via a Web browser at each operatory
so that information such as drug interactions can be
referenced at chair side.
We are steadily progressing toward the August 2009
“Go Live” date, at which point we will transition from
using the current and now-obsolete computer system
that has been in use since the 1980s.
10
SYSTEM
The advantages for our students are many, including
the following:
1. Students will have more information about
patient-care, which will enable them to better
enhance the patient-provider relationship.
2. The system will provide better control of the
assessment of as well as immediate feedback
regarding the students’ work.
3. Students can provide feedback to reassess the
configurations of both the software system and
the physical environments in which they work.
4. Students will be able contribute to the quality
of their own education by participating in the
implementation of the axiUm software system.
5. Students will be trained and educated within
a learning environment that uses up-to-date
technology, similar to what they later will
encounter in their professional practices.
During the month of March we began the process
of testing and evaluating the computer set-up in
the prototype operatory by having faculty, staff, and
students “test drive” the prototype in a simulated
patient treatment setting. The feedback from this
testing will be used to finalize the design used in all
of our clinical spaces – the Main Clinic (2nd floor),
the Third-floor Clinic, and the First-floor Clinic.
Areas such as Oral Surgery and Radiology will require
additional fine-tuning due to the specialized nature of
the set-up of each of these operatories. The installation of the computers and monitors is scheduled to
take place in late May and early June. We are planning
on having the hardware as well as the software tested
during our Summer Clinic. This will then pave the
way for our anticipated “Go Live” date in August.
In various locations throughout each of our clinical
areas, student work can be approved by faculty using
card reader technology (also known as magnetic
card swipe, “mag stripe,” etc.). This allows the
possibility for on-the-spot approval and grading of the
students’ work, and also enables the faculty member
to do the grading at a later time. All full- and half-time
faculty members will have access to axiUm in their
offices. Several instructor workstations will also be
available in the clinical areas for part-time faculty to
do their grading.
In summary, we are in the midst of a pivotal time in the
history of the College of Dentistry. We are excited to be
within a few months of the completion of this project
and look forward to more thoroughly equipping our
graduates for using the latest technology available to
them in their dental careers.
If you would like additional information on the axiUm
Implementation Project or on how you can partner
with/assist the College in this endeavour, please
contact us using the “Keep in Touch” or “Gift” forms
located at the back of Recall.
Clearly, axiUm is a very robust and thorough system.
Although the software is very intuitive, user training
will be provided and probably available in late spring
and early summer.
Kevin Fuglerud,
Manager of Finance and Administration
Alan Deschner, Project Manager
Toby Coté, System Support Specialist
CHECK IT OUT
Take a look at the College of Dentistry Web site for updates on the College
and back issues of Recall: http://www.usask.ca/dentistry
11
(L-R) Jonida Seferi, (patient), Lindsay Woodhouse
COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY/
NATIONAL SCHOOL OF
DENTAL THERAPY
2008–2009 CLINICS
JOINT FIELD
e
2009 marked th
February-March
ic
our joint field clin
third iteration of
ol
ho
Sc
the National
pilot project with
m
This is a com uof Dental Therapy.
h effort in which
nity-based outreac
al
ts team with dent
our dental studen
nt
to deliver de al
therapy students
facing significant
care to patients
iers and oral health
access-to-care barr
year, our teams
disparities. This
ns
mote First Natio
worked in the re
ndy Bay and Fond
communities of Sa
right) in Northern
du Lac (see map
e
e believe that thes
Saskatchewan. W
riences enhance
field clinic expe
l
inical and cultura
our students’ cl
ith
w
oviding them
competencies by pr
d life experiences
enriched clinical an
d
more urban an
outside of the
e
Th
s.
inic setting
southern dental cl
COLLEGE OF
DENTISTRY
Lindsay
YAWORSKY
Nicole
ADAMS
STUDENT
preciation of each
students gain an ap
programs and help
other’s respective
what it is to work
develop a sense of
ional dental team
in an inter-profess
hope that in future
environment. We
llege’s Year Four
years all of the Co
rt of a significant
students will be pa
e.
outreach experienc
Dr. Gerry Uswak
Krista
MAEDEL
Angela
ASH
TEAMS
AT FIELD
CLINICS
Fond du Lac
Brian
PHEE
Jason
LANGIN
Cory
deJONG
Nekky
JAMAL
Erin
ELLIS
Navneet
BHULLAR
Sandy Bay
12
12
Cyrille
GAUDET
Conner
HENDRY
Philip
EI
H NZELM
Eric
NELSON
N
R
E
H
T
R
O
N
E
R
U
S
O
EXP
A TALL FISH TALE
one
munity of just over
Sandy Bay is a com
the province
the eastern side of
on
le
op
pe
nd
sa
ou
th
the
northern beauty of
in the breathtaking
.
Precambrian Shield
I
at we were
’t seem to know th
dn
di
ity
un
m
m
co
ting kids
rger
m school the la
grabbed unsuspec
e
fro
w
ay
e
aw
tim
r
ng
ou
tti
l
in
ge
fil
to
the hope of
and “invited” them
rthern there, so
ol
no
ho
of
s
sc
e
It all started with
ke
la
th
y
of
ph
s
m the hallway
e knew it, our
ng trip to the tro
a couple of fro
And then before w
x,
on a tw0-week fishi
.
bo
ns
io
le
at
ck
in
ta
am
a
ex
ations,
ith
al
eared w
emergency examin
first-year for dent
e
ith
w
m
ll
Saskatchewan. G
so
fu
d
ed
an
ck
s,
pa
ep
as
w
er, we
pair of forc
Sandy schedule
atments. Howev
to
tre
l
y
na
ne
fishing rods, a
ca
ur
jo
ot
a
ro
d
on
of “schedule”
extractions, an
t, we set off
rms and concepts
dental equipmen
arrived we were
te
e
e
w
th
at
ce
th
on
,
ed
er
iz
ev
al
by in the
re
. How
e but loosely abided
over and we soon
ar
n
”
Bay, Saskatchewan
ze
es
fro
tim
e
t
er
en
w
m
s
nt
ke
ply on a
ppoi
ed. The la
d up working sim
rtunately, and “a
de
Fo
en
shockingly surpris
n.
n
te
oo
of
at
e
sk
w
Sa
ger back in
community, so
had left our ice au
to kill time, we
so
ve basis.
s
an
pl
r
he
ot
me
first-come first-ser
Dr. Uswak had so
n so busy
e dental work.
and we were ofte
y
da
decided to do som
y
er
ev
by
w
fle
break
eded The time
break (our lunch
ne
h
be
nc
lu
ld
a
ou
w
ke
k
ta
or
w
to
at we forgot
ments . . . oh
ea of how much
town, we were th
sterilize our instru
We got our first id
to
to
in
d
ed
lle
us
ro
n
e
te
w
of
as
back at
as
ew
when,
e dental assistants
” who didn’t tim
om
th
in that community
es
ou
aw
m
r
e
ou
ng
d
ru
se
“g
is
m
gained
iker with
at that how we
e two weeks we
os
as
th
w
It
in
stopped by a hitchh
e.
gh
ok
ou
sm
th
a
al
d
but just wante
extractions than
t school)! And
really want a ride
g root canals and
have our work cu
in
ld
do
ou
e
w
nc
y
rie
el
lik
pe
e
ex
w
ntal school
more
ized
l of fourth-year de
al
point that we real
g
rin
du
ve
ha
general
we would
setting to see the
up
er
out for us.
th
ra
as
w
it
s,
ess it
e Eco- on campu
e community. I gu
th
om
H
of
e
on
th
iti
in
nd
ic
co
in
cently erupted
eshift dental cl
oral health care
we were joined
We set up a mak
e had to extract re
w
e,
n
er
he
Th
w
.
e
ol
m
ho
ho
sc
t
l
children
hi
e loca
elementary school
an, Brooke really
m
on
re
nomics room in th
s
Ba
ar
l
ol
ta
m
an
st
Ch
fir
y
broke
ent
am, namel
therapy perman
e occasions really
al
os
nt
th
de
by the rest of our te
y;
e
ca
re
de
th
e
l
iv
al
m Arneson,
due to extens
McRitchie, and Ki
ental Therapy in
D
of
ol
ho
Sc
l
na
r hearts.
Natio
a little slow as ou
students from the
e
er
w
ys
da
of
le
first coup
Prince Albert. The
13
ndy
Cory de Jong at Sa
ndy Bay
Nekky Jamal at Sa
Bay
Bay
Ice fishing at Sandy
nd du Lac
Nicole Adams at Fo
erapist Kendra
y, Nicole Adams, th
rsk
wo
Ya
y
sa
nd
Li
)
(L-R
Fond du Lac
Refreshment time at
14
4
Cowie
One of the Sandy Bay field clinic teams: (L-R) Cory de Jong, Dr. Gerry Uswak, Chantal Bareman, Nekky Jamal, Kim Arneson, Brooke McRitchie
This experience certainly opened our
eyes to the inaccessibility and lack
of availability of oral health care for
Saskatchewan’s northern population.
Although we had known (but in theory
alone!) that there are access-to-care
issues in our province’s First Nations
communities, we were completely
unaware of the severity of the
situation. However, in Saskatchewan,
we are fortunate to have dental
therapists who can play an integral
role in delivering dental education,
prevention strategies, and treatment
to communities lacking oral health
care services.
We were lucky and pleased to be
invited to use the resident dental
therapist’s ice fishing shack, where
on one occasion we caught the
ugliest fish you could ever imagine
– a burbot. On another of our many
trips ice fishing, we ended up in the
middle of a fishing derby where first
prize was $1000 for the heaviest
catch. Unfortunately, when Chantal
and Cory reeled in the surely-derbywinning fish, our high moral standard
prevented us from entering late and
taking home the loot (however, if we
had won the money, we could have
afforded the “fresh” apples at the local
“grocery” store). Throughout the trip,
we had a blast with Chantal, Brooke,
and Kim, whose antics added a lot of
fun to our days.
We also had a great time with our
mentor, Dr. Uswak, who gave us
support when we needed it but also
gave us the kind of freedom that would
allow us to grow as future clinicians.
The experience we gained in Sandy
Bay greatly surpassed any experience
that could have been obtained in
equivalent time back on campus. In
fact, we wish we could have remained
there longer. We recommend this
program to all students of the College
and hope the northern rotations
become a permanent component of
the dental curriculum.
Nekky Jamal and Cory de Jong
Class of 2009
VIEW FROM THE TOP
The community of Fond du Lac,
Saskatchewan, a fly-in community,
is located on the north shore of Lake
Athabasca, about sixty kilometres south
of the Northwest Territories border.
We arrived in the friendly community
of Fond du Lac via Transwest Air on
a brisk February Sunday afternoon.
Rose Mercredi-Zinc, a local Fond
du Lacker in her final year of Dental
Therapy, met our plane and immediately took us on a (very brief!) fiveminute tour of the reserve.
Our accommodations at the house of
Flora and Robert Augier were great,
including the bright pink spongepainted room that the two of us
shared; custom-made for good
laughs and good photos! And from
15
the window of that very bright room,
our view of Lake Athabasca was
incredible.
Our clinic was set up in the Home
Economics lab in Father Gamasch’s
School. Five chairs with ancient
portable Adec-like carts (plus a few
hiccups along the way) and we were
ready to see patients. Our supervising
dentist, Dr. John Steel, was fantastic!
And the patients were great—when
they showed up. As a result, we
learned a lot about patience (not just
patients!), and had plenty of time to
chat and to learn about Dr. Steel’s
experiences in his almost 40 years as
a dentist.
Friendships quickly formed with
our field clinic partners, namely the
dental therapists. Those three—Rose,
Jennifer, and Kendra—kept us well
entertained. Fun times at the local
“new” restaurant, often followed by
tea at Rose’s parents’ house, made
for great memories. We learned a lot
about the culture of the Dene, tried
caribou meat for the first time, enjoyed
locally made bannock, got close to a
“werewolf” (aka a wolverine), and met
plenty of interesting people along the
way. A good experience all around –
you should go! And be sure to ask
for Alex—he just might take you ice
fishing!
Nicole Adams and Lindsay Yaworsky
Class of 2009
PROSTHODONTIC TECHNICAL
SUPPORT SERVICES ENHANCED
AT THE COLLEGE
Carlton Dental Laboratory is providing technical
services for the Dental Clinic, utilizing space (Room
336, Dental Clinic Building) leased from the University
of Saskatchewan. Initially, they will be here Mondays
and Tuesdays, offering shade selection and shade
alterations as well as fabrication of student cases.
Gradually, Carlton will begin to offer a broader array
of services. Over time, the plan is to have available
the fabrication of fixed, removable, and implant
prostheses, using their facilities at the College and
elsewhere. Carlton’s technicians will be available
on-base to discuss and assist with the fabrication
of prostheses. They will also have a presence in the
clinics to support our clinical functions which in turn
will provide their technicians with the opportunity to
interact with practicing clinicians, thereby providing a
mutually beneficial educational experience.
The College has not had a broad scope of in-house
technical support for years. We are confident that
through co-operation and consideration, our relationship with Carlton will evolve to serve the best interests of
all stakeholders, offering an unprecedented opportunity
for improved service, enhanced experiential learning,
and increased efficiencies in patient-care.
A DATE TO REMEMBER
The Kent McLeod Memorial Classic Golf Tournament
Saturday, September 12, 2009
Moon Lake Golf and Country Club, Saskatoon
The Saskatchewan Dental Students Society is pleased to announce
our upcoming annual golf tournament! The Kent McLeod Memorial
Classic is named after Kent McLeod, a 1996 graduate of the College
of Dentistry. Despite his youth, keen ambition, and active lifestyle,
Kent suffered a heart attack and passed away in 1998. Memories of
his friendly personality, his quiet manner, and his love of the game
of golf inspired the initiation of the Kent McLeod Memorial Classic
Golf Tournament, an event supported by the wholehearted endorsement of his family and friends. The 2009 event will be the 10th annual
tourney.
Sponsors are encouraged to golf in the tournament, with additional
guests welcome to join golfers for the evening dinner. Proceeds from
the tournament will go toward dental students’ scholarships, and your
support will ensure the continued success of the scholarship fund.
For further information, please contact:
Meghan Betnar ([email protected]) or
Allison Atchison ([email protected])
Class of 2011
16
"First Term Operative"
(NOTE: DECIDED TO DO A RAP SONG
TO BE CREATIVE & HAVE SOME FUN)
First day of classes,
I was sitting, having hot flashes.
Nervous about the academic struggle,
With a busy schedule I’ll need to juggle.
IT SUPPORT STAFF
The Information Technology staff play a vital technical
and advisory role for faculty, staff, and students
at the College of Dentistry in support of teaching,
research, and patient-care. Their assistance and
expertise allows the College to operate efficiently
and effectively in its mission of delivering top-notch
undergraduate education.
Sitting in the dentist chair,
To my back, wow, that’s unfair.
We learned about ergonomics,
Way more fun than learning about genomics.
Listened to speeches,
To teach us how to use our hand pieces.
The drills are high power,
But my muscles are still aching,
These hand instruments making my mind sour.
Gord Unger has been
associated with the College
since the fall of 2001 as the
primary desktop specialist and
continues serving in that role
every Tuesday afternoon.
The ceramic component of composite,
Reduces polymerization shrinkage, a huge problem of it.
Changes the ratio of filler to methyl methacrolite,
Releasing tension across teeth, molecularly, not at eyesight.
By adding composite in small increments,
C-factor that often presents,
Will be reduced,
And there you have it, early steps for a perfect restoration produced.
It is best to bevel a composite preparation,
The result of a perfect transition to normal tooth surrounding is fun.
Amalgam bonding strength and sustainability improves,
With the use of retention grooves.
Bryce Taylor joined the
College in February 2009
and contributes desktop
expertise every Wednesday
and Thursday afternoon.
Toby Coté has been a full-time
member of the IT staff since
October 2008. Her primary
function is that of support
specialist for the new axiUm
software system.
Amalgam must be used quickly,
As it hardens, unequivocally.
Fill and condense,
Removal of margin excess,
Final occlusal shaping,
With a cleoid-discoid instrument, oh this prep I am for sure saving!
We learned about class 1 restorations,
Occlusal fissures are where we find these ugly bacterial decorations.
They say practise makes perfect,
So I worked hard for this class 2 project.
My proximal surface restorations,
Evolved from confusion to ‘no hesitations’.
Took me a couple tries to get the class 5 restoration,
As I didn’t make the preparation far enough into the gingival third location.
Rhyming dentistry terms is quite challenging,
Always seem to be scavenging,
Through my mind’s list of vocabulary,
Though doing a rap song was completely voluntary.
A basic two-paragraph template,
Nah! A rap song formulated to stimulate.
Poorvi Brahmania
Class of 2012
17
COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY AND COLLEGE OF
DENTAL SURGEONS OF SASKATCHEWAN
JOINT MENTORSHIP PROGRAM
ABOUT THE PROGRAM:
The Joint Mentorship program is a partnership
program between the University of Saskatchewan
College of Dentistry and the College of Dental
Surgeons of Saskatchewan. The mission of the
program primarily is to provide mentoring to thirdand fourth-year students that will build on and
support their formal didactic and clinical training to
pave the way for a smooth and successful transition
from graduation to their dental practices. The College
of Dentistry will try to complement mentors’ and
students’ geographic preferences, areas of interest,
and other expressed wishes when establishing
mentorship matches. The mentorship program is
embedded in the overall third- and fourth-year dental
curriculum, in the Practice Management course.
BENEFITS:
v Students are matched with mentors who will
provide valuable insights into types of practices
and patient relations.
v Students can benefit from their mentors’
networking connections and accrued expertise
in the profession.
v Students in the program have access to
“shadowing” experiences in established
practices.
v Students are encouraged/have opportunity to
ask questions about the profession, practice
management, and other areas of relevance.
v Students gain practical knowledge on
running a small business.
v Mentors gain an understanding of the personal
and professional expectations of the students.
v Mentors increase opportunities for students’
transition planning by networking with
potential candidates.
v Mentors gain unique continuing
education opportunities.
v Students have opportunity to interact with
experienced dentists in non-confrontational
and supportive environments.
v Students gain an appreciation of the need for
and benefits of participation in professional
organizations following graduation.
v Increased connection evolves between dental
students, private dentists, College of Dental
Surgeons of Saskatchewan, and the province.
THANK YOU
The College would like to extend a sincere “Thank You” to Dr. Keith King (Class of 1993),
Dr. Jagajit Dhillon (Class of 2002), and Dr. Volinder Dhesi (Class of 2003) of Discover Dental, for their
recent Gift in Kind donations to the College of Dentistry.
This past fall Dr. King graciously donated a CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomographic) I-CAT scanner
to the College. This tool is extremely valuable for providing instruction to our students in the use of
digital radiography. A few months earlier, in the summer of 2008, Discover Dental generously provided
the College with a Panoramic/Cephalometric Orthophos X-Ray Unit.
Both of these donations have assisted the College in our efforts to keep our teaching program up-to-date
with current technologies. If you are interested in making donations to the College, please contact Janet
Sklarchuk at [email protected] or by telephone at (306)966-5121.
18
Engagements &
Marriages
Krisa McCann (Class of 2008) wed Jonathon Nataraj
on September 26, 2008, in Saskatoon, and the two
spent their honeymoon in Greece.
Congratulations to April Sinclair and Chris Walter
(both Class of 2010) on their engagement.
Their wedding will take place in October 2009.
Leemai Lafontaine (Class of 2011) and Rosanna
Jamilano Shavron were married in Regina on August
8, 2008, and honeymooned in Maui.
Ashley Wolfe (Class of 2010) recently became
engaged to Mark Slovack. Wedding plans are set
for June 2010.
Krisa McCann & Jonathon Nataraj
Chris Walter & April Sinclair
Rosanna Jamilano Shavron &
Leemai Lafontaine
Ashley Wolfe & Mark Slovack
19
FULL-TIME CLINICAL-TRACK APPOINTMENT
(NON-TENURE-TRACK) OPPORTUNITY
6. Have an interest in and the potential for limited
research involvement.
The College of Dentistry is seeking interested
candidates for full-time clinical-track (non-tenuretrack) teaching positions to support our pre-clinical
and clinical educational activities. Clinical-track
teaching appointments recognize the unique and
vital role that clinicians play in dental education. The
job duties focus primarily on pre-clinical, laboratory,
and clinical supervision of students; mentoring
student progress; and coordinating all aspects of
patient treatment and ensuring that these meet
professional standards.
Assigned job duties:
The ideal candidate will have the following
qualifications:
1. Seven (7) half-days per week teaching in
undergraduate preclinical and clinical settings.
2. Mentorship of students.
3. Service in support of the College’s
teaching mission.
4. Serve on College-level and University-level
committees (if applicable).
5. Three (3) half-days per week faculty
clinical practice allotment.
1. Hold a DDS/DMD from an accredited
North American educational program.
2. Hold or is able to attain full licensure to
practice general dentistry in Saskatchewan.
3. Hold advanced dental education
(desirable but not required).
4. Have garnered considerable clinical experience
through years of clinical practice.
5. Have an interest and/or experience in preclinical
and clinical supervision of students.
The successful candidate’s initial appointment
will be at the rank of Clinical Assistant Professor.
Salary will be commensurate with the candidate’s
education and experience as guided by the Collective
Bargaining Agreement between the University of
Saskatchewan and the University of Saskatchewan
Faculty Association. The initial appointment will be
a continuous, three-year rolling term appointment
and renewal will be based upon annual performance
reviews including peer and student assessments.
In Memoriam
Sydney Ralph Gelmon was born in Winnipeg,
Manitoba, on June 25, 1916, and died in Vancouver on
January 8, 2009. He is survived by his wife, Miriam,
and his children Larry (Sarah Jones) of Nairobi, Kenya;
Paula (Ken Langford) of Vancouver; Karen (Peter
Busby) of Vancouver; and Sherril (Phil Kreitner) of
Portland, Oregon; as well as six grandchildren and
three step-grandchildren.
Syd pioneered a number of dental techniques for
children with special needs, including reconstructive
dentistry for children born with cleft palate, and was
a founding member of the American Association
for Dentistry for the Handicapped in the late 1950s.
For many years, he taught basics of dentistry to
medical and nursing students at the University of
Saskatchewan, joining the faculty of the College of
Dentistry at its inception in 1967.
Syd grew up in Sturgis, Preeceville, Rhein, Yorkton,
and Winnipeg. He graduated from the University of
Minnesota School of Dentistry in 1938, then joined the
Dental Corps of the Canadian Armed Forces. At the
end of the war, he settled in Saskatoon where he
married Miriam Chertkow in 1945. He practiced
dentistry from the 1940s until his retirement in 1988.
In 1994, he and Miriam moved to Vancouver to be
closer to their children and grandchildren. Syd will be
remembered for his intellect, strong opinions, sense
of humour, and generosity. The College of Dentistry
extends heartfelt condolences to his loved ones.
20
SASKATOON AND DISTRICT
DENTAL SOCIETY
The Saskatoon and District
great, entertaining Christmas
Dental Society continues
party (including a separate
to offer great value and
gathering for the kids).
beneficial programs and
events to its members.
One of the important
Each year, members can
functions of the Saskatoon
accumulate
continuing
and District Dental Society
education points as they
has been to support the
attend
seven
monthly
Student Clinician Table Clinic
lectures or presentations.
presentations, a role it has
The monthly meetings are
maintained since at least
held at one of Saskatoon’s
the early 1980s, thus dating
fine restaurants or clubs,
Dr. Sujata Randhawa and back to the era of Dr. Ernest
so in addition to the
Dr. David Stark, 1989 Table Clinics Ambrose’s years as Dean
information session, each
of the College of Dentistry.
gathering
features
a
Presentation technology has
pleasant social gathering and excellent meal. Meeting
changed significantly since the days of solely “large
places have included the University of Saskatchewan’s
poster” clinics, and use of impressive electronic
Faculty Club and Boffins; the Saskatoon Golf and
formats now is common. The clinics remain a valuable
Country Club; Riverside Country Club; The Willows; the
learning tool for both the students who prepare them
Bessborough, Sheraton, and Radisson Hotels; and,
and the audience who sees them. It is anticipated
currently, the Saskatoon Club.
that the SDDS will continue to support this important
program for the foreseeable future.
Speakers are most often local, and very often are
specialist dentist members or dentist members
As the writer prepares this, he wishes that some of the
involved with organizations such as the College of
“historians” of the SDDS were available to verify some
Dental Surgeons of Saskatchewan and the Canadian
facts and dates, but many of the sources are involved
Dental Association. Many members and speakers are
in the annual Western Canada Dental Curling Bonspiel
graduates of the University of Saskatchewan or are
and are, therefore, otherwise predisposed. Perhaps,
faculty members there. Recent speakers have included
in future, a more complete and accurate history of the
Dr. Anjani Koneru, Dr. Francisco Otero, Dr. Gord
Society can be presented in Recall.
Johnson, Dr. Bernie White, Dr. David Stark, Dr. Blayne
Thibodeau, Dr. Lawrence Reimer, Dr. Dean Kolbinson,
We encourage all new grads to join the Saskatoon and
Dr. Gerry Uswak, and Dr. Garnet Packota. The SDDS
District Dental Society! For more information, please
is very fortunate to have this talented pool from which
contact Dr. Hilary Clark ([email protected]) or Dr.
to draw speakers.
David Stark ([email protected]).
The SDDS offers some great social activities, too,
including an annual spring golf tournament and a
Dr. Dave Stark
Class of 1990
Reunion News
Please let us know if your class is having or has had a reunion this year. Send us the
story along with photos, and we will share them in the next edition of Recall.
21
21
STUDENTS’
R
E
N
R
O
C
ing week
and trouble. The follow
s Pub Crawl,
was the Health Science
ain to show
which allowed us once ag
rs—literally,
off our College colou
sed up in its
since each college dres
eryone from
traditional colours. Ev
time picking
our College had an easy
thereof), as
out clothing (or lack
choice. It’s
purple is our colour of
we are small
safe to say that although
dominated
in numbers, our College
g.
the speaker all night lon
le of March
Well, it’s only the midd
ol year is
and yet another scho
. I would
se
quickly coming to a clo
successful
say that it’s been a rather
ntistry: to
year at the College of De
inter-class
date, at least three new
d, two or
relationships have starte
on good
more have ended (but
occurred,
terms), no divorces have
w babies
ne
and at least two dozen
have made
to oooh and aaah over
ar 4 class,
their arrivals. For the Ye
entful
mean
lmination of another ev
do
I
cu
e
d
Th
(an
ly
ful
pe
ho
ll
wi
this
ll be held
a good run
year at the College wi
hopefully) be the end of
na, where
e National
rrie,
March 28 at the ACT are
R) Alan Chernosky, Kris Cu
here at the College. Th
(Lbreak
students will attempt to
come and
the
ve
ha
s
s
van
am
Be
ex
nt
Tre
ard
Bo
e those terms very
d go again
or/alumni (and I do us
ss
ofe
pr
the
gone, but may come an
y
ma
we
of the annual
se now in the past,
ar reign as champions
-ye
ee
thr
ly)
se
loo
for some of us. With the
l.
ne
tch as
me. Come out and wa
light at the end of the tun
a
ga
e
ey
se
ck
to
ho
le
of
ab
pr
be
ntlly
de
tua
stu
ac
o of Abdulla and
, backed by the African du
nts
de
stu
the
m
fro
ay
th some grit
mories we take aw
rprise the opponents wi
su
to
k
loo
al,
Jam
For most of us, the me
do
to
-contact,”
year will have very little
r before seen in a “non
ve
ne
ss
ne
gh
tou
d
an
the 2008–2009 school
Those
is is definitely the
umphs and defeats.
” game of hockey. Th
dly
ien
“fr
with our educational tri
ll
sti
d
(an
y one year to make
nts’ year!
dentures that took nearl
ies that we could stude
nc
ete
mp
co
ng
ali
sc
se
never fit!) or tho
y to
s that
has been a wonderful wa
forgotten. The memorie
ar
ye
be
e
g
tir
lon
en
ll
wi
the
,
ss
all
pa
in
r
ve
ne
events All
provided us with
the numerous College
iversity career and has
un
a
off
p
ca
will live on will be of
is
Th
.
er the years
er the past four years
ries to look back on ov
mo
me
d
fon
ny
ma
that have occurred ov
al
annu
er school
with such events. The
le of March and yet anoth
dd
mi
e
Th
.
me
co
to
past January was filled
ddle of
piel was held in the mi
ming to a close . . .
Dentistry Curling Bons
skill year is quickly co
e
Th
al.
en
om
en
ph
s
wa
January and the turnout
the
l, but the costumes for
ua
us
as
or
displayed was po
led Ben Wilson
r than ever, which, coup
hte
tig
d
an
r
tte
be
re
we
t
Class of 2009
even
ht full of fun, laughter,
nig
a
for
de
ma
s,
da
so
with a few
, Kris Currie, Lauren Bull
(L-R) Jenny Tran, Jill Kulyk
22
Dan Truong
McIntosh, Trent Bevans,
er
nif
Jen
,
rrie
Cu
s
Kri
R)
(L-
d Jill Kulyk
(L-R) Allison Atchison an
wl
Health Sciences Pub Cra
Abdulla
lson, Karl Martin, Adam
(L-R) Brian Phee, Ben Wi
uja Patel
(L-R) Angela Ash and An
Angela Ash
(L-R) Terran Strang and
23
TIDBITS
Cindy Sanche joins the College
as a casual Clerical Assistant.
Welcome aboard, Cindy!
for dentists across Canada. If you have any inquiry or
questions regarding this program, please contact Dr.
Komiyama by telephone (306) 966-5143; by Fax (306)
966-5142; or by e-mail at [email protected]
On Friday, June 5, 2009, the
University of Saskatchewan
Board of Governors will honour
faculty and staff who have
contributed 25 years of service
Cindy Sanche
to the institution at a special
banquet. The College of Dentistry wishes to join the
Governors in thanking Brian Ambrose, Maggie Leung,
and Dr. Brent Moulding for their years of dedication to
the education of our undergraduate students.
The Table Clinic project conducted by Dr. Amanda
Uzelman (Class of 2008) and Dr. Jocelyne Hodgson
(Class of 2008), “Comparison between Female Dentists
and Physicians: Factors Affecting Career Satisfaction,”
will be presented at the 87th International Association
for Dental Research meeting on Friday, April 3, 2009,
in Miami, Florida. The two then-students conducted
this project under supervision of Dr. Gerry Uswak
(Principal Investigator) and Dr. Kunio Komiyama (CoInvestigator). Both Dr. Uzelman and Dr. Hodgson are
currently practicing general dentistry in Saskatoon.
Congratulations, Amanda and Jocelyne!
Aryn Schmidt (Class of 2002) is off to the Brier in Calgary
March 7–15, 2009. Skip Joel Jordison, third Scott Bitz,
second Aryn Schmidt, and lead Dean Hicke celebrated
their Saskatchewan Provincial Curling Championship
victory on February 8, 2009.
At the joint meeting of the International Association
for Dental Research (IADR), the Canadian Association
for Dental Research (CADR), and the American
Association of Dental Research (AADR) to be held
April 1–4, 2009 in Miami, Florida, Dr. Maged Etman
(as Principal Investigator) along with Daryn Bikey
(Class of 2010) and Ibrahim Muradi (Class of 2010)
will be in attendance to present the following:
Congratulations to Dr. Maria Copete and Dr. Petrus
Gomes on the news that a SHRF (Saskatchewan Health
Research Foundation) Research Group Development
Grant to the amount of $100,000 has been awarded
to the Bone and Joint Imaging Group, of which grant
co-applicants Drs. Copete and Gomes are members.
v Dr. Maged Etman (Session Chair): “Outcomes
of Prosthodontic Investigations and Biological
Investigations”
The College of Dentistry continues to assist the
College of Dental Surgeons of Saskatchewan (CDSS)
continuing education courses. The College’s Infection
Control Quality Assurance Services (Director: Dr.
Kunio Komiyama), in conjunction with the CDSS,
provided a one-day CE course on “Health Sciences
Interdisciplinary Relationships: Medical and Dental
Implications” on Friday, March 13, in Saskatoon. The
guest speakers from the University of Saskatchewan
College of Medicine included Dr. Vernon Heppner (TB
Control), Dr. Stephen Sanche (Infectious Diseases),
Dr. Kurt Williams (Infectious Diseases), Dr. Thomas
Wilson (Internal Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology),
and Dr. Lawrence Worobetz (Gastroenterology).
These speakers have been extensively involved in
teaching dental students in various dental courses.
The College of Dentistry continues to provide infection
control quality assurance services and consultation
v Dr. Maged Etman (Speaker), Daryn Bikey, and
Ibrahim Muradi: “Clinical Evaluation of Removable
Partial Dentures over Three Time Periods”
v Daryn Bikey (Presenter), Ibrahim Muradi, and
Dr. Maged Etman: “Clinical Performance of
Removable Partial Dentures Delivered by Undergraduates”
v Ibrahim Muradi (Presenter), Dr. Maged Etman,
Dr. Alan Kilistoff, and Daryn Bikey: “Retrospective
Clinical Study of Removable Partial Dentures:
Gender and Location”
24
Our
Dental Family
GIANNA PEARL
NOAH CADEN
BENJAMIN BLAKE & MADISON
GRETA ERIS
BRIGGS TAYLOR
NIXON WALLACE
CAILYN ROSE
NUHA PATEL
CHANDRA ELISE
Monica Taylor (Class of 2002)
and husband Roy are pleased to
announce the arrival of Gianna Pearl
Taylor, born October 28, 2008—baby
sister to Linaya.
Jonida Seferi (Class of 2008) and
husband Simon Kapaj are excited to
announce the birth of their daughter,
Greta Eris Kapaj, on December 20,
2008.
Congratulations to Chelsea Schmidt
(Class of 2006) and husband Scott
on the birth of their son, Noah Caden
Schmidt, born August 24, 2008.
It’s a boy! Briggs Taylor Baker was
born February 25, 2009, to proud
parents Brad Baker (Class of 2010)
and wife, Karen, and big brother
Benjamin.
Cody Bowtell (Class of 2007), wife
Danielle, and big sister Madison
welcome the newest addition to the
family—Benjamin Blake Bowtell,
born December 15, 2008.
Elias Cooper would like to introduce
his baby brother, Nixon Wallace
Cooper—born March 4, 2009, to
Jeremy Cooper (Class of 2010) and
wife, Rachelle.
25
Part-time faculty member Dr. Laura
Metcalfe and Aaron Bois announce
the arrival of Cailyn Rose Bois on
December 18, 2008.
Nuha Patel was born February
16, 2009, to Dr. Fatima Coovadia
and part-time faculty member
Dr. Abe Patel.
It’s a girl! Mohan Teekasingh (Class
of 1996) and wife Denise announce
the arrival of Chandra Elise on March
11, 2009.
COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY GIFT FORM:
Pre-authorized Chequing Option:
This is my:
T Monthly gift of P $5, P $10, or P $25 for ____ months.
(Monthly gifts can be made by pre-authorized chequing, credit card, or
post-dated cheques — please indicate T 1st or T 15th of month as
withdrawal date)
T Annual gift of $ _____________ for ___________ years.
(Annual gifts can be made by pre-authorized chequing or credit card)
T One- time gift of $ ____________________________.
To support:
TScholarships ______________________________
(please specify)
TClinic computer system _______________________
TDental equipment __________________________
(please specify)
I hereby authorize the University of Saskatchewan to withdraw
the following amount each month from my account on the
T1st or T15th of the month (check one). My cheque marked
VOID is enclosed.
Account ____________________________________
Bank name __________________________________
Bank address ________________________________
Bank account number ___________________________
This authorization is valid from _____________, 20 ______,
until _____________, 20 ______,
or upon receipt of cancellation in writing.
Start date:_____________ End date:_______________
TOther __________________________________
(please specify)
Paid by:
T Pre-authorized chequing (please fill out information on right)
T Cheque or money order enclosed
Gift Recognition:
In appreciation, we are proud to honour our donors with invitations to
special events, listing on donor rolls (in print and on-line), and in the
U of S alumni publication, the Green and White.
(made payable to the University of Saskatchewan)
T MasterCard
T Visa
(please include your 16-digit credit card number below)
_I_I_I_ _I_I_I_ _I_I_I_ _I_I_I_
Expiry Date:__________ /__________ (Month/Year)
Signature: ___________________ Date: _________________
Cardholder’s Name: _________________________________
Address: _______________________________________
____________________________________________
E-mail Address:___________________________________
Convenient Giving Options:
On-line Secure Gift Form: www.usask.ca/advancement
(click on “Make a Gift” then “On-line Giving” and specify the designation of
your gift in the Comments section)
Preferred published name:
_________________________________________
This is a joint gift with: ___________________________
If you choose not to be publicly recognized for your support, we
will honour your wishes. Please check any or all of the following:
T Please do not publish my name with regard to this gift.
T Please do not publish my name with regard to all gifts.
T I do not wish to be invited to donor recognition events.
Forward to:
Janet Sklarchuk
College of Dentistry
University of Saskatchewan
Room 332, Dental Clinic Building
105 Wiggins Road
Saskatoon SK S7N 5E4
Give by Visa or MasterCard anytime at: 1-800-699-1907
As the purse is emptied, the heart is filled.
—Victor Hugo
Charitable donations play a very important role in assisting
26 the College of Dentistry to maintain and expand its
standard of excellence in education of our dental students and patient-care in the community.
KEEP IN TOUCH
Is the College of Dentistry Recall of interest to you?
Is it keeping you sufficiently informed about fellow alumni and about goings-on in and around the College?
If you have news for Recall—new job, addition to the family, work or vacation adventure, reunion news, change
of address—please let us know. We will update our records and put your news in the appropriate section.
Name___________________________________________________________Class of ___________________
Home Address____________________________________________________ Postal Code________________
Business Address__________________________________________________ Postal Code________________
Telephone (Residence)________________________________ (Business)______________________________
E-mail______________________________________________________________________________________
Contact Preference:
K Residence
K
Business
News and Comments_________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
Is there a particular topic or interest area or profile that you’d enjoy reading about in Recall?
Please indicate:_____________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
I would be interested in contributing a general interest article for publication in Recall on the subject of
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___________________________________________________________________________________________
Please contact us ([email protected]) with your comments
and class news—we would love to hear from you!
27
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