Proposal for Authorization to Implement New Program

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Proposal for Authorization to Implement New Program
Collaborative, Online Bachelor of Science Degree in Heath and
Wellness Management
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
University of Wisconsin-River Fall
University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
University of Wisconsin-Superior
With administrative and financial support from UW-Extension
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Introduction
Healthcare in the United States is rapidly changing. According to the Center for Disease Control,
chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and cancer cause 7 in 10 deaths and account
for 75% annual medical costs. (http://www.cdc.gov/workplacehealthpromotion/businesscase/
reasons/rising.html)
Much of the suffering, disability, and early death caused by chronic diseases is attributable to
modifiable lifestyle behaviors. (http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm)
The economic burden of these preventable conditions not only impacts individuals, but also
employers. Employers provide 61% of Americans under the age of 65 with health insurance, the
premiums for which have nearly doubled in the last decade. In addition, because chronic conditions
are by definition not cured but managed for the rest of an individual’s life, they impact all aspects of
life. Thus employers also bear costs from chronic conditions in the form of absenteeism, reduced
productivity, injuries on the job, short-term disability, and disability pension insurance on top of
direct medical costs. Employees also share this burden through lower wages, higher insurance
costs, and a reduced quality of life. Ultimately, many of the costs are shared by taxpayers. “Through
publicly funded programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, the government pays a significant portion
of direct medical costs for their beneficiaries.” (Avi Dor. George Washington University Research
Report, Sept. 2010.) In brief, it is much less expensive and far better for people’s lives to remain
healthy than to have to manage illnesses that could have been prevented.
Employers have begun to develop health promotion programs to encourage their employees to
live more healthfully. “Evidence continues to grow that well-designed and well-resourced health
promotion and disease prevention programs provide multi-faceted payback on investment. Peerreviewed evaluations and meta analyses show that return on investment (ROI) is achieved through
improved worker health, reduced benefit expense, and enhanced productivity.” (Zank and Friedsam,
2005.) Most recently, the importance of chronic disease prevention is evidenced by significant
funding provided for worksite wellness and health promotion by the "Health Care Reform Laws"
of 2010 (public laws 111–148 and 111-152) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
2009 (public law 111–5). These laws support “Healthy People 2020” objectives of reducing chronic
disease risk and promoting wellness in “the places where people live, work, learn, and play” by
incentivizing health insurance companies and worksites to reduce costs and enhance employee wellbeing.
There is a strong need for qualified individuals who can manage and administer the integration of
health and wellness culture across divisions, departments, and business units to reduce healthcare
costs, and improve productivity and employee well-being (Berry, Mirabito, and Baun. Harvard
Business Review, 2010). The Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management program will
prepare students to capitalize on that opportunity.
1. Program Identification
Title of Program
Bachelor of Science Degree Completion Program in Heath and Wellness Management
Department, College, School, or Functional Equivalent
This is a highly collaborative, interdisciplinary program. The departments and schools/colleges that
will offer courses toward this program on each campus are as follows.
At UW-La Crosse, the Heath and Wellness Management program will be housed in Department of
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Health Education and Health Promotion in the College of Science and Health.
At UW-River Falls, the Heath and Wellness Management program will be housed in the Department
of Health and Human Performance.
At UW-Stevens Point, the Heath and Wellness Management program will be housed within the
School of Health Promotion Human Development within the College of Professional Studies.
At UW-Superior, the Heath and Wellness Management program will be housed within the
Department of Health and Human Performance.
Timeline for Initiation
Pending approval by UW System and the Board of Regents in June 2011, the first classes for the
degree will be offered in Fall 2011.
Delivery
This degree completion program (second 63 credits of a 123 credit bachelor’s degree) will be
delivered fully online. It is currently not offered in any other format on any UW campus.
The first 60 credits of the degree consist of general education classes and prerequisites, and those
may be taken either online through the UW Colleges or several UW campuses, or they may be taken
in face-to-face formats on all UW campuses, as well as at other accredited institutions in Wisconsin
and elsewhere.
2. Context
History of Program
The multi-dimensional concept of wellness has deep and varied roots in many cultures, but it is only
now coming to the foreground as an essential part of our modern work lives. The reason for this
is simple: cost containment. Healthy people cost a company less money: their healthcare costs are
low, they are more productive, and they stay on the job. One case study cited in the December 2010
Harvard Business Review reveals that of a sample of 185 workers who were high-risk according to body
fat, blood pressure, anxiety, and other measures, more than one-half became low-risk by the end of a
voluntary, six-month wellness program. A control group showed no such improvement. In another
case study, MD Anderson Cancer Center found that over a six-year period its health and wellbeing department improved workers health and as a result reduced lost work days by 80%. “What’s
more, healthy employees stay with your company. A study by Towers Watson and the National
Business Group on Health shows that organizations with highly effective wellness programs report
significantly lower voluntary attrition than do those whose programs have low effectiveness (9%
vs. 15%). At the software firm SAS Institute, voluntary turnover is just 4%, thanks in part to such
a program; at the Biltmore tourism enterprise, the rate was 9% in 2009, down from 19% in 2005.”
(Harvard Business Review, December 2010, p. 106.)
Although employers are recognizing the importance of health and wellness programs for their
employees, there are very few higher education institutions that provide the education needed to run
these types of programs, and only the for-profit Kaplan University offers an online B.S. in Health
and Wellness.
Graduates of the University of Wisconsin Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management
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will be prepared for jobs as wellness program managers and related positions. They will understand
how to develop wellness programs, how to continually sell a wellness program throughout
a company, and how to evaluate programs on their effectiveness. They will gain a systems
understanding of health and wellness and how a wellness program must support the culture and
strategy of an organization and fit within it. The Health and Wellness Management program is a
holistic foundation to wellness management within the 21st Century business environment.
Four campuses in the UW System came together to develop this program: UW-La Crosse, UWRiver Falls, UW-Stevens Point, and UW-Superior. UW-Extension provided market research,
program coordination and leadership, corporate engagement, and connectivity to UW System, while
the campuses focused on the academic content, quality, and integrity of the program, as well as the
student registration, financial aid, and other support services.
UW-River Fall and UW-Superior are partners also on the B.S. in Sustainable Management program,
so they understand the partnership model and have been very helpful in helping the other campuses
adjust their operations to accommodate the program. UW-Stevens Point and UW-La Crosse are also
partnering to develop the B.S. Health and Information Technology and Management program, so all
four campuses are involved in collaborative efforts to increase programs for adult and nontraditional
students, and to increase access to the University of Wisconsin.
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Relation to Institutional and System Mission
The Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management (HWM) contributes directly to
the institutional mission of the University of Wisconsin System by supporting the University of
Wisconsin System’s Growth Agenda. The three components of the Growth Agenda are to increase
the number of degree holders in Wisconsin, increase the number of high paying jobs, and build
stronger communities. The HWM degree contributes to all three components of the Growth
Agenda by providing a degree that is in demand, supported by Wisconsin employers, and develops
competencies that enable graduates to help Wisconsin employers reduce costs while increasing
worker health and productivity. It is a degree targeted at adult and nontraditional students and thus
broadens access to the university.
The HWM degree supports the institutional missions of the four partner campuses by contributing
to the core of liberal education by developing communication, critical thinking, problem-solving,
analytical, leadership, teamwork, and collaboration skills. Furthermore, this is a multidisciplinary
degree that helps build bridges among disciplines and develops students’ abilities to think in terms of
systems and interrelationships.
At UW-La Crosse this Health and Wellness Management degree supports the mission of UWLa Crosse to prepare individuals to take their place in a constantly changing world. In addition
graduates of this program will be employed in environments focused on reducing health care costs
and improving personal well-being. The collaborative nature of this degree and the employment
settings of graduates further advances UW-La Crosse’s mission of fostering curiosity and learning
through collaborative, innovation, and the discovery and dissemination of new knowledge.
For UW-River Falls “Develop engaged leaders” is Goal 4 of “Living the Promise,” the strategic
plan for UW-River Falls adopted in 2007-08. The fourth initiative under that goal states that the
university will strive to “produce graduates with an appreciation for life-long learning who will
become the productive, creative, ethical engaged citizens and leaders” promised in our mission
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statement. Hence, the Health and Wellness Management degree fits very well into the Campus
strategic plan.
UW-Stevens Point (UWSP) has a long history in helping create the wellness movement. The Health
Promotion and Wellness program was introduced in 1987. UWSP faculty were instrumental in
developing the modern concept of wellness, which was expanded in 1990 into a 7-dimensional
model including: social, physical, emotional, intellectual, career, environmental and spiritual
wellness. The program has received several national awards for preparing Health Promotion and
Wellness professionals with a Bachelor of Science degree. The HWM degree will build upon
UWSP’s national leadership in wellness and health promotion by expanding its reach into distance
learning. For UW-Stevens Point, the HWM degree aligns with the strategic efforts to develop interdisciplinary programs with a wide audience and promising market perspectives while supporting
the current mission to provide undergraduate professional programs with a strong liberal studies
foundation. The HWM degree supports the missions and visions of the College of Professional
Studies and the School of Health Promotion and Human Development, key aspects of which are
to 1) develop professionals who promote lifelong wellness for individuals and communities, 2)
expand opportunities for bachelor's degrees that contribute to a vibrant economy and flourishing
communities, 3) and to explore new mutually beneficial partnerships. The mission of UW-Superior is to foster intellectual growth and career preparation within a liberal
arts tradition that emphasizes individual attention and embodies respect for diverse cultures and
multiple voices. Students who master the liberal arts competencies embedded within the Health and
Wellness Management degree will be fulfilling the UW-Superior mission by becoming positioned to
help employees maximize their work production within their respective workplace[s] by optimizing
and understanding their personal wellness. The seven dimensional wellness model includes social,
physical, emotional, intellectual, career, environmental and spiritual wellness.
3. Program Description
This program will be a 63-credit, online bachelor’s degree completion program in Heath and
Wellness Management. This degree is intended primarily for adult and nontraditional students. All
courses are required. There are no electives.
To be eligible for admission to this program, students will have to have an Associate’s Degree from
an accredited institution or 60 credits or the equivalent. More specifically, students will have to
have satisfied UW System minimum general education breadth requirements as stipulated in the
UW System Associate Degree Transfer Policy. Prerequisites for admission will be College Algebra,
Statistics, General Chemistry, Introductory Biology, and Introductory Communications, or their
equivalents, passed with grades of C or better. (Note: Admissions decisions are made by the home
institution to which students apply. Students entering the degree program with an Associate’s
Degree from UW Colleges are likely to have met most of the prerequisites. However, students will
have to work with their home institution to clarify their institution’s degree requirements.)
Minimum General Education Breadth Requirements and Associate Degree Transfer Policy
1. Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credit hours of work.
2. Achievement of a "C" grade point average or better.
3. Successful completion of proficiency or competency requirements as defined by the institution.
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4. Completion of 40 semester hours fulfilling the University of Wisconsin System minimum general
education breadth requirements for the associate degree as follows.
•
•
•
•
Humanities and the fine arts - A minimum of 9 and a maximum of 15 semester hours from
at least two disciplines. No more than six semester hours may be taken in the fine arts.
Natural sciences/mathematics - A minimum of 12 and a maximum of 16 semester hours in
at least two disciplines. Not less than 8 hours must be in the natural sciences, including one
laboratory science.
Social science - A minimum of 9 and a maximum of 15 semester hours from at least two
disciplines.
Integrated studies - A maximum of six semester hours may be included in courses which
combine elements of two or more of the breadth categories as defined above.
Additional specific requirements must include one course with a historical perspective, one course
taught from primary texts (including translations), and one two-semester sequence of courses.
In fine arts, only history or appreciation courses are eligible for inclusion as meeting breadth
requirements.
Students wishing to complete the entire curriculum online may do so by entering through UW
Colleges Online or though another UW institution that has the general education program online,
and then finish this degree online through any one of the four partner institutions.
The program will have an academic director at each institution. Students will receive academic
advising regarding admissions and graduation requirements and financial aid through the
administrative home campus. Faculty and academic advisors at each campus will offer virtual office
hours through SKYPE and online chat capabilities as well as by telephone and email. Students will
have online library access through the home institution. An advisor specifically for this program
will be housed at UW-Extension and work in concert with student services staff at the four partner
institutions to provide general program information, problem resolution, and career advising online,
by phone, or in person for students near Madison. The program advisor will be in close contact
with the enrolled students and with the academic program directors to provide the hands-on active
support that has been shown to be important for adult and non-traditional learners. Students
enrolled in this program will have access to an extensive array of online student services including
writing labs, learning readiness assessments and career advising offered by UW-Extension.
Home Institution Model
Once students have satisfied the admission requirements above, they will then be eligible to apply
to one of the four partner institutions to serve as their home institution. Once admitted, they will
receive financial aid, degree requirement counseling, and other services from their home institution.
Due to the collaborative nature of this degree, all four partner campuses will contribute courses,
program oversight, and direction to the program. Students working toward this degree will take
classes from all four partner campuses, and all four partner campuses will accept all 21 courses as
their own. In other words, each partner campus will contribute 5-6 classes toward the degree, but all
four partners will accept all 21 courses toward the degree.
To graduate from one of the partner campuses, students in the Health and Wellness Management
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program will have to satisfy all degree requirements for their home institutions. Those degree
requirements may be found in Appendixes C-1,2,3,4.
Time to Degree
The primary student audience for the program is the adult and nontraditional audience. If students
enroll in the program full-time, including summer, they can complete the program in less than two
years. However, because most adults will probably have significant commitments in addition to their
education, such as work, and family responsibilities, they will likely enroll part-time, taking two to
three classes per term on average. Thus, it is likely that most adult students will complete about 7
courses per year, and because they will enter the degree having already completed 60 credits, they
should fulfill program requirements in approximately three years.
This program is not cohort-based. Students may enter the program at the beginning of any term,
and they may take courses in whatever sequence they wish, as long as they meet the internal
prerequisites listed in the course descriptions. The one exception to this is the capstone course. It
should be taken toward the end of the program.
Capstone Course
All students will complete a Capstone project course at the end of their Health and Wellness
Management (HWM) program. Under the supervision of the course instructor, students will work
with HWM professionals in institutions convenient to the location of their home. As part of the
planning process for the program, partnerships for Capstone placement will be developed with
companies or nonprofit employers. In recognition that students may be located at great distances
from their home campus, student placements may be in numerous locations around Wisconsin
or the nation. In concert with the collaborating schools, criteria will be developed to determine
appropriate Capstone placements. Capstone projects will be based on goals and objectives mutually
agreed upon by the student, the course instructor, and the institution.
Learning Outcomes and Overview of Curriculum
As part of creating the curriculum for this program, multiple resources were tapped to ensure that
the content of the program would be in line with professional standards and that the skills would be
sought by potential employers. The following businesses and professional groups were consulted in
development of the curriculum:
• United Health Group
• WuXi Appletec, Inc.
• Regions Hospital
• UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
• Kimberly-Clark Health Services
• Security Health Insurance
• Mortenson, Matzelle & Meldrum Inc
• City of Wauwatosa
• Greater Wisconsin Agency on Aging Resources, Inc.
• Douglas County Department of Health and Social Services
In addition, we will be working with the National Wellness Institute to seek accreditation for the
program so that graduates will receive credentialing to improve their employment opportunities.
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Program Outcomes
Health and wellness management is a complex endeavor in both theory and in practice. The Health
and Wellness Management (HWM) program will prepare knowledgeable and skillful professionals
to embrace this complexity and assume leadership positions within the public and private sectors.
Within organizations, a HWM professional will be able to manage and administer the integration
of a wellness culture with a wide array of programs that span across divisions, departments, and
business units for the purpose of reducing healthcare costs, improving productivity, enhancing
employee safety, and improving both employee well-being and work-life balance. Under each of the
broad categories listed below, a graduate of the HWM program will be able to:
Fundamental Health and Wellness Knowledge
• Demonstrate familiarity with major concepts, theoretical perspectives, and historical trends in
holistic wellness and wellness programming as a means of cultivating health and well-being of
individuals, communities, organizations, societies and environmental systems.
• Demonstrate familiarity with major concepts, theoretical perspectives, and historical trends in
behavioral medicine and population health, including epidemiology, disease prevention and
treatment, disease risk factors, special populations and health disparities, health research and
research processes, benefits management/compliance, impacts of community on health.
• Demonstrate familiarity with the physiologic and psychological basis for health and wellness
through an understanding of psychology, exercise science, nutrition, environmental health,
integrative medicine, and the seven dimensions of wellness (physical, intellectual, emotional,
social, spiritual, environmental, occupational).
• Demonstrate familiarity with best practices in behavior change facilitation, including lifestyle
coaching.
Policy Management
• Evaluate health and wellness status of an organization and develop policies and practices
that incorporate pertinent legislative issues, advocacy opportunities, communication, media
management and system issues.
• Align policies that promote wellness with local cultures and customs to guide effective practices
that improve well-being.
• Demonstrate familiarity with ethical and legal issues relevant to health policy and clinical practice
as well as federal and state policies regarding access to health services and the reduction of risk
factors, informed consent, advocacy, and patient rights.
• Be familiar with policies and regulations regarding health care licensing, credentialing and
certification.
Demonstrate cross-functionality for guiding the development of employer policies and the
design of health care benefits that positively impact health care costs.
Systems Management
• Analyze and evaluate the make-up of organizations, their operational characteristics, and the
impact of potential change on the well-being of individuals within the organization.
• Demonstrate an understanding of the interaction between change, the change process,
behaviors, and social context – including, but not limited to, gender, sexual orientation, culture,
class, physical disability.
• Analyze the interrelations among health providers and key stakeholders and the influence this
interaction has on the political, social, economic, and educational factors that influence public
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health systems.
Organizational Management
• Assess organizational culture, including norms and values, with the intent of engaging
management and leadership at multiple levels and building coalitions, collaborations and
consensus around an organizations vision and priorities while implementing state and national
health and wellness agendas.
• Manage resources to contain healthcare costs in order to meet short and long term priorities of
an organization.
• Determine impact of current wellness related initiatives within an organization on healthcare
costs and develop both strategic and project management plans to improve employee wellness
and budget outcomes of the organization.
Communication
• Foster a culture of wellness through effective written and oral communication at multiple
management/administrative levels and to diverse constituencies within an organization.
• Build interpersonal relationships with key stakeholders in order to establish and sustain
effective alliances that successfully address priority health problems of both individuals and of
organizations.
• Promote programs that integrate health information literacy and adult learning principles with
appropriate strategies that influence individual behaviors and lifestyles for improved well-being.
• Demonstrate an understanding of business marketing, including market analysis, evaluation,
communication and promotion.
Technology Literacy
• Demonstrate familiarity with integrated information systems that collect, track, and share
information across critical networks of providers and users, in order to improve processes,
quality of care, and service outcomes.
• Examine customer needs and apply a systems approach in successfully addressing those needs
by aligning the organization and customer needs with leading information technology and
communicating the improvements to key stakeholders.
Assessment, Evaluation, and Improvement
• Be conversant on current medical devices and alternate delivery systems.
• Propose a performance improvement system that includes assessment of the organizational
capacity, culture, readiness, and planning to establish performance baseline, goals and
performance management processes for monitoring progress and continuous improvements.
• Integrate health informatics, information systems and technology, and communication strategies
in the design, implementation, evaluation, and replication of best practices for monitoring and
improving overall practice, performance, and outcomes of the program/organization.
• Evaluate program personnel.
• Interpret and apply current demographic and epidemiological data, research methodology, and
statistical data analysis.
Program Structure
As with other collaborative degrees for adult and nontraditional students, students were consulted
and asked about their preferences for course and curriculum formats. They expressed strong
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preference for having courses offered online in both traditional, semester-length formats and in
accelerated formats. Students also expressed strong preference for a streamlined list of courses with
few or no electives so that there is no ambiguity about which courses students should take, and
which courses are required for graduation. Students also asked to minimize repetition or redundancy
in the curriculum. In response to students’ requests, as the partner campus faculty representatives
drafted the curriculum, they limited the number of courses to 21. In most cases, students will be
required to take all 21 courses to graduate once they have completed an associate’s degree or the
first 60 credits of coursework, including prerequisites. It will be possible for students to transfer in
courses if they can demonstrate that their knowledge is equivalent to the courses in the curriculum.
There are no electives in the Heath and Wellness Management program, and the areas of
competence that drive the curriculum are incorporated into the courses so that students experience a
holistic program focused on a systems approach to wellness management.
Because this is a collaborative degree and there are four partner campuses offering courses,
each campus will teach five courses in the degree. As the faculty representatives developed the
curriculum, they made initial course assignments by campus based on campus curricular and faculty
strengths. The curriculum is as follows.
Curriculum
The curriculum consists of the following 21 courses. These courses have significant health and
wellness industry specific components and are not duplicative of other online courses in the UW
System.
The Heath and Wellness Management courses will have some overlap with existing business, health
education and wellness principles but only in regards to basic content or knowledge. Once students
gain the basic knowledge of the course content, this content will be comprehended, applied,
analyzed, synthesized, and evaluated using application to the healthcare field. In this manner, the
critical thinking requested of students will pertain to the healthcare industry and not replicate
courses already offered online.
PROGRAM COURSE LIST
HWM 300 Introduction to Human Health
HWM 310 Changes Across the Life Span
HWM 320 Health and Medical Terminology
HWM 330 Survey of Information Technology in Health Care
HWM 340 The Wellness Profession
HWM 350 Applied Research Methods
HWM 360 Stress and Dependencies and Addictions
HWM 370 Health Behavior/Understanding and Effecting Change
HWM 380 Environmental Health
HWM 390 Marketing and Communication for Health and Wellness
HWM 400 Resource Management
HWM 410 Applied Anatomy and Fitness Principles
HWM 420 Health Literacy
HWM 430 Population Health
HWM 440 Health and Wellness Coaching
HWM 450 Medical Ethics/Policy
HWM 460 Leadership and Change Management in Health
CAMPUS
UW-River Falls
UW-River Falls
UW-Superior
UW-La Crosse
UW-Stevens Point
UW-River Falls
UW-Superior
UW-Superior
UW-La Crosse
UW-Stevens Point
UW-River Falls
UW-Superior
UW-La Crosse
UW-La Crosse
UW-Stevens Point
UW-River Falls
UW-Superior
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HWM 470 Assessment and Evaluation
HWM 480 Health Benefit Plans and Providers
HWM 490 Employee Health and Well Being
HWM 495 Capstone
HWM 399 Special Topics in Health and Wellness Management
HWM 499 Special Topics in Health and Wellness Management
UW-La Crosse
UW-Stevens Point
UW-Stevens Point
UW-Stevens Point*
*All campuses are sharing in responsibility of supervision and management of capstone course.
Students will be allowed to take the above courses in whatever order works for them, as long as they
meet the internal course prerequisites specified in the course descriptions below.
Descriptions for the courses in the Bachelor of Science degree completion program in Heath and
Wellness Management are as follows:
HWM 300: Introduction to Human Health – UW-River Falls
This course is designed to provide students with general background knowledge on many of the
issues impacting our health today. Topics of study will include issues in mental, physical and social
health such as stress, nutrition and fitness, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs, relationships and
sexuality and diseases and disorders. An introduction to behavior change theories and the factors
contributing to overall wellness will also be included.
Prerequisites: UW Colleges BIO 109 or equivalent and enrollment in the online Health and Wellness
Management degree program
HWM 310: Changes Across the Lifespan – UW-River Falls
This course explores research and theory regarding the nature and processes of human development
from early adulthood through old age and death. Key topics include biological theories of aging;
the changing body; disorders of the brain; personality development; changing memory and thinking
skills; relationship issues, careers and retirement, and death/dying
Prerequisite: HWM 300 Introduction to Human Health or concurrent enrollment.
HWM 320: Health and Medical Terminology – UW-Superior
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the basic terminology used in health and
medical settings. Although most wellness settings are not inclusive to a medical center or clinical
setting, often the clients are participating in a program because of a visit to a medical setting. Since
health care uses a unique blend of prefixes, suffices and terms related to both preventative and
clinical care, it is important that the wellness professional has the knowledge and abilities to decipher
this information. Emphasis will be placed on the systems that a wellness professional will most likely
be exposed to including: Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Muscular Skeletal, Nervous systems.
Prerequisites: UW Colleges ENG 102 or equivalent and Enrollment in online Health and Wellness
Management degree program.
HWM 330: Survey of Information Technology in Healthcare– UW-La Crosse
This course surveys essential healthcare information technologies (HIT) that are used for healthcare
information systems (HISs). Popular HISs include electronic medical record systems (EMRS) that
keep record of the patients’ history, the computerized provider order entry systems that record the
history of the procurement of medicine and other medical necessaries, telemedicine, which keeps
information of the medical doctors in the computers, telehealth e-prescribing, which prescribes the
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medicine electronically, medication administration, which keeps the information of medical doctors
and other hospital staff members, and nursing and ancillary service systems.
Prerequisites: Enrollment in online Health and Wellness Management degree program.
HWM 340: The Wellness Professional – UW-Stevens Point
This course explores the definition of wellness, health promotion and the seven dimension model of
wellness. Students will learn the professional role and personal commitment required to implement
life-style wellness programs. The course includes an overview of the history and philosophy
contributing to the success of wellness and health promotion professionals. Students learn through
assigned experiential learning the basics wellness principles. Activities explore personal wellness and
whole systems healing in the seven-dimensions of Spiritual, Physical, Emotional, Career, Intellectual,
Environmental and Social.
Prerequisite: UW Colleges PSY 202, Introduction to Psychology; HWSM 300 Introduction to
Human Health or concurrent, HWSM 310 Changes Across the Lifespan or concurrent.
HWM350: Applied Research Methods – UW-River Falls
This course is designed to familiarize students with research nomenclature, procedures for the
design and evaluation of research and interpretation of statistical analysis in the health field. Also, to
provide the tools for critically evaluating the validity of health research.
Prerequisites: UW Colleges Eng 102 or equivalent and Enrollment in online Health and Wellness
Management degree program.
HWM 360: Stress and Dependencies and Addictions – UW-Superior
Examine common behavioral strategies with regard to stress and it’s management, and the use of
alternative remedies for physical and emotional dependencies and addictions.
Prerequisites: UW Colleges BIO 109 or equivalent and UW Colleges ENG 102 or equivalent and
Enrollment in online Health and Wellness Management degree program.
HWM 370: Health Behavior/ Understanding and Effecting Change – UW-Superior
Understanding how change happens. Basic knowledge and understanding of foundational change
theories, based upon the ‘Transtheoretical Stages of Change Model’. Included is a reflection on one’s
personal wellness and strategies for implementing health behavior change.
Prerequisites: UW Colleges PSY 202 Intro to Psychology or equivalent and HWM 300 .
HWM 380: Environmental Health– UW-La Crosse
This course examines the interdisciplinary and global effects of human-environment relationships.
Emphasis is placed on the critical nature of the relationship between ecosystem health and
human health and well-being. Environmental politics, economics, global disease, and traditional
environmental health topics are considered for the purpose of improving the quality of life for all
people through the creation of a sustainable society.
Prerequisite:
HWM 390: Wellness Marketing and Health Communications – UW-Stevens Point
Students will develop basic marketing and promotional skills, grounded in the disciplines of social
marketing, health communication and business marketing that address consumer health "needs"
and customer "wants". Students will be able to assess market opportunities in wellness services,
programs and facilities, and create marketing strategies and tactics. Emphases will be placed on best
practices for behavior change, increased cost savings for employers, improved customer/employee
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participation and/or revenues for wellness programs, services and facilities. Prerequisite: UW
Colleges COM 103 or equivalent, UW Colleges PSY 202 or equivalent HWM 300, and HWM 310
HWM 400: Resource Management – UW-La Crosse
The objective of this course is to examine the functions of human resource management. The
course will focus on recruitment, selection, job analysis, compensation, labor relations, performance
appraisals and organizational change.
Prerequisites: Enrollment in online Health and Wellness Management degree program
HWM 410: Applied Anatomy and Fitness Principles – UW-Superior
This course presents a hybrid of disciplines which examines the anatomical structures that facilitate
movement and a very basic review of the energy systems and principles which support these
structures, along with training approaches which stimulate them to become more efficient
Prerequisites: HWM 300
HWM 420: Health Literacy– UW-La Crosse
This course will explore the current understandings and work in health literacy research, advocacy,
and outreach efforts across the various health education and related fields. It will include readings,
discussions, and competencies in evaluation health information for quality and credibility; locating
health information and determining quality resources; identifying and assessing population health
literacy; and understanding the networks of agencies working in health settings to address literacy in
the health field.
Prerequisite: UW Colleges BIO 109 or equivalent and HWM 320.
HWM 430: Population Health– UW-La Crosse
This course introduces the evolution of health problems and services and will examine the methods
designed to capture a community health profile. The participant will apply concepts involved in
measuring and understanding the health of individuals and populations in order to enhance quality
of life. The key social determinants of wellness and their interactions will be considered.
Prerequisites: Enrollment in online Health and Wellness Management degree program
HWM 440: Health and Wellness Coaching– UW-Stevens Point
Definition of coaching and diverse methodologies will be taught, practiced, compared and
contrasted. The course will assist in developing a strong, useful theoretical viewpoint for health
coaching as well as to understand those of therapists and how differential treatment therapeutic
goals are set. Students will specifically gain an understanding of "What treatment, by whom, is
most effective for individuals displaying specific problems and under what set of circumstances?
As a result you will learn a variety of treatment modalities, and learn to respect vastly differing
worldviews.
Prerequisite: UW Colleges PSY 202 or equivalent, HWM 300, and HWM 310
HWM 450: Medical Ethics/Medical Policy – UW-River Falls
This course will explore the moral values and judgments as they apply to medicine. Discussion will
involve ethical principles which govern the practice of medicine as well as the ethical theories which
form the basis of ethical argument.
Prerequisite: HWSM 310 and HWSM 340
HWM 460: Healthcare Systems: Project Management– UW-La Crosse
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This course addresses the phenomenal impact information system (IS) projects have had on
healthcare delivery. Students learn how healthcare IS projects affect organizations, doctors, patients,
and chronic-illness treatments, as well as individuals interested in managing their own healthcare.
Concepts and tools for effective healthcare IS project management, process re-engineering and
work redesign are introduced. The purpose of this course is to expose students to IS project
management activities in healthcare settings. Topics covered include recent healthcare IS project
trends, budgeting, scheduling, resource management, scope, risk analysis, and deployment controls.
The genesis of healthcare project management is covered using specific cases and examples.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in online Health Information Management and Technology degree
program.
HWM 470: Assessment and Evaluation– UW-La Crosse
This course surveys general approaches to assessment, programming and evaluation in health and
wellness settings. Participants will explore individual, group, and organizational approaches to
assessment, programming, and evaluating planned and organized efforts to promote both health and
wellness.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in online Health Information Management and Technology degree
program.
HWM 480: Health Benefits and Plan Providers– UW-Stevens Point
The design and administration of a health care plan plays a key role in attracting and retaining
employees and employers cost savings. This course is designed to provide you with a solid
introduction to the basic issues of health care benefits and how to integrate successful return
on investment [ROI] strategies for adopting preventive health benefits that enhance employee’s
wellbeing.
Prerequisite: HWM 320, HWM 350, and HWM 430
HWM 490: Employee Health and Well being– UW-Stevens Point
What successful companies are doing is reviewed in Case studies to provide the groundwork for
the importance of workplace involvement in health. The relationship of employee health to health
care costs and productivity will be calculated as return on investment [ROI] and investment in
human capital. Strategic and product management planning are developed in relationship to, disease
management vs. population wellness theory. Assessment of employer needs, organizational culture,
environmental policy and procedures supportive to desired outcomes are practiced. Professionals
learn about aligning client needs and wants with best practice program design, implementation and
evaluation for successful results. Age, gender, race and issues that affect participation in wellness
programs are reviewed.
Prerequisite: HWM 320, HWM 400, HWM 430, and HWM 450
HWM 495: Capstone - UW-La Crosse, UW- River Falls, UW-Stevens Point, UW-Superior
This course explores the theory and dynamics of interprofessional and team practice in health and
wellness management and within the context of projects undertaken in corporate setting. Work may
involve all phases of project development. Project set-up will be jointly done by the student, site
mentor/sponsor, and the course faculty.
Prerequisite: Senior status and consent of the instructor
HIMT 399: Special Topics in Health and Wellness Management–
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HIMT 499: Special Topics in Health and Wellness ManagementStudents will be eligible for admission to this degree if they have completed at least 60 credits of
coursework and three prerequisites. The prerequisites are as follows. UW Campus equivalents or
other college/university equivalents may be substituted.
Biology (not botany or environmental science), (UW Colleges 109 or equivalent)
La Crosse (BIO 105)
River Falls (BIOL 150)
Stevens Point (BIOL 101)
Superior (BIOL 123)
Composition (UW Colleges 102 or equivalent)
La Crosse (ENG 110)
River Falls (ENG 200)
Stevens Point (ENGL 102)
Superior (ENGL 102)
Communications (UW Colleges COM 103 or equivalent)
La Crosse (CST 110)
River Falls (CSTA 101)
Stevens Point (COMM 101)
Superior (COMM 110)
Psychology (UW Colleges PSY 202 or equivalent)
La Crosse (PSY 100)
River Falls (PSYC 101)
Stevens Point (PSYC 110)
Superior (PSYC 101)
Interrelationship with Other Curricula
As an interdisciplinary, collaborative degree, this program is able to engage faculty experts from
each partner campus. Although the courses developed for this degree by campus faculty are unique
to this degree, they dovetail very well into the general curriculum of each campus and highlight
the academic strengths of each partner. This is evidenced by the diversity of departments at each
campus that support this degree. (See Relation to Institutional Mission Section above.)
Although this is a unique and new degree, it complements the broad array of degrees offered across
the UW System by creating a new point of entry for adult and nontraditional students, by building
upon the associate’s degree offered by the UW Colleges and other campuses, and by engaging
faculty who have expertise in related areas on all of the partner campuses. In addition, the proposed
health and wellness management degree will serve as an excellent starting point for students who go
onto master’s degrees in public policy, healthcare management, business, and related fields.
Accreditation Requirements
Once it is fully established, the Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management program
will seek accreditation from the National Wellness Institute.
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The National Wellness Institute developed a baccalaureate degree level set of standards and
processes that lead to accreditation of academic programs and to certification of their graduates. By
meeting these standards programs demonstrate that graduates have acquired appropriate knowledge
and skills to initiate and provide effective wellness/health promotion programs in a variety of
settings
Diversity
Like other efforts at all of the partner campuses, this program will strive to achieve inclusive
excellence by enrolling, retaining, and graduating sufficient numbers of student from
underrepresented populations; engaging faculty from underrepresented populations; implementing
strategies to promote and support integration efforts; implementing multidimensional approaches to
teaching and learning; and leveraging resources so that the program is able to respond to students’
evolving and growing needs.
This degree will target primarily nontraditional student populations. Many students of color, firstgeneration Americans, first-generation college students, and low-income students are--often by
necessity--nontraditional students because they have family or work responsibilities that prevent
them from attending school in traditional formats. Hence, from its inception, this degree is designed
to attract underserved populations. In addition, however, recruitment and marketing efforts for
this degree will focus on under-represented populations. UW-Extension will leverage advertising
space on multiple partner sites in the “Diversity & Inclusion Network:” BlackPlanet.com,
AsianAvenue.com, MiGente.com, and others. UW-Extension will also advertise this program in
minority-focused newspapers, periodicals, and websites.
While the proposed major does not project a significant number of new faculty and staff, the partner
campuses will continue to be committed to recruiting a culturally diverse campus community.
Currently, there is near equity in the gender distribution of faculty, and faculty of color will be
encouraged to participate in this program.
UW-Extension has several initiatives currently underway to attract more students of color into the
UW System. Through UW HELP, brochures focusing on Hispanic and Hmong students are sent
to those target groups. UW-Extension also employs a field recruiter who works with employers
to encourage employers to support the education of their employees, especially focusing on
underrepresented minorities. UW-Extension is also maintaining ethnic information from COBE
data that will allow UW-Extension to market specifically to ethnic audiences.
An Advisory Board will be formed to work closely with employers who have an interest in this
major to encourage them to send their employees to school. Many companies interested in health
and wellness programs have employees of color. The Advisory Board will invite representation from
minority-owned businesses. Their input will be important to ensure that the program reaches out to
people of color and other under-represented groups.
Ensuring that diverse student populations enter the Health and Wellness Management program
is important, but equally important is providing the support services that students need to feel
comfortable and able to succeed. The UW-Extension student advisor/coach will work closely with
students to identify barriers to their success to either help them overcome those barriers directly or
to point them to campus and other resources that will be of assistance to them. UW-Extension will
maintain online student communities that will allow individuals from diverse ethnic background to
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connect with other students over both cultural similarities and over programmatic interests to help
build points of commonality and understanding. Simply put, an essential goal of this program is to
increase both the access for diverse audiences to this degree and the success of those students once
they enter the program. To ensure that this goal is met, one of the areas of assessment focuses on
diversity. (See Assessment Section, p25.)
Collaboration
By design, the Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management will be a highly
collaborative degree. For students who do not have an associate’s degree or the requisite
foundational 60 credits, UW Colleges and several other UW campuses will provide online classes
for students to complete those requirements. The four comprehensive partner campuses will jointly
develop, approve, and offer the Health and Wellness curriculum. Each campus will offer 5-6 courses
in the fall and spring once the degree is fully operational, and all four campuses will share equally
in the academic oversight of the degree. Extension will provide administrative support, financial
investment, fiscal management, and student services for all partner campuses. Although students will
choose a home institution from which to receive the degree, all four partner campuses will approve
all 21 courses in the degree so that from a student’s perspective moving from one course to another
will be as seamless as if all courses were offered by one institution. All partners will share equally in
net revenues relative to the number of courses they offer in the program.
Outreach
The entire Health and Wellness Management Bachelor’s Degree is an outreach effort by the four
UW campuses and UW-Extension. The program is designed to maximize access by being delivered
online; robust student services help ensure that nontraditional students receive the support they
need to succeed in the program; and the business sector has been and will continue to be engaged in
helping to shape the curriculum and its continued evolution.
Wisconsin businesses will be engaged to develop internship opportunities for students in the
program. In addition, those businesses will be involved in helping to create direct school-to-work
paths so that students who enroll in the program have opportunities for internships and eventually
for full-time employment.
Delivery Method
The entire Health and Wellness Management Degree will be offered online. Since this program
consists of the second 63 credits of a 123 credit bachelor’s degree, students may complete the first
60 credits of general education in face-to-face, blended, or online formats through UW campuses.
4. Need, Market Research, and Market Demand
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as healthcare costs continue to rise, insurance
companies, employers, and governments are attempting to find ways to curb costs. This is leading
to positive anticipated employment growth (18-22 percent) in the health and wellness field.
Increasing healthcare costs and a growing number of healthcare coverage options will spur demand
for professionals to develop strategically integrated wellness programs. This program will meet
the increasing demand for professionals that focus on integrating various wellness services (e.g.
preventative wellness programming; safety and environmental health risk management; human
resources benefits management, return to work programs, etc.). The education of these professionals
will focus on the complexity of the issues and systems management of divergent aspects of
healthcare as applied to business and community organizations. In light of these trends, graduates of
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the Health and Wellness Management program will:
• Integrate a wide array of programs to enhance employee safety and wellness and
improve work-life balance
• Influence corporate productivity
• Reduce health care costs
• Engage management and leadership at multiple levels
• Foster a culture of wellness in organizations
• Provide passionate and persistent leadership for health and wellness
• Communicate the value of health and wellness across diverse sectors
• Develop and maintain collaborations with internal and external partners
• Interpret and apply assessment and evaluation information pertaining to health
A quick scan of undergraduate degrees across the UW System and across the nation shows that
there are very few that focus on building competencies in health and wellness management—
especially as degrees for individuals working in industry to help improve employee health and
wellbeing while bringing operational costs down..
Based on these initial scans, Extension commissioned a market study conducted by Eduventures (a
higher education market research firm) to determine if a health and wellness management degree
from the UW System campuses was viable.
The key findings of the study were:
Healthcare/wellness programs are growing despite the recession. According to a 2009 survey by the
Integrated Benefits Institute, 68% of responding employers who provide any health and productivity
initiatives said that over the next two years, they plan to add resources to at least one program,
without decreasing resources for any other program.
Large employers such as IBM are investing heavily in healthcare in light of concerns about the rising
costs of healthcare expenses; the company estimates it has saved $80 million in healthcare costs as a
result of healthcare/wellness programs.
Prospective students for healthcare/wellness programs range from aspiring insurance professionals,
human resources administrators, nurses, to health educators/promoters.
Positive occupational outlooks for the 2008 to 2018 period for human resource specialists (24%
growth) and health educators (18% growth) suggest high demand for related degrees.
Occupations in the healthcare/wellness industry also include “Health Fitness Specialist”
and “Health Promotion Specialist”.
An online job search of the Monster.com site found additional job tiles applicable to graduates of
this degree primarily in hospitals and large corporations. Examples include:
• Wellness Coordinator (reported to the HR Director)
• Onsite Health Specialist (in large hospital)
• Wellness Educator (in large hospital)
• Director, Health and Wellness Benefits (Sara Lee)
Graduates of this program may be qualified for new careers in companies that are looking for
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individuals qualified to design and implement new wellness programs for their employees. The best
occupational prospects may likely be with insurance carriers and/or human resources departments,
where the pay may be higher than in the fitness/health club management or wellness screening
facilities.
When researching the potential income and job market for individuals who complete this degree
the following data was obtained. The overall average salary for a wellness professional in 2008 was
$55,304, the survey found.
The following table illustrates ranking wellness titles with average salary, in descending order of
average salary, titles we could compare.
Comparing Wellness Titles With Salaries
Title
Average Salary
Wellness Manager
$69,500
Manager, Employee Health and Wellness
$59,853
Senior Program Manager
$58,333
Source: Wellness Professionals Salary and Benefits Survey, conducted by Wellness Program Management
Advisor. Copyright 2009 Wellness Management Information Center
A Lack of University Programs
The above data suggests growing opportunities in health and wellness management and related
careers. University curricula lag significantly behind the rapid growth, and the B.S. in Health and
Wellness Management for which this Authorization is requested will be the first online degree of its
kind at a public university.
Nationally, there are very few similar degrees. A recent search identified the following.
• Athens State University, GA--BS in Health and Wellness Management (while the title is a
match, it appears to be a traditional health degree.) Delivered face to face.
• Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management degree, but it is delivered in a faceto-face format and at the master’s level.
• State University of New York-Oswego, NY--BS in Wellness Management--similar to what
we propose but delivered in a face-to-face format and aimed at traditional, campus student
audiences.
• Kaplan – for-profit national provider - BS in Health & Wellness – online.
• American University, Washington, D.C., - BS in Health Promotion.
Programs in Wisconsin
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UW System
There are no programs like the Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness Management in the UW
System. The closest programs that exist in the UW System are in face-to-face formats only, and their
foci are quite different: • UW Eau Claire: BS in Environmental Public Health
§ Health and Aging Services (certificate)
UW
La
Crosse:
BS in Community Health Education
•
§ BS in Fitness Management
• UW Milwaukee: BS in Kinesiology, submajor in Health and Fitness Management
• UW Oshkosh: BS in Environmental Health
• UW Parkside: BS in Fitness Management (also have a certificate in this)
• UW Stevens Point: BS in Health Promotion and Wellness
• UW Stout: BS in Health and Fitness – minor
• UW Superior: BS in Community Health Promotion
Although this is a unique and new degree, it complements the broad array of degrees offered across
the UW System by creating a new point of entry for adult and nontraditional students, by building
upon the associate’s degree offered by the UW Colleges and other campuses, and by engaging
faculty who have expertise in related areas on all of the partner campuses. In addition, the HWM
degree is an excellent starting point for students who wish to go onto master’s degrees in business,
public health, healthcare management, and related fields.
•
•
•
An electronic search on keywords was done when possible of course catalog pdfs posted on
the UW System website.
Keyword searches were also done on general campus websites.
Keywords: health, wellness, healthcare management
UW Two Year Campuses
Keyword search on course catalog for all colleges: results of Fitness for Life, Personal
Health & Wellness, and Spanish for the Healthcare Professional courses. http://
www.uwc.edu/academics/catalog/courses.pdf
UW-Eau Claire
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Public Health (B.S.E.P.H.)
Comprehensive Major: Environmental Public Health
Courses in Health Assessment, Introduction to Health Services Administration, Leadership
and Management Practices in Health Services,
UW-Green Bay
Bachelor of Science in Human Biology with a concentration in Exercise Science.
UW-La Crosse
Undergraduate programs:
Majors:
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• Community Health Education
• School Health Education
Minors:
• School Health Education
The Health Education and Health Promotion program at UW-La Crosse prepares
individuals with degrees in both community and school health education to translate
scientific/health/medical research and laboratory findings to make them more easily
understood and made available to all people as a means of preventive medicine, health
promotion and wellness. UW-L is the only institution in the state that offers undergraduate
majors in both community health education and school health education. As health
educators, our graduates link consumers with health care providers and/or health-related
information.
Fitness Management Major
Also offers a course in Health/Wellness Education.
UW-Madison
School of Education offers Kinesiology: Athletic Training Option Kinesiology: Exercise and
Movement Science Option Kinesiology: Physical Education Option
School of Business offers a Health Care Management Specialization within the business
major http://www.bus.wisc.edu/undergrad/majors/certificates.asp#Health. Students must
complete three courses from the following list:
- Econ 548 (3-4 credits), The Economics of Health Care
- Hist Med 218 (3 credits), History of 20th Century American Medicine
- Hist Med 504 (3 credits), Society and Health Care in American History
- Hist Med 507 (3-4 credits), Health Disease and Healing I
- Hist Med 508 (3-4 credits), Health Disease and Healing II
- Hist Med 509 (3 credits), The Development of Public Health in America
- Hist Med 531 (3 credits), Women and Health in American History
- Hist Med 553 (3 credits), International Health and Global Society
- Nurs 105 (2 credits), Health Care Systems: Interdisciplinary Approach
- Philos 558 (3 credits), Ethical Problems Raised by Biomedical Technology
- Poli Sci 440 (3-4 credits), Health Policy and Health Politics
- Pop Hlth 471 (3 credits), Introduction to Environmental Health
- Soc 525 (3 credits), Sociology of Mental Health and Mental Disorders
- Soc 531 (3 credits), Sociology of Medicine
- Soc 635 (3 credits), Cross-National Health Services Systems and Public Policy
UW-Milwaukee
• Bachelor of Science (subject to change) Health Care Administration (HCA); KinesiologyExercise and Fitness, Kinesiology-Health and Fitness Management, Health Care
Administration, Health Services Management
•
Certificate in Therapeutic Recreation http://www4.uwm.edu/ugcatalog/SC/
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D_HS_TR.html
UW-Oshkosh
• Bachelor of Science in Biology with either Healthcare-Business, Healthcare-Science, or
Cell/Molecular/Professional Emphasis
•
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Health
•
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with either Exercise & Fitness, Strength &
Conditioning, or Healthcare-Science Emphasis
•
Bachelor of Science in Psychology with either Healthcare-Business or HealthcareScience Emphasis
•
Business major with minor in Healthcare Management
UW-Parkside
• The Bachelor of Applied Health Sciences is designed to prepare students with an
interdisciplinary and liberal arts foundation for professional careers within health care
systems. This major is intended primarily for students who wish to pursue advanced
degrees and/or careers in the professional fields of Physical Therapy, Occupational
Therapy, Chiropractic, Physician Assistant, Athletic Training, and Kinesiology/Exercise
Science. http://www.uwp.edu/departments/health.science/
• Bachelor of Science in Sport Management or Fitness. Courses include:
Lifetime Wellness and Lab
Sport and Fitness Nutrition
Physiology of Exercise
Fitness Assessment and Prescription
Fitness Program Management
Sport and Fitness Marketing
Fieldwork in Fitness Management
UW-Platteville
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education with Health Promotion emphasis. The Bachelor
of Science degree in physical education provides excellent preparation for teaching and
coaching. Teaching licensure covers birth to age 21. The health promotion emphasis
prepares students for employment in fitness centers, and YWCA/YMCA-type programs.
http://www.uwplatt.edu/academics/factsheets/Health_Promotion.pdf Courses include:
Intro to Health Promotion
Health Education
Stress Management @ Worksite
Lifetime Activities
Fitness Evaluation
Consumer Health
Fit Program & Prescript
Health Promotion @ Worksite
UW-River Falls
Health and Human Performance Major (Health Education) http://www.uwrf.edu/Catalog/
HHP.cfm
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UW-Stevens Point
Major in Health Promotion/Wellness is available within the Health Promotion and Human
Development department. http://www.uwsp.edu/hphd/ Courses include:
Careers in Health Promotion/Health Protection.
The Healthy American.
Healthy Weight Management.
Special Topics in Seven Dimensions of Wellness.
Creating Great Relationships.
Personal Wellness for Preprofessionals.
Personal Wellness and Group Exercise Leadership.
High Level Wellness.
Social and Emotional Wellbeing.
Health Risk Reduction.
Creating Healthy Relationships.
Psychological Aspects of Health.
Health Promotion Programming: Design, Techniques, and Resources.
Behavior Change Facilitation.
Epidemiological Factors in Health Promotion/Protection.
Exercise Physiology.
Developing Stress Management Programs.
Reading, Writing, Computing and Presenting in Health Promotion.
Practicum in Health Promotion/Wellness.
Promoting and Marketing Wellness.
Health Promotion/Protection Management.
Health Behavior Change.
Practicum in Health and Wellness Coaching.
Internship in Health Promotion/ Wellness.
Grief and Loss
Healthy Aging.
Contemporary Issues in Health Promotion.
Advanced Physiology for Health Care Professionals.
Economic Evaluation in Health Promotion.
UW-Stout
Bachelor of Science in Health, Wellness and Fitness
[new Fall 2011, pending approval] •
Health and Wellness Promotions
•
Fitness Professional
UW-Superior
Major: Physical Education with a Community Health Promotion Concentration
UW-Superior's community health promotion concentration focuses on fitness, health and
disease prevention. Fact sheet: http://www.uwsuper.edu/admissions/facts/upload/HHPcommunity-health.pdf
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UW-Whitewater
Physical Education major with emphasis on Health, Human Performance and Recreation
with minors including:
•
•
•
•
Physical Education Major in Health, Human Performance and Recreation
Health Promotion Minor
Coaching Minor
Recreation & Leisure Studies Minor
Enrollment
It is anticipated that the program will have strong enrollment growth in the early years, with the rate
of growth leveling in the third through fifth years, then picking up again once the first graduates
enter the workplace. The five-year enrollment projection patterns shown in the following table
are consistent with those of adult students in other University of Wisconsin online programs. It
is anticipated that the attrition will be moderate—15 percent—for students moving from their
first year to their second year in the program, but very low—less than 5 percent—as they progress
beyond their second year.
Students/Year
New
Continuing
Total
Graduating
Year 1
53
Year 2
106
45
151
53
Year 3
88
135
223
Year 4
62
210
272
41
Year 5
59
222
281
86
The projections in this chart are conservative, assuming that most students will enroll part-time and
take an average of six courses per year. The projections further assume that all students who remain
in the program after their first year will graduate—90 percent within four years, 100 percent within
five years, or 76 percent and 85 percent, respectively, of the students entering the program.
On-Campus Correlative
Because this is a collaborative online program to which each partner campus contributes 5-6 courses
for a total of 21 courses, none of the individual partner campuses will offer this program in a faceto-face format.
5. Assessment and Advising
Assessment
This program will be assessed through multiple qualitative and quantitative evaluation tools. These
tools include but are not limited to course evaluations; interviews and discussions with faculty,
academic advisors, students and employers; and surveys from campus Career Services. UWExtension is also working to establish a Heath and Wellness Management Advisory Board consisting
of employers in Wisconsin. One of the responsibilities of the Advisory Board will be to help assess
the continuing relevancy of the curriculum and whether it fosters the competencies needed to
fill key jobs in Wisconsin. The Advisory Board will provide feedback about the program to the
Academic Directors for their annual program review meeting.
To determine how well the learning outcomes are being met, and how well students are mastering
the areas of competence, each course will assess student mastery using methods identified by the
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instructor – papers, class projects, exams, community-based activities, internships, for example.
Students will also complete course evaluations according to the process used at each respective
campus. Academic directors will communicate regularly, and meet formally semi-annually to discuss
data on each course and how well students have reached the course objectives and the relevant
program learning outcomes. In addition, the faculty teaching in the degree will meet annually to
discuss the program, its effectiveness as a collaborative degree, how well students are meeting
the learning outcomes identified, and related issues. Each course will be reviewed annually for
immediate minor revisions. It is expected that each course will undergo major revision every three
years.
Student satisfaction and success will also be measured. Each semester UW-Extension will collect
and monitor data on new enrollments, retention rates, and graduation rates. Since this program
is part of the UW Growth Agenda and Adult Student Initiative, pertinent student demographics
will also be collected to determine whether the degree is reaching adult students, and if students
in the program are part of a traditionally underserved demographic (as defined by UW System).
Program graduates will be surveyed to determine success in securing employment related to the
major and regarding the types of roles and careers that graduates have entered. Program evaluation
regarding the collaborative nature of the model will help assess processes critical to the success of
the collaboration, such as the financial model, student recruitment and advising, admission and
enrollment processes and trends, and curriculum design. Student services, instructional, and business
office personnel from each institution have committed to maintaining annual contact to review
processes and concerns and to make adjustments as necessary.
Advising
From the inception of this program, student support and student advising will take priority. A
number of measures will be put in place to ensure that students have the support they need to
successfully progress through this program, graduate in a timely manner, and gain good employment
in Wisconsin. These services include the following.
A full-time advisor or “student success coach” will be dedicated to this degree. The advisor/
coach will be housed in Extension, be accessible to students online and via phone, and work in
concert with the student services staff on the four partner campuses. The advisor/coach will be
responsible for being highly proactive in his/her interactions with students to help students learn
about the program and to connect students to the service areas on the individual campuses to ensure
that students can easily access information and support for credit audits and academic advising,
registration, financial aid, and related services. The advisor/coach will track students’ progress and
check-in with students regularly. He/she will communicate concerns to faculty and campuses to
ensure that small problems are resolved quickly and well before they hamper students’ abilities to
succeed in the program.
Extension is also expanding it portfolio of student services and creating an online Learning
Community that will serve as a multi-functional “place” for students to go to get support, engage
in social networks centered around academic areas, and access services. Through the Learning
Community students will be able to use SKYPE video-communication so that online students
can speak with and see the advisor/coach. Faculty teaching in the program will also have SKYPE
connectivity so that they can hold virtual office hours and engage with students “virtually” faceto-face. In addition, other Learning Community components include online support to students
in the form of an online writing lab, online readiness assessment for online learning, online social
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networking, and direct, online access to other Extension resources such as Cooperative Extension,
Public Broadcasting, and Small Business Development Centers. These resources are particularly
valuable to adult and nontraditional students who have multiple needs and priorities and might need
help not only academically but also for family wellness, broad information, job help, etc.
Access for Individuals with Disabilities
The online bachelor’s degree completion program in Heath and Wellness Management will be ADA
accessible. Students with special needs will be directed to work with the disability services offices at
their home institutions to work out the best ways to meet their special needs.
6. Personnel
Current Faculty Requirements
Because this will be a collaborative degree shared by four campuses, the burden on faculty at any
one campus will be limited. There are 21 courses total that comprise the degree completion, so each
campus will teach five courses per fall and spring semesters once the program is fully operational,
and one campus will teach 6—that being the capstone course. Campuses will also teach summer
courses based on student demand. It will take about one and one-half years for all courses to be
offered.
Additional Faculty Requirements
Because this will be a collaborative program, the course development and teaching load is shared
among the four partner institutions. Faculty FTEs to teach in this program will be reallocated from
each institution and no new faculty are required. The partner institutions expect that initial funding
from UW-Extension will cover the costs of faculty teaching in this program during the first five
years. As the program grows and additional faculty are needed, their salary costs, including fringe
benefits, will be covered by program revenue to ensure full cost recovery. Some costs--such as
costs to convert classes to online formats--will decrease over time as the online conversion and
development process is completed. Other costs--such as faculty instruction--will increase over time
as more classes are taught or as new sections are added.
7. Academic Support Services
Library Resources
Students will have access to partner campus’ online library resources. Additionally, the UW System
provides for inter-library transfers within the UW System. Online courses will be designed to
maximize the use of web resources and e-books in the curriculum. Textbooks will be provided by
Extension Division of Continuing Education, Outreach and E-Learning (UW-Extension) virtual
bookstore, MBS. Students may order texts online or via a toll free call.
Library Links for partner campuses:
UW-La Crosse Library Distance Learning Resources
http://www.uwlax.edu/murphylibrary/distance/index.html
UW River Falls
http://www.uwrf.edu/library/
UW Stevens Point
http://library.uwsp.edu/depts/ill/detest.htm
UW Superior Library – Distance Learning Resources
http://library.uwsuper.edu/distancelearning.html
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In addition to traditional UW System library resources, UW-Extension will provide online learning
resources. Students will be able to utilize the Online Writing Lab (OWL) housed in and staffed by
UW-Extension. This writing lab serves as a tutorial service for students who need extra writing help.
http://access.wisconsin.edu/owl/
UW-Extension also offers a READI assessment that students may take to evaluate their readiness
for online learning. If a student requires additional assistance in a particular area, UW-Extension will
provide online links to learning resources. http://uw.readi.info/
Finally, UW-Extension will host a course “How to Take an Online Course” for the purpose of
tutoring students new to online learning.
Access to Student Services
Students in the Heath and Wellness Management Bachelor’s Degree will be able to reach the
program advisor/coach through several means: Toll free phone number, email, free video/audio
internet call via SKYPE, and internet chat. Students in the Madison area may also speak to the
advisor/coach in person during regular office hours. The advisor/coach will be available Monday
– Friday from 8:00 am - 5:00 p.m. In addition, UW-Extension student services for general advising,
program information, registration help, etc. are available M.-Th. 8 am - 8 pm; F. 8 am-5 pm; Sa. 8
am - 2 pm; and Su. 2 pm - 8 pm.
Each student will be admitted to the home institution of his/her choice (one of the four partner
campuses granting the degree). Admissions, financial aid, registration, and institution-specific
academic advising will be done at the home institution by phone and/or online following similar
protocols as for on-campus students.
Students may utilize UW Colleges online placement testing if necessary.
The student advisor/coach in UW-Extension will work with students from their initial interest
in the program. She will help students through the application process and help student move to
a home institution for initial credit evaluation and campus-specific advising. The UW-Extension
advisor/coach will track students’ general progress throughout the program, working with students
to maximize their success and to expedite the time to degree.
Technical Support
Technical support is currently provided 7 days per week between 6:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m. via email
or a toll free call by UW-Extension and by [email protected] UW-Extension provides technical support
M-Th 8 am - 9 pm; F. 8 am - 4:30 pm; and Su. 1 pm - 9 pm. Technical support during the remaining
hours is provided by [email protected] Between 1:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m. students may leave a voice mail
for tech support call back or access the Frequently Asked Questions page or fill out an online ticket
request for help. Additionally, tutorials will be available online through the D2L platform to instruct
on basic online course tech support issues. As courses are developed, concerted efforts will be made
in the design process to minimize complexity from the user’s perspective while proactively working
with students to ensure that they can access and use online courses without difficulty.
Technical support is also currently provided by UW-Extension to faculty developing courses and
teaching in the program. In addition to online and phone support, UW-Extension course designers
travel to partner campuses to work with faculty to help them develop their courses. UW-Extension
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also holds periodic online course development retreats to inform instructors about emerging
technologies and to help them incorporate new technologies into their courses.
Extension will host the D2L instance for this program and monitor related hardware and software.
8. Facilities and Equipment
Capital Resources
This is an online program.
Capital Budget Needs
No additional capital budget needs are anticipated.
Security
All course materials, student submissions, and related materials will be housed on secure servers
maintained by [email protected] The academic integrity of student submissions and requisite use of
learning resources will be monitored by faculty teaching courses in this program, as well as by the
advisor/coach dedicated to this program.
9. Finance
Budget Narrative
The initial development and launching of the program is possible due to the 2007-09 Growth
Agenda GPR funding for the UW-Extension Adult Student Initiative. These funds will provide start
up resources until the program can be self supporting. The budget is built on the program being self
supporting within five years of implementation. UW-Extension is underwriting the investment to
develop the program’s 21 courses and will also fund UW institutions and UW-Extension program
support costs until the program begins to generate revenues in excess of expenses. Thus current and
additional expenses will be funded through a combination of GPR and program revenues. Revenue
surpluses will be shared relative to course enrollments amongst the participating partners.
Program tuition will be set at $375/credit for FY11-12 and will be the same among all four partner
campuses. Students will not be charged any additional fees as part of the program, except for the
costs of their books. If students live near their home campus and wish to pay segregated fees for
the use of recreational and other facilities, they may do so. However, they will not be required
to pay these fees if they do not take advantage of those resources. This tuition rate is based on
market demand estimates as well as comparisons with other online programs in the UW System and
nationally.
This budget model is very conservative with enrollment estimates are well below the expected
enrollments for the first three years. If the program does not generate the expected enrollments, the
marketing effort will be reevaluated and adjusted to better reach the intended students.
Because this will be a collaborative program, the course development and teaching load is shared
among the four partner institutions. Faculty FTEs to teach in this program will be reallocated from
each institution and no new faculty are required. The partner institutions expect that initial funding
from UW-Extension will cover the costs of faculty teaching in this program during the first five
years. As the program grows and additional faculty are needed, their salary costs, including fringe
benefits, will be covered by program revenue to ensure full cost recovery. Some costs--such as
costs to convert classes to online formats--will decrease over time as the online conversion and
28
development process is completed. Other costs--such as faculty instruction--will increase over time
as more classes are taught or as new sections are added.
Estimated Total Costs and Resources
First Year
CURRENT COSTS
#FTE
Dollars #FTE
Personnel
Faculty/Instructional Staff
Academic/Classified Staff
Non-personnel
Subtotal
1.000
4.250
5.250
ADDITIONAL COSTS
#FTE
Personnel
Non-personnel
Other - (S&E)
Subtotal
TOTAL COSTS
4.000
4.000
9.250
$140,000 1.000
$463,800 4.250
0
$603,800 5.250
Dollars #FTE
$312,080 7.125
0
$286,000
$598,080 7.125
$1,201,880 12.375
Second Year
Dollars #FT
E
Third Year
Dollars
$140,000 1.000
$505,160 2.000
0
$645,160 3.000
$142,800
$151,410
0
$294,210
Dollars #FT
E
$589,560 9.375
0
$246,000
$835,560 8.500
$1,480,720 11.500
Dollars
$898,420
0
$252,000
$1,150,420
$1,444,630
CURRENT RESOURCES
Adult Student Initiative
Subtotal
$985,880
$985,880
$848,920
$848,920
$398,755
$398,755
ADDITIONAL
RESOURCES
Program Revenue-tuition
Subtotal
TOTAL RESOURCES
$216,000
$216,000
$1,201,880
$631,800
$631,800
$1,480,720
$1,045,875
$1,045,875
$1,444,630
It should be noted that for consistency across categories, positions funded by GPR dollars at the
beginning of the program are treated as if they come with fringe. However, since fringe is not paid
separately by institutions on GPR-funded positions, those positions will come with fringe only after
they are moved to program revenue funds. That will happen once the program generates sufficient
revenue dollars. For a more detailed and long-term budget synopsis, see Appendix B.
Revenues
• UW-Extension Growth Agenda Adult Student Initiative GPR will be used to underwrite the
development of 21 Health and Wellness Systems Management courses. GPR will also fund
program support costs in excess of program revenues.
• Program revenue assumptions:
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
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Number of Courses Offered
Average Enrollments per Course
Section
Average Number Students in
Program (12 Cr)
Student Credit Hours
Tuition per Credit
16
36
48
16
36
48
48
576
$375
135
1,620
$390
216
2,592
$405
Program Investment
• Joint development of 21 Health and Wellness Systems Management courses by faculty and
UW-Extension over two years, $749,960.
• Faculty course development of content, .125 FTE and $5,000 per course.
• UW-Extension instructional course design and development, 440 hours and $31,680 per
course.
UW Institution - Program Support
• Program director, .250 FTE, $25,000 per institution and GPR funded in year 1 and 2. In
year 3 and beyond the program director will be program revenue funded with a base salary
increase of $500 per year plus fringe.
• Faculty course instruction will be program revenue funded, .125 FTE, $7,500 plus fringe per
course. Instructional costs will increase $500 per year.
• Faculty course instruction S&E, $500 per course section.
• Registrar services, .125 FTE, $5,000 per institution and GPR funded in year 1 and 2. In year
3 and beyond the base salary will be program revenue funded with a $500 increase per year
plus fringe.
• Faculty course revisions to update course content and prepare the course to be offered will
be program revenue funded, 7 courses will be revised every 2 to 3 years and $2,500 per
course.
• Marketing local, $7,000 per institution and GPR funded.
UW-Extension – Program Support
• Program Manager and Student Service Coordinator, 2 FTE, $105,000 and GPR funded in
year 1 and 2. In year 3 and beyond the positions will be program revenue funded plus fringe.
• Course revision assumes 7 courses will be revised year 2 to 3 years, 300 hours per course.
• Course maintenance assumes 40 hours per the number of course sections offered.
• Marketing, $250,000 and GPR funded.
Net Cash Flow
• It is projected that the program will be program revenue cost recovery within five years of its
initial launching. Revenues in excess of costs will be shared equally amongst the participating
partners.
Revenues
• UW-Extension Growth Agenda Adult Student Initiative GPR will be used to underwrite the
development of 21 Health and Wellness Systems Management courses. GPR will also fund
program support costs in excess of program revenues.
30
•
Program revenue assumptions:
Number of Courses Offered
Average Enrollments per Course
Section
Average Number Students in
Program (12 Cr)
Student Credit Hours
Tuition per Credit
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
16
36
48
16
36
48
48
576
$375
135
1,620
$390
216
2,592
$405
Program Investment
• Joint development of 21 Health and Wellness Systems Management courses by faculty and
UW-Extension over two years, $749,960.
• Faculty course development of content, .125 FTE and $5,000 per course.
• UW-Extension instructional course design and development, 440 hours and $31,680 per
course.
UW Institution - Program Support
• Program director, .250 FTE, $25,000 per institution and GPR funded in year 1 and 2. In
year 3 and beyond the program director will be program revenue funded with a base salary
increase of $500 per year plus fringe.
• Faculty course instruction will be program revenue funded, .125 FTE, $7,500 plus fringe per
course. Instructional costs will increase $500 per year.
• Faculty course instruction S&E, $500 per course section.
• Registrar services, .125 FTE, $5,000 per institution and GPR funded in year 1 and 2. In year
3 and beyond the base salary will be program revenue funded with a $500 increase per year
plus fringe.
• Faculty course revisions to update course content and prepare the course to be offered will
be program revenue funded, 7 courses will be revised every 2 to 3 years and $2,500 per
course.
• Marketing local, $7,000 per institution and GPR funded.
UW-Extension – Program Support
• Program Manager and Student Service Coordinator, 2 FTE, $105,000 and GPR funded in
year 1 and 2. In year 3 and beyond the positions will be program revenue funded plus fringe.
• Course revision assumes 7 courses will be revised year 2 to 3 years, 300 hours per course.
• Course maintenance assumes 40 hours per the number of course sections offered.
• Marketing, $250,000 and GPR funded.
Net Cash Flow
• It is projected that the program will be program revenue cost recovery within five years of its
initial launching. Revenues in excess of costs will be shared equally amongst the participating
partners.
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For ten-year budget projections for the Heath and Wellness Management Bachelor’s Degree, see
Appendix B.
Commitment to Maintain Program
Each partner campus and Extension will review the program annually. Academic directors, faculty,
and administrators from all partners will have input into programmatic changes and upcoming
needs. Extension, as the fiscal agent for this program, will manage resources to ensure that funds are
available to invest in the program as needed. The decision about how to invest in the program will
be made collaboratively by all partners.
Extension will continue to provide technical expertise, manage IT services and related equipment
and software, and provide financial planning and fiscal oversight.
Each partner campus will be responsible for ensuring that appropriate faculty teach in the program.
Extension will work with partner campuses so that courses are developed and updated on a regular
schedule that ensures quality. Every online course will be significantly updated every three years.
Most courses will require minor updates annually.
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