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Section C
Effective Programs
Ineffective Strategies for Violence Prevention
 
Scare tactics
 
Segregating aggressive students
 
Short-term interventions
 
Identification of the pre-violent adolescent
 
Focus on providing information
 
Focus on self-esteem only
Source: Dusenbury, et. al. J School Health.
3
Ineffective Strategies for Teen Pregnancy Prevention
 
Providing information alone
 
Scare tactics
 
Short-term interventions
 
Abstinence only
 
Contraception only
 
School-based services
4
Improving Youth Health Outcomes
 
What does research show us about what works to improve youth
health outcomes
5
Violence Prevention Strategies
 
Building supportive (adult-youth) relationships
 
Have clear principles, objectives, and a theoretical frame
 
Recognize strengths of communities
 
Build on resiliency of youth
6
Elements of Positive Youth Development
 
In substance abuse prevention, effective programs include many
elements of positive youth development
-  Skills training
-  Providing life options
-  Linking youth to social contexts (adults, school, community
institutions)
-  Expanding youth participation
-  Empower communities to control drugs
Source: Leventhal & Keeshan in Millstein, et al. Promoting the Health of Adolescent.
7
Positive Youth Development
 
Positive youth development is defined as participation
in pro-social behaviors and avoidance of health
compromising and future jeopardizing behaviors
8
Connections Count
 
Parent and family connections
 
School connections
 
Peer connections
9
School Counts
 
School achievement
 
School involvement
 
School climate
10
Parents Count
 
Parent availability
 
Parent expectations for school performance
 
Parent values
11
A Positive Youth Development Framework Provides
 
Safety and structure
 
Belonging and group membership
 
Self-worth and contributions
 
Independence and control over one’s life
 
Competence
 
Closeness with peers and nurturing adults
Source: Kirby & Coyle.
12
Five Aspects of Institutions that Enhance Youth Development
 
Providing youth choices and control over things that affect their
lives
 
Having a safe place to be themselves
 
Being treated with dignity and respect
 
Having access to relationships that create connections and
connectedness
 
Being surrounded by hope and promise
Source: Berry. (1995).
13
Blum’s Positive Youth Development Model
People: An adult who cares, who is
connected; a network of adults who
are involved in the life of the adolescent
Contributions:
The opportunities to
contribute to family,
neighborhood,
community, youth
involvement
P
C
A
P
Place: A place for youth to
congregate, to recreate
with adult supervision, to
develop friendships
The Adolescent
A
Activities: School and
community activities that
develop a sense of
connection/belonging
14
Wrap Up
15
Wrap Up
16
Wrap Up
17
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