ISTEP+ Teacher Scoring Guide Appendix C

advertisement
Appendix C
ISTEP+ Fall 2000
Teacher Scoring Guide
Teac er's Scoring Guioe
Grade 3
English/language Arts
and Mathematics
Applied Skills Assessment
Fall 2000
Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress
40529
CTB/McGraw-Hill
'Z2
A Division of TheMcGraw·HiD Companies
20 Ryan Ranch Road
Monterey, California 93940-5703
Teacher's Scoring Guide
Grade 3
English/language Arts and Mathematics
Applied Skills Assessment
Fall 2000
Indiana Department of Education
I 111111111
40529
-
INTRODUCTION
During fall 2000, Indiana students in Grades 3, 6, 8, and 10 participated in
the administration of the ISTEP+. The test for ISTEP+ Fall 2000 consisted of
two parts: (1) a basic skills section and (2) an applied skills section. For the
fall testing, the basic skills, or multiple choice, section of ISTEP+ was machinescored. The applied skills section, which consisted of open-ended questions
and a writing prompt, was hand-scored in Indiana during October and
November 2000.
The results of both the basic skills section and the applied skills section were
returned to the schools by January 2001. Copies of imaged student responses
in the applied skills section have also been returned to the schools. It is the
Indiana Department of Education's expectation that schools will take this
opportunity to invite students and parents to sit down with teachers to
discuss the results. To help in this process, the Indiana Department of
Education has prepared the following Teachers Scoring Guide. The purpose
of this guide is to help teachers
• understand the methods used to score the ISTEP+ Fall 2000 Applied Skills
Assessment, and
• discuss and interpret these results with students and parents.
In order to use this guide effectively, you will also need the Applied Skills
Report and the imaged copy of the student's work.
For Grade 3, the scoring guide is divided into two sections: Englishl
Language Arts and Mathematics. In each section, you will find
• an introduction,
• a list of the Grade 3 Essential Skills,
• rubrics (scoring rules) used to score the items,
• anchor papers or examples of actual student work (transcribed in this
guide for clarity and ease of reading), and
• descriptions of the ways in which the response meets the rubric criteria
for each of the score points.
When you review the contents of the scoring guide, keep in mind that
this guide is an overview. If you have questions, write via e-mail
([email protected]) or call the Indiana Department of Education
at (317) 232-9050.
1
INTRODUCTION TO THE ENGLlSHILANGUAGE ARTS
WRITING ASSESSMENT
The ability to write clearly and effectively is more important today than ever.
By asking students to write, educators send a clear message to students that
the ability to organize one's thoughts clearly and logically and to use standard
usage (grammar) conventions is valued by schools and the larger community.
This is why the Indiana Department of Education developed a writing assessment
for ISTEP+. The purpose of the writing task is to assess students' abilities to
(1) communicate effectively in writing and (2) use correct language conventions
(e.g., grammar, punctuation, and capitalization).
The writing assessments developed for ISTEP+ are based on the recognition
that writing is a process. For this reason, the writing tasks are closely aligned
with the writing process.
Students
• are given a writing prompt.
The prompt describes what the students should write about. For example, in
Grade 3 the students were asked to write a story about sending a gift in a
sailing shoe to children across the sea.
• engage in pre-writing and drafting.
Pre-writing and drafting are planning phases. During these phases, students
begin to organize and put their ideas on paper. The pre-writing and initial
drafts are not scored.
-
• revise their writing.
During the revision stage, students focus on the content, organization of
ideas, and overall meaning of the writing. Students should ask themselves,
"Does my writing say what I want it to say?"
• edit their writing.
The focus during the editing phase is on the correct use of grammar,
punctuation, and capitalization. An Editing Checklist is provided in the
test book to remind students to review their papers for these elements.
• complete a final draft.
The final draft is the completed student response. Only this final draft
is scored.
Although a standardized testing situation does not permit full implementation
of the writing process (e.g., peerlteacher conferencing or multiple revisions), the
process described above encourages students to use the skills learned in the
classroom to communicate their ideas effectively. The Indiana Department of
Education encourages teachers to familiarize students with the writing process
and the rubrics used to score their writing.
2
RUBRICS FOR THE WRITING ASSESSMENT
A rubric is a description of student performance that clearly articulates
the requirements for each of the score points. Scoring rubrics are essential
because they ensure that all papers are scored objectively. Moreover, because
the writing rubrics were developed by Indiana teachers, they represent those
characteristics of writing that Indiana educators identify as important.
There are two types of rubrics used to score student writing on ISTEP+.
• Writing Development Rubric
This rubric assesses the students' ability to communicate their ideas
effectively. The Grades 3-5 Writing Development Rubric has three major
categories: (1) Ideas and Content, (2) Organization, and (3) Style. Under
each major category there are specific criteria that describe the category
more fully. For a detailed description of the categories and the scoring
criteria for each of the six performance levels, see the Elaborated Writing
Development Rubric on pages 8 through 13.
• Language-in-Use Rubric
This rubric assesses students' abilities to use grammar, punctuation,
and capitalization. The language-in-Use Rubric is directly linked to the
Editing Checklist in students' test books. For a description of the
language-in-Use Rubric, see page 14.
In conjunction with the writing rubrics, anchor papers are used to score
student writing. Anchor papers are examples of actual student responses
that meet the rubric criteria for a particular score point. Anchor papers
for Writing Development and language-in-Use are shown on pages 19
through 27. These anchor papers have been transcribed for publication to
make them clearer and easier to read.
Based on the rubrics and the anchor papers, each student paper receives
two scores, one for Writing Development and one for language-in-Use.
Both of these scores are derived holistically. In holistic scoring, each paper
is assigned the score points that provide the best overall description of the
performance. In this scoring process, evaluators examine each response as a
whole for the body of evidence of writing ability, rather than concentrating
on any single factor, such as length of the essay or the number of errors
contained in the writing.
Each score point covers a range of performance. The anchor papers
presented in this guide represent the types of responses most commonly
found at each score point level. These anchor papers also represent the most
typical combinations of Writing Development and language-in-Use scores
(e.g., 6/4, 5/4,414,3/3,212, 1/1). Other combinations of scores, though not as
common, are also possible.
3
RUBRICS FOR THE WRITING ASSESSMENT (cont.)
If a response is unscorable, it is assigned one of the following condition codes:
A Blank/No response/Refusal
B Illegible
C Written predominantly in a language other than English
o Insufficient response/Copied from text
E Response not related to test question or scoring rule (ELA and Writing only)
In addition to their function as a scoring device, rubrics are an effective
instructional tool. We encourage teachers to make rubrics a regular part
of classroom instruction. Teachers may discuss the rubric categories, provide
examples of the strategy/skill from published and student writing, model the
strategy/skill that supports each category, and use the rubrics as a basis for
teacher/peer/self evaluations. These activities will support student growth and
allow students to enter the testing situation with confidence.
4
ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS GRADE 3
ESSENTIAL SKILLS
-
o
Use meaning (semantic), structural (syntactic), and sound (phonetic) clues to construct
meaning (Construct Meaning)
o
o
Elaborate on the literal meaning of written text (Elaborate on Meaning)
Use the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing with an emphasis
on content (Writing Development)
o
o
o
o
Categorize information logically (Categorize)
I:)
Make predictions from what is read (Make Predictions)
o
o
o
Determine the literal meaning of written text (Literal Meaning)
Language-in-Use
Edit and proofread for selected punctuation and capitalization (Punct/Capitalize)
Edit and proofread for selected usage (Usage)
Read and interpret signs and symbols (Signs/Symbols)
Produce a variety of forms including picture books, stories, rhymes, and poems with
emphasis on content*
* NOTE: Essential Skills marked with an asterisk are assessed in the classroom and not as a
part of the ISTEP+ tests. The Writing Development and Language-in-Use Essential Skills
are assessed in the applied skills section. The other Essential Skills are assessed in the basic
skills section.
5
WRITING DEVELOPMENT RUBRIC
Grades 3-5
OVerview of the Writing Development Rubric
This rubric summarizes the scoring requirements for each of the six performance
levels. To determine the criteria for a specific score point, read across the rows.
For more detailed information about each of the score points, refer to the
Elaborated Writing Development Rubric on pages 8 through 13. For information
about the Language-in-Use Rubric, turn to page 14.
Score
Level
Writer:
6
• stays fully focused on topic
• includes thorough and complete ideas and information
5
• stays focused on topic
• includes many relevant ideas and information
4
• stays mostly focused on topic
• includes some relevant ideas and information
3
• stays somewhat focused on topic
• includes some relevant ideas and information
2
1
6
Ideas and Content
• exhibits less than minimal focus on topic
• includes few relevant ideas and little information
• has little or no focus on topic
• includes almost no relevant ideas and information
Organization
Writing:
Style
Writer:
• exhibits exceptional word usage
• has clear order
• is fluent and easy to read
• displays a strong sense of audience
• exhibits more than adequate word usage
• has clear order
• is fluent and easy to read
• displays a sense of audience
• exhibits adequate word usage
• has order
• has some order
• is readable
• displays some sense of audience
• exhibits minimal word usage
• is mostly readable
• displays little sense of audience
• exhibits less than minimal word usage
• has little order
• is hard to read
• displays little sense of audience
• exhibits less than minimal word usage
• has little or no order
• is hard to read
• displays little or no sense of audience
7
Elaborated Writing Development Rubric
Grades 3-5
SCORE POINT 6
A 6-point paper is rare. It has a distinctive quality that sets it apart as an
outstanding performance.
IDEAS AND CONTENT
Writer stays fully focused on topic.
• Writer stays on the topic.
• Writer does not ramble and repeat.
Writer includes thorough and complete ideas and information.
• Writer gives in-depth information and supporting details.
• Writer fully explores many facets of the topic.
ORGANIZATION
Writing has clear order.
• Writing follows a clear sequence with a beginning, a middle, and
an end.
• Writing has a logical progression of main ideas and support.
STYLE
Writer exhibits exceptional word usage.
• Writer uses dynamic words; provides rich details, strong verbs,
and/or vivid descriptions.
• Writer demonstrates control of a challenging vocabulary.
Writing is fluent and easy to read.
• Writing sounds natural.
• Writer uses varied sentence patterns.
• Writer may use complex sentence patterns.
Writer displays a strong sense of audience.
• Writer has a unique perspective; may be original, lively,
authoritative, and/or interesting (Le., has clear voice).
8
SCORE POINT 5
IDEAS AND CONTENT
Writer stays focused on topic.
• Writer stays on the topic.
• Writer very seldom rambles and repeats.
Writer includes many relevant ideas and information.
• Writer gives some in-depth information.
• Writer gives supporting details.
• Writer explores many facets of the topic.
ORGANIZATION
Writing has clear order.
• Writing follows a clear sequence with a beginning, a middle, and
an end.
• Writing has a logical progression of main ideas and support.
STYLE
Writer exhibits more than adequate word usage.
• Writer uses dynamic words; uses vivid or challenging words.
Writing is fluent and easy to read.
• Writing sounds natural.
• Writer uses varied sentence patterns.
• Writer may use complex sentence patterns.
Writer displays a sense of audience.
• Writer may have a unique perspective; may be original, lively,
authoritative, and/or interesting (Le., has voice).
9
SCORE POINT 4
IDEAS AND CONTENT
Writer stays mostly focused on topic.
• Writer mostly stays on the topic, but may get distracted.
• Writer may ramble or repeat.
Writer includes some relevant ideas and information.
• Writer presents several related ideas.
• Writer may not fully develop details; may list ideas with some detail.
ORGANIZATION
Writing has order.
• Writing follows a sequence, but may show a lapse (Le., may start out
with clear beginning, but wanders; may be missing a beginning, but
has a conclusion).
• Writing has a logical progression of main ideas and support, but may
have lapses.
STYLE
Writer exhibits adequate word usage.
• Writer may use some vivid or challenging words, but mostly uses
ordinary/common words.
Writing is readable.
• Writing flows naturally most of the time but may be choppy or
repetitive; may have run-on sentenceslfragments in spots.
• Writer may not vary sentence pattern.
• Writer may use complex sentence patterns.
Writer displays some sense of audience.
• Writer attempts to develop a unique perspective; may attempt to be
original, authoritative, and/or interesting (Le., has some voice).
10
SCORE POINT 3
IDEAS AND CONTENT
Writer stays somewhat focused on topic.
• Writer stays minimally focused on topic.
• Writer may get distracted; may have a lapse in focus.
• Writer may ramble or repeat.
Writer includes some relevant ideas and information.
• Writer provides minimal information; does not begin to exhaust
the possibilities.
• Writer gives minimal detail, but does not develop details.
ORGANIZATION
Writing has some order.
• Writing shows minimal evidence of logical sequence (Le., may be
missing a beginning, a middle, or an end); reader has to fill in gaps
in the sequence.
STYLE
Writer exhibits minimal word usage.
• Writer uses ordinary/common words.
• Writer shows minimal evidence of word choice.
Writing is mostly readable.
• Writing may be difficult to follow in some sections.
• Writing may be hard to understand; the connection of ideas and
information may be unclear.
• Writing lacks sentence variety.
Writer displays little sense of audience.
• Writing may be repetitive, predictable, and/or dull
(Le., minimal voice).
11
SCORE POINT 2
IDEAS AND CONTENT
Writer exhibits less than minimal focus on topic.
• Writer may get distracted, drift away from topic.
• Writer may not develop topic.
Writer includes very few relevant ideas and little information.
• Writer may have unfinishedlfragmented ideas.
• Writer may have only one or two bits of information.
ORGANIZATION
Writing has little order.
• Writing shows little evidence of logical sequence (Le., has no clear
beginning, middle, or end).
• Writing may have ideas that are not related to each other.
STYLE
Writer exhibits less than minimal word usage.
• Writer uses ordinary/common words.
• Writer shows no evidence of attention to word choice.
Writing is hard to read.
• Writing may require the reader to fill in gaps or guess what the
writer was trying to say.
• Writing lacks sentence variety.
Writer displays little sense of audience.
• Writer may produce a flat, lifeless text (Le., has no voice).
12
SCORE POINT 1
IDEAS AND CONTENT
Writer has little or no focus on topic.
• Content may convey little meaning.
Writer includes almost no relevant ideas and information.
• Writer may not finish ideas.
• Writer is likely to be very brief.
ORGANIZATION
Writing has little or no order.
• Writing has no sequence of beginning, middle, or end.
• Writing may have ideas that are not related to each other.
STYLE
Writer exhibits less than minimal word usage.
• Writer uses a very limited and simple vocabulary.
Writing is hard to read.
• Sentence construction is frequently incorrect.
Writer displays little or no sense of audience.
• Writer may produce a flat, lifeless text (Le., has no voice).
13
Language-in-Use Rubric
Grades 3-5
Score
4
Writing exhibits a very good command of language skills.
•
•
•
•
•
Beginning capitalization has few or no errors.
Capitalization of proper nouns has few or no errors.
Ending punctuation has few or no errors.
Subject and verb agreement has few or no errors.
Writing has few or no run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
In a Score Point 4 paper, there are no errors that impair the flow of communication. Errors
that appear will generally be of the first-draft variety; they have a minor impact on the
overall communication.
Score
3
Writing exhibits an adequate command of language skills.
•
•
•
•
•
Most beginning capitalization is correct.
Most proper nouns are capitalized correctly.
Most sentences end with correct punctuation .
Most sentences have correct subject and verb agreement.
Writing may have run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
In a Score Point 3 paper, errors are occasional but do not impede the flow of communication;
the writer's meaning is not seriously obscured by language-in-use errors.
Score
2
Writing exhibits a minimal command of language skills.
•
•
•
•
•
Some beginning capitalization is correct.
Some proper nouns are capitalized correctly.
Some sentences end with correct punctuation.
Some sentences have subject and verb agreement.
Writing may have run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
In a Score Point 2 paper, errors are generally frequent and cause the reader to stop and
reread part of the writing. While some aspects of the writing may be more consistently
correct than others, the existing errors do impair communication. With a little extra effort on
the reader's part, it is still possible to discern most, if not all, of what the writer is trying to
communicate.
Score
1
Writing exhibits a less than adequate command of language skills.
•
•
•
•
•
Beginning capitalization has many errors.
Writing has little or no evidence of capitalization of proper nouns.
End punctuation is missing or incorrect.
Writing has many errors in subject and verb agreement.
Writing has run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
In a Score Point 1 paper, errors are serious and numerous; they cause the reader to struggle
to discern the writer's meaning. Errors are frequently of a wide variety. There may be sections
where it is impossible to ascertain what the writer is attempting to communicate.
14
WRITING PROMPT AND
STUDENT ANCHOR PAPERS
The following section contains an overview of a writing prompt. It also
includes samples of student anchor papers that meet the Writing
Development and Language-in-Use rubric criteria for a particular score.
Each sample paper is accompanied by an explanation of the score points
it received.
Please note that in the sample anchor papers in the Scoring Guide, actual
names of people are replaced by initials. Similarly, actual places are replaced
by generic designations (e.g., Anytown or Hometown).
15
Writing Prompt:
Use the Writing ProcesS/Language-in-Use
Pages 16 and 17 provide an overview of the parts of the writing prompt.
Writing Prompt
The prompt describes
what ideas students
should include in
their writing.
Read this poem.
On This Day
by M. B. Goffstein
On this day
I'm going to pick
a big bouquet
and put it in my shoe
and let it sail away.
And when it gets
across the sea,
how amazed the children
there
will be.
NOTE: In Grade 3,
the teacher reads
aloud to the students
all parts of the
prompt, including the
Pre-Writing Activity
and all directions.
Read the information in the box. Then do the writing activity.
The speaker in the poem is sending flowers to children who live across
the sea. What would you put in the shoe?
Write a story about what happens after you fill the shoe. Describe the
shoe's journey. Explain why the children who live across the sea are
surprised. Your story will be included in your classroom's book of stories.
Pre-Writing Activity
These are statements
or questions that will
help the students
begin to think about
the topic and focus
their thoughts on the
requirements of the
prompt before
beginning to write.
16
Pre-Writing Activity
•
•
•
•
•
What will you put in the shoe?
What happens when the shoe sails across the sea?
Why are the children surprised?
Be sure your story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.
Use the boxes on the next page to help you plan your story.
• If you need more paper to plan your writing, ask your teacher.
Graphic Organizer
Plan your writing.
BEGINNING OF MY STORY
MIDDLE OF MY STORY
Once students have
thought about the
requirements of the
task, the graphic
organizer helps
organize their ideas
logically. The graphic
organizer is used
only for Grade 3
and is not scored.
END OF MY STORY
Whenever you see this picture, you will be doing a writing
activity. Your writing will be scored on how clearly you write
and how well you get your ideas across. Your writing will not
be scored on your personal opinions. Be sure to check your
writing for correct grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.
Editing Checklist
1
Have you started each sentence with a capital letter?
2
Have you capitalized names of people and places?
3
Have you ended each sentence with the correct punctuation mark?
.,
Does the subject of your sentence agree with the action word (verb)?
Examples:
Writing Icon and
Editing Checklist
The writing icon and
the Editing Checklist
remind students to
use correct grammar,
punctuation, and
capitalization in
their writing. The
explanation of the
writing icon also
indicates to students
that their writing
will not be scored
on their personal
opinions.
Tom plays at the park.
--=
They play at the park.
S
Have you written complete sentences?
17
Writing Development
Score Point 6
The following list describes a writing sample (shown on the next page) that earns a Score Point 6 using the
ISTEP+ Elaborated Writing Development Rubric.
This sample
• stays fully focused on the task (Le., tells a story of what is put into the shoe, describes the journey across
the sea, and explains why the children who live across the sea are surprised).
•
is a thorough and complete narrative, amply supported by relevant and telling details (i.e., Beanie babies
come alive, make a motor and steering wheel, and try to steer out of the way of a ship; the shoe comes
alive; they have a wild adventure on their way and receive crowns and coats when they reach their
destination).
•
is organized logically and sequentially, beginning with the beanie babies' coming alive, progressing
through their cruise, and ending with their royal experiences upon arrival at the distant shore of the sea;
there is a definite beginning, middle, and end, with smooth transitions throughout.
• concludes with lively and delightful anticipation of more adventures to come (e.g., "I wonder what we'r
[we're] going to do tomorrow" said Princess).
• employs exceptional word usage (e.g., seaweed; crusing [cruising] around the Red Sea; they had a blast;
Uah-I-Umm-Uah; said Seaweed in a confused voice; limizeen [limousine]).
• flows, is easy to read, and contains effectively used narrative conventions.
• exhibits varied sentence patterns, including complex sentence structures (e.g., The beainie [beanie] babies
had there [their] own royel [royal] beds with curtains around it [them] including the shoe with little
sheets the Queen sewed!).
•
has a clear, unique, and lively voice.
NOTE: A Score Point 6 paper is an outstanding performance and therefore is rare.
Language-in-Use
Score Point 4
The following list describes a writing sample (shown on the next page) that earns a Score Point 4 using the
ISTEP+ Language-in-Use Rubric.
This sample
• begins all sentences with a capital letter.
• correctly capitalizes proper nouns except for unnecessary capitalization of Mother and Father in the
context used.
• ends all sentences with the correct punctuation.
• exhibits a very good command of language skills (i.e., there are no grade-level errors).
•
has correct subject and verb agreement.
• has no sentence fragments and one run-on sentence (e.g., "Yep that's right that was a fun ride thanks"
said the Shoe).
NOTE: Grade 3 students are not expected to know all the grammar conventions. They are assessed only on
beginning capitalization, capitalization of proper nouns, end punctuation, subject and verb agreement, and
sentence construction. They are not assessed for spelling.
18
Story
The S v..fr ,"se
TItle:
Em ljO,"rtJ to ev..t some 1I:.00,"ne Ix>./;/es ,"n my shoe (or the Ch'"/Jren o.Cross
the ReA Seo.. On the \..vo.y the II!.o.n,"e Ix>./;,'es come 0.1,'ve! They (,"nJ some
seo.~
o.nJ (,"sJ, /lJneoS on the \..vo.y. They mo.'I<e
Heo.~'"1e
0.
• • • 0. sJ,,"e ,"s heo.J,',!, sir0.'"# f..-vorJ.s the .shoe. Bon,? h,"toS the "
bv..Hon r,"jJ.rf on f,'me (or the sJ,,"e to h,'t them.
on the leftover
They
~J
0.
seo.~
They
~re
\..vo.S
~re
the shoe!!! They
(v..n r,'Je tho.n\<.S'
0.
bv..sy chew,',!,
Bo.st "vht1e they v",eren't o.rov..nJ ••• The WHAlfS (o.vor,"te
'rov..r
Uo.h - I - Umm - Uo.""
,'n
Seo.~ \..vo.S
Jv..st Crv..s,"'!' o.rov..nJ on that ReA Seo.!
Seo.~
sf!{,f,'on!!! Then Pr,"nsses, Bon,?, Peo.ce, Er,"n o.nJ
It
mofer o.nJ steer,',!, '-vheeL
so.,~
heo.rJ
so sv..er,"seJ!!! They cov../J Ix>.rly
o.l,"ve to"
oSo.,~
Bo'!1O.
0.
I'"ffle vo,"ce.
+o.~
'ree t~f s r ,"jJ.rf t~t
the Shoe. Yov..r - Yov..r - Yov..r Wetome so.,'J
\..vo.S 0.
Seo.~
corl'v..seJ vo,'ce. r,'rly they ,:if o.Cross the seo.. The 6 do. v..,J.rfers 0( the
k'",!, (ov..nJ them. Ho.nno.h ,at Bon,?, kefy ,:if
Seo.~,
M-Jey ,:if Peo.ce, ko.f,'e
,at pr,'tf.,e~, So.ro.h ,:if Er,"n, G-ro.ce ,:if the Shoe. They
~
to sho..v there
1
Ho+J,er o.nJ ro.ther. They v",ere very .sv..er,'sec!. All 0(( them
coo.ts.
It
~J
Ever~e
0.
they
~,"mm,"rtj
fOol,
~
m
Cr~
they "vOv../J Ir,"rtj there toys ,"n the
~,"rtj
set,
~ t,"rtj
r,"rtj o./ll o.n ,"ce
o.nJ
L"m,"~wr.
~t,"rtj
r ,"rtj!!! It
\..vo.oS
"vOll!er(v../!!! It \..vo.sr/t even cold! (Orly ,"( yov.. +v..rn on the o.,"r.) It
\..vo.oS
t,"me to So.y ,aoJ - n,'~J.rf. The 1I!.o.,·n,·e Ix>./;,"es
~J
there
CJvvn
roye1
~
cv..rlo.,"n,s o.rov../ll ,"t ,"tf.,Iv..J,"rtj the shoe v..-,"th I/ffle sheets the Qv..een
'1. "v01l!er
~t ~'r
'jO,"rtj
to do fornorrUw"
v..-,"th
s~
so.,~ Pr,"tf.,e~
2
19
Writing Development
Score Point 5
The following list describes a writing sample (shown on the next page) that earns a Score Point 5 using the
ISTEP+ Elaborated Writing Development Rubric.
This sample
• stays focused on the task (Le., tells a story about a shoe, filled with teeth, crossing the sea and what
happens when the shoe is found).
•
provides many relevant ideas (i.e., the shoe floated into the Black Sea where a whale ate it; the shoe
floated into the whale's stomach and just sat there for an hour before being spit out; kids found the
shoe, divided the teeth, put them under their pillows, and each received five dollars), but with fewer
details and less development than would be found in a Score Point 6 paper.
•
begins the first two sentences in the future tense rather than the past tense, but presents events logically
and sequentially; there is, however, some over-reliance on the word then to move the narrative along.
•
has a beginning (e.g., I will put [in] all my teeth that have fallen out), a middle, and an end
(e.g., and they where [were] all happy), although the beginning and end are weaker than those
found in a Score Point 6 paper.
•
uses mostly common words, but does so effectively (e.g., all of a sudden; floated to the top; shot out of
the whales [whale's] body; divided all the teeth).
•
has one usage error (e.g., Shoe started the [to] move), but this is probably a first-draft* error; in addition,
the first sentence is somewhat awkward.
•
•
is easy to read.
uses varied sentence patterns, including complex sentence structures (e.g., The whale thought it was
food so he swam over and ate it).
• has a clear and interesting voice.
_
NOTE: A Score Point 5 paper may have many of the same characteristics as a Score Point 6 paper. The
difference between a Score Point 6 paper and a Score Point 5 paper is often the degree of in-depth
development and the use of supporting details.
*First-draft errors are those errors that have most likely been made because the student was writing quickly
or did not have time to check his or her work. An error is considered to be of the first-draft variety if the
student has not repeated the error or made similar errors elsewhere in the response.
Language-in-Use
Score Point 4
The following list describes a writing sample (shown on the next page) that earns a Score Point 4 using the
ISTEP+ language-in-Use Rubric.
This sample
•
begins all sentences with a capital letter.
• ends all sentences with the correct punctuation.
• has correct subject and verb agreement.
•
20
has no run-on sentences, although the eighth sentence in the first paragraph would be more proper if
divided into two sentences.
Story
TItle:
The S o./I/n, Shoe
I \.vI] ruf 0.1 my feeth fho.f ho.ve (0.1Ien ouf. Then I \.v/I eu.sh d ouf
/""'0 fhe .seo.. The .shoe (lco.feJ /""'0 fhe
Blo.c.~
Seo.. If .s0.//eJ (or Jo.y.s o.nJ
cky.s. Then one Jo.y 0. \.vho./e -S\.vo.m by. He .so.\.v fhe .shoe. The \.vho./e fhou,hf
/f \.vo..s (ooj .so he
~o.m
over o.nJ 0. fe d. The .shoe (100. feJ fo fhe \.vho./e.s
.sfomo.c.h o.nJ jU.sf .so.f fhere (or one \.vho/e hour fhen 0.11 o( 0. .suJJen
fhe .shoe .sfo.rfeJ the move. If (loo.feJ fo fhe foe o( fhe \.vho./e.s .sfomo.c.h
o.nJ .sfo.rfeJ fo move ouf fhe .sfomo.c.h.
\.vo.fer, o.nJ
~er1
fhe .shoe ,of
on (Ioo.f/n,. The .shoe (loo.feJ (or fhree Jo.y.s. Then one Jo.y
.sfuc.~
on .somefh/n,. Some
~/J.s
ro.n ue fo fhe .shoe o.nJ
foo~
ouf fhe feeth. They J/y,"W 0.. fhe feeth ouf. Everyone ,of 5 feeth. Then
fho.f n,·,hf 0.. fhe C.h,"/Jren euf fhere feeth unJer fhere e/I/O\.v-S o.nJ fhe
nerf morn,"n, fhey 0.. ho.J (,"ve JoHo.r.s unJer fhe,"r el]O\.v-S, o.nJ fhey \.vhere
o.U ho.eey.
1
21
Writing Development
Score Point 4
The following list describes a writing sample (shown on the next page) that earns a Score Point 4 using the
ISTEP+ Elaborated Writing Development Rubric.
This sample
• stays focused on the task (i.e., tells the story of a shoe that is sent to children who live across the sea).
•
provides related ideas, but the relevant details are not as developed as in a Score Point 6 or Score Point 5
paper (i.e., the writer tells of putting snakes in the shoe, but does not describe them or tell what kind of
snakes they are; the tidal wave made it [the shoe] go faster, but no further elaboration of the conditions
is included).
• shows a logical sequence from beginning to end.
• has a perfunctory beginning (e.g., I put some snakes in my shoe and let my shoe sail to the children on
the eather [other] side of the sea), and a clear ending (e.g., They put a letter in the shoe and thanked me
for putting the snakes in the shoe).
•
uses common words, but communicates with clarity; word usage is less sophisticated than in a Score
Point 6 or Score Point 5 response.
• is readable, but has some gaps in the story (i.e., the shoe was almost there. Finaly [Finally] it got there.
What happened in-between being almost there and getting there? Also, how did the children get the
snakes in a tank?).
•
uses complex sentence patterns (e.g., The snakes got out and the children ran away but the snakes went
after them real [really] fast).
• shows some sense of audience and voice (e.g., When it was sailing the shoe almost tiped [tipped] over
and the snakes almost fell out but they didn't).
NOTE: A Score Point 4 paper represents a solid performance. One factor that differentiates a Score Point 4
paper from Score Point 6 and Score Point 5 papers is the development of ideas and content. A Score Point 4
paper frequently has a list-like quality and does not have the clear organization of Score Point 6 and Score
Point 5 papers.
language-in-Use
Score Point 4
The following list describes a writing sample (shown on the next page) that earns a Score Point 4 using the
ISTEP+ Language-in-Use Rubric.
This sample
•
begins all sentences with a capital letter.
• has correct beginning capitalization.
• has correct ending punctuation.
• has correct subject and verb agreement.
• has no run-on sentences or sentence fragments.
22
Story
Title:
So.,l,"rt1 Sno.\{e,s
I put ,some -Sno.\{e,s ,"n my ,shoe 0.1ll let my ,shoe
the -Sno.\{e,s o.lmo.sl (ell out but they j,"Jn't. There Wo.,s
there. r,"no.ly '"t
m- there.
The c,h/lJren ,so.w /t 0.1ll
to.n\{ 0.1ll \{eet them (or 0. pet. They put 0. letter ,"n
1
23
Writing Development
Score Point 3
The following list describes a writing sample (shown on the next page) that earns a Score Point 3 using the
ISTEP+ Elaborated Writing Development Rubric.
This sample
• accomplishes the task (i.e., tells a story about sending a shoe filled with apples across the ocean).
•
provides a few relevant ideas, but does not develop any of them (i.e., Why did the writer fill the shoe
with apples, and who were the happy people across the ocean?).
•
has some order, with logical sequence.
•
has a rudimentary beginning (e.g., I ran To the bech won day and fond a sho [I ran to the beach one day
and found a shoe)) and ending (e.g., an thats wy tha ru hapy [and that's why they are happy)).
•
is missing a middle (i.e., a description of events between the time the shoe was washed away by a big
wave and when it was found).
•
has minimal word usage; uses common words, with an over-reliance on the words and and then.
• is mostly readable, but comprehension is negatively affected by the repetition of then.
• has little sense of audience.
NOTE: The word minimal is often associated with a Score Point 3 paper. A Score Point 3 paper, like a Score
Point 4 paper, has a list-like quality. However, a Score Point 4 paper provides some details and in-depth
information, while the Score Point 3 paper shows little or no development of ideas.
Language-in-Use
Score Point 3
-
The following list describes a writing sample (shown on the next page) that earns a Score Point 3 using the
ISTEP+ Language-in-Use Rubric.
This sample
• has some missing capitalization at the beginning of sentences (e.g., ten [Then)).
• is missing some ending punctuation.
• has two verb errors (e.g., a big wave come [came]); I goed [went] home).
• has two run-on sentences in a relatively brief narrative.
NOTE: In a Score Point 3 paper, errors occur, but do not impede the flow of communication; the writer's
meaning is not seriously obscured by language-in-use errors.
24
Story
The Se1,"n, SJ,o..,.,.
Title:
I ro.n To the
~h
"vOn do.y o.nJ (onJ
0.
.sho. AnJ I ,oeJ
1
25
Writing Development
Score Point 2
The following list describes a writing sample (shown below) that earns a Score Point 2 using the
ISTEP+ Elaborated Writing Development Rubric.
This sample
•
attempts to accomplish the task, but is initially flawed by the lack of any introduction; development is
insufficient to provide sustained or meaningful focus.
•
is developed only to the extent that it presents four ideas (e.g., the cat is black; the cat are in A Big, Shoe
[The cat is in a big shoe]: The Shoe had A motr [The shoe had a motor]; They like It [it]).
•
has little sense of order; there is no clear beginning, middle, or end, but rather a list of four separate
statements.
•
uses basic vocabulary with no evidence of attention to word choice.
• there is little sense of audience or voice.
NOTE: On the positive side, the Score Point 2 paper communicates some ideas. However; the overall lack of
writing skills limits the student's ability to communicate effectively and to develop the body of the writing.
Language-in-Use
Score Point 2
The following list describes a writing sample (shown below) that earns a Score Point 2 using the
ISTEP+ Language-in-Use Rubric.
This sample
• begins two of the sentences with a capital letter.
• ends two of the sentences with the correct punctuation.
• has correct subject and verb agreement, except for the cat are [is] in a big shoe.
•
has one run-on sentence in a very brief narrative.
Story
TItle: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Shoe.
They
I,~
It
1
26
Writing Development
Score Point 1
The following list describes a writing sample (shown below) that earns a Score Point 1 using the
ISTEP+ Elaborated Writing Development Rubric.
This sample
•
has some focus on the task, but the content conveys little meaning (i.e., it is understood that the puppy
will be put in the shoe, although there is no mention of the shoe or sailing it across the sea).
•
includes almost no relevant ideas (e.g., flowers; puppy).
•
is very brief (i.e., nine words in all).
•
is too brief to determine logical order or sequence.
•
uses limited vocabulary.
•
displays little sense of audience.
NOTE: Score Point 1 is the lowest score point. It is important to note that even at this level, the student
conveys some meaning. Problems with sentence construction and development of ideas may seriously
compromise meaning.
Language-in-Use
Score Point 1
The following list describes a writing sample (shown below) that earns a Score Point 1 using the
ISTEP+ Language-in-Use Rubric.
This sample
•
has no capitalization, except for Day.
•
has no punctuation.
•
demonstrates some subject and verb agreement (e.g., i [I] put).
• consists of one partially-constructed sentence.
NOTE: In this typical Score Point 1 paper, errors are serious and numerous; the reader struggles to discern
the writer's meaning. Problems with sentence structure make it difficult to determine what the writer is
attempting to communicate.
Story
Title:
on th,'~ Do.y
{/t:J\,ver ~
" f"U.. t e"U..ffr,'n ,..,.
1
27
INTRODUCTION TO THE MATHEMATICS
PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT
The performance assessment that students took this past fall in Grade 3
allowed them to demonstrate their understanding of mathematics in a
variety of ways, such as using a ruler, using other manipulatives, explaining
a solution, drawing a picture, or making a table or graph.
In Grade 3, the students completed a series of unrelated constructed-response
items and one performance-assessment task.
STRUCTURE
The constructed-response items for Grade 3 Mathematics are contained in a
single session and are organized as follows:
• Items 1 through 3 and 9 through 11 are constructed-response items that are
not related to each other by topic. Each item consists of a single part.
• Items 4 through 8, all single part items, comprise a performance task. These
four items are related to a single topic. The task includes an introductory
narrative and/or graphic that sets the topic, with the items relating to this
topic immediately following the narrative or graphic.
SCORING
Each constructed-response item is scored according to its own rubric. A
rubric is a description of student performance that clearly articulates the
requirements for each of the score points. Scoring rubrics are essential
because they ensure that all papers are scored objectively. Each rubric for
the Grade 3 ISTEP+ Fall 2000 test has a maximum possible score of one or
two score points.
NOTE: Images of the items and student work have been reduced to fit
the format of this guide. As a result, actual measures of items will not
be reflected.
28
Rubrics describe the requirements for each score point level. The number
of score point levels possible varies according to the requirements of each
activity. The performance criteria (requirements) comprising the rubrics
were established prior to testing to ensure that all responses are judged
objectively.
1. Students should not be penalized for omitting the following
• degree symbols
• dollar signs ($) or cent signs (~)
• zeros for place holders; for example, either
0.75 or .750 could be used
• labels for word problems; for example, miles
2. Students should not be penalized for
• spelling or grammar errors
• using abbreviations; for example, ft or feet could be used
3. Students should be given credit for
• entries in work space that indicate understanding of a complete
process even if the response on answer line is incorrect (the student
would receive partial credit for items with rubrics that allow for
scoring the work)
• answers not written on answer line; for example, answer could be
given in work space or in explanation (however, in some cases,
because of the multiple calculations in the work space, placement of
answer on the answer line is necessary to determine which result the
student intended)
4. Graphs
• Bar graphs may be horizontal or vertical.
• The order in which the data in bar and circle graphs are shown is
NOT important.
• Line graphs are acceptable with or without lines connecting the points.
• Any width of a bar in a bar graph is acceptable.
CONDITION CODES
If a response is unscorable, it is assigned one of the following condition
codes:
A Blank/No response/Refusal
B Illegible
C Written predominantly in a language other than English
o Insufficient response/Copied from text
29
MATHEMATICS GRADE 3
ESSENTIAL SKILLS
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Develop problem-solving abilities (Problem Solving)*
Communicate understanding of mathematics (Communication)*
Develop reasoning skills (Reasoning)*
Develop a sense of whole numbers (Whole Number Sense)
Develop place-value concepts for whole numbers (Place Value)
Develop a sense of fractions and decimals (Fraction and Decimal Sense)
Develop computation and estimation skills for whole numbers
(Whole Number Computation/Estimation)
o
Recognize, describe, draw, classify, and compare geometric objects
(Geometry)
o
o
Develop spatial sense (Spatial Sense)
o
Use data analysis and probability to analyze given situations and
outcomes of experiments (Probability and Statistics)
Estimate and measure using standard and nonstandard units
(Measurement)
* NOTE: For ISTEP+ assessment purposes only, the Essential Skills marked
with an asterisk have been combined into one category called
Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning.
30
Three Essential Skills-Problem Solving, Communication, and Reasoning-are
identified as Process Skills in the Indiana Academic Standards. To ensure that
the ISTEP+ items that assess these Process Skills are grade-appropriate and that
the items use skills that are contained in the standards, these items are
developed by also including one of the Content Skills (such as Place Value,
Computation, or Geometry).
NOTE: For the Process Skill items, score points are awarded only for the
Process Skills, not for the Content Skill associated with the item.
The Content Skill used for each of the Process Skill items in the Grade 3
Applied Skills Assessment is shown in the following chart.
PROCESS SKILL ITEMS
Item
Process Skill
(score points awarded)
Content Skill
(score points not awarded)
Session 2
3
Problem Solving/CommunicationJReasoning
Computation and Estimation
5
Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning
Measurement and Estimation
6
Problem Solving/CommunicationlReasoning
Whole Number Sense
9
Problem Solving/CommunicationlReasoning
Computation and Estimation
10
Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning
Measurement and Estimation
11
Problem Solving/CommunicationlReasoning
Measurement and Estimation
31
ISTEP+ GRADE 3 MANIPULATIVES
.0
.
.
. .....
......
... -
~
'
.
:!I
~
••
e
~.
.~
-(\i
-~
~
..
-.'
.
'
~ ~ ~
32
-~
-5!
N-
-,......
>-
(t)
~~~
e I>
CD
-R1
~~~
ee
i.=
-ta
...
(0)-
_CD
.-
~
~
-~
-;!
"..-
-~
-~
-
QI-
.-
0
~
~
v
-~
_0)
0)-IZ)
-,...
.....
-CD
-
-It)
-
.
CII-
-(I)
-~j
--s
i
11)-
-
Session 2-ltem 1: Whole Number Sense
1
Draw a circle around each group of 5 ladybugs.
/.t\.
kl:A
If one more group of 5 ladybugs were added, how many ladybugs would
there be IN ALL?
Answer _ _ _ _ _ Iadybugs
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• Any 4 groups of S ladybugs circled
2 points
Exemplary response
1 point
One correct
component
o points
Other
AND
• 2SIadybugs
33
Session 2-ltem 1
Score Point 2
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
correctly circles
groups of 5 ladybugs
and gives the
correct answer of
25 ladybugs. The
response receives a
Score Point 2.
SCORE POINT 2
1
Draw a circle around each group of S ladybugs.
H one more group of Sladybugs were added, how many ladybugs would
there be IN ALL?
Answer _ _ _ _ _ ladybugs
Session 2-ltem 1
Score Point 1
Th is response shows
groups of 5 ladybugs
circled correctly, but
the student does not
give the correct
answer of 25
ladybugs. Therefore,
the response receives
a Score Point 1.
SCORE POINT 1
1
Draw a circle around each group of S ladybugs.
H one more group of S ladybugs were added, how many ladybugs would
there be IN ALL?
Answer _ _J-.......;.O
_ _ _ ladybugs
34
SCORE POINT 0
1
Draw a circle around each group of 5 ladybugs.
Session 2-ltem 1
Score Point 0
This response shows
incorrectly ci rcled
groups of ladybugs
and an incorrect
answer of 21
ladybugs. Therefore,
the response
receives a Score
Point o.
If one more group of 5 ladybugs were added, how many ladybugs would
there be IN ALL?
Answer _J..._l____ ladybugs
35
Session 2-ltem 2: Place Value
2
Reggie is making brownies. He wants to find out how many
chocolate chips are on the plate below. Draw a circle around
each group of TEN chips .
..
:
...
.
.
........
... . .--...
••••••
• • •••
• •••
•••
Use your drawing to help you fill in the chart below.
NUMBER OF
CHOCOLATE CHIPS
Tens
Ones
Total
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• Student circles 3 groups of 10 chips each,
leaving 7 single chips
2 points
Exemplary response
1 point
One correct
component
o points
Other
AND
•
36
NUMBER OF
CHOCOLATE CHIPS
Tens
Ones
Total
3
7
37
Session 2-ltem 2
Score Point 2
SCORE POINT 2
2
Reggie is making brownies. He wants to find out how many
chocolate chips are on the plate below. Draw a circle around
each group of TEN chips.
Th is response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
correctly circles
groups of 10
chocolate chips and
correctly completes
the place-value
chart. The response
receives a Score
Point 2.
Use your drawing to help you fill in the chart below.
NUMBER OF
CHOCOLATE CHIPS
Tens
3
Ones
7
Total
37
37
-
Session 2-ltem 2
Score Point 1
This response shows
groups of 10
chocolate chips
circled correctly, but
the student does not
complete the placevalue chart correctly.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point 1.
SCORE POINT 1
2
Reggie is making brownies. He wants to find out how many
chocolate chips are on the plate below. Draw a circle around
each group of TEN chips.
Use your drawing to help you fill in the chart below.
NUMBER OF
CHOCOLATE CHIPS
Tens
10
38
Ones
10
Total
7
SCORE POINT 0
2
Reggie is making brownies. He wants to find out how many
chocolate chips are on the plate below. Draw a circle around
each group of TEN chips.
Session 2-ltem 2
Score Point 0
This response shows
incorrectly circled
groups of chocolate
chips and an
incorrectly
completed placevalue chart.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point O.
Use your drawing to help you fill in the chart below.
NUMBER OF
CHOCOLATE CHIPS
Tens
Ones
Total
3
5
35
39
Session 2-ltem 3: Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning
3
e
®~~ Use your punchout coins to solve this problem.
Micky has 85¢ to spend at the Snack Shop. Look at the sign below to
see what Micky can buy.
POPCORNp'
25~
••.
..
,.'
/
~
f:!/!I""~-~
....
CANDY
BAR
60~
ICE CREAM
90~
MILK
SHAKE
SODA
65~
40~
Micky wants to spend ALL his money. What can Micky buy?
You MUST show your work.
Ans~
_______________________________________
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• Candy bar and popcorn
2 points
Exemplary response
AND
1 point
Correct answer only
• 60~ (candy bar) + 25~ (popcorn)
= 85~
OR
Correct complete
process; error in
computation
40
o points
Other
Session 2-ltem 3
Score Point 2
SCORE POINT 2
3
e
~(I) Use your punchout coins to solve this problem.
~
Micky has 85¢ to spend at the Snack Shop. Look at the sign below to
see what Micky can buy.
...
.
•
POPCORN
25(
.\
.
.
p
•••
... .~ .
~
~ANDY
BAR
60(
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
gives the correct
answer of a candy
bar and popcorn
and shows the
correct work
demonstrating the
process used. The
response receives a
Score Point 2.
ICE CREAM
90(
MILK
SHAKE
SODA
65(
40(
Micky wants to spend ALL his money. What can Micky buy?
You MUST show your work.
41
Session 2-ltem 3
Score Point 1
This response shows
an incorrect answer
of popcorn and
soda, but the
student shows work
demonstrating use
of a correct
complete process
with an error in
computation.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point 1.
SCORE POINT 1
3
B
~fIJ
®
Use your punchout coins to solve this problem.
Micky has 85( to spend at the Snack Shop. Look at the sign below to
see what Micky can buy.
.........
•
~ ,
POPCORNp'
25(
•••
.. ".
~NDY
BAR
60(
•
ICE CREAM
90(
MILK
SHAKE
65t
SODA
40(
Micky wants to spend ALL his money. What can Micky buy?
You MUST show gour work.
42
TASK INTRODUCTION
Bird Watching Field Trip
Students at Washington Elementary School went on a bird watching
field trip. Answer Numbers 4 through 8 about the trip.
.. .
>;'
. .;~
,',
:-
L.... ~..-~
\
I
J:",~ ..~"""t..__
'-:: •. -
44
-'..;J
Session 2-ltem 4: Measurement and Estimation
",
The clocks below show the time the bus trip began and the time the bus
trip ended.
BUS TRIP BEGAN
BUS TRIP ENDED
How many minutes did the bus trip last?
Answer ______ minutes
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• 25 minutes
1 point
Exemplary response
o points
Other
45
Session 2-ltem 4
Score Point 1
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
gives the correct
answer of 25
minutes. The
response receives a
Score Point 1.
SCORE POINT 1
4
The clocks below show the time the bus trip began and the time the bus
trip ended.
BUS TRIP BEGAN
BUS TRIP ENDED
How many minutes did the bus trip last?
;;s
Answer _ _-.:..._ _ minutes
-
Session 2-ltem 4
Score Point 0
The answer is
incorrect. Therefore,
the response
receives a Score
Point O.
SCORE POINT 0
4
The clocks below show the time the bus trip began and the time the bus
trip ended.
BUS TRIP BEGAN
BUS TRIP ENDED
How many minutes did the bus trip last?
l_w
__ minutes
Answer _ _ _
46
Session 2-ltem 5: Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning
5
The thermometer below shows the temperature outside on the morning of
the field trip.
Fahrenheit
100
95
90
85
80
75
70
65
60
55
50
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
o
What temperature does the thermometer show?
Answer _ _ _ _ _ degrees Fahrenheit (OF)
By 1:00 P.M., the temperature on the thermometer was lOoF higher.
What was the temperature at 1:00 P.M.?
Answer _ _ _ _ _ degrees Fahrenheit eF) at 1:00 P.M.
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• 65 degrees Fahrenheit (OF)
2 points
Exemplary response
AND
1 point
One correct
component
o points
Other
• 75 degrees Fahrenheit (OF)
47
.-.
Session 2-ltem 5
Score Point 2
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
gives the correct
answer of 65
degrees Fahrenheit,
and a correct answer
of 75 degrees
Fahrenheit. The
response receives a
Score Point 2.
SCORE POINT 2
5
The thennometer below shows the temperature outside on the morning of
the field trip.
Fahrenheit
100
95
90
85
80
75
70
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
What temperature does the thennometer show?
Answer _----:;6..:..5___ degrees Fahrenheit eF)
By 1:00 P.M., the temperature on the thennometer was 10°F higher.
What was the temperature at 1:00 P.M.?
Answer _ _7
_5___ degrees Fahrenheit eF) at 1:00 P.M.
48
SCORE POINT 1
5
The thennometer below shows the temperature outside on the morning of
the field trip.
it
100
95
85
75
65
55
45
- 90
80
70
60
Session 2-ltem 5
Score Point 1
This response shows
a correct answer of
65 degrees
Fahrenheit, but the
student gives an
incorrect answer of
85 degrees
Fahrenheit in the
second part of the
item. Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point 1.
50
40
35
25
15
5
30
20
10
0
What temperature does the thennometer show?
Answer _-..I.o!6..L5___ degrees Fahrenheit eF)
By 1:00 P.M., the temperature on the thennometer was 10°F higher.
What was the temperature at 1:00 P.M.?
Answer _ _
8'_5___ degrees Fahrenheit (OF) at 1:00 P.M.
49
Session 2-ltem 5
Score Point 0
In this response,
both answers are
incorrect. Therefore,
the response
receives a Score
Point O.
SCORE POINT 0
5
The thermometer below shows the temperature outside on the morning of
the field trip.
100
95
90
85
75 --
80
70
65
60
55
45
50
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
What temperature does the thermometer show?
Answer _--'-f....
5___ degrees Fahrenheit (OF)
By 1:00 P.M., the temperature on the thermometer was 10°F higher.
What was the temperature at 1:00 P.M.?
Answer _ _6
_5___ degrees Fahrenheit eF) at 1:00 P.M.
50
Session 2-ltem 6: Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning
6
Some students watched a cardinal build a new nest. Each time she flew
to the nest, she carried 2 twigs. The students watched her fly to the nest
7 times. How many twigs IN ALL did the students watch her carry to
the nest?
You MUST show gour work.
Answer _ _ _ _ _ twigs
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 2
2 points
Exemplary response
OR
1 point
Correct answer only
• 7 x 2
OR
OR
Correct complete
process; error in
computation
• Other valid process
AND
o points
Other
• 14 twigs
51
,-.....
Session 2-ltem 6
Score Point 2
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
gives the correct
answer of 14 twigs
and shows the
correct work
demonstrating the
process used. The
response receives a
Score Point 2.
SCORE POINT 2
6
Some students watched a cardinal build a new nest. Each time she flew
to the nest, she carried 2 twigs. The students watched her fly to the nest
7 times. How many twigs IN ALL did the students watch her carry to
the nest?
You MUST show your work.
1f___ twigs
Answer _ _
Session 2-ltem 6
Score Point 1
This response shows
an incorrect answer
of 13 twigs, but the
student shows work
demonstrating a
correct process.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point 1.
SCORE POINT 1
6
Some students watched a cardinal build a new nest. Each time she flew
to the nest, she carried 2 twigs. The students watched her fly to the nest
7 times. How many twigs IN ALL did the students watch her carry to
the nest?
You MUST show your work.
13
52
twigs
SCORE POINT 0
6
Some students watched a cardinal build a new nest. Each time she flew
to the nest, she carried 2 twigs. The students watched her fly to the nest
7 times. How many twigs IN ALL did the students watch her carry to
the nest?
You MUST show your work.
Session 2-ltem 6
Score Point 0
This response shows
an incorrect answer
of 9 twigs and shows
work demonstrating
an incorrect process.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point O.
Answer _ _9<--__ twigs
53
Session 2-ltem 7: Statistics and Probability
7
The class made this table to show the number and types of some birds
seen during the field trip.
BIRDS SEEN
Type of Bird
Number Seen
Wren
7
Jay
5
Sparrow
Oriole
10
2
Another class will be taking the same field trip tomorrow. Which type of
bird will they MOST LIKELY see more of during their trip?
54
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• Sparrow or S
1 point
Exemplary response
o points
Other
SCORE POINT 1
7
The class made this table to show the number and types of some birds
seen during the field trip.
BIRDS SEEN
Type of Bird
Number Seen
Wren
7
Jay
5
Session 2-ltem 7
Score Point 1
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
gives the correct
answer of Sparrow.
The response
receives a Score
Point 1.
10
Sparrow
Oriole
2
Another class will be taking the same field trip tomorrow. Which type of
bird will they MOST UKELY see more of during their trip?
SCORE POINT 0
7
The class made this table to show the number and types of some birds
seen during the field trip.
BIRDS SEEN
Type of Bird
7
Jay
5
Oriole
This response shows
an incorrect answer.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point o.
Number Seen
Wren
Sparrow
Session 2-ltem 7
Score Point 0
10
2
Another class will be taking the same field trip tomorrow. Which type of
bird will they MOST LIKELY see more of during their trip?
Answer_j_o.y
____
55
Session 2-ltem 8: Measurement and Estimation
8
After the field trip, Richard decided to build a birdhouse in his back yard.
He needed 5 FEET of wood to make the birdhouse. Richard's dad bought
2 YARDS of wood. Do they have enough wood to make the birdhouse?
Tell how you know.
Richard wants to tie a short ribbon to his birdhouse. Circle the SHORTEST
length of ribbon below.
9-£00t ribbon
9-inch ribbon
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
Explanation equivalent to:
2 points
Exemplary response
• 2 yards equals 6 feet, so they would have
1 foot left over
1 point
One correct
component
OR
o points
Other
• 5 feet equals 1 yard and 2 feet, so 2 yards
would be more than enough
OR
• Other valid explanation
AND
• 9-inch ribbon circled
56
9-yard ribbon
Session 2-ltem 8
Score Point 2
SCORE POINT 2
8
After the field trip, Richard decided to build a birdhouse in his back yard.
He needed 5 FEET of wood to make the birdhouse. Richard's dad bought
2 YARDS of wood. Do they have enough wood to make the birdhouse?
Tell how you know.
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
gives a correct
explanation and
circles the correct
answer of 9-inch
ribbon. The response
receives a Score
Point 2.
Richard wants to tie a short ribbon to his birdhouse. Circle the SHORTEST
length of ribbon below.
9-£00t ribbon
(finch ribb~
9-yard ribbon
57
,-...,
Session 2-ltem 8
Score Point 1
This response shows
an incorrect
explanation, but
the student circles
the correct answer
of 9-inch ribbon.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point 1.
SCORE POINT 1
8
After the field trip, Richard decided to build a birdhouse in his back yard.
He needed 5 FEET of wood to make the birdhouse. Richard's dad bought
2 YARDS of wood. Do they have enough wood to make the birdhouse?
Tell how you know.
Ye.s! kf,o.v...e.s
0.
yo.rJ
'-.s lon,er fho.n
5 feef.
Richard wants to tie a short ribbon to his birdhouse. Circle the SHORTEST
length of ribbon below.
9-£00t ribbon
58
9-yard ribbon
Session 2-ltem 8
Score Point 0
SCORE POINT 0
8
After the field trip, Richard decided to build a birdhouse in his back yard.
He needed 5 FEET of wood to make the birdhouse. Richard's dad bought
2 YARDS of wood. Do they have enough wood to make the birdhouse?
Tell how you know.
This response shows
an incorrect
explanation, and the
student circles the
incorrect answer of
9-foot ribbon.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point o.
Richard wants to tie a short ribbon to his birdhouse. Circle the SHORTEST
length of ribbon below.
9-inch ribbon
9-yard ribbon
59
Session 2-ltem 9: Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning
9
Use the clues below to find how many ladybugs Jeff saw.
• Annie saw 14 ladybugs.
• Ben saw 2 MORE ladybugs than Annie saw.
• Jeff saw more ladybugs than Annie, but FEWER than Ben.
How many ladybugs did Jeff see?
You MUST show gour work.
Answer _ _ _ _ _ ladybugs
Exemplary Response:
• 14 + 2
16 - 1
= 16
= 15
Rubric:
2 points
Exemplary response
1 point
Correct answer only
OR
OR
Annie saw 14. Ben saw 16. Jeff saw 15.
Correct complete
process; error in
computation
OR
• Other valid response
AND
• 151adybugs
60
o points
Other
SCORE POINT 2
9
Use the clues below to find how many ladybugs Jeff saw.
• Annie saw 14 ladybugs.
• Ben saw 2 MORE ladybugs than Annie saw.
• Jeff saw more ladybugs than Annie, but FEWER than Ben.
How many ladybugs did Jeff see?
You MUST show gour work.
Session 2-ltem 9
Score Point 2
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
gives the correct
answer of 15
ladybugs and shows
the correct work
demonstrating the
process used. The
response receives a
Score Point 2.
Answer _ _ _15
__ ladybugs
SCORE POINT 1
9
Use the clues below to find how many ladybugs Jeff saw.
• Annie saw 14 ladybugs.
• Ben saw 2 MORE ladybugs than Annie saw.
• Jeff saw more ladybugs than Annie, but FEWER than Ben.
How many ladybugs did Jeff see?
You MUST show gour work.
Session 2-ltem 9
Score Point 1
This response shows
a correct answer of
15 ladybugs, but the
student's work does
not demonstrate a
correct process.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point 1.
Answer _---...;15=-__ ladybugs
61
~
Session 2-ltem 9
Score Point 0
This response shows
an incorrect answer
of 20 ladybugs and
shows work
demonstrating an
incorrect process.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point o.
SCORE POINT 0
9
Use the clues below to find how many ladybugs Jeff saw.
• Annie saw 14 ladybugs.
• Ben saw 2 MORE ladybugs than Annie saw.
• Jeff saw more ladybugs than Annie, but FEWER than Ben.
How many ladybugs did Jeff see?
You MUST show gour work.
I
lt
J..
tt
rtf
___J.._O
__ Iadybugs
62
Session 2-ltem 10: Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning
10
~ Use your orange punch out shape
D to solve this problem.
ESTIMATE how many ladybugs in one line can fit on this blade of grass.
You MUST show gour worIt.
\I
\I
U
Answer _ _ _ _ _ Iadybugs
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• Grass is about 4 squares tall.
2 points
Exemplary response
1 point
Correct answer only
5+5+5+5
OR
OR
• Other valid process
Correct complete
process; error in
computation
AND
• 20
OR
o points
Other
• Any answer in the range of 17 to 22
63
",......
Session 2-ltem 10
Score Point 2
This response
matches the
exemplary response
contained in the
rubric. The student
gives the correct
answer of 20
ladybugs and shows
the correct work
demonstrating the
process used. The
response receives a
Score Point 2.
SCORE POINT 2
10
~ Use your orange punchout shape D to solve this problem.
ESTIMATE how many ladybugs in one line can fit on this blade of grass.
You MUST show gour work.
I m().de ~me c,,"rc,rI
on ~jr()..s.s.
Answer --=.J..."",O::.....-_ _ _ ladybugs
64
-
SCORE POINT 1
10
~ Use your orange punchout shape
D to solve this problem.
ESTIMATE how many ladybugs in one line can fit on this blade of grass.
You MUST show gour work.
Session 2-ltem 10
Score Point 1
This response shows
an incorrect answer
of 25 ladybugs, but
the student's work
demonstrates a
correct process.
Therefore, the
response receives a
Score Point 1.
J
"J..-
1·-
.1.
\
J
, I
U
-
Answer
J, 5
ladybugs
65
,-....
Session 2-ltem 10
Score Point 0
Th is response shows
an incorrect answer
of 16 ladybugs and
shows work
demonstrating an
incorrect process.
Therefore. the
response receives a
Score Point O.
SCORE POINT 0
10 ~ Use your orange punchout shape D to solve this problem.
ESTIMATE how many ladybugs in one line can fit on this blade of grass.
You MUST show gour work.
-
.\
(
II,
\
,
\
II
I
i
II
\
I
i
I
i
l
I
I
l
\u !
c..
6 k..Jy"u~ ~ 10 k..Jy"u~
16 k..Jy"u~
~
Answer _ _--I.11.J.6_ _ ladybugs
66
Session 2-ltem 11: Problem Solving/Communication/Reasoning
®'
G
11
Use your punchout coins to solve this problem.
Laura found 3 coins in her backpack. Two of the coins are the same and
one is different. What is the LEAST amount of money the 3 coins can
add up to?
You MUST show gour work.
Ansroer _ _ _ __
Exemplary Response:
Rubric:
• 1~ + 1~ + 5~
2 points
Exemplary response
OR
1 point
Correct answer only
• Other valid process
OR
AND
Correct complete
process; error in
computation
• 7~
o points
Other
67
Download