South Australia - Whyalla And Eyre Peninsula

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REGIONAL EDUCATION, SKILLS AND JOBS
PLAN
SOUTH AUSTRALIA – WHYALLA AND EYRE
PENINSULA
2012 – 2014
JULY 2013
This plan was first published in July 2012. This is the July 2013 edition.
Details in this report are correct at time of drafting.
This report can be found at the Regional Education, Skills and Jobs webpage (www.deewr.gov.au/resj) or the
My Region website (www.myregion.gov.au).
For more information about this plan, please contact:
The Office of Regional Education, Skills and Jobs
GPO Box 9880
Canberra ACT 2601
Email: [email protected]
ISBN:
978-0-642-78671-5 [PDF]
978-0-642-78672-2 [DOCX]
With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms and where otherwise noted all material presented in this
document is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia licence
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/).
The details of the relevant licence conditions (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode) are
available on the Creative Commons website (accessible using the links provided) as is the full legal code for the
CC BY 3.0 AU licence.
The document must be attributed as the Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan 2012-14 – Whyalla and Eyre
Peninsula.
Disclaimer about data used in this plan
Data used in the development of this plan comes from a variety of sources and was correct at time of drafting. This
document should not be used as a data source as data referred to may have been updated or reformulated since
the publication of the plan. Refer to primary sources for confirmation of data.
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 2
www.deewr.gov.au/resj
CONTENTS
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plans ................................................................................ 4
Strategies .................................................................................................................................................. 4
Community engagement........................................................................................................................... 4
Implementation ........................................................................................................................................ 4
Executive summary ................................................................................................................ 5
Characteristics of the region ................................................................................................... 7
Population ................................................................................................................................................. 7
Early childhood education and care .......................................................................................................... 8
School education ....................................................................................................................................... 9
Tertiary education and training .............................................................................................................. 10
Jobs, skills and workforce development ................................................................................................. 11
Other characteristics ............................................................................................................................... 12
Issues, goals and strategies ................................................................................................... 14
Issue 1 Adequate numbers of qualified early childhood education and care workers to comply with
the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education and Care. ........................................... 15
Issue 2
Below average participation rates in higher education. ......................................................... 16
Issue 3 Educational engagement, attainment and transition of young people from school to further
education, training and employment. .................................................................................................... 18
Issue 4 Skills development to meet the current and projected skills required by the region’s
businesses and industries. ...................................................................................................................... 20
Issue 5 The employment opportunities provided by local business and industry sectors, particularly
in identified growth industries. ............................................................................................................... 21
Appendices .......................................................................................................................... 23
Appendix A — Stakeholders .................................................................................................................... 23
Appendix B — Existing related plans and strategies ............................................................................... 24
Abbreviations ....................................................................................................................... 29
REGIONAL EDUCATION, SKILLS AND JOBS PLANS
The Australian Government announced the Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plans initiative in the
2011–12 Budget, as part of the Building Australia’s Future Workforce package. The initiative addresses
four key areas of the Australian Government’s productivity and social inclusion agendas: early childhood
education and care; Year 12 attainment; participation in vocational and higher education; and local job
opportunities.
The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) has deployed 34 Regional
Education, Skills and Jobs (RESJ) Coordinators to work with local stakeholders to develop Regional
Education, Skills and Jobs Plans for the 46 Regional Development Australia (RDA) areas that cover nonmetropolitan Australia.
The plans present locally identified opportunities and challenges and outline local strategies to improve
education, skills and jobs outcomes in regional Australia.
For more information, including the contact details of your local RESJ Coordinator, please refer to the
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs webpage at www.deewr.gov.au/resj.
Strategies
Each plan reflects community priorities and includes goals and local strategies to achieve the
community’s objectives, based on four key themes: early childhood education and care; school
education; tertiary education and training; and jobs, skills and workforce development.
The plans build on the range of services and programs already offered by DEEWR and the strategies draw
on the programs of other government agencies and the opportunities arising from major local projects.
Community engagement
The plans were developed by RESJ Coordinators with close community engagement and include views
from young people, parents, employers, educators, service providers, peak bodies, community leaders,
government organisations and agencies, and other interested individuals and organisations. The plans
draw strongly upon existing strategic plans in each region, including the local RDA regional plan.
DEEWR acknowledges the traditional owners of the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula RDA region and their
elders past and present recognising their continuing connection to country. This plan strives to build and
harness mutually respectful relationships and reflect community priorities in education, skills and jobs
development for the region.
Implementation
The RESJ Coordinator, on behalf of DEEWR, will oversee the implementation of the strategies and
promote and coordinate linkages between the government agencies, providers and stakeholders
involved in this plan’s implementation.
Progress towards achieving the goals within each plan will be closely monitored, while stakeholders will
be kept informed through participation in plan strategies.
This edition incorporates strategies that respond to changes in local circumstances identified through
continuing community input or changing government priorities in regional Australia as well as access to
new data. The plans continue to be living and responsive documents that will be revisited throughout
their implementation to June 2014.
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 4
www.deewr.gov.au/resj
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region of South Australia comprises a number of communities covered
by 11 Local Government Areas: City of Port Lincoln; City of Whyalla; District Council of Ceduna; District
Council of Cleve; District Council of Elliston; District Council of Franklin Harbour; District Council of
Kimba; District Council of Lower Eyre Peninsula; District Council of Streaky Bay; District Council of Tumby
Bay; and Wudinna District Council. The region also includes some remote areas of the state including the
Maralinga Tjarutja and Yalata Aboriginal Lands, and areas that are serviced by the Outback Communities
Authority.
The Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region extends from Whyalla in the east to the West Australia border in
the west. The region encompasses a third of the state’s coastline including the Spencer Gulf, Southern
Ocean and Great Australian Bight. The region is one of South Australia’s most productive areas,
generating a third of the state’s grain harvest and over 90 per cent of its seafood. Recent mining
exploration in the region has identified significant prospects for future development of mineral assets.
Whyalla, the largest city in the region, maintains a strong industrial base centred on manufacturing, steel
production and resource processing. Its bulk handling, transport and logistics and engineering services
are directly involved in meeting the demands of local and remote mining and mineral processing
developments.
Port Lincoln is the region’s second major service centre and a popular tourist destination. Port Lincoln
has South Australia’s largest commercial fishing fleet and an innovative aquaculture industry and is a
major port for grain exports.
Ceduna is the east–west gateway between the Eyre Peninsula and the Nullarbor Plain – Great Australian
Bight. Recent growth in the tourism, seafood and mining industries has increased demand for services,
land development and employment opportunities.
The region is home to a significant Indigenous population who live in small townships and communities.
The Eyre Peninsula region is branded as ‘Australia’s Seafood Frontier’, and is well known for its wild
caught and aquaculture produce such as southern bluefin tuna, prawns, rock lobsters, oysters, abalone
and sardines.
Based on a comprehensive environmental scan and extensive community consultation, the key
education, skills and jobs challenges identified for the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region include:

adequate numbers of qualified early childhood education and care workers to comply with the
National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education and Care

levels of Year 12 completion

percentage of the population with tertiary qualifications

percentage of youth employment and retention in the region

workforce development needs of local business/industry

maximising the employment opportunities afforded by the region’s mining/resources, tourism
and renewable energy sectors.
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 5
www.deewr.gov.au/resj
Accordingly, the key goals of this RESJ Plan are:

supporting and promoting a well-trained early childhood education and care workforce in the
region

improving Year 12 (or equivalent) attainment levels and increasing higher education
participation rates

facilitating effective youth transitions strategies and retaining higher numbers of young people in
the region

improving access to skills training

improving access to training and employment opportunities, particularly in identified
emergent/growth sectors.
The Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula has an RDA Committee with a broad plan that includes opportunities for
education, skills and employment. The City of Whyalla is part of the Port Augusta–Whyalla–Port Pirie
priority employment area and has a Local Employment Coordinator (LEC) in place. The Whyalla and Eyre
Peninsula RESJ Plan complements the existing goals and strategies in the RDA Plan and the LEC’s
Regional Employment Plan.
Some outcomes achieved by the RESJ Coordinator working with local stakeholders include:

Designing and implementing the SkillsOnEyre regional training portal; this innovative site boasts
dozens of registered users (training providers) who utilise the service to promote hundreds of
local training opportunities.

Planning and delivering the inaugural Eyre Peninsula Mining Careers Expos, a week-long series of
nine career expos delivered across four regional centres to over 900 secondary school students
and job seekers. The expos presented information about the scope of potential employment
opportunities in the mining sector.

Participating in the Speakers in Schools program; delivering aspirational messages and
disseminating localised education, training and employment information/data to over seven
hundred school staff, students and parents to support informed career choices.

Successfully facilitating the Port Lincoln High School’s participation in DEEWR’s pilot of the
Indigenous Ranger Cadetship program which will see a cohort of 26 Indigenous students
undertake units in Conservation and Land Management (including assorted relevant field skills
and experiences) in conjunction with their South Australian Certificate of Education studies.

Assisting in the establishment and development of Mentoring EP (Eyre Peninsula); a program
currently providing guidance through mentoring to around 60 young people in need of extra
support. Mentoring EP assists 10 to 18 year olds in the areas of engaging with education and
training, career guidance, transition from primary to secondary school and into the workplace, or
further study as well as support with social/living skills. Mentoring EP has recruited, screened
and trained over 80 community mentors to support its work.
CHARACTERISTICS OF THE REGION
This section sets out the characteristics of the region identified through a comprehensive environmental
scan and local consultations. The information detailed in this section is not exhaustive of the
characteristics of the region, but provides an overview and insight to some of the challenges facing the
region.
To guide the RESJ Coordinator’s identification of issues and engagement with the community, various
data sets have supported the development of this plan. Data used in the development of this plan was
sourced from DEEWR, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and other relevant sources. Data referred
to may have been reformulated and was correct at time of drafting. Different data sets are refreshed at
different intervals, for example, unemployment rates are updated monthly for national and
state/territory figures and quarterly for regions.
Population
The 2011 ABS estimated resident population data indicates that the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region
has a population of 57,688 people, 3.5 per cent of the South Australian total. Around 64 per cent of
residents live within the region’s two cities of Whyalla (22,580) and Port Lincoln (14,519). The District
Councils of Lower Eyre Peninsula (5014) and Ceduna (3662) are the next most highly populated areas.
According to the South Australian Government’s Regional Projections, the Eyre Peninsula’s population is
expected to grow by 6 per cent during the period 2006–2021, a slower rate than the state projection of
18 per cent. Over the last 12 months, population growth has been recorded in the District Council of
Lower Eyre Peninsula (1.8 per cent) and the City of Whyalla (0.1 per cent), whilst the remaining local
government areas indicate a slight population decline.
The South Australian Government’s Eyre and Western Region Plan (April 2012) identifies a target
population of 60,685 for the region by 2021. Such an increase will create challenges for the provision of
education, training and employment.
The 2010 Population by Age and Sex, Regions of Australia data indicates above average proportions in
the region of children aged 0 to 14 years (20.2%) and residents over 65 years of age (15.2%) than
national averages (18.9% aged 14 and under / 13.8% aged 65 and over). The median age of residents in
the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region is consistent with the state average of 39 years, but older than the
national average of 37 years of age. The region in general has above average proportions of families with
children, whilst Whyalla features above average sole parent families and people living alone.
In the 2011 Census, 5.3 per cent of the region’s total population identified as Indigenous on Census
night; in comparison, the proportion of the state’s total population was 1.9 per cent. Most of the region’s
Aboriginal people reside in Ceduna, Whyalla and Port Lincoln. To the north west of Ceduna are the
Aboriginal communities of Koonibba, Yalata and Oak Valley which have fluctuating populations of
between 50 and 200 people. Oak Valley, established in 1985, is the only community on the Maralinga
Tjarutja lands.
The region’s Indigenous population features a younger demographic than the non-Indigenous
population, with around 35 per cent aged 14 years or less and only 2.7 per cent aged older than 65 years.
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 7
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The land of the Eyre Peninsula is home to Indigenous Australians from the Nauo (south western Eyre),
Barngarla (eastern Eyre), Wirangu (north western Eyre), Mirning (far western Eyre) and Kokatha (far
northern Eyre) areas.
According to 2011 Census data, over 82 per cent of the region’s population were born in Australia, well
above the state average of 73 per cent. The majority of the remainder have come from the United
Kingdom, New Zealand, the Philippines and Germany.
The past few years have seen a moderate intake of skilled migrants from Africa, the Middle East,
South Asia, Asia and the United Kingdom. This trend is likely to increase in line with the expansion of the
region’s mining and heavy manufacturing industries.
Early childhood education and care
There are currently 20 child care centres and 23 pre-schools in the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region.
Although some access issues have been reported in the Ceduna and Far West Coast district, in general
terms the region’s centres are well utilised, resulting in a largely stable sector. This is indicative of the
high proportions of young and school-aged children in the region.
Work has recently commenced on the construction of new Indigenous children and family centres in
both Ceduna and Whyalla, funded by the Australian Government. Although these facilities will target the
education, health and social development needs of Indigenous families and their young children, all
families will be able to use the service.
The Australian Government is committed to achieving universal access to early childhood education for
all children in the year before school by 2013, with a particular focus on services for Indigenous children
in remote communities. The program will be delivered by a university-qualified early childhood teacher,
in accordance with the Early Years Learning Framework (15 hours per week and 40 weeks per year).
Six services in this region are receiving support from the Australian Government’s Budget Based Funding
Quality Measure to upgrade their infrastructure, increase the qualifications of their workforce (to
Certificate III or better) and improve their governance and administrative capacity. The need for a larger,
more qualified workforce in accordance with the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood
Education and Care is an ongoing focus for this sector.
The Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) measures young children’s development across five
domains: physical health and well-being, social competence, emotional maturity, school-based language
and cognitive skills, and general knowledge. 2009 AEDI data indicated that, at a national level,
23.6 per cent of children were vulnerable on one or more domains and 11.8 per cent were vulnerable on
two or more domains. The AEDI found that the communities of Far North and Flinders, Streaky Bay,
Cleve/Kimba, Le Hunte/Elliston and Tumby Bay had a proportion of vulnerable children at less than the
national rates on both measures. However, the AEDI communities of The Yalata–Maralinga Tjarutja
Lands, Ceduna, Lower Eyre Peninsula and Whyalla had a proportion of vulnerable children higher than
the national averages on both measures.
The Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) operates in Whyalla Stuart. HIPPY
supports parents and children in the year before formal education with pre-literacy and pre-numeracy
skills. Further support into the first year of formal schooling extends this support to focus on children’s
learning and development.
School education
There are 38 government (primary/secondary/area) schools in the region, managed by the Eyre and
Western Regional Offices located in Port Lincoln and Whyalla. There are also five non-government
schools; one in Ceduna, two in Port Lincoln and two in Whyalla. These facilities cater for over 10,000
students. Approximately 10 per cent of the total cohort identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. In
an attempt to address the needs of the region’s Indigenous students, local youth agencies and providers
have utilised government services such as School Business Community Partnership Brokers, Youth
Connections and the Parental and Community Engagement Program.
The Trade Training Centres in Schools Program will provide $2.5 billion from 2008 to 2018 to enable
secondary schools across Australia to seek funding for Trade Training Centres. The program allows
students from Years 9-12 to access vocational education and training through Trade Training Centres to
give them a broader range of options, to help improve Year 12 retention rates and enhance pathways
into vocational careers.
Specialised school centres within the region include:



Cleve Area School/Sims Farm—a combined school farm and Trade Training Centre, specialising in
dry land agricultural education with a merino flock, prime lamb production and wheat, barley
and oats crops
Cowell Area School—delivering aquaculture courses using a two-hectare research and
development oyster lease
Eyre and Western Multi Trade Training Centre—a consortium of schools (as listed below) aiming
to provide trade training opportunities for students in primary industry (fishing, aquaculture and
farming), metal fabrication, building and construction and commercial cookery.
o Ceduna Area School (Aquaculture)
o Cleve Area School (Agriculture)
o Cowell Area School (Aquaculture & Engineering)
o Cummins Area School (Agriculture)
o Edward John Eyre High School (Engineering)
o Kimba Area School (Commercial Cookery)
o Port Lincoln High School (Commercial Cookery & Aquaculture)
o Streaky Bay Area School (Commercial Cookery & Construction and Engineering)
o Stuart High School (Aquaculture)
o Whyalla High School (Commercial Cookery)
o Wudinna Area School (Engineering)
The Port Lincoln High School is one of twelve regional and remote schools to receive funding of up to
$500,000 over two years to take part in the Indigenous Ranger Cadetship (IRC) pilot. The IRC pilot is part
of the Australian Government’s commitment to Building Australia’s Future Workforce and aims to assist
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people complete school and encourage further study,
training, jobs and careers in land, sea and natural resource management.
The pilot will provide culturally relevant school-based learning, develop industry appropriate skills for
employment and assist in closing the gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and all
students Year 12 attainment rates by 2020.
Further, the Focus School Next Steps Initiative is an Australian Government commitment of $30 million
over two years (beginning 2012) to directly assist 101 specially selected schools across Australia to
improve the attendance and literacy and numeracy results of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
students. This investment has provided extra assistance to kick start the implementation of success
factors aimed at lifting the attendance, engagement and educational achievement of Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander students. The initiative is being delivered in the Ceduna Area School and
Port Lincoln High School in the region.
Tertiary education and training
One of only two regionally-based university campuses in South Australia is the University of South
Australia’s Centre for Regional Engagement in the City of Whyalla. Whilst the majority of its students
come from the western and northern regions of the state, an increasing number of interstate and
overseas students are choosing to study in Whyalla.
The Centre for Regional Engagement has a strong research focus and provides programs and expertise
that reflect the needs of rural and regional Australia—business and accounting, nursing and rural health,
computer and information science, applied statistics, social work, community wellbeing and arid lands
technology.
The campus is currently seeking to expand its range of courses and extend its research, consultancy and
business services through collaborative ventures with local industry and community organisations. From
2013, the Bachelor of Education (Primary) will be delivered from the Whyalla campus. The University of
South Australia recently secured funding from the Australian Government to expand its physical
footprint and information technology infrastructure. The Regional Connections project will ensure that
regional students have access to the same learning resources as their metropolitan counterparts, and
will provide opportunities for the development of in-demand skills programs in the health, education and
engineering professions. Other tertiary institutions in the region include:



Minnipa Agricultural Centre—broadacre demonstrations of innovative, best practice farm
management for low-rainfall environments and development of new seed stock cultivars
Flinders University’s Lincoln Marine Science Centre—tertiary level education in marine biology,
ecotourism and aquaculture, and a field and laboratory-based research centre
TAFE SA Regional—the largest provider of vocational training in South Australia offering a wide
range of courses with an emphasis on developing productive partnerships with local business
and industry. Major campuses are located in Whyalla, Port Lincoln and Ceduna, and smaller
facilities are located at Cleve, Kimba and Wudinna.
Despite the presence of these facilities, the 2011 Census reveals that the region recorded lower rates of
attainment of post-school qualifications (35.7% of the population aged 15 years or over) than South
Australia (41.7%) and Australia (44.4%). Further, the region recorded above average proportions of
people with Certificate level III and IV qualifications, and fewer with diplomas and degrees. This is
consistent with the high proportions of local residents who are employed in the manufacturing,
agriculture and fishing and aquaculture industries.
The National Centre for Vocational Education Research reports that in terms of VET participation rates,
the region maintains levels on par with the rest of the nation, with higher apprentice and trainee
commencements and completions by Indigenous students.
Jobs, skills and workforce development
DEEWR’s Small Area Labour Market data reveals that since March 2009, the unemployment rate in the
Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region has remained at or below both the state and national averages. In the
September 2012 quarter, the rates were Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 5.0 per cent, South Australia
5.6 per cent and Australia 5.4 per cent. The participation rate has remained constant over the past
10 years at around 60 per cent. In recognition of local labour market challenges, the City of Whyalla has
been designated as part of the Port Augusta-Whyalla-Port Pirie priority employment area. This national
DEEWR initiative identified 20 areas vulnerable to economic downturn, with Local Employment
Coordinators appointed to work with community stakeholders on planning local responses to
employment issues.
The 2011 Census records the region’s Indigenous unemployment rate as 20 per cent, marginally above
the state figure of 18 per cent.
According to DEEWR’s Labour Market Information Portal (September 2012), the average job seeker
duration of registration in the North Country Employment Service Area (which includes Whyalla) was
38 weeks, and 36 weeks in the Port Lincoln-Ceduna ESA.
The 2011 Census reveals that the region’s largest employing industry sectors are:










Agriculture, forestry and fishing
Health care and social assistance
Manufacturing
Retail trade
Education and training
Construction
Accommodation and food services
Transport, postal and warehousing
Public administration and safety
Mining
3338 persons
2996 persons
2890 persons
2669 persons
1967 persons
1813 persons
1595 persons
1260 persons
1172 persons
957 persons
13.1 per cent
11.8 per cent
11.3 per cent
10.5 per cent
7.7 per cent
7.1 per cent
6.3 per cent
4.9 per cent
4.6 per cent
3.8 per cent
The size of the region’s Mining workforce is likely to increase considerably over the next decade; the Eyre
Peninsula, situated within the Gawler Craton and Eucla Basin provinces, is widely recognised as one of
Australia’s most promising frontiers for mineral wealth.
Current exploration activity has identified significant prospects, including heavy mineral sands, kaolin,
gold, silver, nickel, copper and iron ore in the northern and western parts of the region, and iron ore and
coal on the eastern, central and lower Eyre Peninsula.
With thousands of direct jobs (e.g. construction, mining, engineering, transport) and indirect jobs (e.g.
trades, hospitality, cleaning) likely to be created from increased mining activity, the region is uniquely
positioned to benefit from significant economic and social dividends. However, the emergence of the
mining and resources sector has already created considerable workforce challenges across the region.
With strong industry growth also expected in other key sectors such as tourism, aquaculture and
renewable energy, employment outcomes can be maximised by focusing on training that is directly
linked to industry needs. The RDA Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula’s A Definitive Labour Market Study of
Advertised Job Vacancies (July 2011) revealed that the health/aged care and transport/logistics sectors
recorded the greatest employment demand across the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region over the
previous 12 months.
Commencing on 1 July 2013, the new Remote Jobs and Communities Program (RJCP) will be
implemented in remote communities throughout Australia, and will incorporate the current Job Service
Australia, Disability Employment Services, Indigenous Employment Program and Community
Development Employment Program. The Remote Jobs and Communities Program objective is to build
jobs and create sustainable communities in Remote Australia. The RJCP will be jointly administered by
DEEWR and the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. RJCP
providers will work in partnership with communities to develop Community Action Plans, which set out
the framework to meet employment, economic and community development goals. RJCP will service
two remote regions in the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula RDA region: Far West and Eyre.
Other characteristics
The Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region extends from Whyalla in the east to the West Australia border in
the west. The region encompasses a third of the state’s coastline including the Spencer Gulf, Southern
Ocean and Great Australian Bight. By way of comparison, the Eyre Peninsula is similar in geographic size
to Tasmania. Distances are significant, with highways stretching 300–400 km between the main regional
centres of Whyalla, Port Lincoln and Ceduna. These three major communities possess distinctive
characteristics.
Whyalla, the largest city in the region, maintains a strong industrial base centred on manufacturing, steel
production and resource processing. It also boasts an educational precinct that includes the region’s only
university campus and extensive retail, sporting and boating facilities. Whyalla is strategically located at
the junction of the Eyre Peninsula and the Upper Spencer Gulf regions. Its bulk handling, transport and
logistics and engineering services are directly involved in meeting the demands of local and remote
mining and mineral processing developments.
Port Lincoln is the region’s second major service centre. A popular tourist destination, the city boasts the
state’s busiest regional airport in terms of annual flights and passenger numbers. In particular,
eco-tourism is thriving, largely due to the growth in recreational diving. Port Lincoln has South Australia’s
largest commercial fishing fleet, an innovative aquaculture industry and is a major port for grain exports.
Ceduna is the east–west gateway between the Eyre Peninsula and the Nullarbor Plain – Great Australian
Bight. The community serves as a hub for a variety of government services and supports a bulk handling
facility at Thevenard, just south of the town centre. Ceduna is home to a significant Indigenous
population (both permanent and transient) and maintains associated Community Development
Employment Projects. Recent growth in the tourism, seafood and mining industries has increased
demand for services, land development and employment opportunities.
The remainder of the region’s population live in a diverse range of coastal settlements and inland
townships, including Indigenous communities such as Yalata in the far west, Koonibba near Ceduna, and
Oak Valley in the Maralinga Tjarutja Lands.
The region is one of South Australia’s most productive areas, generating a third of the state’s grain
harvest and over 90 per cent of its seafood, resulting in an estimated $2.4 billion in annual revenue. This
output is highly export oriented with around $1.76 billion of product being sent to overseas markets
each year.
The Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region has many competitive advantages. These include well established
industries and communities, significant export and domestic growth opportunities, natural resources and
a desirable lifestyle. Opportunities in the region tend to be constrained, however, by the region’s low
population base and isolation from the state capital. Local authorities face a challenge to provide and
maintain strategic transport, communications and energy infrastructure.
The Eyre Peninsula has limited natural water resources, with reticulated water supplemented with
supply from the Murray River. With the combination of forecast population growth and increasing
industry needs, the South Australian Government’s Eyre Peninsula Demand and Water Supply Statement
(April 2011) identified that the demand for drinkable water is expected to exceed supply in the period
2017–23.
The Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region has the potential to make a significant contribution to the
Australian Government’s legislated target of 20 per cent of national energy generation supplied by
renewable energy by the year 2020. Existing renewable energy sources in the region include wind farms
at Cathedral Rocks, south of Port Lincoln, and at Mount Millar, west of Cowell, a solar thermal plant
north of Whyalla and an innovative wave energy project near Elliston.
The size of the Eyre Peninsula means that residents need private transport, an essential support to
accessing employment, education and training, and health, social and community services.
ISSUES, GOALS AND STRATEGIES
This section sets out the issues and goals identified through local consultation. It also details the specific
strategies that will help achieve the community’s objectives. The issues and strategies will be reviewed
and may be modified throughout the implementation of the plan to June 2014 to ensure they respond to
emerging issues and opportunities or changing community or government priorities in the Whyalla and
Eyre Peninsula RDA region.
The programs and stakeholders listed in the following tables are indicative only. Both may vary over time
and any listing does not guarantee either the availability of program funding or stakeholder involvement.
The four key themes of the Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plans initiative are:

Early childhood education and care

School education

Tertiary education and training

Jobs, skills and workforce development
The numbering of each issue is for ease of reference only and does not indicate its priority within the
region. They are generally sequenced according to the life cycle of the four key themes listed above.
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 14
www.deewr.gov.au/resj
Issue 1
Adequate numbers of qualified early childhood education and
care workers to comply with the National Quality Framework
for Early Childhood Education and Care.
Goals:
Early childhood education and care workers in the Eyre and Western region are
supported to gain formal qualifications in accordance with the National Quality
Framework.
Families within the Eyre and Western region have access to high quality early
childhood education and care.
Theme(s):
Early childhood education and care; School education; Tertiary education and
training; Jobs, skills and workforce development.
Strategies
Stakeholders
Programs
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Support the Home Interaction Program for Parents
and Youngsters (HIPPY) in Whyalla Stuart to
promote improved childhood education and care
services.
Support prospective and existing early childhood
educators and carers to attain formal qualifications
in accordance with the National Quality Framework.
Specific strategies include:
o providing information on local training
opportunities via the SkillsOnEyre regional
training portal
o liaising with Job Services Australia (JSA) and
Disability Employment Service (DES) providers
o promoting training and employment
opportunities in the early childhood education
and care sector to secondary students and job
seekers via regional career expos and
information sessions and the development of
career promotion resources.
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Australian Children’s
Education and Care
Quality Authority
Department for
Education and Child
Development (SA)
Department of
Further Education,
Employment, Science
and Technology (SA)
Department of
Human Services
(Centrelink)
DES providers
Early childhood
education and care
providers
JSA providers
Registered training
organisations
TAFE SA
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



DES
HECS-HELP
HIPPY
Inclusion and
Professional Support
Program
JSA
National Workforce
Development Fund
Recognition of Prior
Learning Assessment
Grant
Skills for All (SA
Government)
TAFE Fee Waiver
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 15
www.deewr.gov.au/resj
Issue 2
Below average participation rates in higher education.
Goals:
Schools in the Eyre and Western region record improved retention and
attainment rates, ultimately leading to improved Year 12 (or equivalent) results.
More Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula residents are engaged in higher education,
particularly striving to achieve diplomas or degrees.
Theme(s):
School education; Tertiary education and training.
Strategies
Stakeholders
Programs
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Distribute relevant labour market information, data
and resources to the established network of key
regional secondary school personnel, including on:
o workforce development needs of key local
employment sectors
o relationship between educational attainment
levels, employment outcomes and socioeconomic and health benefits
o transition processes to further education or
meaningful employment, including VET and
work experience opportunities
o developments in higher education options.
Through consultation with secondary school leaders
and representatives from higher education
institutions, explore opportunities for students to
visit tertiary and TAFE institutions and for
representatives of those institutions to promote the
benefits of further education.
Promote existing (and explore potential) links
between secondary schools and industry. Strategies
to include:
o engaging with existing intermediaries such as
SA Department for Education and Child
Development (DECD) Resources and Energy
Program and Industry Skills Managers and the
Resources and Engineering Skills Alliance
o providing support for existing trade training
programs such as Trade Training Centres in
Schools (Australian Government) and Trade
Schools for the Future (SA Government).
Explore opportunities to enhance mathematics and
science education. Strategies to include:
o organising the inaugural staging of the
University of Newcastle’s Science and
Engineering Challenge in Whyalla (August
2013)
o promoting mathematics and science
competitions, awards and scholarships
establishing mathematics and science
extension programs (e.g. F1 in Schools)
o promoting mathematics and science pathways
during subject and career counselling periods
Support the University of South Australia’s Whyalla
Campus to increase tertiary education
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Adelaide University
Australian
Apprenticeship
Centres
DECD (SA)
Eyre and Upper
Spencer Innovative
Community Action
Networks
Flinders University
Resources and
Engineering Skills
Alliance
School Business
Community
Partnership Broker
Schools
TAFE SA
University of
Newcastle
University of South
Australia
Youth Connections
providers
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
Higher Education
Participation and
Partnerships Program
Industry Skills
Program (SA
Government)
Resources Energy
Program (SA
Government)
Schools Business
Community
Partnership Broker
Trade Schools for the
Future (SA
Government)
Trade Training
Centres in Schools
Youth Connections
Strategies

opportunities, particularly in areas of local industry
demand; and to disseminate relevant information
and data as required.
Promote locally delivered tertiary education
courses.
o Where appropriate, participate in or assist in
open days, school presentations and visits and
marketing strategies.
o Coordinate uni/TAFE involvement in 2013 Eyre
Peninsula Mining Careers Expos.
Stakeholders
Programs
Issue 3
Educational engagement, attainment and transition of young
people from school to further education, training and
employment.
Goals:
Young people in the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula region are supported to engage
in learning or earning activities and make successful transitions to further
education or employment in the region.
More young Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula people are retained in the region.
Partnerships are created between federal, state and regional agencies/providers
to enhance the delivery of programs that maximise career transition processes,
with a focus on trade training pathways for students.
Theme(s):
Early childhood education and care; Tertiary education and training; Jobs, skills
and workforce development.
Strategies
Stakeholders
Programs
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


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
Support existing youth-related networks such as
Youth Connections’ Community Action Referral
Team and the Eyre and Upper Spencer Innovative
Community Action Networks (ICANs) in the
provision of:
o strategies aimed at increasing engagement in
school
o school-to-work transitions processes
o trade training and career advice
o local opportunities for young people.
Provide advice on relevant DEEWR programs and
initiatives to these networks.
Contribute to the planning and facilitation of
regional career events for secondary school
students which are focused on local training and
employment opportunities:
o 2013 Eyre Peninsula Mining Careers Expos
o 2013 Upper Spencer Gulf Careers Promotion
Roadshow
o 2013 Eyre Peninsula Careers Expo
Collaborate with key Port Lincoln High School
personnel and relevant community partners
(including assorted environmental groups and the
relevant registered training organisation) to
implement the Indigenous Ranger Cadetship pilot.
Liaise with organisers of the 2013 Rio Tinto
Aboriginal Lands Challenge Cup to hold a mining
career-related information session for the
Indigenous participants.
Support the further development of Mentoring Eyre
Peninsula for the provision of school-based
community mentoring across the region (initially
founded in Port Lincoln before exploring expansion
opportunities to Whyalla and Ceduna).
Liaise with Advantage SA and school leaders on the
facilitation of ‘Speakers in Schools’ regional tours –
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Australian
Apprenticeship
Centres
Business and industry
peak bodies and
individual enterprises
Department of
Further Education,
Employment, Science
and Technology (SA)
Eyre and Upper
Spencer ICAN
providers
Eyre Futures
Industry Skills
Councils
RDA Whyalla and Eyre
Peninsula
Registered training
organisations
School Business
Community
Partnership Broker
Schools
Skills for All in Regions
TAFE SA
Youth Connections
providers
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

Indigenous Ranger
Cadetship Program
Industry Skills
Program (SA
Government)
Mentoring Eyre
Peninsula
National Youth Week
Resources Energy
Program (SA
Government)
Rio Tinto Cup
School Business
Community
Partnership Broker
Speakers in Schools
Trade Training
Centres in Schools
Youth Connections
Strategies


motivational speakers from assorted industries
inform students about state employment
opportunities and encourage the attainment of
career and lifestyle goals; participate in regional
speaking opportunities to disseminate labour
market and career development data/information
and deliver aspirational messages; assist Advantage
SA with identifying and recruiting potential
speakers from the region.
Join and contribute to the Team Eyre Peninsula
initiative (aimed at promoting the region as a
desirable place to live, work and study); focus on
formulating marketing strategies aimed at retaining
young people within the region.
Promote National Youth Week initiatives in the
region.
Stakeholders
Programs
Issue 4
Skills development to meet the current and projected skills
required by the region’s businesses and industries.
Goals:
Residents of the Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula are supported to gain new and/or
upgrade existing skills.
Relevant and accurate information pertaining to the current and projected skills
required in the region’s businesses and industries is readily available.
Improved literacy and numeracy levels within schools, the workforce and across
the broader community.
Theme(s):
School education; Tertiary education and training; Jobs, skills and workforce
development.
Strategies
Stakeholders
Programs
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
Monitor, manage and refine the SkillsOnEyre
regional training portal, in collaboration with the
Department of Further Education, Employment,
Science and Technology (DFEEST) Regional
Coordinator:
o continue to liaise with registered training
organisations, Job Services Australia (JSA) and
Disability Employment Service (DES) providers,
Remote Jobs and Communities Program (RJCP)
providers (from July 2013) and other relevant
agencies on the ongoing promotion and
utilisation of the portal
o monitor/analyse web traffic and obtain
feedback from training providers and end-user
clients to inform further site developments
o explore opportunities to expand the concept to
other regions (via other RESJ Coordinators and
DFEEST Regional Coordinators).
Subsequent versions of SkillsOnEyre may include
information pertaining to:
o job vacancies and skills shortages
o key employment sectors and projected needs
o skills sharing opportunities
o upskilling opportunities
o VET/work experience opportunities
o careers advice.
Collaborate with the DFEEST Regional
Coordinator(s), Skills for All in Regions network and
local business/industry leaders on the development
and implementation of a regional “Work Exposure”
project. This initiative will be based on the British
Telecom “Work Inspirations” model, a national
employer-led campaign which provides young
people and job seekers with an opportunity to
experience the world of work in a varied,
meaningful and inspiring manner.
Promote National Literacy and Numeracy Week
initiatives in the region.
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Australian
Apprenticeship
Centres
Australian College of
Educators
Business and industry
peak bodies and
individual enterprises
Chambers of
Commerce
DES providers
DFEEST (SA)
Eyre Futures
JSA providers
Local government
RDA Whyalla and Eyre
Peninsula
Regional Resources
Workforce Planning
Council and other
Industry Skills Boards
Registered training
organisations
Resources and
Engineering Skills
Alliance
RJCP providers
Schools
Skills for All in Regions
TAFE SA


DES
JSA
Skills for Education
and Employment
formerly known as
the Language, Literacy
and Numeracy
Program
South Australian
Government Skills for
All
Workplace English
Language and Literacy
Issue 5
The employment opportunities provided by local business and
industry sectors, particularly in identified growth industries.
Goals:
More Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula residents are actively engaged in the
workforce, creating a more productive and inclusive community.
The workforce development needs of Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula businesses and
industry sectors are met.
Partnerships between all levels of government and business/industry agencies
are created to support employment outcomes, workforce participation and skill
development.
Through effective coordination and partnerships, Australian Government funding
and programs are more efficiently utilised in the region.
Theme(s):
School education; Tertiary education and training; Jobs, skills and workforce
development.
Strategies
Stakeholders
Programs
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
Collaborate with the Local Employment Coordinator
(LEC) to identify employment opportunities for job
seekers in the City of Whyalla.
Attend and contribute to quarterly employment
service provider meetings (and other related
forums, including as Chairperson of the quarterly
Employment + Enterprise Strategic Planning group
in the Ceduna/Far West Coast region); actively
communicate the range of DEEWR and other
government programs and initiatives that support
training and employment opportunities for job
seekers, particularly the long-term unemployed and
other disadvantaged groups.
Provide accurate information and referrals to
enquiries related to existing training and
employment programs and initiatives:
o Clean Energy Futures
o JSA Employment Pathway Fund
o National Broadband Network
o National Workforce Development Fund
o Remote Jobs and Communities Program
o Skills for All in Regions
o Australian Government Skills Connect
o Skills for All/Skills in the Workplace.
Attend local business, industry and regional
development forums to promote the benefits of
workforce development planning and the provision
of training to both new and existing employees;
provide information on related Australian
Government funding opportunities.
Support the community by providing labour market
data and information and promoting:
o career expos and events
o skills training opportunities
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Australian
Apprenticeship
Centres
Chambers of
commerce
Department for
Education and Child
Development (SA)
Department of
Further Education,
Employment, Science
and Technology (SA)
DES providers
Eyre Peninsula Mining
Alliance
Higher education
institutions
Industry peak bodies
and individual
enterprises
JSA providers
LEC
RDA Whyalla and Eyre
Peninsula
Registered training
organisations
School Business
Community
Partnership Broker
Schools
TAFE SA
Tourism Target Team
UniSA – Whyalla
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

Australian
Government Skills
Connect
DES
Indigenous
Employment Program
JSA
National Workforce
Development Fund
Remote Jobs and
Communities Program
Resources and Energy
Program (SA
Government)
School Business
Community
Partnership Brokers
Skills for All in Regions
(SA Government)
Strategies
o work experience opportunities
o higher education opportunities.
 Arrange and facilitate a seminar with
representatives from DEEWR, presenting relevant
labour force data and findings from a survey of
employers in the Port Lincoln-Ceduna Employment
Service Area and other labour force data.
Resources/mining sector
 Contribute to the planning and facilitation of Eyre
Peninsula mining careers expos.
 Link local JSA and DES providers with Eyre Peninsula
Mining Alliance contacts, career expo details and
information on mining careers at the certificate
level; liaise with Eyre Peninsula Mining Alliance
representatives on the production of a regular enewsletter pertaining to the Eyre Peninsula mining
industry and distribute to employment service
providers and other relevant providers.
Tourism sector
 Join and contribute to the RDA Whyalla and Eyre
Peninsula’s Tourism Target Team ; focus on
identifying skills shortages and education/training
and employment opportunities.
 Survey regional secondary schools about the
availability and delivery of tourism at the South
Australian Certificate of Education Stage 1/2 levels.
Renewable energy sector
 In collaboration with LEC and TAFE SA Regional,
explore opportunities for regional students to
utilise the proposed South Australian Centre for
Renewable Energy in Whyalla’s education precinct;
the Centre will provide training for electricians (and
associated occupations) to service both grid and
non-grid residential and commercial renewable
energy connections.
Stakeholders
Programs
APPENDICES
Appendix A — Stakeholders
Below is a list of organisations consulted during the development of this RESJ Plan, listed by sector.
Sector
Stakeholder
Local government
Eyre Peninsula Local Government Association; City of Port Lincoln; City of
Whyalla; District Council of Ceduna; District Council of Cleve; District Council of
Elliston; District Council of Franklin Harbour; District Council of Kimba; District
Council of Lower Eyre Peninsula; District Council of Streaky Bay; District Council
of Tumby Bay; Wudinna District Council.
State government
Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology;
Department for Education and Child Development.
Australian Government
Department of Human Services (Centrelink); Department of Industry,
Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education.
Education
Department for Education and Child Development – Eyre and Western Regional
Office.
Vocational Education and
Training
TAFE SA Regional – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula.
Higher education
University of South Australia – Whyalla Campus; Spencer Gulf Rural Health
School; University of Newcastle.
Youth
School Business Community Partnership Brokers; Youth Connections Brokers;
Eyre Futures; Eyre and Upper Spencer Innovative Community Action Networks;
Mentoring Eyre Peninsula; West Coast Youth and Community Support.
Employment
Local Employment Coordinator; Eyre Peninsula Mining Alliance; Whyalla
Chamber of Commerce and Industry; Port Lincoln Chamber of Commerce and
Tourism; Ceduna Business and Tourism Association; Baptist Care; Community
Bridging Services Jobnet; Complete Personnel; CRS Australia; Interwork;
Salvation Army Employment Plus; HETA Incorporated; Career Employment
Group; Business SA.
Indigenous organisations
Indigenous Coordination Centre; Ceduna Aboriginal Corporation (formerly
known as Tjutjunaka Worka Tjuta); Port Lincoln Aboriginal Community Council.
Regional development
Regional Development Australia – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula.
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 23
www.deewr.gov.au/resj
Appendix B — Existing related plans and strategies
This section includes some of the related strategic plans in the region which have:

influenced the direction of this RESJ Plan

have complementary goals and strategies and/or

have significance in the region in relation to education, skills and jobs.
It provides an overview of how each strategy or plan has had an impact on this RESJ Plan and how it may
be utilised to maximise outcomes.
Plan or strategy
Impact on RESJ Plan
Regional Development Australia –
Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula (RDAWEP)
The RDA-WEP’s current Strategic
Plan contains 10 Focus Areas, with
related targets and strategic
directions:
 infrastructure
 community sustainability
 business capability
 exports
 employment
 population
 investment
 innovation
 skills
 governance.
How it can be
used/linked/expanded
This RESJ Plan is consistent with
the following targets stated within
the RDA-WEP’s Strategic Plan:
 reducing the gap between
Indigenous and non-Indigenous
unemployment rates in the
region
 ensuring that the region’s
people have the necessary
education and skills to actively
participate in employment
opportunities that support
growing businesses and
industries
 ensuring the supply of a highly
skilled workforce to meet
existing and future needs of
the region’s businesses and
industries
 providing input into key
strategic plans that impact on
the region.
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 24
www.deewr.gov.au/resj
How it can be
used/linked/expanded
Plan or strategy
Impact on RESJ Plan
Priority Employment Area initiative
(Local Employment Coordinator)
 The Upper Spencer Gulf (Port
Augusta–Whyalla–Port Pirie) is
one of 20 priority employment
areas across the country.
 Through consultation with local
stakeholders, the Local
Employment Coordinator has
produced a Regional
Employment Plan for the area.
This RESJ Plan is consistent with
the following goals of the Regional
Employment Plan: Port Augusta–
Whyalla–Port Pirie (as they relate
to the City of Whyalla):
 supporting employment,
workforce participation and
skills development, including
through maximising
government investment
 facilitating employment and
training opportunities for
job seekers, including
disadvantaged groups, with a
focus on industries that are
experiencing skills shortages
 facilitating opportunities for
employment in new, emerging
and growth industries
 developing industry and
stakeholder partnerships to
increase employment and
training participation.
Resources and Engineering Skills
Alliance (RESA)
 The RESA Report provides
information and data on the
current and projected
workforce requirements of the
region’s resources sector.
 Estimates of ongoing job
creation numbers over the
next decade in mining and
processing operations are
more than 2200.
 The document aims to position
the region to maximise the
economic and social dividends
afforded by the resources
boom.
This RESJ Plan is consistent with
the content and recommendations
of RESA’s report entitled
Workforce Study for the Resources
Sector in the Eyre Peninsula by:
 outlining a comprehensive
approach to workforce
development in the resources
sector, involving business,
industry, government, training
providers and support agencies
such as RESA and the South
Australian Chamber of Mines
and Energy
 providing specific information
on projected workforce needs,
including occupations and
training and qualification
requirements
 informing and influencing the
appropriate allocation of
training places and resources.
Local Government Strategic Plans
Local governments in the region
publish strategic plans that address
community and economic
development needs.
This RESJ Plan supports the
strategies relating to education,
skills and jobs.
How it can be
used/linked/expanded
Plan or strategy
Impact on RESJ Plan
South Australia Works Working
Regions Action Plans (Whyalla and
Eyre)
This Department of Further
Education, Employment, Science
and Technology (DFEEST) funded
program specifically addresses the
skilling of disadvantaged
unemployed and underemployed
job seekers.
This RESJ Plan is consistent with
the Priorities and Strategies of the
SA Works Working Regions Action
Plans:
 in complementing the more
substantially resourced
Employment Pathways Fund
(EPF) (which is administered by
Job Services Australia
providers) it offers targeted
assistance to job seekers with
limited or no EPF access
 the DFEEST SA Works
Coordinators (and local
grantee staff) are a valuable
resource in identifying and
developing employment and
training opportunities for longterm unemployed and
disadvantaged job seekers.
School Business Community
Partnership Brokers
The School Business Community
Partnership Brokers program is
focused on building partnerships
to support young people to attain
Year 12 (or equivalent) and reach
their full educational and social
potential.
This RESJ Plan supports the work of
the region’s Partnerships Brokers
by:
 fostering a strategic, whole-ofcommunity approach to
improving education and
transition outcomes for all
young people
 creating new (and enhancing
existing) partnerships between
and among four key
stakeholder groups –
education and training
providers, business and
industry, parents and families
and community groups
 complementing the identified
priority areas of youth
transitions, mentoring, career
development and skills
training.
National Resource Sector
Workforce Strategy
The relevant recommendations
from the National Resource Sector
Employment Taskforce include:
 increase the number of trade
professionals
 strengthen workforce
participation
 forge stronger ties between
industry and education.
This RESJ Plan’s strategies
complement the
recommendations in the National
Resource Sector Workforce
Strategy.
Plan or strategy
Impact on RESJ Plan
Department for Education and
Child Development
Informed by strategic planning at
both state and federal level, the
education priorities for the Eyre
and Western region include:
 access (to education)
 early years
 high expectations
 instructional leadership
 focus on reading
 future opportunity.
How it can be
used/linked/expanded
This RESJ Plan is consistent with
the following Improvement targets
as stated in the Eyre and Western
Region Strategic Directions plan
2011:
 increased literacy/numeracy
proficiency (with a focus on
reading)
 increased proportion of 15–19
year olds who achieve the
South Australian Certificate of
Education (SACE) or equivalent
qualifications and progress to
employment, apprenticeships
and traineeships, further
education or other affirmative
post-school options
 increased proportion of
students achieving a tertiary
entrance rank in mathematics
and science subjects.
Further, DECD administers a series
of complementary programs in the
region for senior secondary
students:
 Industry Skills Program –
establishes Industry Pathways
Programs (IPP), incorporating
high levels of VET and industry
engagement to meet industry
needs and address skills
shortages
 Resources and Energy Program
– utilises VET units, schoolbased apprenticeships and IPPs
to provide employment
pathways into trades and
professions
 Trade Schools for the Future –
enable students to combine
SACE studies with VET training
via school-based
apprenticeships or
traineeships, creating genuine
career pathways and
motivated, trained and workready employees.
How it can be
used/linked/expanded
Plan or strategy
Impact on RESJ Plan
Skills For All / Skills in the
Workplace
 Commencing 1 July 2012, Skills
For All funds skills training
(qualifications and skills sets)
up to advanced diploma level
for all South Australians over
the age of 16.
 The VET in SACE component of
this program will fund VET
qualifications within schools.
 The Skills in the Workplace
component partly funds skills
training for industry and is a
complementary program to
the Australian Government’s
National Workforce
Development Fund.
This RESJ Plan is consistent with
the aims/objectives of the Skills
For All initiative. Further, it
provides:
A strategy of the Regional
Development Australia – Whyalla
and Eyre Peninsula Business Target
Team, the Team EP initiative aims
to promote the Whyalla and Eyre
Peninsula region as a desirable
place to live, work and study.
This RESJ Plan supports the aims
and objectives of the Team EP
initiative, particularly the following
strategies:
Team Eyre Peninsula (Team EP)
 an excellent opportunity for
third parties such as Job
Services Australia (JSA)
providers to aggregate industry
and client needs and broker
local delivery of required skills
training
 the potential to broker direct
skills training and fund
workforce development
activities to maximise skills and
productivity outcomes across a
range of business and industry
sectors.
 workforce development and
customer service training for
regional industries such as
retail and tourism
 promotions aimed at retaining
young people within the
region.
Innovative Community Action
Networks (ICANs)
 A South Australian
Government initiative, ICANs
bring together young people,
families, schools, community
groups, businesses and
different levels of government
to find solutions to local issues
that prevent young people
from completing their
education.
 ICANs target young people
(Year 6 to 19 years) who are
disengaged and at risk of
leaving school early.
 They remain engaged in
education whilst exploring
pathways to further education,
employment and/or
community participation.
This RESJ Plan is consistent with
the aims and objectives of the
ICAN initiative, particularly in
relation to youth transitions and
retention strategies. Further, the
ICAN program is regarded as:
 an essential element of the
school education system as it
addresses the needs of
disengaged students, forming
the crucial link between
education and employment
 an integral component of interagency youth and community
support networks.
ABBREVIATIONS
Abbreviation
Full Term
ABS
Australian Bureau of Statistics
AEDI
Australian Early Development Index
DECD
Department of Education and Child Development (SA)
DES
Disability Employment Service
DEEWR
Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
DFEEST
Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology (SA)
EPF
Employment Pathway Fund
HIPPY
Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters
ICAN
Innovative Community Action Networks
IPPs
Industry Pathways Programs
IRC
Indigenous Ranger Cadetship
JSA
Jobs Services Australia
LEC
Local Employment Coordinator
RESA
Resources and Engineering Skills Alliance
RESJ
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs
RJCP
Remote Jobs and Communities Program
RDA
Regional Development Australia
RDA-WEP
Regional Development Australia – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula
SACE
South Australia Certificate of Education
VET
Vocational Education and Training
Regional Education, Skills and Jobs Plan – Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula 29
www.deewr.gov.au/resj
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