Imperialism ARS - Teaching American History in SW Washington

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Annotated Resource Set (ARS)
Phase I
1.Title / Content Area:
Imperialism
Overarching question: What are the causes and effects of Imperialism?
2. Developed by:
Jeanne Silvey, Anna Lisenby, Natasha Flak, Larry Asher, Jim Stoda
3. Grade Level:
10
4. Essential Question:
1.
Do the “civilized” nations have a duty to the “uncivilized” nations?
2.
What did people at the turn of the century mean by the phrase “white man’s burden?”
Culminating ques: When, if ever, is it valid for one nation or culture to intervene in another to impose its values?
How did the imperializing countries justify imperialism?
5. Contextual Paragraph
During the 1800s, Europeans continued their expansion. At first the Europeans had little influence in the places where
they settled. In about 1870, though, they began to take control of these new areas, viewing expansion as a right and a
responsibility. "It is our duty," explained a famous supporter of expansionism, "to seize every opportunity of acquiring
more territory. . . ."
The years between 1870 and 1914 were the height of the age of imperialism. Imperialism is when one country takes
control of another country. One country might control the other's government, trade, or culture. It combines expansionist
and mercantilist policies. This was not a new idea. Empires had controlled other countries before the 1800s. What was
new was the strength of the modern nations. By 1914 the great powers of Europe, Japan, and the United States
controlled almost the entire world.
Materials
The White Man’s Burden refers to a poem by Rudyard Kipling. Imperialists interpreted this poem as a characterization
that justified their policy as a noble act to “save” or improve these imperialized nations.
Instructor: Set of full LOC info.
Student:Two sets of the four source folders (numbered), Bib. Info and caption if needed. Class set of Rudyard Kipling Poem and collection chart
organizers.
Teaching with Primary Sources - Annotated Resource Set
1
Procedures: Day before: model Sleeping Sickness on separate mini chart
Lesson Day:
1.
Bellwork: individual reading of Kipling’s White Man’s Burden. Fill in row one of collection chart. Discuss with a partner.
6. Resource Set
(Model day before)
The Sleeping Sickness
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Title: The sleeping sickness / Gordon Ross.
Creator(s): Ross, Gordon, 1873-1946, artist
Date Created/Published: N.Y. : Published by Keppler & Schwarzmann,
Puck Building, 1911 October 25.
Medium: 1 photomechanical print : offset, color.
Summary: Illustration shows a large African man sitting, leaning against
a tree, asleep; several European countries are staking claims to portions
of Africa, planting flags labeled "England, Portugal, Belgium, Turkey,
Italy, Germany, Spain, [and] France" all around the sleeping man.
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-27783 (digital file from original
print)
Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1911
c-P&P(Case X)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Notes:
o Title from item.
o Caption: Cutting a continent out from under him.
o Illus. in: Puck, v. 70, no. 1808 (1911 October 25), centerfold.
o Copyright 1911 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2011649074/
1.
Real "White Man's Burden"
[poem] [from
newspaper]SOURCE
Cleveland Gazette 16, no. 37
(04/15/1899): 02CREATOR
Crosby,Ernest,H.SUBJECTS
Poetry
Afro-Americans--Social
conditions--To 1964
Real White Man’s Burden
Creator
Ernest Howard Crosby
Context
Expansion into the Philippines created antiimperialists who attacked American
imperialism.
Audience
poetry
Purpose
MEDIUM
NewspaperCALL NUMBER
Newspaper
Roll#4432REPOSITORY
Ohio Historical Center Archives
Library
The general public and readers of his
To parody Rudyard Kipling's The White
Man's Burden by attacking American
imperialism.
Historical Significance
Rudyard Kipling's poem "The White Man's Burden" argued
that imperialism spread the benefits of civilization. Ernest
Crosby's poem, "The Real White Man's Burden," parodied
Kipling's, and showed his anti-imperialist abhorrence of war
and sympathy for the Filipinos. The anti-imperialists were
unable to stop the annexation of the Philippines, and their
efforts went counter to the expansionist nationalism of
those in power.
Bellwork: indiv. Copies at each table
http://memory.loc.gov/cgibin/query/h?ammem/aaeo:@field([email protected](o19095))
Teaching with Primary Sources - Annotated Resource Set
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2.
3.
The White Man's Burden, 1899
This famous poem, written by Britain's imperial poet, was a
response to the American take over of the Phillipines after the
Spanish-American War.
Modern History Sourcebook:
Rudyard Kipling
Creator
Rudyard Kipling
Context
Philippine-American War and the ratification of a
treaty in which Cuba, Guam, the Philippines, and
Puerto Rico came under U.S. control
Audience
Readers of McClure's Magazine
Purpose
To encourage the United States to take up the
"burden" of empire
Historical Significance
In 1899, British poet Rudyard Kipling enjoined the United States to
take up the "burden" of empire in his poem "The White Man's
Burden: The United States and The Philippine Islands." Senator
Henry Cabot Lodge noted that it was "rather poor poetry, but good
sense from the expansion point of view." For some, the idea of the
"White Man's Burden" became a justification for American
imperialism. An alternative reading of the poem cautions the United
States on the heavy toll of imperialism.
Teaching with Primary Sources - Annotated Resource Set
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Willing to Compromise
Title: Willing to compromise / Frank A. Nankivell.
Creator(s): Nankivell, Frank A. (Frank Arthur), 1869-1959, artist
Date Created/Published: N.Y. : J. Ottmann Lith. Co., Puck Bldg., 1901 January 23.
Medium: 1 print : chromolithograph.
Summary: Illustration shows a native king sitting on a throne, speaking with his advisors about
the presence of a missionary on the coast.
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-25492 (digital file from original print)
Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1901
c-P&P(Case X)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Notes:
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Title from item.
Caption: "Your Majesty," said the right-hand man of the native king, "there is a
missionary working his way along the coast." "Well, we don't want to have any
trouble," said the king. "Ask him if his people won't be satisfied with a coaling station."
Illus. in: Puck, v. 48, no. 1246 (1901 January 23), cover.
Copyright 1901 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.
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Caption: "Your Majesty," said the right-hand man of the native king, "there is a missionary working his
way along the coast." "Well, we don't want to have any trouble," said the king. "Ask him if his people
http://yesteryearsnews.wordpress.com/2011/01/07/the-whitemans-burden/
won't be satisfied with a coaling station."
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010651366/
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/kipling.asp
4.
Civilization
THE FILIPINO’S FIRST BATH
Grant Hamilton
Judge, New York, June 10, 1899
Here President William McKinley
scrubs a Filipino savage with a
brush labeled “Education” in the
cleansing waters of “Civilization”.
A freshly scrubbed Cuba and Porto
Rico in the background are donning
new clothes decorated with the
U.S. stars and stripes.
Teaching with Primary Sources - Annotated Resource Set
5.
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Pear’s Soap
Title: The first step toward lightening the White man's burden in through teacing the virtues of cleanliness
Date Created/Published: 1899.
Medium: 1 photomechanical print : halftone.
Summary: Advertisement for Pears' Soap, illustrated with a general washing his hands.
Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-86352 (b&w film copy neg.)
Rights Advisory: Rights status not evaluated. For general information see "Copyright and Other
Restrictions..." (http://lcweb.loc.gov/rr/print/195_copr.html).
Call Number: Illus. in AP2.C8
c-GenColl
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
Notes:
o Halftone repro. of drawing.
o Illus. in: Cosmopolitan (Advertising Section), v. 27, May-Oct. 1899.
o No ref. copy.
o This record contains unverified data from caption card.
o Caption card tracings: Colonialism; The White Man's Burden; Adv. Soap; Hygiene.
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Model image
http://www.presidio.gov/NR/rdonlyres/3AD099E74401-420B-A6D1-A3E004012999/0/pt_wd_gallery7.pdf
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002715038/
Phase II
Foundations Annotations
7. Curriculum Standards
History 4.3.1 Historical Interpretation Analyzes and interprets materials from a variety of perspectives in world history
National Common Core:
Key Ideas and Details 2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the
course of the text.
Inegration of Knowledge and Ideas 9: Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.
9. Content & Thinking Objectives
Teaching with Primary Sources - Annotated Resource Set
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Other Resources
12. Web Resources
13. Secondary Sources
14. Print and Other Media Resources
Teaching with Primary Sources - Annotated Resource Set
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Teaching with Primary Sources - Annotated Resource Set
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