Biomedical Research to Translational Medicine
*
MS ,
Saigal A.
Tuteja D. PhD and Chaturvedi D. PhD
Bio Business Inc., 400 Continental Blvd, 6th Floor, El Segundo, CA 90245
[email protected]
www.biobusinessinc.com
INTRODUCTION
(ii) CURRENT STATE OF AFFAIRS
(iv) GLOBAL PROGRESS IN TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE
Drug Discovery, the first step towards creation of blockbuster and orphan drugs,
occurs at a variety of academic institutions and pharmaceutical, biotechnology
and / or life science industries, that predominantly work independently. With
increasing new drug disapprovals, regulatory constraints and the inevitable
“patent cliff”, escalating drug prices and funding impediments (also referred as
“Valley of Death”), an amiable and a collaborative nexus between academia and
industry
offers
a
promising
solution.
This can be achieved by adopting a Translational Medicine (TM) approach. TM
ensures that bounty of biomedical research is “translated” into benefits in
oncology, inflammation, metabolomics and unmet needs in other challenging
fields. It thus, helps in, not only improving the quality of human healthcare
effectively but also streamlines resources requisite for supporting meaningful
research endeavors. TM is slowly gaining momentum in leading nations of the
world such as USA, UK, Netherlands, Austria, Singapore, China, Australia, Japan,
Japan, India, Malaysia and South Korea.
TRANSLATIONAL GAP
(iii) THE TRANSLATIONAL APPROACH
METHODS
TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE
At BioBusiness Inc., we facilitated vital affiliations, innovative thinking and offered
tools for speedy and effective translation of biomedical research into clinical
applications thereby bridging the translational gap while providing an appropriate
platform for professionals to learn, network and make crucial strategic decisions.
RESULTS
This section underscores the relevance of TM, identifies major logjams hindering
its implementation, discusses propitious strategies to mitigate such hurdles,
acknowledges global efforts advocating TM and how TM has facilitated overall
progress in R&D.
BIOMARKER DEVELOPMENT
RADICAL RE-STRUCTURING

Stratify Disease + Population

Cordial Nexus

Predictibility

Autocracy + Tech Transfer

Personalized v/s “One-modelfits-all”

Fragmentation of R&D +
Manufac. / Mktg.
EDUCATION / TRAINING
(i) THE BELIEF

“It is much more important to know what
kind of patient has a disease, than to know
what kind of disease a patient has”

Biotech Incubators and hubs


Curriculum revision


Obdurate diseases - multiple
causes


Economic growth
Reduction of Translational
Gap
Innovative solutions
Incentivize progress
Cost effectiveness
(v) SCOPE OF IMPROVEMENT
C
H
A
L
L
E
N
G
E
S
Lack of
TRANSLATIONAL EDUCATIONAL METRICS
Lack of
ROBUST MANAGEMENT WITH A TM VISION
Lack of
GOVERNMENT SUPPORT
Lack of
FUNDING SOURCES
CONCLUSION
TM helps in improving the quality of human healthcare by providing innovative
solutions for hard-to-cure diseases and streamlines resources necessary to
support meaningful research endeavors, hence encouraging economic growth.
Heeding emerging biomarkers from regulatory and human prognosis perspective,
cordial nexus amidst academia and industry and tenacious approaches to
promote TM globally can render optimism regarding winning the translational
race.
REFERENCE
Caleb Perry
(1755-1822)
ZIAGEN
GEFITINIB
TRASTUZUMAB
IVACAFTOR
i. Woolf, S.H. (2008) The meaning of translational research and why it matters
JAMA 299(2) : 211-213.
ii. Zhang, F., P. Cooke, and F. Wu, State-sponsored Research and Development: A
Case Study of China’s Biotechnology. Regional Studies, 2011. 45(5): p. 575-595.
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Biomedical Research to Translational Medicine