Human Safety and Risk Management

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This presentation is based on content presented at the Industry Forum
on Reducing Approval Times: What is “Reasonably Practicable”?, held
on 14 November 2014.
It is made available for non-commercial use (e.g. toolbox meetings,
safety discussions) subject to the condition that the PowerPoint file is
not altered without permission from Resources Safety or Melanie
Freeman
For information about this presentation, please contact the author
Melanie Freeman, [email protected]
For other information, please contact:
[email protected]
or visit
www.dmp.wa.gov.au/ResourcesSafety
www.dmp.wa.gov.au/ResourcesSafety
1
Human safety and risk management
How to consider the people and the systems
Melanie Freeman
Registered Psychologist
Emergency Support Network
www.dmp.wa.gov.au/ResourcesSafety
2
Human Safety and Risk
Management: How to
Consider the People
and the Systems
Melanie Freeman
Registered Psychologist
Overview
 Human Safety and Risk Management
 Human Factors
 Psycho-social Factors
 Mental Health and Well-being
 Safety Culture
 A Model for Psycho-social Risk Management
Balance of Strategies
 Safe Person
versus
Safe Place
4 Basic Models /
Approaches to Risk
Technical
• Origins in engineering and
science
• Focus: physical risks
• Criterion: harm
Economic
• Origins in mathematics,
statistics and history
• Focus: market risks
• Criterion: utility (benefit)
Cultural
• Origins in social structures
of trust and blame
• Focus: risks socially and
politically constructed
• Criterion: perceived risk
(attitudes/beliefs)
Psychometric
• Origins in human
perception
• Focus: perceived risk
• Criterion: human
behaviour, attitudes and
cognitions
Psycho-social Factors
What do we mean by “psycho-social
hazards”?
 Psychosocial – interactions among job
content, work organization and
management, and other environmental and
organizational conditions that may interact
with the employees’ competencies and
needs (Cox, Griffiths and Randell, 2003)
 Interactions that are ‘hazardous’ influence
employee health through their perceptions
and experience (ILO, 1986)
Psycho-social Factors
 WHS Harmonisation Legislation
 Important definitions in the draft legislation:
 hazard means a situation or thing (including an
intrinsic property of a thing) that has the
potential to cause injury, illness or death of a
person.
 health means physical and psychological
health.
 Psychosocial hazards cover:
 content of work
 its context
 our perceptions
Examples of Psycho-social
Hazards
Job content
Workload and work pace
Work schedules
Control
Environment and equipment
Organisational culture and function
Interpersonal relationships at work
Role in the organisation
Career development
Home and work interface
Poor feedback, inadequate appraisal and
communication processes
 Performance visibility
 Job insecurity, excessive work hours, bullying,
managerial style











(Cox, Griffiths and Randell, 2003)
Attention
and
Vigilance
Shift work
and
Rosters
Causal
Attribution
Human
Factors
Human
Error
Fatigue
Interface
Design
Stress
Work-Life
Balance
Depression
Mental
Health
and Wellbeing
Adjustment
to
FIFO/DIDO
Anxiety
Alcohol
and Other
Drugs
Safety Culture and Climate
Behaviour
Values
Beliefs
Assumptions Norms
“the way we do
things around
here”
NOPSEMA
Safety Alert (#51) (March 2012)
A Model for Psychosocial Risk
Management
A Framework for Psychosocial Risk Management
(Leka, Cox and Zwetsloot, 2008; p. 8)
Risk Management
 Strategies at each stage
Intervention
Prevention
Proactive Strategies
(Inoculation)
Strategies for when
things are impacting
on people, teams
and work
Follow-up
(Postvention)
Ongoing Strategies
for Support
A Start Point if you want to
think about any of this more
 Glendon, I., Clarke, S.G. and McKenna,
E.F. (2006). Human safety and risk
management. (2nd Ed.). New York:
Taylor and Francis.
 9th Managing Fatigue Conference
 International researchers
 March 2015
 www.fatigueconference2015.com.au
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