Flinders IT Standards

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Information Technology Services
Flinders IT Standards
Version 1.5
October 2013
Flinders IT Standards
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Purpose of Document ..................................................................................................................... 3
Related Documents......................................................................................................................... 4
Definition of the FITS ...................................................................................................................... 4
Systems Classification .................................................................................................................... 5
Change Control ............................................................................................................................... 5
Architectural Principles ................................................................................................................... 6
Business Architecture ..................................................................................................................... 8
Information Architecture .................................................................................................................. 8
8.1
Conceptual and Logical Data................................................................................................... 9
9.
Application Architecture .................................................................................................................. 9
9.1
Presentation Architecture ........................................................................................................ 9
9.2
Database environment ........................................................................................................... 10
9.3
Adaptors ................................................................................................................................. 11
9.4
Application Development ....................................................................................................... 11
9.4.1
Application Consolidation and Key Systems ................................................................. 12
9.4.2
Methodologies ................................................................................................................ 12
9.4.3
Languages ..................................................................................................................... 12
9.4.4
Source Code Change Control and Management .......................................................... 13
9.4.5
Software Testing ............................................................................................................ 13
9.5
Application Support Services and Integration ........................................................................ 14
9.5.1
Identity Management ..................................................................................................... 14
9.5.1.1
Directory Services ...................................................................................................... 14
9.5.2
Application Integration ................................................................................................... 14
9.5.3
Business Reporting ........................................................................................................ 15
9.5.4
Collaboration Services ................................................................................................... 15
9.5.5
Web Server .................................................................................................................... 16
9.6
Desktop Applications ............................................................................................................. 16
9.7
Workstation Support Services ............................................................................................... 17
9.7.1
Remote Printing Services .............................................................................................. 17
9.7.2
Remote File Services ..................................................................................................... 17
9.7.3
Remote Management .................................................................................................... 18
9.7.4
Anti-virus, anti-spy ware and SPAM filtering services ................................................... 18
9.7.5
Systems Monitoring and Analysis .................................................................................. 19
10.
Infrastructure Architecture ......................................................................................................... 19
10.1
Client Platform Architecture ............................................................................................... 19
10.2
Educational Technology Architecture ................................................................................ 20
10.3
Server Technology Architecture ........................................................................................ 21
10.3.1
Server Operating Systems ......................................................................................... 21
10.3.2
Server Hardware Vendors ......................................................................................... 22
10.3.3
Virtual Server Systems .............................................................................................. 22
10.3.4
Storage Systems........................................................................................................ 23
10.3.5
Storage Protocols ...................................................................................................... 23
10.3.6
Backup and Archiving Systems ................................................................................. 24
10.4
Network Technology Architecture ...................................................................................... 24
10.4.1
Switch and Router Equipment ................................................................................... 24
10.4.2
Wireless Access Points ............................................................................................. 25
10.4.3
Network Load Balancers ............................................................................................ 25
10.4.4
IP Telephony .............................................................................................................. 26
11.
Technology Advisory Groups..................................................................................................... 28
12.
Document Review and Updating ............................................................................................... 28
13.
Glossary ..................................................................................................................................... 29
14.
Revision History ......................................................................................................................... 31
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1.
Purpose of Document
The purpose of this document is to define the Flinders IT Standards, FITS as referred to by the IT
Architecture Policy.
The business scenario extract below describes the typical context in which the FITS will be used.
Scenario
The business implements an IT solution to a business problem
Actors
An administrative business unit or academic faculty / department, ITS, solution
vendors
Steps
Comments
Use of the
FITS
1.
The business, (possibly with support from ITS),
defines the requirements for the solution
Typically Business Analysts
would be involved in projects
undertaken to define
requirements.
2.
The business in consultation with ITS identify
solution options and build a business case.
This leads to a selection of ways
in which the problem may be
solved – commercial-of-the-shelf,
custom development etc.
3.
The business and ITS decide on solution short list
and assess against the environment.
The FITS, specifically its policy
guidelines, assists in selecting
the class of solution to be
adopted. Specific solutions are
identified and their adherence to
the environments is assessed
using the FITS.



Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) product

Custom internal development

Custom external development
Vendors may contribute to this step also.
4.
The business and ITS identify the business
environment in which the solution options will
operate
The FITS provides a framework
to define the environmental
constraints on the solution
options
5.
The business and ITS select the solution
The assessments are used as
input to an objective decisionmaking framework to identify the
best solution. Pilot undertaken
where appropriate.
Refer notes below…
6.
Implement the solution
7.

On Flinders IT infrastructure

Outside of Flinders (e.g., externally hosted)
These steps have the greatest direct impacts on
the ITS group (and form the justification for the
FITS).
Support and Maintain the solution
Notes
In step 5 the decision making process may result in the following types of decisions:

Select a solution with best FITS conformance

Select a solution which delivers very high value to the business which justifies additional ITS
overhead in its maintenance – i.e., The cost benefit ratio – ITS Cost : Business benefit is skewed in
favour of business benefit

Select the only solution which delivers the key requirements – being aware of the impact on ITS

Select the solution which best delivers business prioritised requirements amongst a selection of
similar FITS impact solutions.
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2.
Related Documents
Relevant policies and standards are published on the Flinders University website.
The following policy directly relates to this document:

Flinders University Applications Acquisition, Development and Maintenance Policy (Draft)
ITS policies and standards can be accessed at
http://www.flinders.edu.au/ppmanual/computing/computing_home.cfm. Flinders University Policies
and Procedures can be accessed at http://www.flinders.edu.au/ppmanual/
3.
Definition of the FITS
Through the definition of a series of standards, the FITS describes the ITS supported architecture(s)
that should be considered at each stage of the technology life cycle, including system conception,
development, implementation, extension, maintenance, replacement or retirement.
The FITS is based on a descriptive classification of all key elements of the architecture, including
hardware, system and application software, development and management tools and technologies etc.
Most of these “elements” are then classified according to the following measures:
Class
Element
Notes
Supported
<product/technology>
The element is preferred by ITS and represents the
best match to the architectural principles
To Be Supported
<product/technology>
The element is being considered or actively evaluated
to determine its class.
Candidate products/technologies cannot be
implemented in a production environment until its class
is confirmed as either supported or restricted.
Restricted Support
<product/technology>
The element is required by a specific application and
will be supported on that basis only.
New products/technology of this class may only be
used with the written permission of the Director ITS or
delegate. Such usage must be justified in the business
case for the system. Commodity items or specific PC
applications.
Not Supported
<product/technology>
The element is being actively phased out by ITS.
New products/technologies of this class may not be
introduced.
Prohibited
<product/technology>
The element does not meet or contradicts the
architectural principles.
New products/technologies of this class may not be
implemented and existing implementations may be
targeted for replacement. Products may also be
classed as prohibited due to potential security or legal
issues.
The exception to this is Desktop Applications (see 9.6), which is categorised into only 2 classes:
 Supported - Preferred
 Not Supported - Accepted but not supported
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4.
Systems Classification
Each system will be classified according to a number of criteria that describe the characteristics of the
system. The characteristics relating to the classification of a key system are outlined as follows:








It is used University-wide or on a Divisional basis
It supports a university-wide administrative or statutory need of the University (e.g.
Student Administration, Research, Human Resources, Finance) or it directly supports
the delivery of teaching at least on a Divisional basis (e.g. FLO)
It is used to move data between or into key systems
It has a responsible Business Owner/technical support
It conforms to the University’s information system architecture
It runs on a Flinders approved server platform
It operates within the Standard Flinders Operating Environment (SOE)
It has a documented Backup strategy and Disaster Recovery Plan
Where a system does not meet the above criteria, a system may still be considered for classification
as key, provided adequate justification exists. Justifications may include things such as value to
stakeholders, reputational risk, significant operational disruption or strategic importance.
Unless specifically approved as key, Applications will be deemed to be non-key.
When an additional system is introduced to Flinders, the system will be added to the inventory and
assigned a classification for each criterion. A BPM modelling tool will be selected to be the primary
source of information on systems classification.
These criteria comprise all the elements in the FITS which describe a system (e.g. database
environment, programming language etc) and additionally other criteria specified in the Applications
Acquisition, Development and Maintenance Policy.
The criteria that originate from the elements of the FITS are particularly relevant to
 The effective management and development of staff and their skills
 Developing plans for the consolidation, migration and retirement of systems
The criteria that originate from the Applications Acquisition, Development and Maintenance Policy are
particularly relevant to establishing the appropriate arrangements for that system in terms of:
 Implementation
 Maintenance
 Support
 Testing & Development
 Change Management
5.
Change Control
This document can only be changed with approval of the Director ITS.
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6.
Architectural Principles
The architectural principles follow the principles outlined in the Architecture Policy:






IT architecture must be business driven
Use of key systems in preference to the use of non-key systems
Use of open standards
Use of packaged and configurable solutions in preference to solutions requiring custom
development of software
Products for which vendor support is available
Systems which are compliant with relevant legislative or regulatory requirements related to
non-functional aspects such as privacy, security and resilience
The following architectural principles, which are encompassed in the policy principles, provide greater
context and specific application to the architectures described in this document:
No.
Principle
Relates to
AP-1
Alignment with business requirements
Convergence between business needs and technical
capabilities.
AP-2
Focus on key systems
Maximise solutions based on existing systems. Among the
existing systems maximise solutions based on key systems.
AP-3
Preference towards integrated solutions
rather than ‘best of breed’
Integrated solutions enable greater efficiencies and improved
reliability. Should minimise support costs and overheads.
AP-4
Minimise the number of vendors and
suppliers
Reduce overheads and build strategic relationships with
vendors.
AP-5
Focus on secured systems and data
Security of systems, information and secure access to it.
AP-6
Focus on availability and reliability
High levels of availability of key systems supporting critical
business services.
AP-7
Protecting privacy and information sharing
Conform to Flinders security policies for systems being
developed or extended in house, or when reviewing solutions
provided by external vendors.
AP-8
Use and control of authoritative data source
A designated single authoritative data source for each class of
information in order to ensure effective management of data
and data integrity.
AP-9
Encourage use of open standard
technologies and platforms
Prefer open standards for the building of Flinders’ information
systems for increased flexibility and interoperability of
solutions as well as reduced technology and business risks.
AP-10
Platform independent from delivery of core
functionality
Provide access to the same functionality or service from a
disparate set of client tools (such as web browser, PDA,
desktop computer), supported by the same application
component or code base.
AP-11
Encourage use of purchased software
instead of development
Prefer commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) applications to custom
development options.
Prefer re-using or extending an existing COTS application to
sourcing a new one.
Prefer configuration over customisation.
AP-12
Use of standard platforms and software
products
Use the elements of Standard Operating Environment (SOE).
AP-13
Sharing of resources for delivery of
applications
Shared usage of hardware and software resources for the
delivery of application services in order to meet security,
business continuity and performance requirements more
efficiently.
AP-14
Solutions to be built with a focus on future
re-usability
Maximise amount of re-usability and modularisation in solution
design in order to provide better change management and to
minimise maintenance costs.
AP-15
Data provision devolved to end user tools
where appropriate
Centralise data to maintain its integrity and decentralise
presentation of it to provide flexibility for the users.
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AP-16
Focus on sustainability
Minimise environmental impact of technologies and solutions
while balancing financial, social and efficiency concerns.
AP-17
Ease of access to relevant expertise
Current staffing profile and skills set and / or the availability of
relevant external contractors.
AP-18
Optimal use of infrastructure assets
Ensure consolidation of assets and that assets are not underutilised.
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7.
Business Architecture
Business architecture describes the accountabilities for, and the operation of the processes, which
deliver the main business activities. The business architecture is referenced by, supported by, and has
interactions with the IT architecture. While ITS is not responsible for Business Architecture, ITS is
responsible for Business Process Modelling.
Element
Description
Business Process Modelling
Process to model business processes, data, organisation structure, and business
rules as well as IT architecture models and representations in a single repository.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Visio
Visio is used to produce technical diagrams and process maps for vendor system
implementation to maintain business accessibility. Visio diagrams can be exported
and imported into a BPM tool if required.
Although Business Architecture resides in the Business Domain, it is essential that the Director ITS
has a key role in its governance. This aids the development of compatible business and IT
architectures, thus enabling the design and delivery of reliable and efficient systems, while also
reducing the risk associated with managing change.
Owner
Director ITS
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-1
Process driven by business requirements.
AP-8
The business process has been defined and modelled in
consultation with the business and is maintained by a
well-defined management process.
AP-9
The business process model created in the selected BPM
tool can be transferred to another BPM product.
AP-11
Use of a COTS product: e.g. Visio
AP-16
Aim to reduce reliance on paper within business
processes. Pursue online viewing, reviewing of
documents.
AP-17
Aim to increase expertise available within ITS through the
deployment of professional development opportunities
and the allocation of resources.
8.
Information Architecture
Information architecture encompasses all enterprise information used within the organisation. It deals
with the use of information, naming conventions to reference information and the relationship of
information to business processes. Owned and primarily defined by the business, this architecture is
translated to logical and physical data entities used within the IT domain. ITS defines the standard
representations, using appropriate methods and associated UML model types, and supports the tool
and repository.
Good data modelling techniques enable accurate impact analysis of the potential introduction of new
data or changes to existing elements or structures. Building and maintaining a map of the university’s
descriptions and use of data is vital to support this type of activity.
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8.1
Conceptual and Logical Data
Conceptual data models describe large categories of information and how they may relate to or be
used by business users in terms of business objects, (e.g. forms, categories), and general entities (i.e.
Local Students, International Students).
Logical data models define standard business entities with related attributes instantiated as UML Class
Diagrams. Logical data models are vital in ensuring business specifications of data are transferable to
technical specifications and database designs
Element
Description
Conceptual Data Modelling
Conceptual data models are generally constructed during early analysis
phases. They incorporate forms, large entities and technical terms for data
used within the organisation.
Logical Data Modelling
Logical data models are generally constructed during detailed specification
phases. They are often built on Conceptual Data models where refinement and
consolidation of Entities, (Classes), will occur, as well as formal representations
of attributes associated with classes.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Visio
Visio is currently the main tool used to represent both the conceptual and
logical data models of Flinders business.
9.
Application Architecture
Application architecture comprises the software systems, platforms and integrations that collectively
support business processes.
Flinders’ application architecture is diverse with a wide variety of solutions deployed, interlinked by a
number of custom integration implementations.
Flinders’ applications solutions will come from the following three conceptual layers:
Architectural Layer
Description
Presentation Architecture
Provides access to information, services and applications using client tools and
interfaces, such as web browsers for reporting or Portal based services and ‘thick
clients’ (Finance One). This layer is mainly focused on authenticated Web delivery.
Core Transactional
Systems
Core transactional systems provide computing and application resources to critical
data entry applications underpinning the University’s core business processes and
activities.
Business Intelligence &
Data Repositories
The design and production of information is managed in the Business Intelligence &
Data Repository layer where extracted information from core transactional systems
is transformed into a consumable state. This layer also maintains refreshed data
repositories or ‘data-marts’ which primarily support individual end user reports or
services.
9.1
Presentation Architecture
Support for the current suite of interfaces and products will continue.
While some exceptions are granted they do not negate the need to pursue common authentication
systems, single login to many services and a standard, user-friendly application interface tailored for
different user groups.
Element
Description
Presentation tool
Provides access to information, services and applications using client tools and
interfaces, such as web browsers for reporting or Portal based services and ‘thick
clients’ (Finance One).
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Class
Product
Notes
Supported
PHP
Required for presentation layer for Moodle (FLO). FLO is a
COTS Learning Management System (LMS), which is
externally hosted and managed by the vendor.
Supported
JavaScript
Required for data warehouse, Service Interruption
Notifications and other sundry applications.
Supported
.Net
For Finance and Student Administration online services.
Not Supported
Oracle Forms
Interface
Currently required for the administration of applications –
specifically for Human Resources and sundry applications.
To be phased out.
In the design and build phases of web based software development projects, user centric techniques
and either story boarding or mock ups of pages and interactions should be pursued using a standard
analysis and design approach.
The same standards apply to all web applications whether they are developed in-house or by third
parties. The University requires strict adherence to web presentation and visual design standards as
found at http://www.flinders.edu.au/marketing-communications/training-and-support/onlinecommunications-support/visual-design.cfm
Owner
Associate Director, Applications Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-2
Focus on Key Systems.
AP-10
n-tier architecture and platform independent access to
functionality.
AP-11
Use of a COTS product.
AP-13,
AP-14
Portal architecture promotes reusability and sharing of
resources.
AP-15
Use of centralised data and decentralised presentation
principle in the portal based solution.
9.2
Database environment
Oracle is the current primary relational database. Microsoft SQL Server is a major relational database
getting increased use. All structured data should be stored in a centrally administered database. Any
new application or development initiative must also take this into account at the conception, planning
and implementation phases.
Element
Description
Database
Relational Database Management System (RDBMS)
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Oracle 11G R1/R2
Production applications.
Supported
SQL Server
2005/2008 R2
Production applications.
Supported
MySQL 5.1
Required for specific web applications.
Not Supported
PostgreSQL
Specific applications.
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Not Supported
Oracle 10G R1/R2
Production applications –phased out.
Prohibited
Microsoft Access1
Not suitable for mission critical applications or storage of
persistent corporate data. Exception may be made for pure data
push solutions where other preferred or supported databases
cannot provide adequate functionality.
Prohibited
FileMaker Pro
Not suitable for mission critical applications or storage of
persistent corporate data.
Owner
Associate Director, Applications Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-3
Preference for integrated solutions.
AP-8
Centrally controlled and managed data.
AP-11
Use of a COTS product.
AP-15
Central data repository.
9.3
Adaptors
Database adaptors provide secure access to RDBMS where required within integration or reporting
solutions. In addition they may form an abstraction layer between native RDBMS applications and
staging or reporting data repositories.
Element
Description
Database Adaptor
Database adaptors used to couple RDBMS to staging or reporting repositories to
support access to data.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
JDBC
The Java Database Connector is generally used in Oracle
Application server solutions. JDBC connectors can
successfully be used for all supported Flinders RDBMS
web services.
Supported
Web Services
Web services are a standardised way of integrating Webbased applications using the XML, SOAP, WSDL and
UDDI open standards over an Internet protocol backbone.
Restricted Support
ODBC
Open Database Connectivity is used in specific client
server solutions.
Restricted Support
Product API
The use of pre-built, existing APIs while not encouraged, is
acceptable for some applications where other adaptors are
not supportable.
9.4
Application Development
While the architectural principles encourage the use of off-the-shelf solutions rather than in-house
development, ITS will be expected to undertake a certain amount of development, particularly in the
maintenance of legacy key systems and the business intelligence and integration layers. By adhering
to managed processes and methodologies, ITS ensures that regardless of language or chosen
platform, good architectural principles are employed in all developed solutions.
All software development projects are required to adhere to Flinders’ Architectural Principles as well as
meeting the goals of re-usability and supportability. Adequate evidence of design and technical
specification and maintenance documentation of all solutions is required, whether built by internal staff
or third parties.
1
Microsoft Access is prohibited in the context of Database Environments only.
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9.4.1
Application Consolidation and Key Systems
The architectural principles encourage the maximum exploitation of the University’s existing enterprise
and key systems.
9.4.2
Methodologies
All software development should follow one of the supported Software Development Methodologies.
Element
Description
Software Development
Methodology
Standard for software specification, production, testing and deployment.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
SDLC Methodology
Contained in Project Management Framework.
http://www.flinders.edu.au/its/information-technologyservices/about-us/its-project-services/pmf/pmf_home.cfm
Supported
Agile Approaches
(e.g. Scrum, Lean,
Test Driven)
Emphasis on communication and collaboration,
functioning software, and flexibility to adapt to emerging
business realities.
9.4.3
Languages
The objective is to employ a limited number of languages and development environments in order to
narrow the skill set to be maintained within ITS.
Currently, the ongoing support of critical key application systems as well as the transition to the new
standard requires a range of skills and languages.
Element
Description
Application Development
Language
Languages used to develop Flinders applications
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Java
Used within Oracle Application Server solutions.
Supported
Apex
Oracle Application Express (Oracle APEX) is a declarative,
rapid web application development tool for the Oracle
database. It is a fully supported, no cost option available
with all editions of the Oracle database.
Supported
PL/SQL
Oracle’s procedural extension language for SQL and the
Oracle relational database.
Supported
Perl
Perl is the scripting language of choice on Linux based
systems, and is essential for systems administration tasks.
Supported
Powershell
Microsoft Powershell has replaced VB Script as the default
scripting language within Microsoft environments. Systems
such as Office 365 and automation of administrative tasks
rely upon it.
Supported
.Net
Microsoft’s Application Development Platform. Used for
SMS and Progress Review applications.
Supported
PHP
Required for specific web applications.
Restricted Support
ColdFusion
Current Application Framework used for web CMS, lecture
capture and important smaller systems.
Prohibited
Microsoft Access
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Prohibited
VB Script
Owner
Associate Director, Applications Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-9
9.4.4
Use of standards based technologies: Java, SQL, etc.
Source Code Change Control and Management
Vital to the change and release management aspects of all software development projects is version
control of software and documentation artefacts. All software developed for the University must have
source code maintained and auditable in a suitable source code management system. Similarly scripts
used for updates, upgrades or utility type functions should also be maintained in the same repository
even though they may not be directly part of the software application.
Element
Description
Source Code Change
Control
Repository to manage source code and track changes.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Subversion
Product built by SUN used as source repository for all
Portal / Java platform code.
Restricted Support
MS Visual
SourceSafe
Used solely as a repository for historical ColdFusion
Application Code as well as specification library for IS
Systems and Applications Development.
Owner
Associate Director, Applications Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-8
Centrally controlled and managed data.
AP-11
Use of a COTS product: Subversion.
9.4.5
Software Testing
The University requires all internally and externally developed solutions be put through formal systems
and acceptance testing based on functional and technical specification. For externally developed
solutions the system and acceptance test cases together with a description of the test environments
will be provided by the vendor or solution provider as part of the deliverables. This is required for
maintaining the system and change management purposes after delivery of the solution to ITS.
Owner
Associate Director, Applications Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-8
Centrally controlled and managed test artefacts.
AP-9
Use of open source open standards based solutions.
AP-11
Use of a COTS product: Open STA, JIRA.
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9.5
Application Support Services and Integration
9.5.1
Identity Management
Identity management comprises the identification of a user, known as authentication, and the granting
of access or privileges to a set of particular services or functions, known as authorisation. Typically,
users are classed in groups or levels of authorisation, which may be organised across functional or
departmental areas. Staff and student access to information and systems via network resources is
also specified within the domain. Access within applications forms part of identity management but
typically application level authentication is only subject to the application and contributes to the issue
of multiple accounts, differing levels of security adherence and poor administration and control.
Single sign-on is to be pursued for application integration into the university’s supported systems as
well as encouraging the use of portal delivery of application services to utilise the in-built
authentication service available.
Element
Description
Identity Management
(IDM) Techniques and protocols concerned with user authentication and access to
services and resources.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
MS Active Directory
Required for File, Print and email authentication,
applications are being actively ported to OID
authentication.
Restricted Support
Application specific
user repository
To be used only when specified by business requirements
and authorised by Director ITS or delegate.
Restricted Support
Novell eDirectory
Source of authentication data (IDM).
Owners
Associate Directors, Applications Services / Infrastructure Services
9.5.1.1 Directory Services
The Identity Management system becomes aware of a user’s identity and access privileges to
enterprise applications after authenticating the end user. Directory Services manage this process by
acting as a central repository for user information by incorporating data from various enterprise
sources and repositories.
Element
Description
Directory Services
Provides a centralised data store for users’ identity data and all supporting data to
ensure that information is properly used and shared, and that sensitive information
is protected.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Active Directory
Microsoft’s directory service product.
Restricted Support
eDirectory
Novell directory service product.
Owners
Associate Directors, Application Services / Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-5
Authorised access to systems and data.
AP-8
Centrally controlled and managed authentication and
authorisation.
AP-9
Use of a standards based solution: eDirectory.
AP-11
Use of a COTS product: eDirectory, AD.
9.5.2
Application Integration
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The integration architecture is a point-to-point solution supported on a case-by-case basis.
9.5.3 Business Reporting
Reporting is included in this section as often data integrations are specifically required for report
delivery.
Element
Description
Business reporting
Generation of business reports from various data sources.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Oracle Discoverer
End-user reporting tool capable of integration with Portal.
Supported
Oracle Business
Intelligence
An operational tool for management staff providing
operational reporting and student information.
Supported
Crystal Reports
General purpose reporting tool.
Owner
9.5.4
Associate Director, Applications Services
Collaboration Services
Collaboration Services are made up of a range of service types including: services for delivery of
lectures and courses, workspaces, email, calendars etc.
Element
Description
Email, calendar, work
management
Tools for collaboration services.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Microsoft Office 365
Microsoft’s messaging and collaborative software product.
Supported
Microsoft Outlook
Supported
Confluence - Wiki
Team collaboration software written in Java.
Supported
Microsoft Entourage
Email client and personal information manager developed
for Mac OS.
Supported
Apple Mail
Email program included with Mac OS X operating system.
Supported
Skype
Voice over IP service and software application.
Supported
Learning
Management
Systems (FLO)
Used to support specific student work spaces and use of
email, and web technologies. Refer to section 9.1 for the
specific LMS products.
Supported
Cisco Collaboration
Suite
Collaboration tools across voice, video, web conferencing,
messaging, mobile applications and enterprise social
software.
Restricted Support
Microsoft Sharepoint
Pilot Sharepoint implementation.
Not Supported
Microsoft [email protected]
Hosted collaboration services for students – being phased
out.
Not Supported
Other mail clients
Other mail clients including but not limited to: Thunderbird,
Gmail, and Yahoo Mail are not supported.
Owners
Associate Directors, Application Services / Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-8
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Centrally controlled and managed data.
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9.5.5
AP-10
Platform independent collaboration service.
AP-11
Use of a COTS product: LMS products.
Web Server
Applications are increasingly deployed via a web server or with significant application services reliant
upon web servers.
Element
Description
Web Server
Server software providing services via the HTTPS protocol.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Apache
Industry standard.
Supported
Oracle OAS
Required for ALESCO HR clients.
Supported
Microsoft IIS
Required for Windows web applications.
Supported
GlassFish
Open source application server.
Supported
WebLogic
Server software application enables connection of users in
a distributed computing environment.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-9
9.6
Open source, industry standard web server.
Desktop Applications
Refer to the Software and Standard Operating Environments Standard. The procurement of any other
desktop application will be authorised by the Director, ITS or delegate on a case-by-case basis.
Element
Description
Desktop
applications
Desktop applications reside on a user’s machine and can operate as standalone applications,
i.e. they do not require additional components on servers or key application systems.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Any desktop
applications included
in a standard
operating
environment.
The Software and Standard Operating Environments Standard
specifies the software. This includes site licensed software which is
available at no additional cost.
Not
Supported
Any other desktop
application
If authorised by the Director ITS or delegate, other desktop
applications may be procured and installed, but such applications
should be considered to be unsupported by ITS. However, support
arrangements may be made with ITS, in which case the application
will be added to the ‘accepted and supported’ list.
Owner
Associate Directors, Infrastructure Services / Client Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-12
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Use of SOE systems.
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9.7
Workstation Support Services
9.7.1
Remote Printing Services
Element
Description
Remote printing services
Configuration and management of printing services.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
MS Print Services
In the normal office environment concerned with
administrative or business computing tasks, printers will be
setup as shared resources for a workgroup via a dedicated
network point.
Supported
Unicard
A single printing and copying system for students across
the Bedford Park and metropolitan Adelaide locations.
Owner
Associate Directors, Infrastructure Services / Client Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-8
Use and control of authoritative data source.
AP-11
Use of COTS products.
AP-13
Shared usage of hardware and software resources.
9.7.2
Remote File Services
Element
Description
File Storage
Location for storage of user created files.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
MS managed file
systems
MS Network file system.
Supported
Local desktops
Standard file redirection implemented to file server.
Prohibited
Local desktops
Storing data primarily on local desktop machines is
prohibited.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-5
Security and accessibility of information.
AP-8
Use and control of authoritative data source.
AP-11
Use of COTS products.
AP-13
Shared usage of hardware and software resources.
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9.7.3
Remote Management
All SOE desktops will be open for remote management using the following standards.
Element
Description
Remote management
Provides remote access to and management of desktop machines.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Bomgar
Remote support solution that allows service desk
consultants to access and control systems and devices
remotely, including PCs, smartphones, tablets, servers and
switches.
Supported
Casper Suite
Comprehensive platform for managing Mac OS X
computers, including inventory, software distribution,
settings and security.
Supported
MS SCCM
Microsoft systems management software product for
managing large groups of Windows-based computer
systems. Provides remote control, patch management,
software distribution, operating system deployment,
network access protection, and hardware and software
inventory.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-7
Protection of privacy and information sharing – Adherence
to Flinders’s privacy policy is ensured to be extended to
staff workstations.
AP-11
Use of COTS products.
AP-12
Use of SOE systems.
9.7.4
Anti-virus, anti-spy ware and SPAM filtering services
All SOE desktops will be protected using anti-virus software for desktops as per SOE standards.
All ITS supported servers are configured with the following server based Anti-virus tools.
Element
Description
Anti-virus software for
servers
All servers will be protected using the following tools.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
MS Forefront
For Windows platforms.
Supported
Sophos
For all platforms.
Email servers implement Spam filtering which supports notification to end-users. Microsoft Exchange
and other supported mail clients also support configuration of local Spam rules.
Element
Description
Spam filter for servers
Software product supporting trapping and filtering of suspected Spam email based
on rules and content of email received by Flinders mail servers.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Sophos PureMessage
Product supporting Flinders spam filtering rules. Blocks
spam, viruses, spyware and phishing.
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Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-5
Secured systems data.
AP-6
Secured availability and reliability.
AP-7
Protection of privacy and information sharing – Adherence
to Flinders’s privacy policy is ensured to be extended to
staff workstations.
AP-11
Use of COTS products.
AP-12
Use of SOE systems.
9.7.5
Systems Monitoring and Analysis
System monitoring tools enable the monitoring of network services or host resources and will send an
alert if a problem is identified. Analysis tools enable systems administrators to find the root cause of
problems quickly and locate latent systems issues before they cause downtime.
Element
Description
Systems monitoring and
analysis
Software product supporting monitoring and early problem identification and the
ability to find the root cause of problems quickly.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Splunk
Enables monitoring and analysis of machine generated
data via a web-style interface.
Supported
Nagios
IT infrastructure monitoring and problem identification.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-5
Secured systems data.
AP-6
Secured availability and reliability.
AP-11
Use of COTS products.
AP-12
Use of SOE systems.
10.
Infrastructure Architecture
10.1 Client Platform Architecture
Client Platform Architecture relates to supported hardware and software specifications in use across
Flinders. ITS supports the SOE, and all desktop, laptop on the preferred hardware list and all mobile
computing devices (excluding applications support for mobile devices) on the supported mobile
devices list, across the University.
Desktop and Laptop standards are contained in the Hardware Recommendations available from the
Desktop Technology Standard (refer to Preferred Products list:
http://www.flinders.edu.au/its/computers-and-software/hardware-purchasing/preferred-products.cfm
For the supported mobile devices refer to https://www.flinders.edu.au/its/help-and-support/its-clientservices/tips/mobile-device-support/mobile-device-support_home.cfm
The procurement of any client hardware or software not compliant with these standards must
 be justified to the Director ITS or delegate, and
 shall be authorised on a case-by-case basis by the Director ITS or delegate.
Configurations non-compliant with the SOE must be authorised on a case-by-case basis by the
Director ITS or delegate.
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The procurement of all IT-related items will be undertaken in conjunction with ITS. Details of
procurement processes and relevant policies and procedures are available at the policies and
procedures web site, refer to: https://www.flinders.edu.au/ppmanual/finance/purchasing.cfm
Owner
Associate Director, Client Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-1
Solutions based on business requirements / client needs.
AP-3
Preference for integrated solutions.
AP-6
Focus on availability and reliability of client infrastructure.
AP-11
Use of COTS products.
AP-16
Selection of technologies includes sustainability criteria.
10.1.1 Application and Desktop Virtualisation
Application and Desktop Virtualisation provides the user with the same user experience regardless on
which device (desktop, mobile) or platform (operation system) he is on. Minimising the number of
supported Application and Desktop Virtualisation Systems reduces support and maintenance costs,
and provides a consistent environment which can be well managed.
ITS does not support Desktop Virtualisation at the moment.
Element
Description
Application Virtualisation
systems
Application Virtualization transforms applications into centrally managed services
that are never installed and don’t conflict with other applications
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Citrix XenApp
For running Windows applications on OS X platforms.
Restricted Support
MS App-V
For running a Windows application on a client without
conflicting with other applications
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-1
Solutions based on business requirements / client needs.
AP-6
Focus on availability and reliability of client infrastructure.
AP-9
Use of open standard technologies and platforms.
AP-11
Use of COTS products.
AP-12
Use of standard platforms and software products.
10.2 Educational Technology Architecture
Educational Technology Architecture is comprised of the audio-visual components that are required to
facilitate various teaching and classroom scenarios. Minimum standards for Educational Technology
ensure that high quality audio-visual facilities are available for all academic staff and students, in all
teaching areas at all campuses. These standards may only be installed, maintained or otherwise
configured by staff from the AV Systems Group, ITS.
These minimum standards are applied to the following teaching spaces:
 Small classroom
 Standard classroom
 Teaching computer laboratory
 Lecture Theatre
Refer to the Audio Visual Classroom Equipment Standard:
http://www.flinders.edu.au/isdfiles/documents/Audio%20visual%20services/AV%20General%20Standards%20Guidelines-ver10.pdf
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Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-1
Solutions based on business requirements / client needs.
AP-6
Focus on availability and reliability of client infrastructure.
AP-9
Use of open standard technologies and platforms.
AP-11
Use of COTS products.
AP-12
Use of standard platforms and software products.
10.3 Server Technology Architecture
Server Technology Architecture is comprised of the server, storage, backup, archive, and associated
infrastructure which is hosted in a secure data centre facility. Server Technology Infrastructure
provides the underlying platform to support applications and systems, and is required to provide high
levels of reliability, redundancy, and scalability to meet the needs of the University.
10.3.1 Server Operating Systems
Server Operating Systems provide the basic management and operation functions to support
applications. Minimising the number of supported Server Operating Systems reduces support and
maintenance costs, and provides a consistent environment which can be well managed.
Element
Description
Server Operating
systems
The operating system that will be installed on servers in order to deliver services or
support applications.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
RedHat Enterprise
Linux 6
For Linux platforms.
Restricted Support
RedHat Enterprise
Linux 5
For legacy Linux applications.
Not Supported
RedHat Enterprise
Linux 4
To be phased out as soon as possible.
To Be Supported
Microsoft Windows
Server 2012
Pilot evaluation needs to be performed and support teams
trained before being deployed.
Supported
Microsoft Windows
Server 2008R2
For all Microsoft Windows server platforms.
Restricted Support
Microsoft Windows
Server 2003, 2008
Legacy or existing applications only; or as part of a turnkey system provided by a vendor.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-3
Preference for integrated solutions.
AP-5
Security and accessibility of information.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-9
Use of open standard technologies and platforms.
AP-17
Ease of access to relevant expertise.
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10.3.2 Server Hardware Vendors
Element
Description
Server hardware
The hardware platform that will run either virtualisation software or dedicated
operating systems that are supported.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Dell
Systems must be certified for the supported virtualisation
technologies, have redundant power supplies and cooling,
have remote management capability, and be rack
mountable.
Supported
Cisco
UCS Blade Servers
Not Supported
Macintosh servers
No longer supported by Apple.
Not Supported
Macintosh desktops
Apple Macintosh desktops do not have sufficient
redundancy to provide server capabilities.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-4
Minimise the number of vendors and suppliers.
AP-5
Focus on secured systems.
AP-6
Selected systems must have high level of availability and
reliability.
AP-12
Use of standard platforms and conform to Flinders SOE.
AP-16
Focus on sustainability.
10.3.3 Virtual Server Systems
Virtual Server systems enable one physical server to run multiple operating systems in a safe, reliable
manner. This maximises the utilisation of resources, minimises power consumption and data centre
requirements, and provides enhanced flexibility to meet business requirements.
Element
Description
Server virtualisation
Server virtualisation platforms that can run multiple instances of supported operating
systems.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
VMware
Current version (N) and N-1 versions are supported.
Restricted Support
Microsoft HyperV
HyperV systems will be migrated to VMware platforms as
soon as is practical.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-1
Alignment with business requirements.
AP-5
Focus on secured systems and accessibility of
information.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-13
Sharing of resources for delivery of applications.
AP-16
Focus on sustainability with optimal use of power and
resources.
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10.3.4 Storage Systems
Storage systems provide the mechanism for storing all information and data that pertains to the
operation of the University. This includes data for administrative, research, and teaching systems.
Element
Description
Storage platforms
The specific technologies which comprise the storage platforms for use with
University applications and systems.
Class
Product
Notes
To Be Supported
Cloud storage
An evaluation of cloud based storage platforms will be
performed in 2013.
Supported
Dell Compellent
University-wide storage platform.
Restricted Support
EMC CX3-40
Previous storage platform which provides storage for most
administrative systems of the University. End of Life in
January 2014.
Restricted Support
Direct attached arrays
(CORAID, Pegasus,
MD3200, others)
Turn-key applications may require direct attached storage,
but alternatives should be found where possible.
Restricted Support
Dell Equilogic
Platforms purchased by faculty/school which are not
scalable to an enterprise capability.
Restricted Support
Internal storage
Internal disks will not be used due to the support
overheads. Exceptions will be based on specific
application requirements where SAN storage is not
appropriate.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-5
Security and accessibility of information.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-8
Effective management of data and data integrity.
10.3.5 Storage Protocols
Storage Protocols provide the mechanism for connecting server platforms to storage systems.
Element
Description
Storage protocols
The specific technologies which enable server platforms and storage systems to
communicate together.
Class
Product
Notes
To Be Supported
FCoE
An evaluation of Fibre Channel over Ethernet protocols will
be performed in 2013.
Supported
Fibre Channel
4gbs, 8gbs, and 16gbs fibre channel protocols are
supported by the University server and storage systems.
Supported
NFS
Distributed file system protocol.
Supported
iSCSI
iSCSI is supported on smaller scale storage platforms that
are purchased for specific applications which cannot
leverage the university-wide storage platforms.
Not Supported
SCSI, USB, internal
Older storage protocols will be actively phased out for
server platforms.
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Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-5
Security and accessibility of information.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
10.3.6 Backup and Archiving Systems
Backup systems enable information and data that is stored on the University storage systems to be
copied and protected. The University backup system is primarily based on traditional tape backup
technologies which are proven and cost effective.
Element
Description
Backup platforms
The specific technologies which comprise the storage platforms for use with
University applications and systems.
Class
Product
Notes
To Be Supported
Archiving
An evaluation of archiving systems will be performed in
2013, including cloud/hosted solutions.
Supported
Quantum iScalar tape
libraries
Main tape drive technology used for backup purposes.
Supported
LTO4 and LTO5 tape
drives
Tape drive standard which is used within the tape libraries.
Supported
Symantec Netbackup
Vendor solution which is used to backup all supported
server platforms.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-5
Security and accessibility of information.
AP-6
High level of reliability.
AP-16
Focus on cost effective and sustainable approach to
backup and archiving.
10.4 Network Technology Architecture
Network Technology Architecture is comprised of the network devices, network topology, and network
protocols which provide services across the University. The network provides access to applications
and services that are required by staff and students, and enables collaboration and communication
across the various Flinders University locations. Flinders will minimise the number of network
equipment vendors that are necessary to provide the required services to the University.
10.4.1 Switch and Router Equipment
Switches and routers enable the interconnection of computers, or connection to other network devices
or to other networks.
Element
Description
Network equipment
vendor
Network switches and routers will be purchased from this vendor unless they cannot
supply satisfactory solutions that address business requirements.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Cisco
Default network equipment vendor.
Not Supported
D-Link, Netgear,
Netcomm
To be replaced as soon as possible.
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Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-3
Preference for integrated solutions.
AP-4
Minimise number of vendors.
AP-5
Security and accessibility of information.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-17
Ease of access to relevant expertise.
AP-18
Optimal use of infrastructure assets.
10.4.2 Wireless Access Points
Wireless access points are specially configured nodes on wireless local area networks (WLANs).
They enable wireless devices to connect to a wired network using Wi-Fi, or related standards.
Element
Description
Network equipment
vendor
Wireless Access Points and associated equipment.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Cisco
Default network equipment vendor.
Not Supported
Non-Cisco equipment
To be replaced as soon as possible.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-3
Preference for integrated solutions.
AP-4
Minimise number of vendors.
AP-5
Security and accessibility of information.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-17
Ease of access to relevant expertise.
AP-18
Optimal use of infrastructure assets.
10.4.3 Network Load Balancers
Network load balancers enable the balancing of network sessions like Web, email etc. over multiple
connections. This spreads out the amount of bandwidth used by each local area network (LAN) user,
thus increasing the total amount of bandwidth available.
Element
Description
Network equipment
vendor
Network load balancers distribute network traffic evenly between other infrastructure
and applications which is accessed over the network.
Class
Product
Supported
F5
Supported
Citrix Netscaler
Not Supported
Big-IP
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Notes
To be replaced as soon as possible.
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Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-3
Preference for integrated solutions.
AP-4
Minimise number of vendors.
AP-5
Security and accessibility of information.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-17
Ease of access to relevant expertise.
AP-18
Optimal use of infrastructure assets.
10.4.4 IP Telephony
IP telephony provides full-featured telephone connection over the data network.
Element
Description
Network equipment
vendor
IP Telephony to ensure full functionality and inter-operability between end points.
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Cisco
Default network equipment vendor.
Not Supported
Avaya, Mitel
Mitel removed from ASMS.
Owner
Associate Director, Infrastructure Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-3
Preference for integrated solutions.
AP-4
Minimise number of vendors.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-18
Optimal use of infrastructure assets.
10.5 Printer Device Architecture
10.5.1 Printer Device
Printer Device relates to the supported hardware and driver specifications in use across Flinders. ITS
supports both network multifunction printing devices and standalone network-based printers, using the
IP protocol with drivers compatible on Windows 2008 R2 and later printer servers.
Due to complexity requirements of Flinders University, other print manufacturers have been untested
with both the Client Standard Operating System (SOE) and Tier 1 Applications (Finance System).
While not prohibited, explicit approval will need to come from the Director of ITS or a specified
delegate
Element
Description
Printer
Device vendor
Supported Printer Hardware
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
Ricoh
Standalone & Multifunction
Supported
Kyocera
Standalone & Multifunction
Supported
Canon
Multifunction
Supported
HP
Standalone
Not Supported
Sharp
Any model
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Not Supported
Fuji
Any model
Not Supported
Konica Minolta
Any model
Not Supported
Xerox
Any model
Prohibited
Hosted-based Printer
Models
Owner
Associate Director, Client Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-1
Alignment with business requirements.
AP-4
Minimise number of vendors.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-18
Optimal use of infrastructure assets.
10.5.2 Printer Driver
To optimise the efficiency and retain a level of stability on the print server, it is recommended the
number of drivers in the print server drive store is kept to a minimum. For this reason,.
Element
Description
Printer
Driver
Printer models must be compatible with an existing or released universal print
driver, capable of providing all functionality offered by the device
Class
Product
Notes
Supported
PCL 5.x
Printer Command Language 5
Supported
PCL 6
Printer Command Language 6
Supported
PostScript
PostScript Level 1,2,3
Owner
Associate Director, Client Services
Architectural Principle Reference
AP-3
Preference for integrated solutions.
AP-4
Minimise number of vendors.
AP-6
High level of availability and reliability.
AP-18
Optimal use of infrastructure assets.
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11.
Technology Advisory Groups
Flinders University Technology Advisory Groups provide advice and recommendations to the Pro Vice
Chancellor, Information Services in relation to the development of University-wide IT resources,
services and systems.
Recommendations and advice are used to guide solutions, and to resolve issues to satisfactorily meet
the administrative, research, teaching and learning needs of defined users across the University.
Each group listed below is an advisory group and in no way diminishes the Director ITS’s discretion to
take immediate action to protect the security of the University’s computing environment.
The following Technology Advisory Groups have been established:
Technology Advisory Group
TAG
Abbreviation
Infrastructure Advisory Group
IAG
Enterprise Applications
Reference Group
Scholarly Communication and
Library Advisory Group
EARG
SCHOLAG
Educational ICT Advisory Group
ETAG
Role
IAG provides advice on the development of the University’s
ICT systems and services.
EARG provides advice and recommendations to the
PVC (IS) on the development and acquisition of the
University’s enterprise technology systems.
SCHOLAG provides advice to the University on
developments in scholarly information and communication
and on the development, policies and operation of the
Library.
ETAG provides advice on policies, strategies and priorities in
the provision of ICT services that provide educational
outcomes.
12. Document Review and Updating
The Flinders IT Standards document is both a reference and compliance document for all initiatives
involving the use of ICT, and also where third parties are seeking to provide ICT related goods or
services to the University. Accordingly, it is important that the document incorporates the current
standards and that where changes occur in the ICT environment, the relevant sections of the
document are updated and the current version posted on the ITS web site.
Action
Frequency
Responsibility
Regular review, updating, version control
and posting
As required
Associate Director, Application
Services and Associate Director,
Infrastructure Services
Expert advice on changes to applications,
infrastructure and client services
Bi-annual or as required
ITS Management Team convened by
one Associate Director
Document review
Annual
ITS Management Team convened by
one Associate Director
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13.
Glossary
ARIS
Software for business process management
BPEL
Business Process Execution Language: a business process modelling language that is executable
BPM
Business Process Modeling
CMS
Content Management System
COTS
Commercial Off the Shelf Software
DAS
Direct Attached Storage
DRP
Disaster Recovery Plan
Enterprise system
A very high criticality Flinders system (see the Application Classification Policy for full definition)
ETL
Extract, Transform, Load
FITS
Flinders IT Architecture Standards
FLO
Flinders Learning Online
HTTP
Hyper Text Transfer Protocol: a method used to transfer or convey information on the world wide web.
It is a request/response protocol between clients and servers.
IDM
Identity Management
IP
Internet Protocol
IS
Information Systems
ISDG
Information Systems Development Group
ITS
The IT Services Department of Flinders
JIRA
A J2EE web-based bug tracking and issue tracking application
Key system
A critical Flinders system
LDAP
LMS
LPR/LPD
Lightweight Directory Access Protocol is an Internet protocol that email and other programs use to
look up information from a server.
Learning Management Systems
Line Printer Remote protocol / Line Printer Daemon protocol: a set of programs which provide printer
spooling and network print server functionality for Unix like systems
Non-Key system
A non-critical Flinders system
Not Supported
See section 3
OID
Object identifier
OIM
Oracle identity management
Open source describes the principles and methodologies to promote open access to the production
Open Source
and design process for various goods, products, resources and technical conclusions or advice. The
term is most commonly applied to the source code of software that is made available to the general
public with either relaxed or non-existent intellectual property restrictions.
PDA
Personal Digital Assistant
Prohibited
See section 3
RDBMS
Relational Database Management System
Restricted Support
See section 3
SAN
Storage Area Networks
SMS
Student Management System
SOA
Service-Oriented Architecture: a software architecture that uses loosely coupled software services to
support the requirements of business processes and software users
SOE
Standard Operating Environment: see section 10.1
Supported
See section 3
TAG
Technology Advice Group
TCP or TCP/IP Transmission Control Protocol: Using TCP, applications on networked hosts can
TCP
create connections to one another, over which they can exchange streams of data. The protocol
guarantees reliable and in-order delivery of data from sender to receiver.
To be Supported
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UML
Unified Modelling Language: in the field of software development , UML is a standardised specification
language for object modelling.
UPS
Uninterruptible power supply
VOD
Video on Demand
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14.
Revision History
Version
Issue Date
Editor
Sections Affected
Description
1.0
5/12/2012
Ray Fallu
All
Final draft developed following three
meetings of the FITS Working Group and
subsequent review of documentation,
including the addition of sections relating
to server and networking technology. The
Working Group comprised the following
ITS staff: Rob Reddecliffe, Dean Gawler,
Kevin Knox, Chris Simmons, Rick
Williams, Mark Materne and Gavan
Conroy
1.1
18/01/2013
Ray Fallu
All
Document reviewed by Nicole Fishers
with a number of amendments
recommended. Recommendations
included a change to the title of the
document to reflect the emphasis on IT
Architecture Standards
1.2
6/06/2013
Ray Fallu
All
Complete document review undertaken by
Nicole Fishers, Sally Wheldrake, Rod
Walker and Peter Woolley.
1.3
22/10/2013
Nicole Fishers
1, 8.1, 9.3, 9.4.5
Minor updates from review.
1.4
25/10/13
Nicole Fishers
All
Updates from Sally Wheldrake and Peter
Woolley
1.5
29/10/13
Nicole Fishers
All
Minor updates from Sascha Meier
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