final review

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questions, comments
and ideas
I am not very good with kids
yet. I just haven't spent
enough time with them to
know what is appropriate
and what is not.
questions, comments
and ideas
 Chari: I hope I can take what I know and what I
have learned and apply it! I hope I will have the
guts to stand my ground and provide the
education for my students that I KNOW they
need! Sometimes I feel so overwhelmed and
blown away by all that I’m going to have to do,
and all that I will have to balance. But in the end
I know I have a passion to teach, a passion for
children, and a passion learn and help others to
learn.
questions, comments
and ideas
 Heidi Jo: Anna is a perfect example of what Oliver VanDemille
calls, "A Full On Genius." Oliver Van Demille is the author of a
Thomas Jefferson Education. He states that, "Every child you
have ever met, every child you will ever meet is a full on
genius." I think of all the statements I have heard in my life, this
is my favorite. I believe genius can be found in every child. I am
surprised at the lack of respect we have for children's potential.
We should expect that children will develop in their own way
and on their own time. We should be ready for when we get a
glimpse of their genius and be ready to encourage them. I think
this is why we teach so many subjects at school, it is a service
to us as teachers. The hope that we will be given the
opportunity to see the thing that these children succeed at and
be able to relate it to their learning in a way that gets them
excited.
questions, comments
and ideas
 Chari: I had a fifth grade teacher who was amazing! I think that
was the only class in elementary school where I learned how to
learn, I don’t necessarily remember the content that was taught
that year but I do remember the impact he had on me and my
passion for education, he is a big part of the reason I am going
to be a teacher and the reason that I had such a passion and
drive to me successful and smart! He taught the value of an
education and it was a year I really excelled, my reading level
jumped significantly that year along with my ability to do math, I
never liked math until that year and now even today it is
something I love! I think he also pushed us to be passionate
and curious!
questions, comments
and ideas
 Heidi Jo: When he was young he aspired to be a Doctor, a Lawyer, or
an Entrepreneur. In high school that changed. He took a couple auto
shop classes from a teacher that he loved. He enjoyed so thoroughly
the way this professor taught and the excitement of his lessons he
completely jumped tracks. He left high school and entered college on
a scholarship, with a job on the side working in a mechanics shop.
You know what he discovered six months into his new chosen career.
He hated mechanics. He hated being dirty and grubby, he hated the
conversations in the garage, he hated working on vehicles that were
predictable and too easily understandable. But the thing he did learn
was that his teacher from high school had loved what he did enough
to make his subject intriguing. He ask what would have happened if
he had had seven subjects with instructors who were as engaging.
"You can't light the fire of passion in someone if it doesn't burn within
you to begin with."
questions, comments
and ideas
 Christopher: Teachers need to expand
the way they teach from read-andanswer questions to inspiring their
students. It is important that each
injects passion and curiosity into their
youth… While reading, I continually
thought of the question “how can I
make a difference?”
questions, comments
and ideas
 Aleece: Being smart is not good enough
anymore. We need to have passion and
curiosity. Like we discussed on the first
day of class, children are naturally
curious. Reading this chapter made me
feel like being an elementary school
teacher was the most important job
on the planet!
questions, comments
and ideas
 Tiffany: I was going to ask the
question – How do we get our kids
interested in science and engineering
careers again? – but I answered my
own question. We need to be role
models for our kids and we need
teachers that excite an interest in these
subjects as well - just like the article
suggests.
questions, comments
and ideas
 Becky: I do have a question though. It's about
choosing novels to integrate. I picked H.G.
Wells War of the Worlds. I would be doing a
teacher read-aloud with this book because it
may be a little to difficult for the class entirely.
Is there a way to make sure that we are
choosing books that will support our students
and not be too difficult or too easy?
Instructor: Bryce Passey
Give you insights and experiences that will
prepare you to be a highly effective teacher.
 Get you excited about the fun and
possibilities that teaching and specifically
teaching science can hold.
 Prepare you to enter your first teaching
assignment as a dreamer and an idealist…
(“I am going to make a difference in the lives
of these kids.”) and hopefully 30 years later
be even more of a dreamer and an idealist.

 Science
is a way of looking at the world
 and figuring stuff out
 Three
kinds of blood vessels are arteries,
vanes, and caterpillars.
 Respiration is composed of two acts, first
inspiration, and then expectoration.
 Dew is formed on leaves when the sun
shines down on them and makes them
perspire.
 Kids
look at the world with a natural
fascination
 Figuring stuff out… well… that’s where
they need our help
 Our challenge is to clarify
the understanding while
fostering the natural
curiosity and fascination.
Powerful Learning
“Real-world”
Integrated Science
•Students see that
science does not
exist in isolation.
•Students have the Science is taught
in conjunction
“Hands-on” Science
opportunity to
with English,
conduct real
history, art, math,
•Teachers demonstrate experiments with
or students do labs no known outcome. technology, music,
Textbook Science
reading, etc.
with
(Students
are
the
Students read the
(Science becomes
known outcomes.
scientists.)
part of the students
chapter answer the (“gee-whiz science”)
other school work
questions
and their everyday
and do a worksheet.
world.)
“Real-world”
Practical Science
by Robert Marzano
$15.00 (including shipping)
from Amazon
Chapter 1
Schools Can (Must) Make the Difference:
“…some people (even some teachers and administrators)
assert that schools can make little difference in overcoming
the background factors that negatively affect student
academic achievement.”
“The most straightforward way to enhance students’
academic background knowledge is to provide academically
enriching experiences… field trips to museums, art galleries,
and the like, as well as school-sponsored travel and exchange
programs… In these days of shrinking resources, schools
commonly must cut back or even cut out these activities.”
Chapter 1
“I strongly fear that if schools (and future
teachers) do not implement indirect approaches
like those outlined in this book, they will
continue to be a breeding ground for failure for
those students who grow up in or near poverty.”
Your Role as an Educator
Technician
Or
Craftsman
Bringing Science to Life
How do we create Powerful Learning?
In order to create the rich, environment needed to stimulate
powerful learning for all students, current research shows
that all 19 senses need to be stimulated.
YES, 19 Senses (not 5)
Sight
Taste
Vestibular
Temperature
Infrared
Proximal
Hearing
Smell
Pain
Magnetic
Ionic
Electrical
Barometric
Touch
Balance
Eidetic imagery
Ultraviolet
Vomeronasal
Geogravimetric
Bringing Science to Life
Curriculum and instructional strategies need to be
based upon being there input (stimulating as
many senses as possible) extended by immersion
and enriched with hands on of the real thing.
In contrast, learning based on secondary input
(print with some video) is inherently brainantagonistic because it severely restricts input.
The fewer senses involved, the more difficult the
task of learning becomes for all learners.
Bringing Science to Life
Today’s students are starved for exposure to reality.
They are coming with a shortage of experiences
with the real world and the concepts and language
that accompany them. They are therefore illequipped to adequately learn from our secondhand
sources. For example, we have known for some
time that 80 percent of reading comprehension
depends upon prior knowledge. In effect, one can
only take from a book what one brings to the book.
Books can expand our knowledge but cannot create
it from scratch
Bringing Science to Life
Multiple Intelligences
Current research has identified eight (8)
intelligences, only two of which are focused on in
traditional schooling. One of the truly
revolutionary discoveries is that we all possess
portions of each of the intelligences. We each favor
certain intelligences as our particular strengths, but
we all possess portions of each. Another
revolutionary discovery, at least to education, is that
in order to truly educate a student, any student, all
8 intelligences must be developed
Bringing Science to Life
Needs Assessment
“I don’t want to know that all
students can learn, I want to
know what you do when they
don’t.”
Richard Dufour
The Multiple Intelligences
of Reading and Writing
“Making the Words Come Alive”
Thomas Armstrong
The Multiple Intelligences
of Reading and Writing
“Making the Words Come Alive”
The Conundrum of Multiple Intelligences
Bodily/Kinesthetic
Logical/Mathematical
Spatial/Mechanical
Intrapersonal
Musical
Interpersonal
Verbal/Linguistic
Naturalist
Thomas Armstrong
Bringing Literature to Life
Multiple
Intelligences
in the
Classroom
By Thomas Armstrong
Eight Ways of Learning
Children who
are highly:
THINK
LOVE
NEED
in words
reading, writing, telling stories,
playing word games
books, tapes, writing tools, paper, diaries, dialogue,
discussion, debate, stories
by reasoning
experimenting, questioning,
figuring out logical puzzles,
calculating
materials to experiment with, science materials,
manipulatives, trips to the planetarium and science
museums
SpatialMechanical
in images and pictures
designing, drawing, visualizing,
doodling
art, LEGOS, video, movies, slides, imagination
games, mazes, puzzles, illustrated books, trips to art
museums
BodilyKinesthetic
through somatic
sensations
dancing, running, jumping,
building, touching, gesturing
role play, drama, movement, things to build, sports
and physical games, tactile experiences, hands-on
learning
Musical
via rhythms and
melodies
singing, whistling, humming,
tapping feet and hands, listening
sing-along time, rips to concerts, music playing at
home and school, musical instruments
Interpersonal
by bouncing ideas off
other people
leading, organizing, relating,
manipulating, mediating,
partying
friends, groups games, social gatherings, community
events, clubs, mentors/apprenticeships
Intrapersonal
in relation to their
needs, feelings and
goals
setting goals, meditating,
dreaming, planning, reflecting
secret places, time alone, self-paced projects, choices
Naturalist
through nature and
natural forms
playing with pets, gardening,
investigating nature, raising
animals, caring for planet earth
access to nature, opportunities for interacting with
animals, tools for investigating nature (e.g.,
magnifying glass, binoculars)
VerbalLinguistic
LogicalMathematical
Planning Questions
Around Multiple Intelligences
Verbal Linguistic
How can I use the
spoken or written word?
Naturalist
How can I incorporate
living things, natural
phenomena, or
ecological awareness?
Intrapersonal
How can I evoke
personal feelings or
memories, or give
students choices?
Logical-Mathematical
How can I bring in
numbers, calculations,
logic, classifications, or
critical thinking skills?
Objective
Interpersonal
How can I engage
students in peer sharing,
cooperative learning, or
large group simulation?
Spatial Mechanical
How can I use visual
aids, visualization, color,
art, or metaphor?
Musical
How can I bring in music
or environmental sounds,
or set key points in a
rhythmic or melodic
framework?
Bodily-Kinesthetic
How can I involve the
whole body or use handson experiences?
I hate science!
I hate being curious…
I hate being fascinated…
I hate learning new things…
I hate observing the world around me…
State Core
The core curriculum
is a mile wide
and an inch deep
Enduring Understanding
What do you want them to remember … a
week from now,
…a month from now,
…ten years from now?
Approach each objective…
macro - what is the big picture /
long term objectives / enduring
understandings / integrations
micro – what do I want them to
walk away with today???
creating a safe classroom
(creating an inquiry based classroom)
Establishing
an atmosphere of safety
and inquiry
Class rules - keep them positive
Safe, positive questioning/inquiry
creating a fun classroom
(creating an inquiry based classroom)
Kids
love to have fun, and they
love to feel smart. Science has the
potential (more easily than any other
subject) to let kids have fun and
feel smart. (science’s big vocabulary
words can be a teacher’s best friend)
Vocabulary Building
Vocabulary
should be a key
consideration in looking at Enduring
Understanding… What is the
vocabulary we want them to retain
and comfortably use 10 years from
now
inertia
Backward Design
1)
2)
3)
What do you want the students to learn?
(Enduring Understanding)
How are you going to assess what the
students have learned?
What are the lessons and activities you
are going to use to lead the students
through the learning process?
Scientific Method
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Question – “I wonder why…?”
“I wonder what would happen if…?”
Hypothesis – if… then…
Set up an experiment (recipe)
Collect data
Conclusion – What did we learn?
The World is Flat
The World is Flat
•CQ + PQ > IQ
The World is Flat
• “In the future, how we
educate our children may
prove to be more
important than how much
we educate them.”
“You can’t light the fire of passion in
someone else…
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