ENG1D-E June 2014 Wood

advertisement
Merivale High School
Exam Cover Page
Student’s Name: _______________________________________
Subject: GRADE 9 ACADEMIC ENGLISH
Course Code: ENG1D/E
Teacher: WOOD
Date of Exam: June 20, 2014
Regular Allotted Time:
1.5 hours (up to 2.25 hours for completion)
Number of Pages: 13
Students – please check to be sure you have all pages!
Section
Curriculum
Expectation
Level
Weight
Suggested
Time
Allotment
R.1, R.2
1 2 3 4
35%
25 mins
R.2
1 2 3 4
15%
10 mins
M.1, 2, 4
1 2 3 4
20%
25 mins
R.1, 2
W.1, 2, 3
1 2 3 4
30%
30 mins
100%
90 mins
A: Short Answer
Short Story
Terms &
Literary Devices
B: Multiple Choice
Short Story
Literary Terms
& Grammar
C: Media Analysis
Print Ads
Comparison
D: Long Answer
Novel/Play
Studies
LEVEL____
Total
GRADE______%
Instructions:
 Read through the entire exam carefully before you begin.
 Prioritize the questions on your exam.
 Respond to all questions on this paper. Attach additional pages if needed.
 Leave yourself a few minutes to review your answers before handing in.
 Take a deep breath, relax, and do your best – Good Luck!
2
PART A: Short Answer – Short Story Terms and Literary Devices
Read the short story “The Nest” and answer the questions that follow in proper
sentence form in the space provided. Answer all of the questions in this section.
THE NEST
Robert Zacks
Jimmy was fourteen. He was listening to his mother tell him, in her kindly, measured
speech, why she didn’t want him to go on the hike, and his clear grey eyes were clouded with
sullen rebellion.
“All right, Mom,” he said in the controlled voice he had learned from his parents. “If you
say I can’t go, then I can’t, can I?”
Mrs. Swanson said gravely, “You make me sound like a dictator, Jimmy.”
“Well, you are, kind of, aren’t you?” said Jimmy coldly. “I have to do what you say.”
His mother winced a little. She bit her lower lip and considered this.
“It isn’t as simple as that,” she said, pushing her mind with some difficulty toward coping
with the point Jimmy had made. She smiled a little, however, in pleasure at such evidence of
Jimmy’s growing power to analyse a situation. “My decisions are made for your own good,
Jimmy.”
He misunderstood her smile. He thought she was relegating him to his position as a child.
All his parents seemed to do these days was figure out how to hem him in. “Jimmy, you
mustn’t – ”
The words, the restrictions, they wrapped around him like tentacles of an octopus,
crushing in on his chest so he couldn’t seem to breathe.
He was on his feet, yelling, the controlled, polite speech lost in his bursting anguish for
freedom. “Everything is for my own good. Everything! But you aren’t telling me the truth.
You know why you don’t want me to go on the hike? Because of Paul. You just don’t like
him.”
He sucked in his breath, almost sobbing, shocked at himself and yet glad. Mrs. Swanson
had an unhappy look. The Swansons were a happy family, but these days a strange
restlessness had come into it.
“No,” she admitted. “I don’t think Paul is good for you. I don’t like your associating with
him.”
Jimmy said, all his heart and soul in his words, “I like Paul. He’s my best friend.”
“His father is a drunkard,” said Mrs. Swanson quietly. “And Paul came out of reform
school, didn’t he? He stole from a candy store – ”
“He’s nice!” cried Jimmy, pain in his voice. “And he isn’t a crook. He made a mistake.
He told me what happened. He was showing off. And now nobody will be friends – ”
“But he’s formed a gang already, hasn’t he? I’ve heard about it.”
“It’s just a club, that’s all,” said Jimmy. “And – and I’m a member. The club is running
the hike.”
“We won’t discuss it further.” Mrs. Swanson’s voice was suddenly like steel. She stood
up. She hesitated, pitying him, and tried to soften it with logic. “Remember, Jimmy, every
time we’ve disagreed, it turned out I knew what I was talking about.”
But he didn’t listen further. Jimmy turned and blindly ran off the porch across the lawn
toward the meeting place at Briggs’ Drugstore.
After three bocks he slowed down, panting, his face set with fury. The habit of thinking,
encouraged by his parents at every opportunity, began to function.
“‘I know what’s best for you. I know what’s best for you.’ That’s all I ever hear!”
muttered Jimmy.
To his reluctant mind sprang memories. The time he insisted he could swim to the raft.
Mr. Swanson had curtly said no, he couldn’t risk it. Jimmy had raged, with his father quietly
letting him run down. His father had told him to go ahead, but that he’d swim next to him.
Jimmy’s throat strangled suddenly at the memory: the water was constricting his
windpipe dreadfully, his eyes were bulging, his legs and arms numb with exhaustion from
the too-long swim. And then the wonderful, strong, blessed arms of his father turning him on
his back, pulling him back to shore – .
It was confusing. Jimmy shook his head in bewilderment. Suddenly he felt uncertain, the
rebellion drained out of him.
3
Paul was waiting for him at the drug store with a stillness upon his face as he leaned
against the glass front. He was about fourteen, with dark hair and bright dark eyes. He wore
dungarees. Jimmy saw, when he came closer, traces of tears on Paul’s cheeks.
“Well,” said Paul fiercely, “let’s go.”
Jimmy started. “Where’s everybody?”
“They changed their minds,” said Paul, hate in his voice.
The two boys looked at each other, and Jimmy understood. It made fury grow in him, it
made him want to hit somebody. All those parents had stopped the gang from going with
Paul because he was once in reform school.
Paul said, his voice odd, “Maybe you can’t go either?”
Jimmy looked deep into Paul’s eyes. His heart beat fast with friendship and loyalty.
“Don’t be a jerk. Come on,” he said cheerfully.
Paul’s face changed. The hate seeped away, leaving sweetness and humbleness. He flung
an arm over Jimmy’s shoulder happily.
“Your – your mother doesn’t care if you go, huh?” he said.
Jimmy swallowed. Paul needed this so badly. So very badly. Paul had no mother at all.
And his father just didn’t like looking at the world without Paul’s mother, and was always
drunk.
“Nah,” said Jimmy. “She – she even said I should bring you to supper, afterwards. What
shall I tell her, huh?”
Paul turned ashen, then flushed a deep scarlet. “Sure,” he muttered. “Be glad to.”
“I got to call her,” said Jimmy numbly. “Just a minute.”
Jimmy went into the drugstore and called his mother. He told her in a choking voice he
was going on the hike, just he and Paul, and he didn’t care how mad she got. “Nobody else
cam,” he shouted into the telephone, “because all the mothers – ” He was unable to go on for
a moment. Then he finished. “I’m bringing him to supper afterwards, Mom. I said you asked
him.”
He hung up before she could answer.
They had a wonderful day. Wonderful. It was May, and the leaves on the trees were
chartreuse and new. They went six miles out of town. They watched chip-munks skitter.
They lay on their backs and stared at fleecy white clouds changing shape. Paul’s face showed
his contentment. His eyes were dreamy.
But Jimmy, in one cloud, saw the stern face of his mother.
But Mrs. Swanson’s face, when she greeted Paul, wasn’t stern at all. She looked
uncertain as she studied his wistful, shy smile. Jimmy knew, of course, that his parents would
wait until later to lecture him. They never made a scene before other people.
Throughout supper, Mr. Swanson was very friendly to their guest. But Jimmy could see
that at the same time his father was carefully studying Paul. And Paul, never knowing,
thinking they’d wanted him, had invited him, glowed and showed the side of his personality
that Jimmy liked.
After they’d washed the dishes (at Paul’s suggestion), Mr. Swanson nodded to Paul.
“Come on, Paul,” he said. “I’ll show you my tool shop.”
As Paul eagerly followed him down the basement steps, Mrs. Swanson touched Jimmy’s
shoulder. Jimmy’s heart thudded as he reluctantly lingered behind. He turned and glared in
defiance.
“I don’t care,” he whispered. “Nobody else came. I couldn’t – ”
“Jimmy,” she said softly, and bent and kissed him. “I’m proud of you, Jimmy. You did
the right thing at the right time.”
“But you said – ” faltered Jimmy. “I mean – ”
Her eyes were very bright. “I was wrong,” she said steadily. “This time I was wrong. You
were right. He’s a nice boy, I think.”
She turned away, patting his cheek as she did so.
At first, joy filled Jimmy. Joy and pride. I’m the one who’s right, he thought, dazed. My
mother was wrong. Actually wrong. She admitted it.
And then came a queer and a frightening sense of loss, as well as of gain. It was like
being alone, high up on a precipice where the footing was slippery with moss. Jimmy felt he
had to be careful of each step. He had always been sure, even in his anger, of being able to
depend on the wisdom of his father and mother. They’d always been right.
But not any more. Now they might be wrong. And Jimmy would have to decide.
4
1. Identify the climax of this story and explain in detail why you believe this to be
the climax of this story.
2. Identify two main types of conflicts evident in this story and provide a
quotation and explanation to support each of your answers.
a)
Type of Conflict:
Supporting Quotation/Explanation:
b)
Type of Conflict:
Supporting Quotation/Explanation:
3. In your own words, explain why the author includes a recollection of Jimmy’s
swimming to the raft after his father had refused him permission to try.
5
4. Identify a moment of foreshadowing at the beginning of this story that indicates
that Jimmy’s mother might be recognizing that he is growing up. Explain why
this is foreshadowing:
5. Provide one example from the story for each of the following and explain what
two things are being compared and how they are similar:
Metaphor:
Simile:_____________________________________________________________
6. Explain the significance of the title, “The Nest”
7. In your own words, explain why at the end of the story Jimmy felt, “…a queer
and frightening sense of loss as well as of gain.”
6
8. Identify one possible theme in this story and justify your answer using proof
from the text.
9. Using as much detail as possible from the story, identify the setting.
Rubric Part A: Short Answer – Short Story Term & Literary Devices
EXPECTATIONS
R.1, 2
Level R
Insufficient
Below 50
Identify a variety of
elements of style in
a text and explain
how they help
communicate
meaning and
enhance the
effectiveness of the
text
Absent/
Insufficient
Level 1
Limited
50
53
Level 2
Approaching
57
Correctly
identifies
stylistic devices
with limited
explanation
60
63
67
Level 3
Sufficient
70
73
Level 4
Insightful
78
Demonstrates some
understanding of
stylistic devices by
selecting an
appropriate
example
Demonstrates
considerable
understanding of
stylistic devices by
quoting or paraphrasing
an appropriate example
Provides some
explanation of how
the example helps
enhance the
effectiveness of the
text
Provides considerable
and specific explanation
of how the example
helps enhance the
effectiveness of the text
OR
Effectively
explains an
example but
misidentifies the
stylistic device
80
87
95
Demonstrates thorough
understanding of
stylistic devices by
quoting or paraphrasing
an effective example
Explains specifically and
insightfully how the
example helps to
enhance the effectiveness
of the text
PART B: MULTIPLE CHOICE – SHORT STORY LITERARY DEVICES
AND GRAMMAR
1. Identify the statement from the story that contains alliteration:
a) “We can’t discuss it further.”
b) “Jimmy’s throat strangled at the memory.”
c) “If you say I can’t go, then I can’t, can I?”
d) “Jimmy shook his head in bewilderment.”
2. The type of narrator in this story is:
a) 3rd person omniscient
b) 3rd person limited
c) 2nd person
d) 1st person
98+
7
3. The dynamic character of this story is:
a) Paul
b) Jimmy
c) Paul’s dad
d) Mr. Swanson
4. The inciting incident of this story is:
a) Jimmy inviting Paul to dinner
b) Jimmy hanging up on his mother
c) Paul’s father being an alcoholic
d) Mrs. Swanson not wanting Paul to go on the hike.
5. The irony in this story takes place when:
a) Mr. Swanson shows Paul his workshop.
b) Mrs. Swanson fakes being nice to Paul when he comes over for dinner.
c) Jimmy chooses to go on the hike despite his mother’s concerns.
d) None of Paul’s other friends show up for the hike.
6. Which of the following sentences contain a comma-splice error?
a) “Everything is for my own good, right mother?”
b) “My decisions are made for your own good, Jimmy.”
c) “ It made fury grow in him, it made him want to hit somebody.”
d) “But not any more. Now they might be wrong, and Jimmy would have to
decide.”
7. Which one of the following sentences contains appropriate punctuation?
a) He said, “I felt alone. High up.The footing though was slippery with moss.”
b) He said I felt alone and high up. The footing though, was slippery with
moss.
c) He said, “I felt alone and high up. The footing though, was slippery with
moss.”
d) He said, “I felt alone and high up, the footing though, was slippery with
moss.”
8. Choose the sentence with the sentence fragment:
a) “His mother winced. Just a little.”
b) “You make me sound like a dictator.”
c) “ He slowed down, panting.”
d) “It was May, and the leaves were on the trees.”
Rubric Part B: Multiple Choice – Short Story Literary Devices and Grammar
Level R
Below 50
Expectation
R2
Recognize a
variety of text
forms, text
features, and
stylistic
elements and
demonstrate
understanding
50
R
-
Level 1
53
Limited
1
+
57
60
+
-
Limited
recognition of
most text forms,
text features, and
stylistic elements
and limited
demonstration of
understanding
Level 2
63
+
67
Approaching
2
+
Some recognition of a
variety of text forms, text
features, and stylistic
elements and some
demonstration of
understanding
70
-
Level 3
73
+
78
Sufficient
3
+
Sufficient recognition
of a variety of most
text forms, text
features, and stylistic
elements and
considerable
demonstration of
understanding
80
Level 4 +
87 95
4++
98+
Exceeds expectations
4
+ ++
Excellent recognition
of a variety of all text
forms, text features,
and stylistic elements
and exceeds
expectation of
understanding
8
PART C: MEDIA ANALYSIS - PRINT ADS COMPARISON
1. Compare and Contrast the two Coca-Cola print advertisements (on the next page)
by using the Venn Diagram (on page 10). Consider the media deconstruction
strategies practiced in class assignments, including, but not limited to:
 tone/mood
 chosen visuals
 target audience
 chosen characters
 potential product
 style and wording
placement
techniques
 story
2. After completing your Venn Diagram, reflect upon your analysis. In your personal
opinion, which Coca-Cola ad is more effective and why?
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
Rubric Part C: Media Analysis – Print Ads Comparison
Level R
Below 50
Expectation
M 1,2,4
Explain how both simple &
complex media texts are created:
identifying purposes and audiences,
overall messages, perspectives &
biases
Identify several different techniques
used in familiar media forms and
explain how they convey meaning
and influence their audience
Describe several different strategies
they used in interpreting media
texts, explain which ones they found
most helpful
R
- Level 1 +
50
53
57
-
Limited
1
+
Limited
knowledge of
media audiences,
message,
perspectives and
biases
Identifies basic
techniques or
uses inappropriate
media terms
States an opinion
with little
analysis of
process
Level 2
60
63
+
67
Approaching
2
+
- Level 3
+
70
73
78
-
Sufficient
3
+
- Level 4 + 4++
80 87 95 98+
Exceeds
expectations
4
+ ++
Mostly identifies
audiences,
messages,
perspectives and
biases
Effectively identifies
audiences, messages,
perspectives and
biases
Expertly identifies
audiences,
messages,
perspectives and
biases
Identifies some
techniques
accurately
Identifies various
techniques accurately
and clearly
Thoroughly
identifies and
explains various
techniques
Provides an
adequate response
with some analysis
of process
Sufficiently provides
response to media
texts on analysis
process
Thoughtfully
provides response
to media texts on
analysis process
9
1941 Coca-Cola Ad
Ad Text:
People on-the-go are
never too busy to go
to the soda fountain.
It’s a place where the
hurried are glad to
take a minute for the
pause that refreshes
with ice-cold CocaCola… that refreshing
little stop that keeps
you going. Try it. 5¢
YOU TASTE ITS
QUALITY
Experience proves that
nothing takes the place
of quality. You taste the
quality of ice-cold
Coca-Cola. Again and
again you enjoy the
charm of its delicious
taste… and its cool,
clean after-sense of
complete refreshment.
Thirst asks nothing
more.
2004 Coca-Cola Ad
Ad Text:
Always Coca-Cola
10
11
PART D: Long Answer – Novel/Play Studies
Answer the following questions in full sentences using the space provided. Consider
the paragraph format studied in class:
1. Appearances can often be deceiving and characters must learn to not 'judge a
book by its cover’. Using William Shakespeare’s play Twelfth Night, discuss
how three different characters are tremendously affected when they do not
perceive a situation accurately or correctly. Use specific examples (one for
each character) from the text.
12
2. Literary works often feature a character who comes to a new understanding of
the world in which he/she lives. Using one character from Harper Lee’s To Kill a
Mockingbird, prove that this statement is true using specific examples (2-3) from
the text.
13
Rubric Part D: Long Answer – Novel/Play Studies
EXPECTATIONS
R.1
W. 1, 2, 3
Level R
Insufficient
Below 50
Make and explain
inferences about both
simple and complex
texts, supporting with
stated and implied ideas
from the texts.
Provides
inadequate,
inaccurate or
irrelevant
evidence from
text
Analyse texts in terms of
the information, ideas,
issues, or themes they
explore.
Organizes information
and ideas with clarity
and focus
Insufficient
explanations or
mere plot
summary
Lacks a sense of
direction and/or
has fewer than
500 words
Does not write in
sentence form
and/or does not
effectively
communicate
through
appropriate
structure, length
and transitions
Write complete
sentences that
communicate their
meaning clearly and
accurately, varying
sentence type, structure,
and length for different
purposes and making
logical transitions
between ideas
Uses correct language
structures of English and
its conventions of
grammar, usage, spelling
and punctuation
Numerous major
and minor errors
interfere
seriously with
expression of
ideas and/or has
fewer than 500
words
Level 1
Limited
50
53
Level 2
Approaching
57
60
63
67
Level 3
Sufficient
70
73
Level 4
Insightful
78
Provides limited
supporting
evidence which is
frequently vague or
inappropriate
Provides some
supporting
evidence, but is
occasionally vague
or inappropriate
Integrates
considerable and
convincing
supporting
evidence
Provides limited
explanation of
ideas
Provides
explanation and
shows some
analysis of ideas
Frequent loss of
focus and logical
sequencing of ideas
Occasional lapse(s)
in focus and/or
logical sequencing
of ideas
writes some
complete sentences
that communicate
meaning ; varies
some sentences ;
makes some
transitions between
ideas
Shows
considerable
analysis and
synthesis of
ideas
Organization is
clear, focused
and logical
writes sentences
that communicate
meaning with
limited
effectiveness, does
not vary sentence
type, structure, and
length effectively;
limited use of
transitions between
ideas
Errors frequently
interfere with
expression of ideas
and/or frequently
weaken impact of
the essay
Errors occasionally
interfere with
expression of ideas
and/or weaken
impact of the essay
writes complete
sentences that
communicate
meaning clearly,
varying sentence
type, structure,
and length
making clear
transitions
between ideas
with
considerable
effectiveness
Errors do not
significantly
interfere with
expression of
ideas or weaken
impact of the
essay
80
87 95
98+
Integrates substantial
and compelling
supporting evidence
Shows thorough
analysis and skilful
synthesis of ideas
Organizes
information and ideas
with a high degree of
coherence and unity
writes complete
sentences that
communicates
meaning clearly and
accurately, varying
sentence type,
structure, and length
making logical
transitions between
ideas with a high
degree of
effectiveness
Few errors do not
interfere with
expression of ideas or
weaken impact of the
essay
Download
Related flashcards
Literature

26 Cards

Literary genres

22 Cards

Philosophy books

23 Cards

Metaphors

17 Cards

Series of books

21 Cards

Create flashcards