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Central European University
Admissions Bulletin
Academic Year 2002/2003
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Accuracy of the Admissions Bulletin
The information found in this publication is based on the 2001/2002 academic year; any changes to be
implemented that were verifiable at the time of printing, particularly with regard to the content of the
university’s academic programs (course offerings, etc.) have been included. However, revisions may occur and
details in this publication are subject to change. The Admissions Office can provide the most recent
information available.
Language Used in the Admissions Bulletin
Throughout the Admissions Bulletin references are made to countries and nationalities with the following
designations: “CEE/fSU” refers to countries and persons of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet
Union, which include Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, the
Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova,
Mongolia, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and
Yugoslavia. CEE/fSU countries are referred to collectively as “the region.”
Non-Discrimination Policy
Central European University does not discriminate on the basis of – including, but not limited to – race, color,
national and ethnic origin, religion, gender or sexual orientation in administering its policies, admissions
policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
Policy on Sexual Harassment
Central European University recognizes the human dignity of each member of its community. The university
also believes that each member has a responsibility to promote respect and dignity for others so that all
members of the community are free to pursue their goals in an open environment, able to participate in the free
exchange of ideas, and able to share equally in the benefits of the university’s employment and educational
opportunities. To achieve this end, the university strives to foster an academic work and living environment
that is free from any form of harassment, including that based on sex. For the full university policy on sexual
harassment, please contact the Admissions Office or refer to the CEU Code of Ethics at
http://www.ceu.hu/student_policies.html.
Further updates after the date of this publication can be found on the CEU website: http://www.ceu.hu.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Table of Contents
Part I: Introduction
Remarks by Yehuda Elkana, President and Rector
Central European University: An Overview
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6
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Part II: Academic Departments and Programs
In Brief
Departments and Programs Listing
Types of Degree Programs and Graduation Requirements
Academic Departments and Programs
Department of Economics
Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy
Program on Gender and Culture
Department of History
Department of International Relations and European Studies
Department of Legal Studies
Department of Mathematics and its Applications
Department of Medieval Studies
Nationalism Studies Program
Department of Philosophy
Department of Political Science
Department of Sociology
Joint Program with Bard College: Study Abroad in Budapest
Special Educational and Research Projects
Center for Policy Studies
Humanities Center
Outreach: Programs for Professors and Professionals
Special and Extension Programs
Summer University
Curriculum Resource Center
Senior and Junior Fellowship Program
Hosting a CEU Lecturer
Affiliated with CEU: IMC Graduate School of Business
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14
15
15
19
22
24
27
29
34
36
38
40
41
44
46
47
47
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48
48
48
48
48
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48
Part III: Teaching Sites and Facilities
Budapest Teaching Site, Hungary
Warsaw Teaching Site, Poland
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51
54
Part IV: Student Services and Student Activities
Department of Student Services
Other Services Provided to Students
Student Activities
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57
58
59
Part V: Prospective Students, Applying to CEU, The Admissions Process
Prospective Students
Eligibility and Language Requirements
Applying to CEU
General Admissions Requirements
The Admissions Process
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Part VI: Tuition and Fees
Tuition and Fees
Financial Regulations and Payment Information
67
69
70
Part VII: Financial Aid
General Information
Forms of Financial Aid
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76
Part VIII: Addresses of Soros Foundations and CEU Coordinators
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PART I: INTRODUCTION
Letter from CEU’s President and Rector
Dear Prospective CEU Students
Welcome. CEU continues its original mission to educate hundreds of young graduate students from Central
and Eastern Europe, and the post-communist world, towards the best academic standards that the democratic
West has developed in an intellectual milieu, cultivating the values of democracy, open society and scholarly
humanity.
Furthermore, CEU is expanding its mission to invite students from other emerging democracies but its gates
are open also to students from established democracies; in short to all those who want to learn about the
history, the present, the economy, and the legal and sociopolitical issues, as well as gender problems, and
environmental problems, that abound in these parts of the world.
CEU is aiming at becoming a global niche, creating new knowledge on the dimension of the shifting boundary
between the local and the universal. Also, CEU considers at the center of its tasks the formulation of researchrooted policy papers in diverse areas and training students for thinking out and writing such policy papers.
All these research, teaching, and other activities take place within the framework of its twelve research oriented
teaching units, a Humanities Center, a Center for Policy Studies, and the Open Society Archives.
Your
Yehuda Elkana
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY: AN OVERVIEW
MISSION: DEVOTED TO EDUCATION AND OPEN SOCIETY
Central European University (CEU) is an internationally recognized institution of post-graduate education in
social sciences and humanities. It seeks to contribute to the development of open societies in Central and
Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (CEE/fSU) by promoting a system of education in which ideas
are creatively, critically, and comparatively examined. CEU serves as an advanced center of research and
policy analysis and facilitates academic dialogue while preparing its graduates to serve as the region's next
generation of leaders and scholars. The CEU Fellowship Program has been a direct means of supporting the
university’s mission to develop and sustain open societies, democracy, rule of law, free markets, tolerance, and
political and cultural pluralism in the region. However, it has become clear over the last decade that Central
and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are not the only parts of the world experiencing the
development of more open societies, and also that the main economic, political, social and cultural phenomena
taking place in the region could be better understood if studied within a comparative approach which integrates
the local into a global perspective. To address the challenges resulting from this spreading democratization and
also considering the need for a wider, comparative perspective, CEU decided that from the 2001/2002
academic year, while continuing to focus on individuals and organizations in the CEE/fSU region, the CEU
Fellowship Program would be extended worldwide, with particular emphasis on students in emerging
democracies.
A BRIEF HISTORY
Central European University was established in 1991 as an institution committed to promoting educational
development throughout Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. CEU is a unitary institution,
under a common Board of Trustees and Senate, with teaching sites in Hungary and Poland. Its primary
administrative offices are in Budapest, and the language of instruction and communication is English.
The concept of an institution of higher learning in Central Europe, one which would bring together students
and faculty from a diverse regional and international background in an open and liberal academic setting, was
first discussed in 1989 by a small group of concerned individuals, many of them former dissidents, in
Dubrovnik, Croatia, then part of former Yugoslavia. The setting was the Inter-University Centre, which was for
several years the location of courses in social sciences offered to just such an audience. Funding and support
for the participants taking the courses came from George Soros, and it was a natural progression that, as the
region began its rapid transformation -with varying results- Soros and those who shared his vision would begin
to prepare for the new conditions which would emerge.
Beginning with 100 students in 1991, CEU has grown rapidly and now enrolls about 850 students from over 45
countries each year.
CONCEPT OF AN OPEN SOCIETY
An open society is a society based on the recognition that nobody has a monopoly on truth, that different
people have different views and interests, and that there is a need for institutions to protect the rights of all
people and to allow them to live together in peace. The term "open society" was popularized by the
philosopher Karl Popper in his 1945 book Open Society and Its Enemies. Broadly speaking, an open society is
characterized by a reliance on the rule of law, the existence of a democratically elected government, a diverse
and vigorous civil society, and respect for minorities and minority opinions.
REGISTRATION AND ACCREDITATION
CEU has an absolute charter from the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York (US) for
and on behalf of the State Education Department. This is the legal instrument which allows CEU to operate and
maintain a degree-granting institution.
Central European University is a Candidate for Accreditation by the Commission on Higher Education of the
Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA; (+1
215) 662-5606. Candidate for Accreditation is a status of affiliation with a regional accrediting commission
that indicates that an institution has achieved recognition and is progressing toward, but is not assured of,
accreditation. It has provided evidence of sound planning, seems to have the resources to implement the plans,
and appears to have the potential for obtaining its goals within a reasonable period of time. Candidate for
Accreditation status was granted to CEU in June 1999.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
CEU is recognized as a foreign educational institution with the right to conduct educational activities in
Hungary and whose degrees may be nostrified by the Ministry of Education and Culture in accordance with
relevant statutes.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
George Soros (Chairman)
Aryeh Neier (Secretary)
Donald Blinken
Leon Botstein (Vice-Chair and Treasurer)
Gerhard Casper
Natalie Zemon Davis
Yehuda Elkana (President and Rector)
Gyorgy Enyedi
Vartan Gregorian
Wolf Lepenies
Ewa Letowska
William Newton-Smith
Istvan Rev
Istvan Teplan (Executive Vice-President)
Miklos Vasarhelyi
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS
Yehuda Elkana, President and Rector
Stefan Messmann, Academic Pro-Rector
Edmund Mokrzycki, Warsaw Pro-Rector
Istvan Teplan, Executive Vice-President
Liviu Matei, Academic Secretary
FACULTY
Over 100 professors from around the world teach at CEU; they come from countries including Australia,
Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary,
Israel, Italy, Latvia, Macedonia, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Switzerland,
Spain, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, the United States and Yugoslavia. Additionally, CEU hosts a number of
visiting professors who teach courses and give frequent lectures and seminars, thus giving students access to
highly respected academics from other institutions.
STUDENT BODY
During the 2001/2002 academic year, CEU enrollment is expected to stand at 849 regular full-time students.
Out of the 849 students 525 are newly enrolled and 324 are continuing students. They are drawn from over 45
countries including those of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (CEE/fSU), Western
Europe, North America, South America, Africa and Asia. In addition, CEU enrolls a number of visiting and
exchange students as well as undergraduate students from North America on a semester study abroad program.
For further details on the study abroad program, please refer to the Joint Program with Bard College under
“Academic Departments and Programs.”
The 525 new entrants in in 2001/2002 come from the following countries:
Country
Albania
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Belarus
Belgium
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Canada
China
Croatia
Number of students
3
9
8
6
1
3
26
2
1
15
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Colombia
Czech Republic
Estonia
Finland
Georgia
Germany
Hungary
Iran
Italy
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kyrgyzstan
Latvia
Lithuania
Macedonia
Mexico
Moldova
Mongolia
Nigeria
Norway
Peru
Poland
Romania
Russia
Slovakia
Slovenia
South Africa
Tajikistan
Turkey
Turkmenistan
Ukraine
United Kingdom
United States of America
Uzbekistan
Yugoslavia
1
20
17
1
12
2
75
1
1
7
1
6
8
17
7
8
2
1
1
1
25
82
61
12
6
1
1
2
1
38
1
7
11
12
525
CEU ALUMNI
As of 2001 the number of CEU alumni has grown to approximately 3,700 individuals. Through the Alumni
Affairs Office, CEU maintains contacts with about 80 percent of its graduates, and provides support in
networking among alumni, job placement and exchange of career-related information as well as alumni-student
career mentoring, recently initiated by the Alumni Affairs Office and the career advising services. The CEU
alumni program offers a number of services and benefits, fully described on the alumni web pages at
www.ceu.hu/students_alumni.html.
As indicated by the placement statistics in the following tables, 65 percent of CEU’s graduates enter
professional careers after completing their course of study. The three top areas of employment for CEU
graduates are in the spheres of education, private sector business, and central and local government. A good
number of CEU alumni hold positions at universities and research institutes, public organizations, reputable
companies, and government administrations, consistent with CEU’s mission to contribute to the development
of open societies, democracy, rule of law, free markets, tolerance and political and cultural pluralism in
CEE/fSU and other parts of the world experiencing emerging democracies.
Students from developed democracies find in CEU a stepping stone toward an international career focused on
EU expansion, CEE/fSU policy and grantmaking, the transfer of advanced skills and knowledge to deal with
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the main economic, political, social and cultural phenomena taking place in the region as part of global
development. Those interested in an academic career find an advantage in CEU’s comparative approach and
analysis of the “shifting boundary between the local and the universal.”
Thirty-five percent of CEU’s graduates continue their studies in doctoral or other advanced research programs
primarily in North America and Western Europe, thus accounting for the relatively high number of alumni
currently residing in these parts of the world. The CEU alumni network operates from every country in
CEE/fSU, and in the United Kingdom and the United States. Major alumni events are held at CEU at least
twice per year, as well as in every country where alumni volunteers are active.
For more information on CEU alumni, please visit the section on “Student Services and Alumni” at
http://www.ceu.hu.
Alumni Continuing Studies
In the fSU
Visegrad Countries1
Southeast Europe
Outside the Region
35%
8%
21%
3%
68%
Alumni in Professional Positions
In the fSU
Visegrad Countries
Southeast Europe
Outside the Region
65%
29%
30%
23%
18%
Alumni who have entered the work force are currently employed in the following areas:
Areas of Employment
Education
Private Sector Business
Government/Central and Local
Public Sector Business
Non-Profit
International Organizations2
Self-employed
Tiffany Faykus
History 2001
United States of America
39%
28%
12%
2%
11%
6%
2%
PHOTO
“I can honestly say that my time at CEU has been one of the most enriching experiences of my life. The
opportunity to study with students from such diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds, and to learn from such a
diverse pool of talented professors, will undoubtedly provide immense benefit in any and all of my future
endeavors. I thoroughly enjoyed the thought provoking and often challenging lectures, the spirited debates
among my classmates that often followed, as well as the friendships that developed when the “warring parties”
were reconciled. I was consistently impressed with the professional caliber of both my fellow students and my
professors. As an American, I soon noticed several qualities that distinguish students from this region from the
students I worked with in the US. First of all, their dedication and commitment to their studies was at first a bit
intimidating, but soon I was humbled to realize that these students saw the opportunity to further their
education as a privilege, not as something to be taken for granted as do most American students. I fully expect
to see many of my fellow students’ names appear as the authors of prize-winning books and articles, as leaders
and participants of headline-making panel discussions and conferences and as professors in some of the finest
universities spanning the globe.”
1
The Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia
Permanent staff (not representing national governments) of international organizations (e.g., the United
Nations, European Union, Council of Europe, World Bank, OSCE).
2
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Stanko Andric
PHOTO ????
Medieval Studies MA 1994, Medieval Studies PhD 1998
Croatia
Current Position: Director of the Medieval Research Program, Institute for the History of Slavonia
“CEU enabled me to choose and define with more precision the field of my professional occupation, while at
the same time making me a much more qualified and skillful medievalist. The department’s program,
additional research grants, as well as the considerable scholarly resources of Budapest provided ideal
conditions for my study. Some lasting friendships and many precious acquaintances were also born during my
time at CEU as well as a special affection for Budapest. All these moments keep my CEU experience an
important part of my present professional and personal life. ”
Velitchka Hristova
PHOTO ????
History 1999
Bulgaria
Current Position: Development Assistant, Marketing and Development Department, Children’s Home Society
of Minnesota, USA
“The year I spent at CEU was one of the most amazing experiences in my life. The rigorous nature of the
Master’s program and the opportunities to work with excellent faculty are the aspects that undeniably come to
mind when I think about Central European University. The most important and enriching experience, however,
was the opportunity to learn and live in a multicultural environment, and to make friends with people from all
over the world.”
Joanna Wijaszka
PHOTO ????
IRES 1993
Poland
Current Position: First Secretary, Department of EU Affairs, Polish Embassy in Stockholm, Sweden
“The university itself was not only conveniently located, but above all offered a great opportunity for meeting
people from the countries of our region and high-quality professors of various backgrounds, sharing opinions,
making good friends, as well as learning about the problems and prospects for Central and Eastern Europe. It
has also proven instrumental to my professional work at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, my understanding of
European affairs, and the susceptibilities of our closest neighbors. I hope that all those who had the privilege to
study at Central European University would join me in wishing of many successful endeavors to the university
and memorable experiences to its students. ”
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PART II: ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS
IN BRIEF
Central European University has taken a leading role in providing Western-style post-graduate education in
Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union and views educational innovation as part of its
continuing contribution to the region, as well as to other parts of the world experiencing emerging
democracies. The university seeks to facilitate academic dialogue while providing an environment in which the
region's next generation of leaders and scholars can meet and interact. Through a rich interdisciplinary
curriculum, the university encourages its students to become creative and independent thinkers, lifetime
learners and active participants in society. The university emphasizes respect for, and sensitivity to, differences
among people and ideas.
DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS
Budapest, Hungary
Department of Economics
Department of Environmental Sciences
and Policy1
Program on Gender and Culture
Department of History
Department of International Relations
and European Studies
Department of Legal Studies
Department of Mathematics and its
Applications
Department of Medieval Studies
Nationalism Studies Program
Department of Philosophy
Department of Political Science
Warsaw, Poland
Department of Sociology2
1
MA in Economics
MS in Banking and Finance
PhD in Economics
MS in Environmental Sciences and Policy
MA in Gender Studies
with an option to pursue Open University, UK, MPhil
Note: a PhD specialization in Gender Studies is available under the
PhD in Comparative History of Central, Southeastern and Eastern
Europe
MA in Central European History
PhD in Comparative History of Central, Southeastern and Eastern
Europe
MA in International Relations and European Studies
Note: a PhD Track in International Relations is available under the
PhD in Political Science
LLM in Comparative Constitutional Law
LLM in Human Rights
LLM in International Business Law
MA in Human Rights
SJD Doctor of Juridical Sciences
PhD in Mathematics and its Applications
MA in Medieval Studies
PhD in Medieval Studies
MA in Nationalism Studies
Note: a PhD specialization in Nationalism Studies is available under
the PhD in Comparative History of Central, Southeastern and Eastern
Europe
PhD in Philosophy
MA in Politics and the Political Economy of the Post-Communist
Transition
PhD in Political Science
MA in Society and Politics
MA in Economy and Society
MA in Culture and Society
PhD in Sociology
The degree is validated by the University of Manchester, United Kingdom. Registration of the program by the Board of
Regents of the University of the State of New York (US) is in progress.
Master’s degrees are accredited by the University of Lancaster, United Kingdom, while the PhD program is validated by
the Polish Academy of Sciences.
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Doctoral Support Programs (DSP)
In addition to the regular full-time degree programs, CEU offers non-degree Doctoral Support Programs (DSP)
available to graduate students who are enrolled in doctoral programs at other institutions of higher education
and who wish to utilize CEU’s innovative programs, international faculty, and resources to assist the
development of their dissertations. Such students may apply to spend one or two semesters at CEU and are
eligible to apply for financial aid. DSP students may apply at any time. However, those who submit an
application after CEU’s general applications deadline will be expected to make their own arrangements to take
the required English language tests or other department-specific tests. During their time at CEU, Doctoral
Support students receive consultation and supervision from CEU faculty. There is no requirement to attend
classes, but non-degree students are encouraged to interact with the other program participants and faculty.
Currently, the following departments and programs sponsor Doctoral Support students: Economics, Gender
and Culture, History, Legal Studies, Mathematics and its Applications, Medieval Studies, Nationalism,
Philosophy, Political Science and Sociology.
Student Exchange and other Non-degree Programs
Through a number of student and faculty exchange agreements with other institutions of higher education, each
year CEU hosts approximately 25-30 exchange or visiting students. Normally these students remain at CEU for
a semester, during which time they may be required to take courses for credit or do independent research with
an individual supervisor. Such exchange agreements exist with the University of California system, the
Columbia University School of Law, Cornell University, Emory University, the University of Georgia,
Humboldt Universitat zu Berlin, Leiden University, the University of Toronto, etc.
Students may also enroll at CEU as independent visiting students, and take courses for credit or audit classes if
spaces are available and consent is granted by the faculty member teaching the course. Visiting students are
normally expected to pay per credit. For more information on the Visiting Student Policy, please visit the CEU
website at http://www.ceu.hu (“Student-Related Policies and Procedures” section under “Student Services and
Alumni”), or contact the Student Records Office at (36-1) 327-3217 or [email protected]
A separate study abroad program is available for undergraduate students from North America to study at
CEU’s Budapest teaching site. For more information on the Bard/CEU Study Abroad Program, please see
“Joint Program with Bard College: Study Abroad in Budapest” in this Bulletin or write to [email protected]
TYPES OF DEGREE PROGRAMS AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Master’s Degree Programs
A CEU Master’s degree program typically runs on an academic calendar of ten months, including a three-week
pre-session which provides training to develop the research, academic writing and computer skills necessary to
conduct graduate level academic work, two 12-week semesters, and a two-month spring session during which
the student prepares a Master’s thesis or research project. Some programs run for 11 months, and the Master’s
program in Economics runs for two academic years.
The graduation requirements for a typical CEU Master’s degree are the successful completion of 32 taught
course credits, a Master’s thesis and its defense (for which 8 credits are awarded) plus—when applicable—the
achievement of a satisfactory level of academic writing in English. In the program descriptions that follow,
variations in the academic calendar and degree requirements due to a program’s specific accrediting body’s
regulations are noted.
Open University Research Degree
Central European University is recognized as a sponsoring institution by the Open University (UK). Students
of the CEU Program on Gender and Culture may conduct work towards British research degree programs
(Master of Philosophy) while at CEU. Such students spend two years in an independently tailored program of
taught courses and research developed in consultation with CEU faculty.
Doctoral Studies
A CEU doctoral program normally takes three to five years to complete. Probationary doctoral candidacy (the
period during which a student has been accepted into a doctoral program but has not yet completed the
comprehensive exam and a thesis prospectus) on average lasts one year. During the first year of doctoral study
probationary doctoral candidates must complete a minimum of course credits as specified by the department.
Dependent upon the successful completion of the comprehensive examination and a dissertation proposal (or
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an extensive research paper), the candidate is approved for full doctoral candidacy. Doctoral candidacy is the
period during which the student pursues research toward the dissertation; this period normally lasts an
additional two to four years.
Students approved for full doctoral candidacy are encouraged to study abroad to pursue their dissertation
research and to build international intellectual contacts. This allows CEU doctoral scholars to play an active
role in the global development of social sciences and humanities. CEU sponsors a Doctoral Research Support
Grant Program, which is designed to cover the living expenses of CEU doctoral students while studying
abroad. The Doctoral Research Support scheme is an integral part of the doctoral program. With the advice of
their doctoral supervisor, department head, or external supervisor, students can apply to recognized universities
or institutes in Western Europe, North America or other parts of the world to spend up to six months as
“visiting/research scholars.” CEU has a growing list of cooperative agreements with institutions willing to host
doctoral students. Among those are the University of California, Cambridge University, Cornell University, the
University of Georgia, Emory University, Humboldt Universitat zu Berlin, Oxford University, the University
of Toronto, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the World Law Institute.
Additionally, CEU collaborates closely with the Civic Education Project, a program that supports young
regional scholars in finding placement in their home countries or in other countries in the region. These
programs offer CEU students an additional edge: experience in another country, access to resources which
enhance their research and a means by which to establish contacts for professional placement upon the
completion of their degrees.
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS AND PROGRAMS
ECONOMICS
Budapest
Oktober 6. u. 12, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3020
Fax: (36-1) 327-3232
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/econ/econdir.html
Laszlo Matyas, Head of Department
Fabrizio Coricelli, Director of PhD Program
Daniela Langusi, Department Coordinator
Degree offered:
Average length of study:
Graduation requirements:
Master of Arts in Economics
two years
MA degree: 56 course credits; thesis and its defense (12 credits)
Degree offered:
Average length of study:
Graduation requirements:
Master of Science in Banking and Finance
two years
MS degree: 52 course credits; thesis and its defense (14 credits)
Degree offered:
Average length of study:
Graduation requirements:
Doctor of Philosophy in Economics
four years
32 course credits; dissertation
The MA Program
The CEU Department of Economics offers a two-year Master’s program registered by the Board of Regents of
the University of the State of New York (US). The first year serves as an introduction to the core areas of
standard economics, while the second year offers more advanced specialized field courses.
The Department of Economics trains economists from various regions of the world, and enables them to apply
the tools of modern analysis to the problems faced by different kinds of economies. The department provides
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students with an understanding of the functioning of markets and the role of the state in an economy relying
predominantly on market allocation. Students attend rigorous courses in the most standard fields of economics,
which serve to introduce them to economic analysis and market institutions such as banks and financial
markets. The department also provides instruction in writing and research methodology. Students undertake
individual research projects, focused on topics of their interest, with faculty supervision.
Entry Requirements for the MA Program
In addition to meeting the general CEU admissions requirements, applicants to the Economics Department
must obtain a TOEFL score of 570 (or CTOEFL 230) and demonstrate advanced mathematical skills by
passing an examination in basic calculus, probability theory and linear algebra. Applicants are required to
indicate their preferred research topics at the time of application. Successful applicants come from a variety of
vocational and educational backgrounds; a previous degree in economics is not required. Many students in the
past have held scientific or technical degrees (e.g., mathematics, engineering, computer science and physics)
and have demonstrated high mathematical aptitude in their applications.
The department also accepts applications from exceptional candidates who wish to enroll directly in the second
year of the standard two-year MA degree program in Economics. Such applicants receive the MA degree in
Economics in one year. Applicants who wish to apply for the one-year MA degree option must indicate this in
a separate cover letter, which should also outline all relevant courses taken, but demonstrating that they have
achieved graduate-level proficiency in the core areas of microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory,
econometrics and mathematical methods. Copies of relevant official transcripts should be attached in the
original language along with a certified English translation. The department may administer additional testing
of the applicant’s aptitude in these areas.
The Economics Department will not consider incomplete MA applications.
MA Program Structure
First Year
The first year of the program starts with a three-week Pre-Session during which students participate in
intensive mathematics and statistics courses, computer training and a course in English for academic purposes.
Conversational Hungarian-language classes are also offered during this period. The Pre-Session is followed by
two 12-week semesters and a two-month spring session. The first year of the program focuses on the core
courses in economics, such as macro- and microeconomics, and quantitative methods. Some field courses are
also offered. In the fall semester all courses are mandatory; over the winter and spring semesters, students have
mandatory and optional courses. Over the summer break students are encouraged to do data collection in their
countries for their Master’s theses or for the applied econometrics project (if the appropriate course is chosen
during the second year).
Students must take a minimum of 56 taught credits during the two years of the MA program, including a
minimum of 26 taught credits in the first year. Credits taken in the first year over and above the minimum 26
can be set against the 30 taught credits which otherwise have to be taken in the second year.
Second Year
The second year consists of two 12-week semesters and a two-and-a-half-month research break during which
students work closely with research supervisors to prepare their MA theses. The second year shifts the focus
away from traditional courses in core theory to more advanced field topics in economics. Students must take a
minimum of 30 taught credits in the second year plus 12 credits for their MA theses.
Alumni Profile
Upon completion of the program, students will have developed analytical skills on a sufficiently high level to
be able to undertake doctoral studies or, by returning to their countries, to make genuine contributions in
government, the private sector or academia. At present, CEU alumni of the Economics Department with whom
the university is in contact are studying and employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE:
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
43
15
4
1
13
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Public Sector: State-owned Business
Self-employed
30
3
3
1
Research Opportunities
Research opportunities within the department are available to a limited number of students, especially through
research activity undertaken by faculty. Students are also encouraged to pursue independent research under
close faculty supervision using the main resources available at CEU. The Student Advising Center and the
Department of Economics collaborate in order to inform students of research opportunities available at other
academic institutions and regional research boards.
The MS Program
Starting with the academic year 2002/2003, Central European University (CEU) in cooperation with the
International Training Center for Bankers (ITCB) will offer a two-year Master of Science program in Banking
and Finance. Current developments in the CEE/fSU financial markets create a need for well-trained bankers
and financial analysts able to cope both with the specific problems faced by the emerging market economies
and with the challenges of the new trends in the global financial markets. The Master of Science program in
Banking and Finance is designed to train professionals by providing both theoretical knowledge and practical
skills in the field. It covers state-of-the-art knowledge about the most important issues in banking and finance,
nsuring a comprehensive view of financial markets, investment policy and risk management. Graduates of this
program, apart from mastering a wide range of professional skills based on a sound economic background, will
be able to understand and carry out analyses and forecasts, and to participate in decision-making processes at
various levels.
The program will be submitted for registration with the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New
York (US).
Entry Requirements for the MS Program
Professionals currently working in banking and in the financial sector can apply, as well as prospective
candidates who would like to start a career in the field. Two years of work experience is generally required.
Admission for part-time study is also available. The admissions process follows the university general
admissions calendar, and the entry requirements are the same as for the Master of Arts in Economics. In
addition, applicants to the MS program in Banking and Finance must arrange to take the GMAT
individually and submit a score together with the application materials by January 7, or at the latest by
February 15, 2002.
Financial Aid
The Master of Science in Banking and Finance is a fee-paying program (CEU tuition fee per academic year).
A limited number of external scholarships are available on a competitive basis for the best-qualified
candidates.
The MS Program Structure
Full-time students are required to complete the degree in four semesters. The program consists of core
courses, specialized courses and optional courses, spread over the four semesters of study. Two specializations
are available: Risk Management and Financial Engineering, and Investment Analysis and Fund Management.
Students have to take a total of 52 taught credits (30 credits from core courses, 12 credits from specialized
courses and 10 credits from optional courses) and write a thesis, which earns 14 credits. The high standard of
teaching is ensured by outstanding professors and professionals from a wide range of fields from both CEU
and ITCB, as well as other internationally acknowledged experts.
The PhD Program
The need for well-trained economists has been steadily increasing in CEE/fSU and other emerging
democracies over the last decade. The aim of the PhD program in Economics is to prepare students for careers
in teaching, research or government service and to prepare researchers to participate actively in the analysis of
the fundamental economic questions facing market and transition economies. The program is designed to
ensure that students acquire rigorous and state-of-the-art knowledge of core areas of economic theory and
research methodology and to offer research opportunities under the close supervision of excellent international
and local faculty.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Research Opportunities
Research opportunities are available to PhD students. Apart from using the library and computer research
resources within the university, they can actively participate as authors and/or co-authors of papers presented
in the Budapest Economics Seminar Series or published in the Economics Department Working Papers Series.
During the period when they prepare their dissertations, PhD students are expected to work closely with their
thesis supervisors and to undertake research activities while in residence at CEU Budapest or in other
universities and/or foreign research institutions. The research period is intended to broaden the students’
experience by stimulating interaction with leading academic researchers and fellow students in other
universities.
Entry Requirements
The Department of Economics admits around ten students each year to the PhD program. Students seeking
admission to the PhD program offered by the Department of Economics must meet the general CEU
application requirements for doctoral programs. In addition, applicants to the PhD program in Economics
must arrange to take the GRE individually and submit a score by either January 7, together with the
application materials, or at the latest by February 15, 2002. For information on the Graduate Records
Examination, please check at http://www.gre.org.
Successful applicants are expected to hold an MA in economics or in related fields (i.e., mathematics,
statistics, etc.,) or equivalent degrees with a GPA of 3.3 or higher. In addition, candidates will be required to
prove proficiency in mathematics, familiarity with relevant economic theory and with research methodology.
For qualified students who do not have an MA degree there is an option of applying for admission into the
second year of the Master’s program and continuing with the PhD program after completion of the MA degree.
A research interest in the region is preferred but not required. Applicants to the PhD program should submit
three letters of recommendation, relevant graduate and undergraduate transcripts, and a three-page research
proposal. Applicants can be offered: a) admission to the first year of the PhD program; b) admission to the
second year of the MA program with the option of entering the PhD program afterwards.
Important note: Application deadline for internal applicants (CEU students): February 15, 2002.
Admission is for the fall semester only. For all PhD candidates, GRE scores should be sent to the CEU
Admissions Office no later than February 15, 2002.
PhD Program Structure
The program consists of a coursework component (taught core and optional courses) and a period of research
for completion of the doctoral dissertation. The coursework component of the PhD program is made up of four
terms. Overall, students should take 32 credits from core and optional subjects with a minimum of 16 credits
from the core subjects. Core subjects are offered, while optional subjects may or may not be offered, every
academic year. At the end of the third term a comprehensive examination will be taken embracing
macroeconomics, microeconomics and econometrics. The research period of a candidate starts when all
required coursework has been completed. Registration of the program with by the Board of Regents of the
University of the State of New York (US) is in process.
MA Program Selected List of Courses
Year 1
Applied Econometrics 1: Mark Harris, Mariana Kotzeva
Comparative Economic Systems: Peter Mihalyi
Comparative Macroeconomic Policy: Jacek Rostowski
Econometrics: Mark Harris
Economics of Inequality: Ivo Bicanic
English for Academic Purposes: LTC instructors
Health Economics: Peter Mihalyi
History of Economic Thought: Antoin Murphy
Industrial Organization: Andrzej Baniak, Adam Torok
International Economics: Peter Benczur, Kalman Dezseri
Macroeconomic Theory: Max Gillman, Attila Ratfai, Julius Horvath
Mathematical Methods for Economists: Andras Simonovits, Yuri Yegorov
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Microeconomic Theory: Andrzej Baniak, John Earle
Money, Banking and Finance: Jacek Rostowski
Year 2
Advanced Econometric Theory: Laszlo Matyas
Advanced Macroeconomics 1: Michal Kejak, Max Gillman
Advanced Macroeconomics 2: Fabrizio Coricelli
Advanced Mathematics: Yuri Yegorov
Advanced Microeconomics 2: Leif Danziger
Advanced Microeconomics 1: TBA
Applied Econometrics 2: Gabor Korosi
Applied Macroeconomics: Attila Ratfai
Applied Microeconomics: Leif Danziger
Applied Time Series Analysis: Myles Wallace
Comparative Macroeconomic Policy: Jacek Rostowski
Contract Theory and Property Rights: Ugo Pagano
Corporate Finance: Dusan Mramor
Economics of European Integration: Roger Vickerman
Economics of Inequality: Ivo Bicanic
Economics of Regulation: Andrzej Baniak
English for Academic Purposes: LTC instructors
History of Economic Thought: Antoin Murphy
Industrial Organization: Andrzej Baniak, Adam Torok
Intermediate Econometrics: Laszlo Matyas, Gabor Korosi
International Economics: Peter Benczur, Kalman Dezseri
International Finance: Laszlo Halpern, Peter Benczur
Labor Economics: John Earle, Almos Telegdy
Law and Economics: Antony Dnes
Modelling Financial Markets: Paul Kofman
Monetary Theory: Max Gillman
Pension Economics: Andras Simonovits
Public Economics and Finance: Botond Koszegi
Urban and Regional Economics: Yuri Yegorov
MS Program Selected List of Courses
Core Courses
Corporate Finance: Gyongyi Loranth
Econometrics: Mark Harris
Financial Statement Analysis: Richard Lee
Introduction to Banking and Finance: Steven Plaut
Macroeconomic Theory 1: Max Gillman
Mathematical Methods for Finance: Peter Medvegyev
Microeconomic Theory 1: Andrzej Baniak
Money and Banking: Steven Plaut
Specialization I: Risk Management and Financial Engineering
Financial Derivatives: Janos Szaz
Financial Engineering: George Jabbour
Hedging in Markets: TBA
International Finance: Steven Plaut
Mathematical Finance: Peter Medvegyev
Risk Measurement and Management: Julia Kiraly
Specialization II: Investment Analysis and Fund Management
Advanced Portfolio Theory: Imre Bertalan
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Asset Management: TBA
Dynamic Hedging: TBA
Financial Derivatives: Janos Szaz
Fixed Income Portfolios: Tamas Makara
Legal Issues: Anna Halustyik
Valuation: Anthony Cusack
Optional Courses
Accounting Principles: TBA
Applied Econometrics 1: Mark Harris, Mariana Kotzeva
Applied Econometrics 2: Gabor Korosi
Bank Financial Management: Andre Thibeault, Bela Ocsi
Corporate Finance and Governance: Dusan Mramor
Economics of Exchange Rates: Laszlo Halpern
Intermediate Econometrics: Laszlo Matyas, Gabor Korosi
Law and Economics: Antony Dnes
Modelling Financial Markets: Paul Kofman
Monetary Theory: Max Gillman
Public Economics and Finance: Botond Koszegi
PhD Program Selected List of Courses
Core Courses
Advanced Econometric Theory: Laszlo Matyas
Advanced Macroeconomics 1: Max Gillman, Michal Kejak
Advanced Macroeconomics 2: Fabrizio Coricelli
Advanced Microeconomics 1: TBA
Advanced Microeconomics 2: Leif Danziger
Optional Courses
Advanced Finance: Gyongyi Loranth
Advanced International Finance: Steven Plaut
Advanced Labour Economics: John Earle, Yoram Weiss
Advanced Macroeconomic Theory and Policy: Alex Cukierman
Applied Macroeconomics: Attila Ratfai
Applied Microeconomics: Leif Danziger
Behavioral Economics: Botond Koszegi
Contract Theory: Ugo Pagano
Corporate Finance: Dusan Mramor
Economics of European Integration: Roger Vickerman
Modeling Financial Markets: Paul Kofman
Monetary Theory: Max Gillman
Numerical Methods for Dynamic Macroeconomics: Michal Kejak
Pension Economics: Andras Simonovits
Public Economics and Finance: Botond Koszegi
Special Topics in Advanced Microeconomics: Tito Pietra
Special Topics in Macroeconomic Policy: Fabio Canova
Topics in Econometrics 1: Pierre Siklos
Topics in Econometrics 2: Advanced Econometric Theory: Chris Cornwell
Topics in Economic Theory: Samuel Bowles
2001/2002 FACULTY MEMBERS
ECONOMICS
Andrzej Baniak (CEU), Associate Professor
Peter Benczur (National Bank of Hungary/CEU), Assistant Professor
Ivo Bicanic (University of Zagreb, Croatia/CEU), Recurrent Visiting Professor
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Samuel Bowles (University of Massachusetts, US/CEU), Visiting Professor
Fabio Canova (University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain/CEU), Visiting Professor
Fabrizio Coricelli (CEU/University of Siena, Italy), Director of the PhD Program, Recurrent Visiting Professor
Chris Cornwell (University of Georgia, US/CEU), Visiting Associate Professor
Alex Cukierman (University of Tel Aviv, Israel/CEU), Visiting Professor
Leif Danziger (York University, Canada/CEU), Visiting Professor
Kalman Dezseri (Institute of World Economics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences/CEU), Visiting Faculty
Antony Dnes (University of Hertfordshire, UK/CEU), Visiting Professor
John Earle (CEU/Stanford University/Stockholm Institute for Transition Economies, Sweden), Associate
Professor
Max Gillman (CEU), Associate Professor
Laszlo Halpern (Institute of Economics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences/CEU), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Mark Harris (University of Melbourne, Australia/CEU), Visiting Assistant Professor
Julius Horvath (CEU/Academia Istropolitana Nova, Slovakia), Associate Professor
Michal Kejak (CERGE-EI Prague, Czech Republic/CEU), Visiting Assistant Professor
Paul Kofman (University of Technology, Sydney, Australia/CEU), Visiting Professor
Gabor Korosi (Institute of Economics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, CEU), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Botond Koszegi (University of California at Berkeley, US/CEU), Visiting Assistant Professor
Mariana Kotzeva (University of World Economics, Sofia, Bulgaria/CEU), Visiting Assistant Professor
Gyongyi Loranth (Birkbeck College, University of London, UK/CEU), Visiting Assistant Professor
Laszlo Matyas (CEU/Universite Paris XII, France), University Professor, Head of Department
Peter Mihalyi (University of Veszprem, Hungary/CEU), Visiting Professor
Dusan Mramor (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia/CEU), Visiting Associate Professor
Antoin Murphy (University of Dublin, Ireland/CEU), Visiting Professor
Ugo Pagano (University of Siena, Italy/CEU), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Tito Pietra (University of Modena, Italy/CEU), Visiting Associate Professor
Steven Plaut (University of Haifa, Israel/CEU), Visiting Associate Professor
Attila Ratfai (CEU), Assistant Professor
Jacek Rostowski (CEU), Professor
Pierre Siklos (Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada/CEU), Visiting Professor
Andras Simonovits (Institute of Economics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences/CEU), Recurrent Visiting
Professor
Gyorgy Suranyi (Central-European International Bank/CEU), Professor
Almos Telegdy (CEU), Visiting Faculty
Adam Torok (CEU/IMC/Institute of Economics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Recurrent Visiting
Associate Professor
Roger Vickerman (University of Kent at Canterbury, UK/CEU), Visiting Professor
Myles Wallace (Clemson University, US/CEU), Visiting Professor
Yoram Weiss (University of Tel Aviv, Israel/CEU), Visiting Professor
Yuri Yegorov (CEU), Assistant Professor
For further information, prospective students are encouraged to visit the departmental website at
http://www.ceu.hu/econ/econdir.html
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES AND POLICY
Budapest
Nador u. 9, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3021
Fax: (36-1) 327-3031
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/enviromental_dep.html
Ruben Mnatsakanian, Head of Department
Krisztina Szabados, Department Coordinator
Degree offered:
Average length of study:
Master of Science (MS)
11-month program including two teaching terms and a four-month research
break
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Graduation requirements:
Awarding body:
30 course credits and thesis (10 credits)
University of Manchester, UK, and CEU
The Program
The Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy aims to create a network of collaborating scientists and
environmentally-trained professionals in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. It is hoped
that these individuals will work together to solve environmental problems common to the region. The
foundations for this network are laid by the department’s Master of Science (MS) program, which provides
students with a combination of scientific, technological, socio-scientific, legal and policy vocational training,
preparing them for careers in a range of environmental fields. The aim is to give students an understanding of
all aspects of the environment, of how to develop sound and sustainable policies, and of matters concerned
with solving environmental problems.
The department emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to solving environmental problems. In order to
maintain a proper cultural balance, leading environmental academics from the region, Western Europe and
North America contribute to both taught curricula and fieldwork. The program is based in Budapest but may
include field trips to other parts of the region.
The Environmental Sciences and Policy Master’s program is validated by the University of Manchester ( UK).
Registration of the program by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York (US) is in
progress.
Entry Requirements
In addition to meeting the general CEU admissions requirements, applicants to the Department of
Environmental Sciences and Policy must write a 250-word statement on their career goals and reasons for
applying to the program. Successful applicants must have at least a Bachelor’s degree in any degree subject
related to environmental sciences and policy. Typically these include sciences, engineering, law, geography,
economics and sociology. Other first degrees such as journalism, history and computer science are also
considered, although such candidates must hold a relevant first degree and demonstrate a clear commitment to
the subject, usually through work experience or other extra-curricular activities.
Alumni Profile
Graduates of the Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy leave CEU with a solid understanding of
the social, political and technical problems faced by Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
in this field, as well as a good knowledge of how government policy and social attitudes can affect these issues.
In the past, alumni have found or returned to jobs in local and national government, NGOs and academia.
Many have responsible positions as advisors on environmental policy and the environmental implications of
company and state activities, thus assisting in a variety of environmental planning, regulation and management
activities. Alumni are currently employed in the fields of forestry, education, government, geology, health,
industry, conservation and journalism.
At present, CEU alumni of the Environmental Sciences and Policy Department with whom the university is in
contact are studying or employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Public Sector: State-owned Business
Self-employed
26
31
6
14
14
8
1
0
The Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy has developed a proposal for a PhD program in
Environmental Sciences and Policy and will seek registration of the program by the Board of Regents of the
University of the State of New York. The department aims to start this new PhD program in September 2002.
The PhD program is prepared and will be carried out jointly with the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Those
interested in the program please contact the Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy for details.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
The Environmental Sciences and Policy Department is currently developing internet-based courses. For
details, please check the department’s website at http://www.ceu.hu/enviromental_dep.html.
Course Description
The MS program is divided into two parts, a taught element normally extending from September until March,
and a research element from April until the end of July. Due to the varied backgrounds of the students, the first
aim of the taught portion is to introduce all students to the basic principles required for a full understanding of
the various subject areas. This is achieved in the core course, in which course attendance is mandatory. These
basic skills are built upon with a subsequent longer semester of specialized study focusing on issues of prime
importance in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union and relating them to global problems
and solutions. This section of the taught part contains a mix of compulsory material and electives, and is
organized according to different study streams, emphasizing a multi- and inter-disciplinary approach to topics
including economic, political as well as scientific and technological control.
In the thesis research component of the course, students are given a wide choice of research project areas.
Their chosen project must be completed by late July and submitted as a dissertation.
General Course Content
Semester I:
Pre-Session: Review of the Basics
1) Review of basic principles of environmental decision-making by participation in a “simulation” game.
2) Development of English rhetoric and argumentative writing skills. All non-native English-speaking students
are required to take courses designed to strengthen their English-language academic writing skills for use in the
Master's program and beyond.
Core Course: Introduction to Basic Principles (7 credits)
All courses are compulsory.
Environmental Systems Theory
Humans and the Biosphere
Introduction to Economics
Introduction to Energy
Introduction to Environmental Assessment and Management
Introduction to Environmental Law
Introduction to Environmental Policy
Introduction to Environmental Research Methods
Introduction to Environmental Risk
Introduction to Environmental Thought and Sustainable Development
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
The Non-Human Biosphere
Using the Web for Research
Semester II:
Stream Study (23 credits)
In Semester II students are required to complete the mandatory stream (3 credits) and then choose any of the
remaining streams offered for a minimum of 20 additional credits. All streams will involve assignments and
tutorials, and will conclude with examinations. Students may attend any remaining units they are not registered
for, but will not be examined or receive credit. Students should choose which streams to register for before the
last week of the core course.
Mandatory Section:
Statistics and quantitative data analysis; social science research methods; research and writing techniques;
environmental monitoring. (3 credits)
Elective Section:
Water Resources: the world’s freshwater resources; surface and groundwater; groundwater management, water
management and rehabilitation of lakes and rivers, drinking water and its treatment; wastewater treatment;
water policy, regulation and standards; trans-boundary problems. Introduction to marine systems, problems of
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
enclosed seas. (3 or 4 credits; the section underlined is optional in this theme, and if it is left out, only 3 credits
are awarded).
Atmospheric Pollution and Climate Change: atmospheric pollutants and their general effects; ozone hole; acid
rain; greenhouse effect; the effects of these on ecosystems and human activities; regulation and control of air
pollution; cross-reference to international conventions; trans-boundary and global problems; policy and
economic issues. (3 credits)
Food and Agriculture: world food requirements; food security; food availability; food production and
agricultural systems; fisheries; sustainable food production/exploitation; land degradation; forestry; policies
and trade in food. (3 credits)
Energy: energy use and requirement trends; sources of energy; energy production; economics and efficiency;
environmental effects (cross-reference to other themes); alternative energy sources; general energy policy
issues; issues of nuclear vs. non-nuclear; policy: national and international. (4 credits)
Human Communities and the Environment: population trends and dynamics; migration and movement;
environmental health and NEHAPs; social impact assessment. Occupational health. (2 or 3 credits; the section
underlined is optional in this theme, and if it is left out, only 2 credits are awarded).
Urban Sustainability: cities and their growth; urban planning; transport and transport policy; municipal solid
waste management; local agenda 21 and greening of cities. (3 credits)
Environmental Assessment and Management: environmental assessment (including practicals); eco-efficiency,
audit and management. Social and health impact assessment. (3 or 4 credits; the section underlined is optional
in this theme, and if it is left out, only 3 credits are awarded).
Industrial Waste and Pollution Control: environmental impact of production; pollution mitigation and waste
minimization; hazardous waste management; eco-efficiency, management and audit; environmental
management; occupational health; regulatory mechanisms (PPP, BATNEC etc.); environmental risk. (4
credits)
Biodiversity and Conservation: conservation; biodiversity; national park management; international
conventions; philosophy of conservation. (2 credits)
Environmental Policy and Regulation: international environmental policy, EU environmental policy,
international environmental law, environment and democracy, environment and trade, environmental security,
environment and civil society. (4 credits)
GIS and Advanced Modeling: Geographical Information Systems (GIS); introduction to environmental
modeling, geographical information systems and environmental modeling. (3 credits)
Environment: East–West: Comparative environmental politics and policy, environmental policy in CEE and
fSU, environmental policy in Western Europe, environmental policy in the United States, environmental policy
in CEE and fSU in international perspective, industrialization of nature (3 credits)
Semester III:
Research Project (10 credits)
The research project is discussed and organized with students during Semester II. Once the topic has been
decided upon, each student is required to write a report on the topic consisting of a preliminary literature
review, project goals and a schedule to be handed in and approved by the end of Semester II. Students are
expected to work full-time on their projects from April until the end of July. Regular contact with CEU
supervisors throughout is essential, and students are required to submit progress reports over the summer.
Unbound copies of the thesis must be submitted to the department by the specified submission date.
Selected List of Courses
Core Course:
Humans and the Biosphere: Edward Bellinger, Ruben Mnatsakanian
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Ruben Mnatsakanian
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Introduction to Economics: Aleg Cherp
Introduction to Energy: Diana Urge-Vorsatz
Introduction to Environmental Assessment and Management: Aleg Cherp
Introduction to Environmental Research Methods: Edward Bellinger, Galina Goussarova
Introduction to Environmental Risk: Diana Urge-Vorsatz
Introduction to Environmental Thought and Sustainable Development: Edward Bellinger, Aleg Cherp
Introduction to Environmental Policy: Alexios Antypas
Introduction to Environmental Law: Alexios Antypas
Environmental Systems Theory: John B. Corliss
The Non-Human Biosphere: Edward Bellinger
Using the Web for Research: John B. Corliss
Study Streams:
Environmental Research Methods: Edward Bellinger, Alexios Antypas, Galina Goussarova
Atmospheric Pollution and Climate Change: Ruben Mnatsakanian, Erno Meszaros, Bert deVries
Biodiversity and Conservation: Edward Bellinger, Ruben Mnatsakanian
Energy: Diana Urge-Vorsatz
Environment: East-West: Alexios Antypas, Aleg Cherp, Ruben Mnatsakanian
Environmental Assessment and Management: Aleg Cherp, Edward Bellinger, Manfred Wirth
Environmental Policy and Regulations: Alexios Antypas, Zoltan Illes, Stephen Stec
Food and Agriculture: Zoltan Szocs, Edward Bellinger, Hadrian P. Stirling
GIS and Modeling: Ruben Mnatsakanian, Ferenc Csillag
Human Communities and the Environment: Aleg Cherp, Irina Molodikova
Industrial Waste and Pollution Control: Zoltan Illes, Sergey Mikhalovsky
Charles Levenstein
Urban Sustainability: Aleg Cherp, Jiri Musil, Edward Bellinger, Andreas Pastowski
Water Resources and Management: Edward Bellinger, Emer Colleran
Dan Cogalniceanu, Laszlo Ujfaludi
FACULTY MEMBERS
Paul Aplin (Nottingham University, UK), Visiting Faculty
Alexios Antypas (CEU), Assistant Professor
Edward Bellinger (CEU/University of Manchester), Professor
Aleg Cherp (CEU), Assistant Professor
Emer Colleran (University College, Galway, Ireland), Visiting Faculty
Dan Cogalniceanu (University of Bucharest, Romania), Visiting Faculty
John Corliss (CEU), Visiting Faculty
Ferenc Csillag (University of Toronto, Canada), Visiting Faculty
Galina Goussarova (St. Petersburg University, Russia), Visiting Faculty
Zoltan Illes (CEU), Associate Professor
Charles Levenstein (Univesity of Massachusetts at Lowell, USA), Visiting Faculty
Erno Meszaros (University of Veszprem, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Sergey Mikhalovsky (University of Brighton, UK), Visiting Faculty
Ruben Mnatsakanian (CEU), Associate Professor
Irina Molodikova (University of Moscow, Russia), Visiting Faculty
Jiri Musil (CEU University Professor), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Andrew Palmer (CEU), Academic Writing Instructor
Andreas Pastowski (Wuppertal Institute, Germany), Visiting Professor
Stephen Stec (University of Leiden Faculty of Law, The Netherlands), Visiting Faculty
Hadrian P. Stirling (Glasgow University, UK), Visiting Faculty
Zoltan Szocs (CEU), Associate Professor
Laszlo Ujfaludi (Esterhazy Karoly College, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Diana Urge-Vorsatz (CEU), Associate Professor
Bert de Vries (RIVM - Dutch National Institute for Environment and Public Health), Visiting Faculty
Manfred Wirth (Sustainable Business Consulting/DOW), Visiting Faculty
PROGRAM ON GENDER AND CULTURE
Budapest
22
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Nador u. 11, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3034
Fax: (36-1) 327-3296
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/gend/gendir.html
Susan Zimmermann, Program Director
Maria Szecsenyi, Program Coordinator
Degrees offered:
Master of Arts in Gender Studies
option to pursue the Open University (UK) MPhil
A PhD specialization in Gender Studies is available under the PhD in
Comparative History of Central, Southeastern and Eastern Europe
Average length of study:
MA: ten months
MPhil: two years
PhD: three years
MA: 32 course credits; thesis writing/research colloquium
(4 credits); Master’s thesis and its defense (4 credits)
MPhil: 18 course credits; two terms MPhil seminar (2 credits); 120-page
MPhil thesis and its defense
PhD: total of 56 credits, including credits for coursework, consultation,
research, tutorial, dissertation writing, teaching assistance, and the PhD
research seminar
Graduation requirements:
The initiation of an independent PhD program in Gender Studies is under
consideration by the academic fora of the university.
The Program
The Program on Gender and Culture is a post-graduate program in Gender Studies offering MA and MPhil
degrees, as well as –in cooperation with the CEU History Department– a PhD Program with a specialization in
Gender Studies (degree in History). In addition, the program serves as an organizational base for non-degree
studies in various forms, as well as for other activities in the field.
The Program on Gender and Culture seeks to attract students and young scholars from a wide range of
disciplines in social sciences and humanities and with a genuine interest in gender studies and
interdisciplinarity. Gender has been established in the last decades as one of the basic categories of scholarly
analysis, offering insight into the dynamics and intricacies of social and cultural change and promoting the
production of socially relevant knowledge. Women’s and gender studies are devoted to the critique of
dominant patterns of the construction of knowledge and to social critique. Women’s and gender studies are
intended to contribute to a better understanding of the construction, the meaning and the consequences of
gender and of the relation between male and female in society, culture and systems of knowledge. For example,
gender studies analyzes systems of hierarchy, asymmetry, equality and difference, reciprocity and
subordination, and it seeks to develop integrative perspectives on the entangled relations among gender, race,
and class. Focusing on gender in this sense means focusing on social systems as a whole.
One focus of the Program on Gender and Culture is inquiry into the relation between the global advancement
of women during the last few decades, on the one hand, and growing inequality on a global scale- including
inequality between women– on the other. Another important focus is related to theoretical and –empirical
inquiry into the relations between the symbolic and the social order.
Integrative perspectives in women's and gender studies as promoted in the Program on Gender and Culture
need to be based on scholarship of local and at the same time global relevance. With an important, but not
exclusive, focus on Central and Eastern Europe, the Master’s program in Gender Studies seeks to contribute to
the development of this type of knowledge. For example, analyzing gender in Central and Eastern Europe goes
beyond looking at the region as something “backward” in comparison to the “West” or alternatively as
something “specific” stemming from “indigenous” factors. The complexity of gender is therefore understood
as a product of the often unequal entangling of global and local forces in any particular region.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
The program is registered to grant the Master of Arts degree in Gender Studies by the Board of Regents of the
University of the State of New York (US). MPhil students receive a degree from the Open University (UK),
and CEU is the sponsoring institution. PhD students receive their degree through the History Department of
CEU, which is registered to grant the PhD degree by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of
New York (US).
Entry Requirements
In addition to meeting the general CEU admissions requirements, applicants to the Program on Gender and
Culture must attach a 500-word typewritten essay of the relevance in their academic/professional background
to further studies at CEU and their future career goals. Doctoral Support Program candidates should also
submit: 1) a three- to five-page description of their PhD thesis including research questions, theory and
methodology, and the current status of their project; 2) a one- to two-page proposal of research to be carried
out at CEU; 3) a letter of support from their PhD supervisor.
Alumni Profile
At present, CEU alumni of the Program on Gender and Culture with whom the university is in contact are
studying and employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Public Sector: State-owned Business
Self-employed
52
30
5
5
6
1
1
0
Master of Arts Program
Students registered for the MA degree in Gender Studies will be required to complete 40 credit hours (32
course credits, 4 research colloquium credits and 4 thesis-writing credits). The two mandatory courses among
these have the general themes of Introduction into the Epistemologies of Gender Studies and History and
Theory of Women’s Movements and Feminism. MA students write a research thesis under the guidance of a
faculty member who serves as an advisor. The thesis defense takes place at the end of the spring session as an
oral exam.
Master of Philosophy Program
Students enrolled in the Master’s program may choose to apply to register for the MPhil track at the end of
Semester I. Selections are based on academic performance and a 20-page thesis proposal. Primarily a research
degree, this two-year course of study allows students to explore their field of interest in much greater depth
than the MA. Registered students take 16 credits of coursework in Semester I, 2 credits of Academic Writing
in Semester II, and two terms of the MPhil Seminar (2 credits). Students are expected to write and to defend a
thesis (minimum 120 pages).
The Doctor of Philosophy Program (History Department, PhD in Comparative History of Central,
South-eastern and Eastern Europe, Specialization in Gender Studies)
The first year of studies in the PhD Program is dedicated to coursework, tutorials and preparation for the
comprehensive exam to be held at the end of the first year. Mandatory classes must be taken in the History
Department, elective classes are to be chosen mainly from the curriculum of the Program on Gender and
Culture and relevant offers in History and other departments. Having passed the exam, students are admitted to
doctoral candidacy. The second year is dedicated to research at home or in the field. In addition, possibilities
for short-term study abroad at universities with a high international reputation are offered. The concluding year
of studies is dedicated to thesis writing, a research seminar and some teaching duties. In order to receive their
degrees, students have to complete 56 credits and defend their PhD dissertations.
Doctoral Specialization in Gender Studies
The doctoral specialization is open to enrolled CEU PhD students who wish to concentrate in gender studies.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
The specialization requires 24 credits of gender studies coursework including 4 credits from a directed
seminar, 20 credits from other program course offerings and a final project.
Doctoral Support Program
The Doctoral Support Program (DSP) is available to graduate students registered in an accredited PhD
program at another institution of higher education. During their term at CEU, students will receive consultation
and supervision from CEU faculty and a range of possibilities for presenting and discussing their work.
Advanced PhD students would be particularly suitable applicants for this program. Before leaving CEU, DSP
students are required to write a three- to five-page thesis progress report.
Additional Courses and Activities
In addition to degree and non-degree studies, the Program on Gender and Culture offers other courses and
activities in the field. In conjunction with the Open Society Institute (OSI), in particular with OSI’s Higher
Education Support Program (HESP), the Program on Gender and Culture supports the following activities:
Regional Seminar in Gender and Culture (RSGC), the summer university course on Gender and Culture
(SUN), and numerous Curriculum Resource Center visits. The program also supports short-term HESP visiting
fellowships, translation projects and workshops, and continuous cooperation with other women’s studies
coordinator training seminars, database development and cooperation with other women's studies centers and
associations. The guidance of and cooperation in various research activities and the organization of
conferences, guest lectures, etc., is also vital in ensuring lively scholarly debate and exchange in and on gender
studies with a focus on Central and Eastern Europe.
Selected List of Courses
Semester I (Fall)
Academic Writing: Peter Carrier
Contemporary Literary Theory and its Feminisms: Sophia Howlett
Feminist Rethinking of the Concept of Discourse: Erzsebet Barat
Gender and Politics in Central and Eastern Europe: Milica Antic and Vlasta Jalusic
Gender Matrix, Body Mapping, Social Drama: Participatory Research Methods in a Global Perspective: Hanna Hacker
Gender, Body and Culture: Susan Bandy
How to Teach Gender Studies: Helga Kelle
Mapping Globalization by Place, Gender, Race, Citizenship and Class: Judit Bodnar
“Money Makes the World Round”. Philosophy of Money and Gender Differences: Birge Krondorfer
Path to Citizenship: Europe from the 18th to 20th Centuries: Gisela Bock (PhD course)
Philosophical Perspectives on Gender and Feminist Thought: Linda Fisher
Rebellious Discourses in Western Feminism: Selected Feminist Manifestos since the 1960s: Hanna Hacker
Universalism Ungendered: Enlightenment Political Philosophy: Gaspar Miklos Tamas
Women in Lately Modernized Societies – An Anthropological Approach to Eastern and Central Europe: Peter Krasztev
Women’s Movements and Women’s Aspirations, Global and Local: 19th and 20th Centuries: Gisela Bock and Susan Zimmerman
Semester II (Winter)
Academic Writing: Peter Carrier
Feminist Media Studies: Erzsebet Barat
Feminist Orientalism: Francisca de Haan
From Fairy Tales to Trivial Romances: Popular Genres from a Gendered Perspective: Zorica Mrsevic
Gender and Migration: Francisca de Haan
Gender Construction of State Socialisms: Maria Adamik
Gender, the State and the Politics of Reproduction: Eva Fodor
Gendering the Welfare State: Maria Adamik
Introduction to Feminist Epistemologies: Mona Singer
Introduction to Queer Theory: Hanna Hacker
Modernity and Masculinity: A Sociological Analysis: Miklos Hadas
The Body/Mind Disabled: The Cultural Trauma of Disability from a Gendered and Racial Perspective: Darja Zavirsek
The Work of Gender, the Gender of Work: Eva Fodor
Theory of Violence and Women’s Human Rights: Zorica Mrsevic
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
White Genders, White Cultures: Exploring “Whiteness” in Humanities: Hanna Hacker, (PhD course)
Women and/in the Holocaust: Europe in the 1930s and 1940s: Gisela Bock
Women’s Writing in a Comparative Perspective: Jasmina Lukic
MPhil Seminar: TBA
Semester III (Spring)
Thesis Writing/Research Colloquium in Gender Studies (4 credits; mandatory)
Group 1: Francisca de Haan
Group 2: Linda Fisher
Group 3: TBA
Group 4: TBA
FACULTY MEMBERS
Maria Adamik (CEU/Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary), Visiting Assistant Professor
Milica Antic (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia), Visiting Faculty
Susan Bandy (Semmelweis University, Hungary), Visiting Assistant Professor
Erzsebet Barat (CEU/University of Szeged, Hungary), Visiting Assistant Professor
Gisela Bock (CEU/Freie Universitat Berlin, Germany), Visiting Professor
Judit Bodnar (CEU), Visiting Assistant Professor
Peter Carrier (CEU), Academic Writing Instructor
Linda Fisher (CEU), Assistant Professor
Eva Fodor (CEU/Dartmouth College, USA), Assistant Professor
Francisca de Haan (CEU/International Information Centre and Archives for the Women’s Movement, The
Netherlands), Associate Professor
Hanna Hacker (CEU), Visiting Associate Professor
Miklos Hadas (Univesity of Economics, Hungary), Visiting Associate Faculty
Sophia Howlett (CEU), Dean of Special and Extension Programs
Vlasta Jalusic (Peace Institute, Ljubljana), Visiting Faculty
Helga Kelle (University of Bielefeld, Germany), Visiting Faculty
Peter Krasztev (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Literary Studies), Visiting Faculty
Birge Krondorfer (University of Vienna, Austria), Visiting Faculty
Jasmina Lukic (CEU), Visiting Associate Professor
Zorica Mrsevic (Institute of Social Science Research, Yugoslavia), Visiting Faculty
Judit Sandor (CEU), Associate Professor
Mona Singer (University of Vienna, Austria), Visiting Professor
Gaspar Miklos Tamas, (CEU/Institute of Philosophy, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary), Visiting
Faculty
Darja Zavirsek (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia), Visiting Faculty
Susan Zimmermann (CEU/University of Linz, Austria), Program Director, Professor
HISTORY
Budapest
Nador u. 11, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3022
Fax: (36-1) 327-3191
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/hist/histdir.html
Laszlo Kontler, Head of Department
Jacek Kochanowicz, Director of Doctoral Studies
Marsha Siefert, Head Tutor
Olga Kudriashova, Department Coordinator
Zsuzsanna Macht, Doctoral Studies Coordinator
Degrees offered:
Master of Arts in Central European History;
Doctor of Philosophy in Comparative History of Central,
Southeastern and Eastern Europe
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Average length of study:
Graduation requirements:
MA: ten months; PhD: three years
MA: 32 course credits; Master’s thesis (4 credits) and its
defense (4 credits)
PhD: total of 56 credits, including credits for coursework, consultation,
research, tutorial, dissertation writing, teaching assistance, and the PhD
research seminar
The Program
The Department of History offers integrated graduate training at two levels. Whereas the Master’s program and
doctoral studies are perceived as a continuum, with the MA constituting a preparation for the PhD (at CEU or
elsewhere), both may be pursued as programs in their own right. Focusing on the regions of Central, Eastern
and Southeastern Europe, a solid training in history –embedded in the context of the neighboring social science
and humanities disciplines– is meant to prepare young intellectuals for a variety of academic and other careers
in which they can assert a high level of public awareness and an ability to bridge the gap between the local and
the global.
The Master’s Program
The Department of History offers a one-year Master of Arts degree in Central European History, registered by
the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York (US). The program explores comparative
themes in the history of Central, Southeastern and Eastern Europe within a wider European context. While it is
loosely arranged into “early-modern” (1500–1789), “modern” (1789–1914) and “contemporary” (post 1914)
streams, there is an increasing endeavor to transgress chronological boundaries, as well as to range freely
between sub-disciplines. A special emphasis is placed on topics highlighting the interplay of indigenous
experience and external influence, which supplies the historical individuality of the regions of the European
landmass east of the Rhine. Such themes include patterns of social development, cultural history and everyday
life from the Reformation through the Enlightenment to modernity; problems of modernization, backwardness
and unequal development; modern ideologies, nationhood and the nation state; varieties of authoritarianism
such as fascism and communism and their historical reflection, etc.
In order to foster a critical spirit of inquiry and high standards of verification, the agenda is supplemented by a
solid training in methodology, especially the epistemological issues related to the study of history and
historiography. The department is dedicated to combining academic excellence with social relevance, and
pursues the above objectives while promoting ideas of a tolerant and pluralistic social and political order free
from religious, ethnic, gender and class biases. Toward these ends, the Department of History has assembled
an international teaching staff representing a wide variety of orientations in contemporary historical
scholarship (Sozialgeschichte, histoire des mentalités, intellectual history, postmodernism, etc.,). For more
information on faculty profiles, course descriptions and recent MA thesis topics, please see the department’s
web page.
Master’s Program Structure
Departmental offerings are divided into a pre-session, two semesters and a spring session. The Pre-Session is
designed to consolidate students’ language skills and to introduce them to resources both within CEU and in
Budapest. Semester I and Semester II consist of intensive coursework and lay the groundwork for the Master’s
thesis. The spring session is largely research-oriented: students consult with their thesis supervisors and write
their theses. Throughout the course of the year, a variety of workshops, seminars and lectures are given by
visiting professors.
Master’s Program Entry Requirements
In addition to meeting the general CEU admissions requirements, applicants to the Department of History must
provide a 500-word outline of their proposed research topic for the MA thesis, which will be weighted heavily
in the admissions decision. Applicants should indicate a preferred stream of interest (early modern, modern or
contemporary) and, if known, which courses or professors they see as especially relevant to their interests.
Alumni Profile
Upon completion of the program, graduates will have solid experience with research methodology, academic
writing and historical interpretation. Graduates will be well-qualified to pursue a wide range of further study or
career options, including the History PhD program at CEU, advanced studies at their home universities,
specialized research projects, journalism or government service.
At present, CEU alumni of the History Department with whom the university is in contact are studying and
27
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Public Sector: State-owned Business
Self-employed
37
39
1
5
11
4
2
1
The PhD Program
The Department of History offers a three-year doctoral program registered by the Board of Regents of the
University of the State of New York (US) in the Comparative History of Central, Southeastern and Eastern
Europe within a wider European context. PhD research at the CEU Department of History should be
innovative insofar as the topic is concerned, and also on theoretical and methodological levels. The department
especially welcomes students with PhD projects that contribute to:



the integration of the study of different layers of historical processes (social, cultural, economic, political)
the integration of history and theory (conscious reflection of the basic approaches of research)
comparative approaches in historiography (Central, Southeastern and Eastern Europe being not “different”
and “incomparable,” on the one hand, or a “belated copy” of developments elsewhere, on the other)
Students are encouraged to extend their PhD studies by applying for CEU Doctoral Research Support, which
funds study abroad for up to six months. The department supports this additional study abroad in the form of
exchange agreements with other universities and through supporting students applying for external scholarships
in European and American universities for non-degree study. Students from the Department of History have
been awarded competitive grants from outstanding institutions, such as the University of Toronto, Oxford,
Cambridge, Edinburgh, Columbia, Maryland and Michigan.
The first year of the program concentrates on coursework and preparation for the comprehensive examination,
which focuses on major topics in the comparative history of two of the three regions mentioned above. The
second year is devoted to research in relevant archives and libraries. The third year is spent mainly in residence
at CEU participating in the PhD research seminar, writing the thesis, and fulfilling teaching assistantship
duties.
History PhD Specializations: Gender Studies, Nationalism
Individuals seeking admission to the doctoral program may also opt to pursue a specialization in Gender
Studies or in Nationalism Studies. Students pursuing these options enroll directly into the Program on Gender
and Culture or the Nationalism Studies Program during year one, and enter the History PhD program for years
two and three. Candidates for the PhD program with a specialization in Gender Studies or in Nationalism
Studies should follow the general application requirements for the doctoral program. For each specialization a
joint committee reviews applications.
PhD Entry Requirements
In addition to meeting the general CEU admissions requirements, applicants to the PhD program should submit
letters of recommendation from three professors familiar with their post-graduate work and a three-page
research proposal. Applications are welcome from candidates with an MA or the equivalent.
Selected List of Courses
Semester I - MA courses
Comparative History of European Multiple Borderlands: Drago Roksandic
Comparative Urban Change: Judit Bodnar
Cultural History of the Visual Arts Part 1: Art and Politics from the Age of the Enlightenment to Early Modernism:
Ilona Sarmany-Parsons
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Developing English Rhetoric and Argumentative Writing Skills: Academic Language Instructor and Language Center
Teaching Staff
East-Central Europe in the 20th Century: Symbolic Geographies, Collective Identities: Sorin Antohi
Historiography: Alfred J. Rieber and visiting lecturers
Introduction to Historical Computing: Exercises on the Socio-Cultural Impact on Religion (SPSS): Drago Roksandic,
Victor Karady, and Steven Green
Model of Coexistence: The Habsburg Monarchy (1848-1918): Andras Gero
Sociability and Political Society: Topics in Early Modern Intellectual History: Laszlo Kontler
Social Change under Communism: Jacek Kochanowicz
Social History of Central European Jewry: Victor Karady
Social History of the Habsburg Empire: Istvan Gyorgy Toth
Sociology and Historiography; The Relationship between Two Approaches to Study the Change in Human Societies:
Jiri Musil
The Story of the European Family 1500-1900: Katalin Peter
Semester I - PhD courses
Cultures in Early Modern Europe: Katalin Peter
Eastern Europe in the Modern Era: Backwardness, Dependency, Pursuit of the West? (PhD Seminar): Jacek Kochanowicz
History and Anthropology – Objects, Methods and Discourses (PhD colloquium): Sorin Antohi
Old Sources and New Methods in Early Modern Social History: Istvan Gyorgy Toth
Studies in Comparative History: Drago Roksandic, Jiri Musil and Alfred Rieber
Semester II - MA courses
Everyday Life in Socialism: Hungary – A Case Study: Andras Gero
From Beer Consumption to Perception of Time: New Ways in History of Everyday Life and Mentality (1500-1850):
Istvan Gyorgy Toth
Imperial Order: Social and Ethnic Dimensions of the Russian/Soviet Case: Alexei Miller
Issues in the Cultural History of Eastern Europe: Roumen Daskalov
Legitimization of Communist Regimes: Jacek Kochanowicz
Modernism and Modernity in European Art: Ilona Sarmany-Parsons
Nationalism and its Rivals. Competing Visions of Society, Nation and Politics in East-Central Europe 1780-1914:
Maciej Janowski
Planning and Developing a Thesis (Pass/Fail): Steven Green
Social History of Elite Schooling: Victor Karady
Southeastern Europe on the Road to Development: Social and Cultural Aspects: Roumen Daskalov
Theories and Methods in Historical Studies: A Systematic Introduction: Sorin Antohi
Traditional Societies, Sacred Communities and Challenges of Modernisation: Eastern Europe, 1848-1948: Yaroslav Hrytsak
Transnational Organizations in Europe: 1840s-1940s: Gisela Bock
Semester II - PhD Courses
Empires, Regions and Nation-Building in Eastern and East-Central Europe: Alexei Miller, Maciej Janowski
and Yaroslav Hrytsak
Enlightenment Crossroads: Laszlo Kontler
Recent Theoretical Debates in Historical Studies: Sorin Antohi
Topics in East-European Economic and Social History: Jacek Kochanowicz
PhD Nationalism Specialization Courses
Interpretations of Modern Anti-Semitism: TBA
Nationalism and Political Judgement: TBA
Political Philosophy and Nationalism: Recognition and Resentment: Petr Lom
Topics and Research Methodologies in the Study of Nationalism: TBA
PhD Gender Studies Specialization Courses
Paths to Citizenship: Europe from the 18th to 20th Centuries: Gisela Bock
FACULTY MEMBERS
Sorin Antohi (CEU), Professor
Gisela Bock (Freie Universitat, Berlin), Visiting Professor
Judit Bodnar (CEU), Visiting Assistant Professor
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Roumen Daskalov (CEU/Sofia University), Recurrent Visiting Associate Professor
Andras Gero (CEU/Eotvos Lorand University), Professor
Steven Green (CEU), Academic Writing Instructor
Yaroslav Hrytsak (CEU/University of Lviv, Ukraine), Associate Professor
Maciej Janowski (CEU/Institute of History, Poland), Recurrent Visiting Associate Professor
Victor Karady (CEU/Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, France), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Jacek Kochanowicz (CEU/University of Warsaw, Poland), Visiting Professor
Laszlo Kontler (CEU), Head of Department, Professor
Alexei Miller (CEU/Institute of Slavonic and Balkan Studies, Russia), Recurrent Visiting Associate Professor
Jiri Musil (CEU University Professor), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Katalin Peter (CEU/Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Professor
Istvan Rev (CEU/Open Society Archives)
Alfred Rieber (CEU), Professor
Drago Roksandic (CEU/University of Zagreb, Croatia), Recurrent Visiting Associate Professor
Ilona Sarmany-Parsons (CEU/University of Vienna, Austria), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Marsha Siefert (CEU), Head Tutor
Istvan Gyorgy Toth (CEU/Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Associate Professor
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND EUROPEAN STUDIES
Budapest
Nador u. 9, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3017
Fax: (36-1) 327-3243
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/ires/iresdir.html
Bela Greskovits, Head of Department
Julius Horvath, PhD Program Director
Reka Sipos, Department Coordinator
Degrees offered:
Master of Arts in International Relations and European Studies
A PhD Track in International Relations is available under the PhD in
Political Science
Average length of study:
MA: ten months
PhD: three years
Graduation requirements:
MA: 32 course credits; Master’s thesis (8 credits)
PhD: 32 course credits; comprehensive examination; dissertation and its
defense
The Program
The Department of International Relations and European Studies (IRES) offers an MA in International
Relations and European Studies, and organizes the International Relations (IR) Track within the Political
Science Department’s PhD program at CEU. The MA degree was conferred for the first time in June 1994 and
was accredited by the Open University (UK) until August 2000. Registration with the Board of Regents of the
University of the State of New York (US) is in process.
The MA program builds on the strong tradition of the discipline of international relations in Western Europe
and the United States. It aims at educating students to become analytically trained and informed observers of
contemporary international affairs, with a special emphasis on Europe. All students receive training in research
methods and an education in the major theories of international relations, international political economy, and
European integration. The international relations component of the program includes the classical canon of
foreign policy analysis and security studies. The international political economy component covers the political
economy of policy reform, of foreign direct investment, and of international financial organizations and
financial markets. The European studies component, in addition to focusing on the European Union, covers the
comparative politics of Western Europe as well as Central and Eastern Europe.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
While taught and administered by the Department of International Relations and European Studies, the IR
Track within the Political Science Department's PhD program follows all the general rules of the PhD program
in the Political Science Department. It functions as a regular track specialization for the PhD degree in Political
Science. In the first year, students have to take 32 credits of coursework and present a research prospectus at a
comprehensive examination. Those taking a major in IR have to get at least 16 credits from this track; those
who take it for a minor need at least 8 credits in IR. On the basis of this coursework and passing the
comprehensive examination, students are selected to continue with their PhD studies, which consist of pure
research and writing for two years.
Given the short lenght of the PhD program, the proposed PhD courses are of a slightly different kind than MA
courses. They take certain central aspects of IR (such as Constructivist Approaches in International Relations,
The New Political Economy of Development, Approaches to Foreign Policy Analysis, and Exposed to World
Markets: The Political Economy of Sectors) and explicitly attempt to introduce students to typical research and
research designs in these respective fields. The aim is to get students acquainted with the criteria they are
expected to meet for their academic work, first the prospectus and then the PhD dissertation. Moreover, in
Semesters II and III, there is a prospectus seminar which functions as a research workshop in which first year
PhD students discuss the drafts for their prospectus, while more advanced PhD students present more advanced
research outlines, or dissertation chapters.
For additional information on the Track in International Relations, please refer to the Department of Political
Science in this Bulletin.
Entry Requirements
In addition to the general CEU admissions requirements, IRES requires all applicants to the MA program to
submit a written statement of approximately 500 words outlining the applicant’s study and research interests.
Applicants to the PhD track should refer to the entry requirements for the PhD in Political Science. A joint
IRES-Political Science selection committee will evaluate PhD applications.
Accepted applicants come from a wide variety of academic backgrounds, although preference will be given to
students with a degree in social sciences (including history, law and philosophy). However, others with a
demonstrated interest in international affairs and public policy may also be strong candidates for admission.
Alumni Profile
Alumni of the MA program continue their studies in MA or PhD programs internationally, take positions in
business, diplomacy, government or media, or pursue careers in the NGO sector, teaching and research. At
present, CEU alumni of the International Relations and European Studies Department with whom the
university is in contact are studying and employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Public Sector: State-owned Business
Self-employed
26
14
7
8
24
17
3
1
Program Structure
31
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
The MA program consists of a Pre-Session, two semesters and a spring session, with each segment serving as a
foundation for the following segment. The Pre-Session includes individual assessment of spoken and written English,
an introduction to courses and an orientation to CEU and Budapest.
Selected List of Courses
Semester I
Core Courses
The Study of International Relations: Michael Merlingen
History and Theory of World Economy: Julius Horvath
Theoretical Approaches to the Study of the European Union: Nicole Lindstrom
Skills and Methods
Research in International Relations: Theory and Methods: Paul Roe
International Relations Track
Theories of International Relations: The Classical Debates: Alexander Astrov
Islam and Post-totalitarian Euroasia: Mikhail Karpov
Public International Law: Boldizsar Nagy
International Political Economy Track
From Transition to EU Integration: Laszlo Csaba
Transnational Enterprise and National Government. The Political Economy of Foreign Direct Investment: Bela
Greskovits
European Studies Track
European Security: Paul Roe and Michael Merlingen
European Law and Politics: Tamas Kende
Governance in the European Union and the Challenge of Enlargement: Jurgen Dieringer
Optional Courses
The Dynamics of Post-Communist Russian Foreign Policy: Mikhail Karpov
Cross-listed courses:
Political Science: Theories and Politics of Southeast European Integration: Nicole Lindstrom
From Embedded Liberalism to Global Neoliberalism. Introduction to IPE: Dorothee Bohle
Gender Studies: Mapping Globalization by Place, Gender, Race, Citizenship and Class: Judit Bodnar
Semester II
Core Courses
Introduction to Quantitative Methods (TBA)
Skills and Methods
Research in International Relations: Theory and Methods: Paul Roe
International Relations Track
International Organizations: Michael Merlingen
Russia and China in World Politics: Mikhail Karpov
History, Theory and Politics in Diplomacy: The Case of Henry Kissinger: Alexander Astrov
Global Political Economy and Law: Transforming Governance in Early 21 st Century: Huricihan Islamoglu
International Political Economy Track
The Political Economy of the European Union: Laszlo Csaba
The Political Economy of International Money: Julius Horvath
European Studies Track
Ethnic Violence and War: Traditional and Critical Approaches: Paul Roe
Asylum Seekers, Refugees, Responses to the Dilemmas of Forced Migration: Boldizsar Nagy
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Spring Session
During the spring session, students conduct research, consult with their supervisors and write their theses.
Throughout the year, students also attend a variety of workshops and seminars, as well as lectures presented by
visiting faculty.
Selected list of PhD courses
Semester I
Constructivist Approaches in International Relations: Michael Merlingen
The New Political Economy of Development: Laszlo Csaba
Exposed to World Markets: The Political Economy of Sectors: Bela Greskovits
Semester II
Approaches to Foreign Policy Analysis: Nicole Lindstrom
Politics of Globalization: Dorothee Bohle
Labor and the European Integration: Laszlo Bruszt
For details of the PhD program structure please refer to the Political Science Department.
FACULTY MEMBERS
Alexander Astrov (CEU), Instructor
Laszlo Csaba (CEU), Professor
Jurgen Dieringer (Duke University, USA), Visiting Assistant Professor
Bela Greskovits (CEU), Head of Department, Professor
Stefano Guzzini (CEU), Associate Professor
Julius Horvath (CEU), Associate Professor
Huricihan Islamoglu (Middle East Technical University, Turkey), Visiting Faculty
Mikhail Karpov (CEU), Assistant Professor
Tamas Kende (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Nicole Lindstrom (CEU), Assistant Professor
Michael Merlingen (CEU), Assistant Professor
Boldizsar Nagy (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary), Visiting Associate Professor
Paul Roe (CEU), Assistant Professor
Ulrich Sedelmeier (CEU), Assistant Professor
LEGAL STUDIES
Budapest
Oktober 6. u. 12, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3023
Fax: (36-1) 327-3198
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/legal/legdir.html
Denis Galligan, Head of Department (from January 2002)
Karoly Bard, Chair of the Human Rights Program
Csilla Kollonay Lehoczky, Head of the Doctoral Progam (pro-tempore)
Andras Sajo, Chair of the Comparative Constitutional Law Program
Tibor Varady, Chair of the International Business Law Program
Maria Balla, Department Coordinator
Degrees offered:
Master of Laws in Comparative Constitutional Law
Master of Laws in Human Rights
Master of Laws in International Business Law
Master of Arts in Human Rights
Doctor of Juridical Sciences
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Length of study:
Graduation
requirements:
LLM and MA: 11 months;
SJD: 35 months (average); submission of the dissertation maximum: five years from
the beginning of enrollment
LLM:
Option A) 24 course credits; 30-50 page writing requirement
Option B) 21 course credits; 70-150 page thesis
MA in Human Rights: 28 course credits, 50-100 page Master’s thesis
SJD: Minimum of 10 course credits; comprehensive examination; 250-400 page
dissertation based on independent research and public defense of the dissertation
The Master’s Programs
The three programs – Comparative Constitutional Law, International Business Law and Human Rights – each
examine legal (respectively, human rights) traditions in both civil law (continental) and common law systems.
The program in Comparative Constitutional Law includes intensive courses on the main problems of
constitutionalism, on human and minority rights and on issues that are relevant to the international legal
system.
The program in International Business Law focuses on the fundamental institutions of a market economy with
special reference to international business transactions. There are opportunities for in-depth examination of
theoretical, financial and contractual matters, and methods of dispute resolution. A strong concentration of
courses on the law of the European Union is offered for students focusing on this area of international business
law.
The Human Rights Program is intended to provide a theoretical grounding in traditional and alternative
approaches to human rights. It offers practical instruction on the specific legal mechanisms and institutional
processes which organizations can use to effectively approach the human rights issues confronting Central and
Eastern Europe today, while including analysis of major relevant events elsewhere in the world, such as the
American civil rights movement. Those students who have qualified for an MA in Human Rights, and who
already have a law degree, may further qualify to participate in an intensive course of studies in the law of
human rights. Upon completion of their studies, such students will be issued an LLM degree in Human Rights.
Whereas the majority of the courses are tailored to the requirements of each program, some of the courses
offered are common to all. In addition to a minimal number of mandatory courses, a considerable variety of
elective courses are offered, allowing specialization according to the individual's interest.
The LLM programs in Comparative Constitutional Law, Human Rights and International Business Law as well
as the Master’s program in Human Rights are registered by the Board of Regents of the University of the State
of New York (US).
New CEU-COLPI Human Rights Fellows Program
The Constitutional and Legal Policy Institute (COLPI), part of the Open Society Institute, joins with Central
European University to announce the Human Rights Fellows Program. The program will be conducted by
COLPI and CEU, in cooperation with human rights non-governmental organizations (NGOs) from the
countries of Central and Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and Central Asia (including Mongolia). The
aim of the program is to support the further development of a civil liberties network compose of lawyers and
activists or scholars in Central and Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and Central Asia. Only applicants
from countries in these regions are eligible to participate in the program.
The Human Rights Fellows Program is a two-year program of study and practical work experience. Five
applicants from Central and Eastern Europe, Central Asia including Mongolia and the former Soviet Union
will be selected in 2002 to participate in the program.
Applicants to this program must follow the general CEU admissions requirements, found under the
“Prospective Students” section of this Bulletin, in addition to the Master’s entry requirements for the Legal
Studies Department, listed below. Additionally, applicants to the Human Rights Fellows Program must be
nominated by a non-governmental organization which is concerned with human rights. In their letter (to be
submitted concurrently with other application materials), the nominating NGO should commit to employing the
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
applicant for at least one year upon his or her completion of studies at CEU.
For more information about this new program please consult the CEU website at
http://www.ceu.hu/legal/legalpro.html.
The SJD Program
The SJD program gives students an opportunity to work towards a doctoral degree in law with a combination
of independent research and coursework. While emphasis is on the former, students are encouraged to enroll in
or audit courses during the 35-month program. The SJD program is academic and is primarily oriented toward
the training of future legal scholars.
The program is registered by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York (US).
Doctoral Support Program
Doctoral candidates who are enrolled in an accredited SJD or PhD program at another university are eligible to
participate in the SJD program for up to one academic year. The Doctoral Support Program presupposes
physical presence at CEU and allows the candidate to participate in the SJD program, including supervised
research.
Master’s Entry Requirements
General Requirements
Applicants to all three programs (Comparative Constitutional Law, International Business Law and Human
Rights) must meet the general CEU admissions requirements. Applicants to the LLM and MA programs must
attach a 300-word handwritten essay, on a specific legal or human rights issue of special interest to them. In
addition, applicants to the LLM programs must have completed a law degree or be in the last year of law
school and expect to graduate before the beginning of August 2002, i.e., the beginning of the academic year for
the Legal Studies Department. Students with a degree in political science or international relations may also
apply for admission to the Comparative Constitutional Law Program. Applicants to the Human Rights
Program must have at least a BA degree by the time they start studies at CEU.
Admissions Examination
Structure
The Legal Studies admissions examination is composed of three tests: the Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL); a Legal Reasoning Test; a short academic essay of 45 minutes, corresponding to
whichever program the candidate is applying. In countries where Soros foundations operate, the local CEU
coordinator or representative will administer these tests. The test day will be structured as follows: the
TOEFL1; the Legal Reasoning Test then the academic essay (or essays, if the candidate applies to more than
one of the CEU Legal Studies programs).
Selection of candidates consists of three rounds: language proficiency, results of the Legal Reasoning Test and
essay, and ranking. In order to be considered for admission, candidates must perform satisfactorily on the
TOEFL (or other approved language tests). Further shortlisting of the applicants is based on the Legal
Reasoning Test and essay results. Candidates are ranked based on their test results with due regard to past
academic record and special experience. Normally the Legal Studies Department does not interview its
applicants: an oral interview may be granted only exceptionally.
Whenever the above procedure is not applicable for technical or personal reasons (i.e., candidates are not
residing in a country where a supervised entrance exam is administered by a national Soros foundation or
educational advising center), granted that the candidate is qualified for consideration, a computer-administered
(email) exam will be offered. Depending on the results of the exam, qualified candidates will be granted an
interview. This email exam will take place worldwide on Saturday, March 9, 2002. In case of technical
difficulties, additional dates may be set. Candidates should indicate on the application whether they will have
access to electronic mail on the day of the exam, and if so, include their electronic mail address (notifying CEU
1 Those students who are exempted from taking the TOEFL will join the other candidates in the afternoon for the
subsequent tests.
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Admissions Office of any future changes in the address). If candidates do not have access to electronic mail,
the exam may be carried out by fax. If fax is also not a possibility, then candidates may apply for a special
interview.

Candidates who received their law degree from an accredited American law school are exempt from the
Legal Reasoning Test. Rather, they should submit a copy of their previously obtained Law School
Admissions Test (LSAT) scores with their application for admission.

Candidates who do not have access to a Soros foundation test administration site, and who have not
previously taken the Law School Admissions Test, are strongly encouraged to take it. (Please see the
website listed below for LSAT administration information). CEU will accept an official copy of their
LSAT score report for the admissions process.

Candidates who have not taken the CEU Legal Reasoning Test or the LSAT may be considered for
admissions only under exceptional circumstances.
TOEFL
Applicants to all three programs must meet the general CEU admissions requirements.
Prospective Students section of this Bulletin for language requirements.
Please see the
Legal Reasoning Test
The Legal Reasoning Test is a standardized test measuring analytical thinking and logical reasoning
capabilities. The test consists of four sections of 20-30 questions each, and takes approximately two and a half
hours to complete. Candidates are encouraged to practice law school admission sample tests, available on the
web at http://www.lsac.org/download-forms-guidelines-checklists.asp.
Academic Essay
The academic essay is administered following the Legal Reasoning Test. The topic of the essay will depend
upon the program to which the candidate is applying. If a candidate applies to more than one program, she/he
should write separate essays for each program to which she/he is applying.
Comparative Constitutional Law Program
Those candidates applying to the Comparative Constitutional Law Program should be familiar with the
Constitution of the United States, and with the public law system of their country of residence. A sample
question for the essay is: “Who declares war under the US Constitution? Why is this so?” Recommended
reading: Limiting Government by Andras Sajo, Central European University Press, 1999.
International Business Law Program
Those candidates applying to the International Business Law Program are expected to read the norms of their
respective countries on private international law (conflict of laws), as well as the 1980 Vienna Convention on
the International Sale of Goods. The text of the Vienna Convention is available through the following website:
http://www.uncitral.org/english/texts/sales/salescon.htm
Human Rights Program
Those candidates applying to the Human Rights Program are invited to read the International Covenant on
Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), as well as a periodic State Party report prepared in the context of the
ICCPR, preferably one discussing the candidate’s country of residence. The text of the ICCPR and a periodic
report are available through the following website: www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/a_ccpr.htm
Example of one national report to the Human Rights Committee (Yugoslavia):
http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/MasterFrameView/7946dab8b7e0ed02802567f40038950f?Opendocument
SJD Entry Requirements
Candidates possessing an LLM degree from CEU or another institution with a credit load and program similar
to that of CEU, and candidates who received an MA degree after their basic law degree from another
institution with a credit load and program similar to that of CEU may also be considered for admission,
provided that the MA was received in a field which is consanguine with the proposed SJD research. Students
who have completed their Master of Laws degree at CEU with a “B” average or higher and whose theses were
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
graded “completed with honors” or higher are eligible for further SJD studies. Each applicant should submit a
detailed research project (2000 words, including literature). Applicants to the SJD Program must also fulfill
the general CEU admissions requirements, found under the “Prospective Students” section of this Bulletin.
Doctoral Support Program Entry Requirements
Applicants to the Doctoral Support Program must fulfill the general CEU admissions requirements, found
under the “Prospective Students” section of this Bulletin and submit a detailed research project (2000 words,
including literature).
Alumni of the Department
Graduates of the Comparative Constitutional Law Program will leave with sharpened analytical skills, an
awareness of the intricacies of constitutionalism and an appreciation of human and minority rights issues.
International Business Law graduates will be familiar with the institutions of the market economy and their
effects on international business as well as the various types of legal contracts found within the international
system. Human Rights graduates will complete the program with a solid theoretical grounding in traditional
and alternative approaches to human rights.
Departmental alumni are currently employed in law firms, government ministries, international organizations,
private business ventures, embassies, universities, NGOs and research institutes as well as various
consultancies. The majority of alumni who choose to continue their education at the Master's or SJD level are
outstandingly successful in finding placement and financial aid at a variety of Western European and American
academic institutions.
At present, CEU alumni of the Legal Studies Department with whom the university is in contact are studying
and employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Public Sector: State-owned Business
Self-employed
14
21
6
10
35
11
1
2
Research and Internship Opportunities
The Legal Studies Department offers research exchange opportunities during the research module with US and
Canadian universities. Students are selected to participate in these programs on a competitive basis. The
department also participates in the CEU-wide research grant competition, which allows for short (two to three
week) research opportunities during the research module. Through cooperation with the CEU Human Rights
Students’ Initiative, Human Rights students are eligible to receive credit for internships with Budapest-based
non-governmental organizations during the research module.
CEU sponsors up to three internships at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg for graduates of
the Human Rights Program. Candidates must be citizens of a country which is a member of the Council of
Europe and must have a law degree and a CEU Human Rights degree. The accepted applicants will work for
three months on concrete cases together with a respective administrator from their country.
Program Structure
All Master’s programs follow the same basic structure. The academic year consists of three semesters, which
collectively contain six modules. At the opening of the academic year, students participate in a preparatory
module consisting of mandatory courses, which serve to introduce students to basic legal skills and strengthen
their academic writing. The first semester consists of two additional modules. The second (research) semester
focuses on research and writing and consists of one module of instruction. The third semester consists of two
modules.
Selected List of Mandatory and Elective Courses
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COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW PROGRAM
FIRST (PREPARATORY) MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Legal Terminology: S. K. Rose
Introduction to Comparative Constitutional Law: A. Sajo
Contracts Law – Introduction with Focus on Common Law: N. Gozansky
Computer: A. Balogh
Computer Based Legal Research: SJD candidates
Library Orientation: M. Szlatky
English: LTC Instructor
SECOND MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Academic Legal Writing and Research: S. K. Rose
German Constitutional Law: S. Baer/A. Blankenagel
EU Law I: A. Toth
Elective Courses
Great Traditions of Public Administration: D. Galligan
Russian Constitutional Law: A. Blankenagel
Introduction to the Protection of Human Rights in the Council of Europe: K. Bard
Free Speech – Foundations: A. Sajo
Separation of Powers: R. Uitz
THIRD MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Academic Legal Writing and Research (cont. from the 2nd module): S. K. Rose
Elective Courses
Comparative Legislative Process: R. Uitz
Due Process I: K. Bard
Not-for-Profit Law I: K. Simon
Political Rights in Comparative Perspective – Foundations (cont. in the 5th module): D. Smilov
FOURTH MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Academic Legal Writing and Research (cont. from the 3rd module): S. K. Rose
Elective Courses
Due Process II: K. Bard
Equal Opportunity Law: Cs. Kollonay Lehoczky
Law in Modern Society: M. Krygier
Not-for-Profit Law II (Clinical Course): ICNL TBA
Political and Legal Obligations: J. Kis
FIFTH MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Minority Law: G. Haarscher
Elective Courses
Comparative Federalism: P. Macklem
Emerging European Constitution and European Citizenship: A. Toth
Freedom of Religion – Foundations: C. Durham
Freedom of Religion – Advanced: C. Durham
Political and Legal Obligations: J. Kis
Political Rights in Comparative Perspective – Foundations: D. Smilov
Speech & Privacy – Advanced: R. Errera
The Law of Life and Death: R. Uitz
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
SIXTH MODULE
Elective Courses
Comparative Equality: M. Rosenfeld
Judicial Review: R. Uitz
Constitutional Theory: S. Holmes
Political and Legal Obligations: J. Kis
Political Rights – Advanced: D. Smilov
Gender and Law: Cs. Kollonay Lehoczky
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW PROGRAM
FIRST (PREPARATORY) MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Contracts: Introduction with Focus on Common Law: H. Hunter
Computer: A. Balogh
Computer Based Legal Research: SJD candidates
English: LTC Instructor
Introduction to US Constitutional Law: A. Sajo
Introduction to European Contract Law: S. Messmann
Legal Terminology: K. Weaver
Library Orientation: M. Szlatky
SECOND MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Academic Legal Writing and Research: K. Weaver
EU Law I: A. Toth
Elective Courses
Competition Law of the EU: J. Stuyck
Comparative Social Protection in Business Relations: Cs. Kollonay Lehoczky
Corporations: P. Behrens
International Dispute Settlement: T. Varady
International and European Intellectual Property Law I: Gy. Boytha
US Company Law: R. Buxbaum
THIRD MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Academic Legal Writing and Research: K. Weaver
Elective Courses
International Dispute Settlement: T. Varady
International Business Transactions: T. Varady
Introduction to Not-for-Profit Law: K. Simon
US Company Law: R. Buxbaum
FOURTH MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Academic Legal Writing and Research: K. Weaver
Elective Courses
Drafting and Negotiating International Contracts: S. Messmann
German Legal Concepts: S. Messmann
Legal Aspects of Internet and Electronic Commerce: V. Pavic
Not-for-Profit Law II (Clinical Course): ICNL TBA
Social Law of the European Union: Cs. Kollonay Lehoczky
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
FIFTH MODULE
International Business Law (IBL)
Mandatory Courses
Minority Law: G. Haarscher
Elective Courses
American Civil Procedure: F. Rossi
Doing Business in South-East Asia: S. Messmann
EU Law II: A. Toth
GATT/WTO: J. Barcelo
Global Economy and Human Values: E. Mearns
International Tax Law: C. Fleming
SIXTH MODULE
Elective Courses
Accounting For Lawyers: A. Ramasastry
Capital Markets and Securities Regulation: W. Carney
Comparative Law of Sales: H. Hunter
European Private International Law: P. Hay/T. Varady
Intellectual Property II: TBA
International Technology Transfer: F. Abbott
HUMAN RIGHTS PROGRAM
FIRST (PREPARATORY) MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Computer: A. Balogh
Computer Based Legal Research: SJD candidates
English: LTC Instructor
Introduction to Law: R. Uitz
Introduction to Public International Law: R. Uitz
Introduction to Human Rights: J. McBride
Introduction to US Constitutional Law: R. Uitz
Legal Terminology HR Group V: F. Gabor
Library Orientation: M. Szlatky
SECOND MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Academic Legal Writing and Research: S. K. Rose
Introduction to the Protection of Human Rights in the Council of Europe: K. Bard
Introduction to European Constitutional Law: R. Uitz
Elective Courses
Comparative Social Protection: Cs. Kollonay Lehoczky
Russian Constitutional Law: A. Blankenagel
Police Practices: I. Szikinger
Right to Liberty and Prisoners’ Rights: K. Bard
Roma Rights: D. Petrova
THIRD MODULE
MMandatory Courses
Academic Legal Writing and Research: S. K. Rose
Elective Courses
Asylum, Refugees: B. Nagy
Due Process I: K. Bard
Free Speech – Foundations: A. Sajo
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Human Rights Politics: D. Petrova
Human Rights Litigation: Challenging Discrimination: J. Goldston
Not-for-Profit Law I: K. Simon
Political Rights in Comparative Perspective – Foundations: D. Smilov
Right to Liberty and Prisoner's Rights: K. Bard
FOURTH MODULE
Elective Courses
Children’s Rights and Juvenile Justice: K. Bard
Due Process II: K. Bard
Social Psychology of Prejudice: K. Goncz
Equal Opportunity Law: Cs. Kollonay Lehoczky
Human Rights Internship Credit: K. Bard
Not-for-Profit Law II: ICNL TBA
FIFTH MODULE
Mandatory Courses
Minority Law and Policy: G. Haarscher
Elective Courses
Freedom of Religion – Foundations: C. Durham
Individual and Human Rights: W. Osiatynski
Human Rights in Eastern Europe Workshop: K. Bard
International Humanitarian Law and International Criminal Tribunals: K. Bard
Speech & Privacy – Advanced: R. Errera
International Human Rights Law: P. Macklem
Political Rights in Comparative Perspective – Foundations: D. Smilov
Mental Disability Advocacy in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union: J. Klein
Emerging European Constitution and European Citizenship: A. Toth
SIXTH MODULE
Elective Courses
Institutions of Rights Protection: M.Wyrzykowski/J. Mc Bride
International Humanitarian Law and International Criminal Tribunals: K. Bard
International Human Rights Law: P. Macklem
Human Rights in Eastern Europe Moot Court Competition: K. Bard
Gender and Law: Cs. Kollonay Lehoczky
FACULTY MEMBERS
Frederick Abbott (Chicago-Kent College of Law, USA), Visiting Faculty
Yaman Akdeniz (University of Leeds, Faculty of Law, UK), Visiting Faculty
Susanne Baer (Humboldt University, Law Faculty, Germany), Visiting Faculty
John Barcelo (Cornell University Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Karoly Bard (CEU), Chair of Human Rights Program, Associate Professor
Peter Behrens (University of Hamburg Max-Planck Institute, Germany), Visiting Faculty
Alexander Blankenagel (Humboldt University, Germany), Visiting Faculty
Gyorgy Boytha (Eotvos Lorand University, Faculty of Law, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Richard Buxbaum (University of California, Berkeley, USA), Visiting Faculty
William Carney (Emory University Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Cole Durham (Brigham Young University Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Roger Errera (Conseil d’Etat, France), Visiting Faculty
Clifton Fleming (Brigham Young University Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Francis Gabor (University of Memphis Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Denis Galligan (CEU/University of Oxford, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, UK), Head of Department,
Director of Center for Policy Studies
James Goldston (Deputy Director, Open Society Institute, Budapest, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Kinga Goncz (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Nathaniel Gozansky (Emory University Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Guy Haarscher (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium), Visiting Faculty
Peter Hay (Emory University Law School, Germany), Visiting Faculty
Stephen Holmes (University of Chicago Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Howard Hunter (Emory University Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Janos Kis (CEU, Political Science Department), University Professor
Judith Klein (Mental Disability Advocacy Program, Open Society Institute, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Csilla Kollonay Lehoczky (CEU), Head of the Doctoral Progam (pro-tempore), Professor
Martin Krygier (The University of New South Wales, Australia), Visiting Faculty
Patrick Macklem (University of Toronto Faculty of Law, Canada), Visiting Faculty
Jeremy McBride (University of Birmingham School of Law, UK), Visiting Faculty
Edward Mearns (Case Western Reserve University Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Stefan Messmann (CEU), Academic Pro-Rector, Professor
Boldizsar Nagy (Eotvos Lorand University Faculty of Law, Hungary), Visiting Associate Professor
Vladimir Pavic (CEU/Belgrade University, Faculty of Law, Yugoslavia), Assistant to the Academic Pro-Rector
of CEU
Dimitrina Petrova (European Roma Rights Center, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Anita Ramasastry (University of Washington School of Law, USA), Visiting Faculty
Michel Rosenfeld (Yeshiva University, Cardozo Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Faust Rossi (Cornell University Law School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Wiktor Osiatynski (CEU), University Professor
Andras Sajo (CEU), Chair of Comparative Constitutional Law Program, Dept. of Legal Studies, University
Professor
Judit Sandor (CEU), Associate Professor
Stanley Siegel (CEU), Professor of International Business Law
Karla Simon (Columbus School of Law, Catholic University of America, USA), Visiting Faculty
Daniel Smilov (S.J.D CEU; PhD candidate Wolfson College, University of Oxford, UK), Visiting Faculty
Jules Stuyck (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium), Visiting Faculty
Istvan Szikinger (Schiffer and Tarsai Law Firm, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Akos Toth (Strathclyde University Law School, UK), Visiting Faculty
Renata Uitz (CEU), Assistant Professor
Tibor Varady (CEU), Chair of International Business Law Program, Professor
Miroslav Wyrzykowski (Warsaw University, Faculty of Law, Poland), Visiting Faculty
MATHEMATICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS
Budapest
Nador u. 9, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3000 ext. 2430
Fax: (36-1) 327-3166
Email: [email protected], phd @renyi.hu
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/dep_mathematics.html, http://www.renyi.hu/phd
Dezso Miklos, Acting Program Director
Agnes Makary, Program Coordinator
Degree offered:
Average length of study:
Graduation requirements:
Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics and its Applications
four years
57 course credits; 15 research credits, dissertation
The Program
CEU’s Ph.D. Program in Mathematics and its Applications will be carried out jointly with the Alfred Renyi
Institute of Mathematics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest and with the Université Pierre et
Marie Curie, Paris. As the existing programs of CEU are in social sciences, humanities, and environmental
sciences and policy, it was decided to develop a Department of Mathematics and its Applications that is open
to interaction with scholars in these fields. The Program will strongly encourage interdisciplinary work.
The Department of Mathematics and its Applications is a new academic unit at CEU, and its establishment is
supervised by a committee including Yehuda Elkana (CEU President and Rector), Philippe G. Ciarlet
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
(Member of the French Academy of Sciences and Professor at the Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris),
Gyula Katona (Member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Director of the Alfred Renyi Institute of
Mathematics).
CEU will seek registration with the New York State Education Department for one Ph.D. Program
(Mathematics and its Applications) with two streams: one in Pure Mathematics (headed by Dezso Miklos), and
another one in Applications of Mathematics (headed by Philippe G. Ciarlet). The full start of the program is
scheduled for the academic year 2002/2003. In the academic year 2001/2002, only a small number of students
were enrolled in the Pure Mathematics stream.
Doctoral Support Program
The Doctoral Support Program in Mathematics is available to students enrolled in full-time doctoral studies at
recognized institutions of higher education. Students of the program receive consultation and supervision from
CEU and the institute’s faculty. They can participate in the current Hungarian mathematical life and will have
the opportunity to temporarily join the research groups of the institute. There is no requirement to earn course
credits; rather, participants are encouraged to work together with the program faculty. Primarily those students
who are at the stage of thesis writing are encouraged to apply for the Doctoral Support Program.
Entry Requirements
The Department of Mathematics and its Applications will admit around ten students each year. In addition to
meeting the general CEU admission requirements, students seeking admission to the program must submit
altogether three letters of recommendation and will be required to prove their proficiency in mathematics and
familiarity with fundamental mathematical disciplines. Applicants residing in Central and Eastern Europe and
the former Soviet Union have to take a written exam in general mathematics, including analysis and basic
algebra. The candidates for the stream on Pure Mathematics will also have to take a written exam in probability
theory. The CEU-administered exam will be held on March 9, 2002. Candidates from outside the CEE/fSU
region will be required to submit GRE scores by March 18, 2002.
Successful applicants are expected to have a degree of higher education (at least four years of college studies)
with a strong mathematical background.
Program Structure and Academic Requirements
During four 14-week semesters of coursework, students must take a total of 72 credits, of which 27 credits will
be earned in core courses, and 18 credits in advanced courses. The remaining 27 credits will be earned during
the research period, typically 12 credits for further advanced coursework, and 15 for thesis work. Most of the
coursework component of the Ph.D. program is designed for four semesters, but students with appropriate
backgrounds may finish most of it in two or three semesters.
Students are required to take a comprehensive examination in three topics. After passing the comprehensive
examination and earning in addition 12 credits in core or advanced courses, the students are required to take
the candidacy oral examination on a pass/fail basis. The material is designed by the student’s supervisor.
Students have to demonstrate their proficiency in the subject of their planned theses. The students start the
formal research period after passing the candidacy oral examination. Nevertheless, students are encouraged to
start their research in the third or fourth semester. During the research period, students are expected to write
and defend their theses under a close supervision, and to finish their coursework.
Stream I: Applications of Mathematics
Applications of Mathematics have undergone a tremendous progress during the second half of the twentieth century.
Due to the development of new areas in Mathematics and to the ever-increasing performances of computers, the realm
of Applications is including more and more fields, so far thought to be out of reach of mathematical reasoning.
The aim of the Ph.D. Program in Mathematics and its Applications at CEU is to reflect this trend, by focusing on
some of the most successful Applications of Mathematics, whether "classical", such as weather forecast, or recent,
such as Black-Scholes model for pricing stocks. It is to be especially emphasized that, by their very nature,
Applications have an interdisciplinary character that makes them strong incentives for initiating joint research with
other departments from CEU. For instance, "Weather forecast" should appeal to the Department of Environmental
Sciences and Policy, while "Black-Scholes model for pricing stocks" should appeal to the Department of Economics.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Curriculum
1. "Prerequisites" (3 credit courses). These courses are not compulsory, but their contents will be supposed to be
fully mastered by any student who wishes to enter the Ph.D. Program. The level is that of last year of undergraduate
studies. These courses can be either integrated in the curriculum or be covered during a three-week intensive "summer
school", to be held just before the beginning of each academic year.
Functional Analysis
Introduction to linear partial differential equations
Introduction to numerical linear algebra
2. "Basic" courses (3 credit courses). Each student will have to take at least FOUR "basic" courses. Level: First
year-graduate studies.
Linear and nonlinear elliptic equations
Mathematical modeling in continuum mechanics
Mathematical methods in fluid mechanics – hyperbolic systems and conservation laws
Introduction to numerical methods for linear partial differential equations
Numerical methods for elliptic equations
Advanced finite element methods for elliptic equations
Numerical methods for fluid mechanics and hyperbolic systems of conservation laws
Optimization theory
3. "Specialized" courses (3 credit courses). Each student will have to take at least four "specialized" courses. Level:
Second year-graduate studies.
Nonlinear functional analysis and calculus of variations
Homogenization theory
Differential geometry and applications
Mathematical methods in three-dimensional elasticity
Mathematical methods in plastic theory
Mathematical methods in finance
Mathematical methods in meteorology
Dynamical systems and optimal control
Stream II: Pure Mathematics
The Pure Mathematics Stream offers courses in several fields, such as Algebra, Algebraic Geometry, Analysis,
Discrete Mathematics, Geometry, Mathematical Logic and Foundation, Number Theory, Stochastics,
Theoretical Computer Science, Dynamic and Complex Systems. There are bridge courses with no credit to
prepare students with different backgrounds. Most other courses are worth 3 credits and require three-hour
lectures/discussions/seminars per week. In each field there are three core courses (a general requirement for the
comprehensive exams) and advanced courses for further study. It is also possible to take reading courses (with
the consent of the instructor), and topics courses.
Selected list of courses
Core Courses of the Fields:
Analysis: Complex Function Theory; Functional Analysis and Differential Equations; Real and Harmonic
Analysis
Algebra: Algebra I; Algebra II; Algebra III
Algebraic Geometry: Algebraic Topology; Commutative Algebra; Manifolds and Differential Topology
Complex and Dynamic Systems: Ergodic Theory; Fractals and Dynamical Systems; Mathematical Methods
of Statistical Physics
Discrete Mathematics: Enumeration; External Combinatorics; Random Methods in Combinatorics
Geometry: Differential Geometry; Geometry I
Logic and foundation: Algebraic Logic and Model Theory; Introduction to Mathematical Logic; Modern SetTheory
Number theory: Combinatorial Number Theory; Elementary Prime Number Theory; Probabilistic Methods in
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Number Theory
Stochastics: Information Theory, Mathematical Statistics; Probability
Theoretical Computer Science: Algorithms, Complexity Theory, Introduction to the Theory of Computing
Advanced Courses are listed on the department’s website
Note: A detailed presentation of the curriculum is available on the department’s website at
http://www.ceu.hu/dep_mathematics.html.
Faculty members
In addition to the permanent faculty of the Department (t.b.a), the teaching staff will include specialists from
the Renyi Institute, Budapest and from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris.
MEDIEVAL STUDIES
Budapest
Nador utca 9, 1051 Budapest , Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3051
Fax: (36-1) 327-3055
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/medstud/
Jozsef Laszlovszky, Head of Department
Istvan Perczel, Director of Doctoral Studies
Csilla Dobos, Department Coordinator
Annabella Pal, MA Coordinator
Dorottya Domanovszky, PhD Coordinator
Degrees offered:
Master of Arts in Medieval Studies
Doctor of Philosophy in Medieval Studies
Average length of study: MA: ten months, PhD: three years
Graduation requirements: MA: 32 course credits; Master’s thesis and its defense (8 credits)
PhD: minimum of 20 course credits; comprehensive examination; dissertation and
its defense.
The Program
The Department of Medieval Studies offers interdisciplinary courses focusing on the medieval (ca. 500-1550
AD) civilization of Europe. The program also deals with different ways of communication, migration of
people, mobility of objects, texts, and ideas in the larger medieval oikumene, including Asia and Northern
Africa. Special attention is given to the interactions between Medieval Christian (Latin, Byzantine and Oriental
alike), Jewish and Islamic cultures including the Slavia Orthodoxia. Intertextual relations of different medieval
source languages (Latin, Greek, Old Church Slavonic, Hebrew, Arab, Turkish, etc.) will also be explored. The
program provides broad grounding in these fields and aims to train students in advanced research with special
reference to interdisciplinary, comparative, and supranational issues. The study of Central and Eastern
European monuments is of special interest to the department. In spite of enormous losses incurred during the
many wars since the Middle Ages, the region is rich in medieval monuments, documents and vestiges of the
past yet to be unearthed. Neither the artistic and architectural monuments nor the collections of ancient
documents in archives and libraries have been exhaustively examined with up-to-date methods or analyzed
from the perspective of modern scholarship.
The program is registered to grant the Master of Arts and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Medieval
Studies by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York (US).
Entry Requirements
Students seeking admission to the Medieval Studies Department’s MA program must meet the general CEU
admissions requirements and submit a 500-word outline of their proposed research topic together with the
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
specification of both the primary sources and literature to be studied. Familiarity with and experience in the
basic skills of research as well as a working knowledge of the relevant source language(s) (both modern and
medieval, if any) are expected from all entering students.
The Department of Medieval Studies admits students to its PhD program who meet the following criteria:
a) Graduates of the department’s MA program with a strong thesis and a promising research topic; or
b) Graduates of other universities with an MA in one of the fields of medieval studies provided that they
submit a three-page outline of their MA theses in English. It is expected that applicants present evidence
of the interdisciplinary character of their previous medieval studies and their familiarity with research
methods.
All applicants to the PhD program are required to submit a three- to five-page description of the proposed PhD
thesis including research questions, theory and methodology, current status of the project, and a one- to twopage research proposal.
Alumni Profile
Upon completion of the MA program, students have solid experience with research methodology, analytical
reasoning, medieval sources and the secondary literature of the field. Alumni have enrolled in PhD programs at
CEU, Oxford, Cambridge, Katholieke Universite in Leuven, Université Paris X–Nanterre, the Warburg
Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Yale University, the University of California, Los Angeles and other
European and American universities. Others are employed as research fellows or faculty members throughout
the region, pursue careers in research institutes or museums, edit and translate books and journals or manage
cultural monuments and collections.
At present, CEU alumni of the Department of Medieval Studies with whom the university is in contact are
studying and employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Self-employed
54
34
1
3
3
4
1
Research and Internship Opportunities
The department’s main fields of research are history of ideas and institutions, Latin and Orthodox Christianity,
interaction of religions, economic and urban history, history of everyday life, history of art and architecture,
archaeology, philosophy, medieval languages and literature and Byzantine studies. The department has a
unique medievalist research library in cooperation with Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE), Budapest, and a
computer center specializing in the study of visual records of the Middle Ages.
The Master of Arts Program
The Medieval Studies one-year MA program is a combination of formal coursework (32 credits for seminars
and research method courses) and supervised individual research leading to a thesis (8 credits); it is thus
considered both a taught and research-based MA.
MA Program Structure
The Medieval Studies MA program is divided into a three-week Pre-Session, two semesters and a spring
session. The Pre-Session is designed to introduce students to the resources available at CEU and elsewhere in
Budapest and includes an introductory course in English for academic purposes, optional conversational
Hungarian classes, Latin or Greek courses at all levels, computer training, library orientation sessions and an
individual discussion on research planning. The first and second semesters consist of mandatory courses and
elective seminars. The spring session is devoted to shorter reading courses and thesis-writing workshops.
Throughout the year students are provided guidance on individual and group research and on the discussion of
their results. Members of the faculty offer guidance, assistance and supervision for the students’ own creative
work and information on fields students may not have studied earlier. The department seeks to ensure that the
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courses chosen will most effectively balance specific research interests with interdisciplinary training. A
tentative program for the entire year is individually discussed and designed for each student in September.
Minor changes reflecting new interests on the part of the student are always possible.
The PhD Program
The Medieval Studies PhD program normally lasts for three years. Students admitted to the doctoral program
become probationary doctoral candidates. During this period students take a series of courses (20 credits), pass
a general examination based on a detailed dissertation prospectus and covering several aspects of medieval
studies. Once these requirements are fulfilled, students become doctoral candidates and are allowed up to five
years to complete their doctoral theses. During the second or third year doctoral students will be given the
opportunity (through exchange agreements) to spend one semester (or up to six months) abroad at the
university most suitable for their particular research interests. This possibility is an integral part of each
student’s individual study plan and is sponsored by CEU.
Doctoral Support Program
The Doctoral Support Program is open to graduate students registered in a PhD program at an accredited
institution of higher education. Positions are held on either a semester or academic year basis. During their
residence at CEU, the doctorandi/ae will receive consultation and supervision from CEU faculty. Although not
required to attend classes, they are encouraged to interact with other students and faculty, present their work in
informal workshops, and in general participate in the life of the department.
Selected List of Courses
Pre-Session
Latin and Greek: Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced: Gyorgy Karsai
Conversational Hungarian: Teacher assigned by Language Teaching Center
Visits to libraries, archives and museum collections in Budapest: Katalin Szende
Introduction to Academic Writing: Judith Rasson
Semester I
MA Program: Mandatory Courses
Academic Writing for Medievalists: Judith Rasson
Field Trip Bibliography and Consultation: Jozsef Laszlovszky, Bela Zsolt Szakacs
Introduction to Medieval Studies Bibliography and Research Methods: Janos Bak
MA Thesis Seminar: All Faculty
Languages (intermediate or advanced Latin and Greek): Gyorgy Karsai, Istvan Perczel
MA Program: Elective Seminars
Medieval Philosophy (research methods course): Gyorgy Gereby
The Use of Visual Sources (research methods course): Tamas Sajo
Computing for Medievalists (research methods course): Tamas Sajo
Reading Byzantine Text (advanced Greek): Istvan Perczel
Hagiography: Gabor Klaniczay
Introduction to History of Dogma: Istvan Perczel
Introduction to Medieval Iconography: Tamas Sajo
Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Gyorgy Gereby
History of Daily Life: Gerhard Jaritz
Latin Paleography and Diplomatics: Janos Bak, Laszlo Veszpremy
Major Problems of Medieval Studies: Lecture Series
Renaissance Philosophy: Richard Blum
Signs and Symbols: Janos Bak
Studies in Renaissance Portraiture: Peter Meller
The Bible in the Medieval West: Piroska Nagy
The Culture of Humanism: Marcell Sebok
The Rise of the Ottoman Empire: Gustav Bayerle
Translation Seminar on Medieval Sources (advanced Latin): Janos Bak
Languages (French, German, Italian, etc.): TBA
PhD Program: Mandatory Courses
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Doctoral Seminar: All Faculty
Research Seminar: All Faculty
Advanced Academic Writing: Alice Choyke
Academic Practica: TBA
Semester II
MA Program: Mandatory Courses
Academic Writing Consultation for Medievalists: Judith Rasson
Languages (intermediate or advanced Latin and Greek): Gyorgy Karsai, Istvan Perczel
Field Trip Consultation (individual): All faculty
MA Thesis Seminar: All faculty
MA Program: Elective Seminars
Oral Traditions (research methods course): Michael Richter
Computing for Medievalists (research methods course): Tamas Sajo
Gender and Space: Gerhard Jaritz
Medieval Archaeology: Jozsef Laszlovszky
Reading Byzantine Text (advanced Greek): Istvan Perczel
Historical Anthropology and Legal Sources: Hanna Zaremska, Gabor Klaniczay
Law and Politics: TBA
Religion and Rulership in the Middle Ages - Workshop
PhD Program: Mandatory Courses
Doctoral Seminar: All faculty
Research Seminar: All faculty
Academic Practica: TBA
English Style Consultation: Alice Choyke
Spring Session
MA Program: Mandatory Courses
MA Thesis Workshop: All faculty
Two seminars to be elected
MA Program: Elective Courses
Musicology: Nancy van Deusen
Jewish Christian Interaction: Hanna Kassis
List of Faculty
Janos Bak (CEU)
Gustav Bayerle (Indiana University, USA), Visiting Faculty
Marianna Birnbaum (UCLA, USA), Visiting Faculty
Richard Blum (Pazmany Peter Catholic University, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Neven Budak (University of Zagreb/ CEU), Visiting Faculty
Istvan Bugar (Janus Pannonius University, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Nancy van Deusen (The Claremont Graduate School, USA), Visiting Faculty
Gyorgy Gereby (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Wolfram Horander (University of Vienna, Austria), Visiting Faculty
Gerhard Jaritz (CEU/University of Graz)
Gyorgy Karsai (Janus Pannonius University, Hungary/ CEU)
Hanna Kassis (University of British Columbia, Canada), Visiting Faculty
Gabor Klaniczay (CEU, Collegium Budapest, Hungary)
Jozsef Laszlovszky (CEU), Head of Department
Peter Meller (University of Santa Barbara, USA), Visiting Faculty
Elissaveta Moussakova (Institute of Art Studies, Bulgaria), Visiting Faculty
Balazs Nagy (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Piroska Nagy (Collegium Budapest), Visiting Faculty
Istvan Perczel (CEU)
Judith Rasson (CEU)
Tamas Sajo (CEU)
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Marcell Sebok (CEU)
Bela Zsolt Szakacs (Pazmany Peter Catholic University, Hungary/ CEU)
Katalin Szende (CEU)
Hanna Zaremska (Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw), Visiting Faculty
Ferenc Zemplenyi (Eotovos Lorand University, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
NATIONALISM STUDIES PROGRAM
Budapest
Nador u. 9, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3000 ext.: 2086
Fax: (36-1) 235-6102
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/nation
Maria Kovacs, Program Director
Szabolcs Pogonyi, Program Coordinator
Degree offered:
Master of Arts in Nationalism Studies
A PhD specialization in Nationalism Studies is available under the PhD in
Comparative History of Central, Southeastern and Eastern Europe
Average length of study:
MA: ten months
PhD: three years
Graduation requirements:
MA: 32 course credits; Master’s thesis and its defense (8 credits)
PhD: total of 56 credits, including credits for coursework, consultation,
research, tutorial, dissertation writing, teaching assistance, and the PhD
research seminar
The Program
The Nationalism Studies Program was established by Central European University with the goal of promoting
the study of nationalism in the post-communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet
Union. The program continues the work of the late Ernest Gellner, who founded CEU’s Center for the Study of
Nationalism in Prague. The program is intended to respond to the growing demand for new knowledge and
teaching in the field of nationalism studies. Drawing upon the uniquely supranational milieu of Central
European University, it encourages a critical and non-sectarian study of nationalism with special emphasis on
problems created by the new configuration of states, nations and minorities in the region.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interdisciplinary study of nationalism, a subject that is inherently and
fundamentally interdisciplinary. For this reason, the international teaching staff has been assembled to
represent a wide range of disciplinary expertise relevant to the study of nationalism including history, social
theory, economics, legal studies, sociology, anthropology, international relations and political science. The
program offers a wide selection of courses that provide a complex theoretical grounding in problems
associated with nationhood and nationalism combined with advanced training in the methodology of applied
social science. Additional courses focus on placing problems of nationalism in the context of economic and
political transition as well as constitution building in post-1989 Central and Eastern Europe with a comparative
outlook on regime transitions outside the region.
The Master of Arts degree in Nationalism Studies is registered by the Board of Regents of the University of the
State of New York (US). In addition, a specialization in Nationalism Studies is offered by the CEU
Department of History, PhD in Comparative History of Central, Southeastern and Eastern Europe. MA
graduates of the Nationalism Studies Program may also apply to the PhD program in Political Science, based
on a special agreement between the two units.
Doctoral Support Program
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The Doctoral Support Program in Nationalism Studies is available to students enrolled in full-time doctoral
programs at accredited universities and institutions of higher education. Participants in the program receive
consultation and supervision from CEU faculty to allow them to integrate nationalism studies into their
research. There is no requirement to attend classes, but participants are encouraged to work in informal
workshops and contribute to the life of the Nationalism Studies Program. While students may apply at any time
during their PhD studies, those at the dissertation-writing stage are particularly suitable for the program.
Entry Requirements
Applicants to the MA program must meet the general CEU admissions requirements and submit a 500-word
outline of their proposed research topic and one writing sample, e.g., a term paper of minimum ten pages.
Candidates for the History PhD program with a specialization in Nationalism Studies must meet the general
CEU admissions requirements and submit a 500-word outline of their proposed research topic and one writing
sample, e.g., a term paper of a minimum of ten pages. Applicants to the PhD program should submit three
letters of recommendations. A joint History-Nationalism Studies selection committee will review applications.
Applicants for the Doctoral Support Program must meet the general CEU admissions requirements.
Program Structure and Academic Requirements
The academic year is divided into a three-week Pre-Session, two semesters and a spring session. During the
Pre-Session students will be given information about the resources available at the university and in Budapest,
and will pass a course in academic English and basic computer skills. Semesters I and II include courses and
seminars. In the spring session, students write their MA theses.
All students are required to maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA), earn a standard number of credits
per semester and attend classes as required by the program. Students are required to earn 24 credits from
designated core courses. Classes from other departments can be selected for up to four credits per semester.
Most courses are in seminar format; active participation is required.
Alumni Profile
Upon completion of the program, students will have solid experience with research methodology in their field,
have acquired analytical skills necessary in dealing with the complex phenomenon of nationalism and will in
general be equipped with sufficient academic background to make contributions in academia or in government
and international institutions.
At present, CEU alumni of the Nationalism Studies Program with whom the university is in contact are
studying and employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Self-employed
56
20
0
6
10
2
4
Selected List of Courses
Semester I
Academic Writing I: Michael Miller
Anthropological Approaches to Ethnicity, Racism and Nationalism: Michael Stewart
Can Western Models of Minority Rights Be Applied in Eastern Europe?: Will Kymlicka
Law and Ethnicity: Tibor Varady
Nationalism and Contemporary Politics: Petr Lom
Nationalism and National Feeling: Economic and Sociological Approach: Andras Kovacs
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Nation-state Building in Central Europe and the Balkans: The Break-up of Czechoslovakia and of Yugoslavia
in a Comparative Perspective: Jacques Rupnik
Nationalist Doctrines and Political Thought: Erica Benner
Recognition and Resentment: Petr Lom
The Emergence of Zionism: Michael Miller
Semester II
Academic Writing I: Michael Miller
Art and Nation: the Rise of the National Idiom in Central European Literature and the Visual Arts: Tibor Frank
Debates About Self-Determination and External Minority Protection in the 20th Century : Maria Kovacs
Ethnic and Religious Dimensions of Modernization in Central Europe: Problem Areas and Empirical
Approaches: Victor Karady
Interpretations of Modern Anti-Semitism: Andras Kovacs
Minorities in the Balkans: Panayote Dimitras
Thesis Seminar: Maria Kovacs
The Engima of Nationalism: Yael Tamir
Theory and Research on Nationalism in the New Europe: Rogers Brubaker
TBA: Gaspar Miklos Tamas
FACULTY MEMBERS
Erica Benner (London School of Economics, UK), Visiting Faculty
Rogers Brubaker (University of California, USA), Visiting Faculty
Panayote Dimitras, Visiting Faculty
Tibor Frank (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary), Visiting Faculty
Victor Karady (CEU/Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, France), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Maria Kovacs (CEU), Associate Professor, Program Director
Andras Kovacs (CEU), Associate Professor
Will Kymlicka (Queens University, Canada), Visiting Faculty
Petr Lom (CEU), Associate Professor
Michael Miller (CEU), Academic Writing Instructor
Gaspar Miklos Tamas (CEU/Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Visiting Professor
Jacques Rupnik, Visiting Faculty
Yael Tamir (University of Tel Aviv, Israel), Visiting Faculty
Michael Stewart (Department of Anthropology, UCL), Visiting Professor
PHILOSOPHY
Budapest
Nador u. 11, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3806
Fax: (36-1) 327-3072
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/phil/
Ferenc Huoranszki, Head of Department
Kriszta Biber, Department Coordinator
Degree Offered:
Average Length of Study:
Graduation Requirements:
Doctor of Philosophy in Philosophy
three years
28 course credits in the first year; comprehensive examination;
dissertation specific courses; dissertation and its defense.
The Program
The main purpose of the Department of Philosophy is to train professionals who will be prepared to undertake
academic careers, as researchers or university teachers. The program takes advantage of the unique opportunity
offered by CEU, a university registered in the United States but located in Central Europe, by promoting a
scholarly attitude which combines historical and analytical approaches in philosophy. The curriculum is so
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
designed that students are required to study in each of the major fields of contemporary philosophy. A
specialization in history of philosophy is also available. Thus, it is envisaged that the alumni of the department
will have the rare ability to conduct a dialogue across the dividing lines occasionally fragmenting the
philosophical discipline. The PhD program in Philosophy started in 2000.
Registration of the PhD program in Philosophy by the Board of Regents of the Univesity of the State onf New
York (US) is in progress.
Entry requirements
Candidates must have a BA degree in philosophy, or the equivalent. They are required to have a background in
the history of philosophy (major ancient and medieval thinkers, Cartesianism, British empiricism and classical
German philosophy) and in logic (propositional and predicate logic). Those who do not meet the second
requirement may be accepted on the condition that they enroll in a logic course (4 credits) in the first year, over
and above the standard requirements of seven courses.
Applicants to the program must meet the general CEU admissions requirements and submit a 500-word
typewritten statement of purpose.
Program Structure
In the first year, students must earn 32 credits. At the end of the first year, they must pass the comprehensive
examination. In the second year students have to earn 16 credits in dissertation-specific courses, and by the end
of the third year they must successfully finish and defend their dissertations.
The program includes three areas of study: 1) various topics in the history of philosophy; 2) contemporary
epistemology and metaphysics; and 3) ethics and political philosophy. Every student must choose one area of
specialization.
During the first year, students are required to earn 28 credits and pass a comprehensive examination (4 credits).
In the second year, students must complete four further optional courses. In addition to the courses offered by
the program, students will have the option of attending courses cross-listed with other CEU
departments/programs. Students are also required to attend a research seminar in which they discuss each
other’s work. The third year will focus on dissertation writing. Invited lecturers may offer special courses to
advanced students. Successful students may receive financial assistance for spending up to one year of their
studies at Western European or US institutions.
Selected List of Courses
Moral and Political Philosophy
Ethics: Lorand Ambrus-Lakatos
Political and Legal Obligation: Janos Kis
Advanced Political Philosophy: Ferenc Huoranszki
Decision Theory: Lorand Ambrus-Lakatos
Philosophy of Action: Ference Huoranszki
Understanding Social Action: Explanation and Interpretation in the Social Sciences: Pavel Barsa
Political Legitimacy: Nenad Dimitrievic
Metaphysics, Epistemology and Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy of Action: Ferenc Huoranszki
Philosophy of Science: Katalin Farkas, Yehuda Elkana
Philosophy of Language: Katalin Farkas
Philosophy of Mind: Howard Robinson
Contemporary Epistemology: Katalin Farkas
Conceptual Knowledge: Nenad Miscevic
Ancient Philosophy of Mind: Istvan Bodnar
Plato's Timaeus and its Predecessors: Istvan Bodnar, Gabor Betegh
History of Philosophy
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Empiricism: Howard. Robinson
Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Gyorgy Gereby
Aristotle: An Introduction: Istvan Bodnar
Heidegger: Being and Time: Pavel Barsa
Kant to Nietzsche: Modernity in German Philosophy: Pavel Barsa
Plato: Gabor Betegh
Philosophy in the Renaissance: R. Blum
Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics: Gabor Betegh
Plato's Timaeus and its Predecessors: Istvan Bodnar, Gabor Betegh
Ancient Philosophy of Mind: Istvan Bodnar
FACULTY MEMBERS
Ferenc Huoranszki, (CEU), Head of Department, Associate Professor
Howard M. Robinson (CEU), Professor
Janos Kis (CEU), University Professor
Katalin Farkas (CEU), Assistant Professor
Pavel Barsa (CEU), Assistant Professor
Lorand Ambrus-Lakatos (CEU), Assistant Professor
George Markus (CEU/University of Sydney, Australia), Visiting Professor
Nenad Miscevic (CEU, University of Maribor, Slovenia), Visiting Professor
Gabor Betegh (CEU), Assistant Professor
Istvan M. Bodnar (CEU, Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary)
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Budapest
Nador u. 9, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3025
Fax: (36-1) 327-3087
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/polsci/polsdir.html
Nenad Dimitrijevic, Head of Department
Gabor Toka, Director of the PhD Program
Krisztina Zsukotynszky, Department Coordinator, MA Program
Eva Lafferthon, PhD Program Coordinator
Degrees offered:
Average length of study:
Graduation requirements:
Master of Arts in Politics and the Political Economy of the PostCommunist Transition;
Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science
MA: 10 months; PhD: 3 years
MA: 32 course credits; thesis and its defense (8 credits)
PhD: 32 course credits; comprehensive examination; dissertation and its
defense.
The Department of Political Science offers Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy programs in Political
Science registered by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York (US).
The Master’s Program
The Master’s program offers a standard curriculum in political theory and methods. Against this background
departmental offerings focus on the politics and political economy of the post-communist transition within a
comparative and international perspective.
The MA program has a dual goal: it educates future scholars in political science or political economy,
particularly those who intend to teach in or about the region; and it trains those who plan to become policymakers or expert civil servants in their countries.
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Entry requirements
Students seeking admission to the Political Science Department’s MA program must meet the general CEU
admissions requirements. Successful applicants typically hold a first degree in economics, history, law,
political science or sociology, although other degrees will be given consideration. Applicants must attach a
500-word typewritten statement of purpose, as well as evidence of good TOEFL results (a minimum score of
213/550 is required).
The PhD Program
The Political Science PhD program is aimed at training a new generation of scholars who will be able to
contribute much needed skills and standards in political science to the academic institutions of Central and
Eastern Europe. The PhD program is primarily oriented towards academia.
The first year of PhD studies ends with a comprehensive examination. Those who pass the comprehensive
examination have the right to submit and defend their dissertations at the Department of Political Science. Full
fellowships are not available for all eligible individuals who fall into this category, and therefore funding for
continuation into doctoral candidacy is highly competitive.
Entry requirements
Applicants to the PhD program must attach a 500-word statement of purpose, as well as a three-page summary
of their MA thesis.
The Department of Political Science admits the following categories of students to its PhD program:
) students from the department’s MA program with a 3.3 grade point average or higher and a strong
thesis;
a) graduates of other universities with an MA in political science, provided that, in addition to holding a
3.3 grade point average or higher, they submit a three-page summary of their MA thesis in English
and present evidence of good TOEFL results a minimum score of 250/600 is required);
b) applicants from CEU or other universities with an MA in a social science discipline other than politics
(preferably economics, sociology, law, history or anthropology). In addition to having earned a 3.3
grade point average or higher, they should submit a three-page summary of their MA thesis in
English, and commit themselves to earning 16 credits in courses from the core curriculum of the
Department’s MA program in the course of their PhD studies. Alternatively, they can take a general
exam in these subjects before submitting their dissertation. Applicants must present evidence of solid
TOEFL results (a minimum score of 250/600 is required).
Applications for the International Relations track of the Political Science Department PhD program will be
evaluated by a joint IRES-Political Science selection committee.
Alumni Profile
Upon completion of the program, students will have acquired a solid background in political science and
political economy, both generally and in relation to post-communist Central and Eastern Europe. Students will
also be familiar with basic trends of the transition process currently underway throughout the region.
In the past, students have gained or returned to employment in a variety of fields, including higher education,
politics, political analysis, the media, civil service and other related areas. Alumni from the region have also
been successful in securing positions and funding for additional Master’s or PhD programs in Western
universities or research organizations.
At present, CEU alumni of the Department of Political Science with whom the university is in contact are
studying and employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
36
19
6
7
19
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Public Sector: Government
Public Sector: State-owned Business
Self-employed
10
1
2
Program Structure
The MA program is designed to lead from theoretical analysis to empirical research on the most important
questions about the exit from communism and future political developments. Students are expected to master
the theoretical, methodological and analytical skills necessary for empirical investigation by the end of
Semester I, when the weight of the curriculum is on subjects such as rational choice theory, political
philosophy and statistics. The focus of the curriculum in Semester II is on empirical issues, with a bias towards
the political problems of transitions to, and consolidation of, democracy and a market economy. Compact
courses taught by outstanding visiting academics are integrated with comprehensive courses in the core
program. Minor changes in the curriculum are possible from year to year.
Selected List of Master’s Courses (academic year 2000/2001)
Core Courses
Students are required to take one course from each of four core groups.
Core Group 1:
Elementary Statistics for Political Research I
Elementary Statistics for Political Research II
Core Group 2:
“Political Theory”
Contemporary Political Philosophy
Constitutional Democracy
Core Group 3:
“Comparative Politics”
Comparative Political Research I
Comparative Political Research II
Core Group 4:
“Political Economy”
Macroeconomics and Politics
Rational Choice
Elective Courses
Political Ideologies
Power, Authority and Trust
Post-Communist Constitutionalism
European Politics
Studies in Political Sociology and Political Psychology
Political and Cultural Elites
The Politics of European Integration
Money and Politics: Political Corruption and Party Funding in Comparative Perspective
Mass Media, Nationalism and Minorities
Information Society
Economic Reform and Privatization
Economic Sociology
Lessons from Transition
Foreign Policy Decisions/Institutional Analysis
From Embedded Liberalism to Global Neo-Liberalism
The Political Economy of the Welfare State
Mandatory Courses
Academic Writing
Workshop in Thesis Research and Writing
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Selected List of PhD Courses (academic year 2000/2001)
PhD program courses are organized in the following tracks:
Social and Political Theory
Comparative Politics
Public Policy/Political Economy
International Relations
Students must earn 16 credits from their major and 8 credits from their minor track. The remaining 8 credits
can be chosen freely from the PhD courses offered by the department, or from other departments’ PhD courses,
provided that those are cross-listed in the PhD program of the Political Science Department.
Comparative Politics
Labor and the European Integration
Concepts and Methods in Comparative Politics
Area Studies: Russian Politics
The Application of Theoretical Concepts in Research on the European Union
Voting Behavior
Political Economy
Public Choice and the Economic Roles of the State
Exposed to the World Market: The Political Economy of Sectors
Comparative Capitalism
Comparative Analysis of Firm Behavior
Bureaucracy and Public Administration
Political Economy of Public Services
Theory of Choice, Game Theory and Social Choice
Globalization, Regional Integration and the Transformation of the Nation State
Public Policy
Bureaucracy and Public Administration
Democracy and Rights
Media and Public Policy
Political Economy of Public Services
Voting Behavior
Public Choice and the Economic Roles of the State
Comparative Analysis of Firm Behavior
Social and Political Theory
Democratic Theory
Decision and Explanation: Groundings in the Philosophy of Social Sciences
Political Legitimacy
Theory of Choice, Game Theory and Social Choice
Globalization, Regional Integration and the Transformation of the Nation State
Legal Theory
Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy
International Relations
The Social Construction of IR
The New Political Economy of Development
The Application of Theoretical Concepts in Research on the European Union
Understanding Security: Dimensions and Selected Aspects
Globalization, Regional Integration and the Transformation of the Nation State
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Prospectus Seminar
Labor and the European Integration
Exposed to the World Market: The Political Economy of Sectors
Other Courses
Survey Methodology
Multivariate Statistical Analysis
SOCIOLOGY
Warsaw
Nowy Swiat 72, 00 330 Warsaw, Poland
Tel: (48-22) 828-8009
Fax: (48-39) 122-047
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/socio/socdir.html
Andrzej Rychard, Head of Department
John Fells, Administrative Director
Degree offered:
Average length of study:
Graduation requirements:
Master of Arts in Society and Politics;
Master of Arts in Economy and Society;
Master of Arts in Culture and Society;
Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
MA: 12 months; PhD: three years
MA: 20 course credits; 15,000-word dissertation and its
defense (12 credits)
PhD: 20 course credits; dissertation and its defense.
The Programs
The Department of Sociology offers three 12-month Master of Arts degrees all accredited by the University of
Lancaster (UK): an MA in Society and Politics; an MA in Economy and Society; and an MA in Culture and
Society. PhD studies, validated by the Polish Academy of Sciences, have also been offered in the department
since October 1997. The department operates in collaboration with the Institute of Philosophy and Sociology
of the Polish Academy of Sciences, one of the most prestigious centers for sociology in Central and Eastern
Europe.
Departmental offerings focus on the social and political issues of Central and Eastern Europe and the former
Soviet Union. In addition, the department offers the opportunity for training in research methodology
(including survey analysis, secondary data analysis and other techniques), computing, statistics, comparative
sociology, philosophy of social sciences, social theory and several areas of applied social research. Students
are encouraged to undertake comparative work and utilize material from their home countries.
Situated in the Polish Academy of Sciences’ Staszic Palace in the heart of the old center of Warsaw, the
department is in close proximity to the University of Warsaw. Together, the libraries within these institutions
represent the largest collection of sociological works in Central and Eastern Europe. In addition, the Academy
of Sciences and the Institute of Sociology and Philosophy host numerous conferences, including the 1995 Fifth
World Congress for Central and East European Studies, organized in collaboration with the CEU Sociology
Department. Such academic events allow students to meet potential colleagues as well as some of the most
respected sociologists and political scientists from around the world.
The department draws professors from Polish academic institutions and from internationally recognized
sociological institutions outside the country including CNRS, France; Humboldt University, Germany; the
Institute for Advanced Studies, Austria; the New School for Social Research, US; Salford University, UK;
Rutgers University, US; the University of California, Los Angeles, US; and the University of Siena, Italy.
Entry Requirements
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Applicants to the Sociology Department must meet the general CEU admissions requirements. Applicants to
the MA program must attach a 500-word typewritten essay on the relevance of their academic/professional
backgrounds to further studies at CEU and their future career goals. Applicants to the PhD program must
attach a three-page typewritten PhD research proposal. Successful applicants typically have a first degree in
social sciences or humanities as well as some experience with statistical methods.
Alumni Profile
Upon completion of the program, graduates will have had the opportunity to acquire solid experience with
research methodology and social theory, enabling them to pursue a wide range of further study or career
options. These include the PhD programs offered by the department itself, by Warsaw’s Graduate School for
Social Research or by various regional and Western universities. They also may work in one of the many fields
that utilize applied social research, or follow a career in public administration.
At present, CEU alumni of the Department of Sociology with whom the university is in contact are studying
and employed in the following fields:
INSTITUTION TYPE
%
Continuing Studies
Non-profit: Education & Research Institutions
Non-profit: International Organizations
Non-profit: Public Interest & Advocacy Groups
Private Sector: Business
Public Sector: Government
Public Sector: State-owned Business
Self-employed
48
21
3
4
15
6
2
1
PhD and Research Degrees
Graduates of the department’s Master’s programs interested in pursuing doctoral studies may be considered for
admission to the department’s PhD program or to the Graduate School for Social Research (GSSR) which, like
the CEU Department of Sociology, shares the building of the Institute of Philosophy and Sociology of the
Polish Academy of Sciences. In both cases, students study for the PhD awarded by the Institute of Philosophy
and Sociology of the Polish Academy of Sciences. CEU students following the department’s British-style
research degree will nevertheless be encouraged to attend courses offered by the GSSR, tailoring a program to
complement their own research interests. At least part of the second year of the PhD program will be spent in a
university in Western Europe or North America.
Internship and Research Opportunities
Opportunities for internships are available for students upon consultation with their supervisors.
Program Structure
The department offers three one-year, post-graduate MA programs each divided into a Pre-Session, two
semesters and a spring session. While each part is self-contained, together they form the basis of a study
program that begins with an intensive, compulsory course load (Semester I), moves into more advanced option
tracks while gradually introducing students to independent research (Semester II) and finally concentrates on
completion of the Master’s dissertation (spring and summer sessions). Intensive tutorial contact throughout the
year is an important part of all three programs.
Each MA Program comprises nine 20-hour courses, of which two are compulsory and seven are optional.
Each course is assessed on the basis of one 3,000-word essay. The 12-month MA program is completed by
presentation of a 15,000-word dissertation.
Of the optional courses, students must:
EITHER
choose a minimum of one course per term (and a maximum of five in total) from Track 1 and a total
of not more than one course from Track 2 or 3 to be awarded an MA in Society and Politics on
successful completion of the program.
OR
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
choose a minimum of one course per term (and a maximum of five in total) from Track 2, and a
total of not more than one course from Track 1 or 3 to be awarded an MA in Economy and
Society on successful completion of the program.
OR
choose a minimum of one course per term (and a maximum of five in total) from Track 3,
and a total of not more than one course from Track 1 or 2 to be awarded an MA in
Society and Culture on successful completion of the program.
It is expected that MA dissertations will address subjects within the area of the chosen MA track.
Selected List of Courses
TEACHING PERIOD 1
MA in Society and Politics
Political Sociology: Jacek Wasilewski
Research Methods: Henryk Banaszak, Miroslawa Grabowska
Social Problems and Social Policy: Antonina Ostrowska
Social Psychology: Miroslawa Marody
Social Science Statistics and Computing: Henryk Banaszak
Social Theory: Sven Eliaeson
MA in Economy and Society
Economy and Society I: Andrzej Rychard and Michal Federowicz
Political Economy of Policy Reform: Michal Federowicz
Research Methods: Henryk Banaszak, Miroslawa Grabowska
Social Theory: Sven Eliaeson
Social Science Statistics and Computing: Henryk Banaszak
Social Psychology: Miroslawa Marody
MA in Culture and Society
Research Methods: Henryk Banaszak, Miroslawa Grabowska
Social Science Statistics and Computing: Henryk Banaszak
Social Psychology: Miroslawa Marody
Social Theory: Sven Eliaeson
Theories of Culture: Marian Kempny
The Holocaust and its Cultural Meaning: Annamaria Orla-Bukowska
TEACHING PERIOD 2
MA in Society and Politics
Contemporary Social Theory: Slawomir Kapralski
Culture and Nationalism: Zdzislaw Mach
Law and Society: Wiktor Osiatynski
Qualitative Methods: Miroslawa Grabowska
Quantitative Methods: Henryk Banaszak
Sociology of Institutional Change: Andrzej Rychard
Women’s Political Identity: Joanna Regulska
MA in Economy and Society
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Alternative Routes to Modernity: Jacek Kochanowicz
Contemporary Social Theory: Slawomir Kapralski
Economy and Society II: Michal Federowicz
Qualitative Methods: Miroslawa Grabowska
Quantitative Methods: Henryk Banaszak
Sociology of Institutional Change: Andrzej Rychard
MA in Culture and Society
Contemporary Social Theory: Slawomir Kapralski
Culture and Nationalism: Zdzislaw Mach
Law and Society: Wiktor Osiatynski
Qualitative Methods: Miroslawa Grabowska
Quantitative Methods: Henryk Banaszak
Sociology of Institutional Change: Andrzej Rychard
The Roma in Central/Eastern Europe: Slawomir Kapralski
SPRING SESSION
MA in Society and Politics
Advances in Qualitative Methods: Daniel Bertaux
Advanced Quantitative Applications: Tamas Rudas
Political Culture: Jan Kubik
Seminar on Corruption: Leslie Holmes
Urban Sociology: Jiri Musil
MA in Economy and Society
Advances in Qualitative Methods: Daniel Bertaux
Advanced Quantitative Applications: Tamas Rudas
Human Dimension of Transnational Companies’ Operations in Transforming Economies: Dariusz Filar
Management for Eastern Europe: Piotr Ploszajski
Seminar on Corruption: TBA
Urban Sociology: Jiri Musil
MA in Culture and Society
Advances in Qualitative Methods: Daniel Bertaux
Advanced Quantitative Applications: Tamas Rudas
Mass Media and Society: Tomasz Goban Klas
Political Culture: TBA
Urban Sociology: Jiri Musil
Varieties of Contemporary European Cultures: Jiri Musil
FACULTY MEMBERS
Daniel Bertaux (CNRS Paris), Visiting Professor
Sven Eliaeson (CEU), Professor
Michal Federowicz (Polish Academy of Sciences), Visiting Professor
Gabriel Fragniere (TESCA, Belgium), Visiting Professor
Dariusz Filar (University of Gdansk), Visiting Professor
Miroslawa Grabowska (University of Warsaw), Visiting Professor
Tomasz Goban Klas (Jagiellonian University), Visiting Professor
Leslie Holmes (University of Melbourne), Visiting Professor
Slawomir Kapralski (CEU), Associate Professor
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Marian Kempny (Polish Academy of Sciences), Visiting Professor
Jan Kubik (Rutgers University), Visiting Professor
Steven Lukes (LSE/University of Siena), Visiting Professor
Zdzislaw Mach (Jagiellonian University), Visiting Professor
Miroslawa Marody (University of Warsaw), Visiting Professor
Edmund Mokrzycki (CEU/Polish Academy of Sciences), Professor
Jiri Musil (CEU University Professor), Recurrent Visiting Professor
Annamaria Orla-Bukowska (Jagiellonian University), Visiting Professor
Wiktor Osiatynski (CEU), University Professor
Piotr Ploszajski (Warsaw School of Economics), Visiting Professor
Joanna Regulska (Rutgers University), Visiting Professor
Andrzej Rychard (CEU/Polish Academy of Sciences), Professor
Tamas Rudas (CEU/ Eotvos Lorand University), Professor
Jacek Wasilewski (Jagiellonian University), Visiting Professor
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
JOINT PROGRAM WITH BARD COLLEGE: STUDY ABROAD IN BUDAPEST
Bard College and Central European University have entered into a special agreement to provide study abroad
opportunities for undergraduate students from North America for a semester at CEU.
Bard/CEU Study Abroad
The Bard/CEU program offers a unique opportunity for qualified North American undergraduates to study at
CEU’s Budapest teaching site. Students will be able to choose from graduate-level courses offered as part of
CEU’s general curriculum as well as language courses and special courses designed to broaden their
knowledge of Central and Eastern European history, politics and society. The language of instruction at CEU is
English.
Students participating in the Bard/CEU Study Abroad Program may choose from the course offerings of all
departments and programs located in Budapest. Enrollment in PhD courses should be discussed in advance
with Bard College.
Internships
Students participating in the Bard/CEU program may have the opportunity to participate in internships at the
various network programs of the Open Society Institute - Budapest, a leading non-profit organization in
Central and Eastern Europe and part of the Soros foundations network. Other opportunities may be available
through the Open Society Archives and research projects affiliated with CEU. Students may receive credit for
internships, provided that they are pursued in collaboration with an independent study project.
Credit
Credit for study in the Bard/CEU program and academic transcripts will be provided by Bard College.
Five-Year Master's Program
A special feature of the Bard/CEU program is the Five-Year MA option. Students who perform well (normally
an average of 3.3 and two grades of B+ or better in a single CEU department) will be considered for admission
into appropriate CEU graduate programs upon completion of their undergraduate degrees at their home
institution. Courses taken as part of the Bard/CEU program may count towards CEU Master's programs.
Students admitted to CEU through the Five-Year MA option will be charged CEU tuition and fees and will be
eligible to apply for CEU financial aid.
Tuition and Fees*
Fall/Spring Semesters:
Tuition (per semester)
Housing (out of dormitory)**
Food (estimate)
Local Transportation
Residency Permit
Health Insurance
Total Cost Per Semester***
$6,000
estimated $1500 per semester or $300 per month
$600 per semester or $120 per month
$75 per semester or $15 per month
$25 (one-time cost)
available for all non-Hungarian students (please see the CEU website for a
description of medical services and health insurance)
$8,200 (estimated)
* Valid for the academic year 2001/2002.
** CEU has its own modern dormitory facility. A limited number of single dormitory rooms are available at
$155 per month or $775 per semester. Apartments outside the dormitory are available at a cost of $150-$500
per month, depending on location, size, number of roommates, etc.
*** Cost does not include airfare to Budapest, which is normally $800-$1,200. Cost estimates are current at the
time of printing, but are subject to change without notice.
Study Trips: Budapest's location makes it an ideal starting point for study trips to historically important
centers such as Berlin, Paris, Prague, Vienna and Venice. Extended trips to Greece or other selected
destinations are also possible.
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
For further information about this program and application contact:
Carlton Rounds
Institute for International Liberal Education
Bard College
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504 USA
Phone: (845) 758-7076
Fax: (845) 758-7076
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/bard_ceu.html or www.bard.edu
Sabra Volek
International Relations and European Studies 2001 – Joint Program with Bard College: Study Abroad in
Budapest
United States of America
“Having multiple perspectives is the key to studying political science and international relations. That’s why I
love how CEU brings people together from all over the world to study. It creates the perfect setting to explore
complex issues from many angles. ”
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL AND RESEARCH PROJECTS
External Russian Law School (ERLAWS)
ERLAWS aims to improve legal education in Russia and, towards this goal, educates Russian legal scholars
who will assist in the reform of curricula and teaching methods once they have returned to their respective
universities.
For more information, please contact the CEU Department of Legal Studies.
Jewish Studies Project
The Jewish Studies Project sponsors events to promote academic exchange concerning issues in modern
Jewish history. Activities include an extensive lecture series and Summer University courses.
For more information, please contact the CEU Department of History.
Center for Policy Studies
The Center for Policy Studies (CPS) was established in Budapest in March 2000. CPS is concerned with
research and the policy implications of social research. It concentrates on issues of importance to the region
and related to the mission of building open societies. Located at CEU, the center will seek to enhance the
university's status as an institution that accumulates and creates regionally-relevant knowledge and critical
thinking about issues of public policy.
The first issues CPS is examining are the interface between globalization and regionalization; regional
sustainability; transnational cooperation; governance and public administration; anti-discrimination and equal
opportunities, and the delivery of public health services.
The International Policy Fellowships Program of the Open Society Institute is affiliated with CPS.
Contact information:
Denis J. Galligan, Director
Violetta Zentai, Research Coordinator
Zsuzsa Gabor, Program Manager
Center for Policy Studies
Central European University
Nador u. 11, Rooms 318-321
1051 Budapest, Hungary
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu/cps
Humanities Center
CEU has established a Humanities Center to encourage the creation of new knowledge, working especially on
the dimension of the “shifting boundary between the local and universal.” In many of the social sciences and
some of the humanities, and even in the natural sciences, this dimension has become of great theoretical
interest recently. The center plans to choose a theme each year, within this general framework, and to invite
scholars to work together for shorter or longer periods. The Humanities Center will be looking for “successful,
dissatisfied scholars” who are willing to experiment theoretically with the foundations and limits of their
disciplines. In addition, since CEU is part of the Soros foundations network, which supports local NGOs in
more than fifty countries worldwide, the center intends to invite experts from NGOs to interact with the
scholars, supplying much-needed local knowledge which would serve as an empirical basis for their theorizing.
The Humanities Center is guided by an International Advisory Council chaired by Ian Buruma. As a first
theme we chose Behavioral Economics since it is on the cutting edge of economics.
Contact Information:
Viktor Bohm, Director
CEU Humanities Center
www.ceu.hu/humanities_center.html
Tel.: (36-1) 235-6126
Fax: (36-1) 235-6168
E-mail: [email protected]
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
OUTREACH: PROGRAMS FOR PROFESSORS AND PROFESSIONALS
SPECIAL AND EXTENSION PROGRAMS
Special and Extension Programs (SEP) comprises three units: the Special and Extension Programs Office;
CEU Summer University (SUN); and the Curriculum Resource Center (CRC). SEP provides a bridge
between CEU and the Open Society Institute (OSI), and a bridge between CEU and its target countries. To this
end, SEP provides programs for university professors, researchers and professionals from Central and Eastern
Europe, the former Soviet Union, Mongolia and other emerging democracies. SEP also provides organizational
and intellectual support for OSI projects (especially HESP, the Higher Education Support Program).
SEP works on three levels: transregional programs (those initiatives that are available to eligible applicants
from all of its target countries); microregional programs (primarily focused on providing support to HESP’s
regional projects in Southeastern Europe and Central Asia); and country specific projects (usually at the
request of HESP and the relevant national Soros foundation). In addition, SEP is now working with other
emerging democracies as a part of CEU’s globalization.
SEP specializes in the following services: making available the academic and physical resources of CEU for
the benefit of its target countries and of OSI’s network programs; managing projects on behalf of OSI
(especially where such projects will benefit from cooperation with CEU); developing and supporting CEU’s
own outreach efforts; and providing training and other technical assistance to support OSI’s work in capacity
building for higher education.
The following programs all belong to the transregional aspect of SEP’s work. For further information on other
projects, please visit the SEP website (www.ceu.hu/sep). All of the following projects below are provided on a
full scholarship basis to those citizens of Central and Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, Mongolia and
other emerging democracies who are selected through an open and competitive application procedure. For
more details on eligibility for specific programs, visit the web pages shown or contact the program by email at
[email protected]
Summer University
The Summer University (SUN) is an academic program for university professors, administrators and
professionals held every July and August at CEU in Budapest and in Warsaw. It offers a series of intensive
two- and three-week courses in social sciences and humanities to encourage and promote regional academic
cooperation and curriculum development by bringing together young faculty in lectures, seminars and
workshops. For more information see the SUN website at http://www.ceu.hu/sun/sunindx.html or contact
[email protected]
Curriculum Resource Center
The Curriculum Resource Center (CRC) is CEU’s outreach program for social sciences and humanities
teaching in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. With an emphasis on curriculum
development, teaching and dissemination of academic resources to higher educational institutions in the region,
CRC facilitates academic exchange, course development and curriculum reform activities. CRC offerings
include the following:
CRC Workshops
CRC workshops are discipline-specific week-long workshops held throughout the academic year for teachers
in higher education. An online service and syllabi collection are also available at http://www.ceu.hu/crc/.
Course Development Competition
The Course Development Competition is an annual competition to fund university teachers in specific subject
areas to prepare and teach a new course. A ten-month stipend, money for teaching aids, etc., are provided to
the successful applicants.
For more information see the CRC website at: http://www.ceu.hu/crc/ or contact [email protected]
Senior and Junior Fellowship Program
CEU offers one- to six-month research fellowships for regional scholars. These are post-doctoral fellowships
designed to give scholars the opportunity to research and write at CEU in cooperation with a relevant academic
department. For further information visit the website at www.ceu.hu/sep or contact the program by email at
[email protected]
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CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Hosting a CEU Lecturer
This program enables institutions of higher education in the region to receive CEU professors for short lecture
visits (up to seven days). The purpose is to create or strengthen ties between CEU and the host institution, to
respond to specific regional needs in terms of academic expertise and to allow both academics and students to
experience CEU’s approach to teaching. For further information visit www.ceu.hu/sep or contact the program
by email at [email protected]
Faculty Newsletter
Twice a year, CEU produces a Faculty Newsletter with information on opportunities for faculty from
CEE/fSU, for instance, summer schools, research grants, etc. The Newsletter is sent to over 1000 regional
universities and is available online at http://www.ceu/hu/sep/.
Additional Information and Events
Special and Extension Programs offers a number of other opportunities for faculty. These include discipline
specific workshop series and special conferences. For further details on all of the programs mentioned here or
information on other such opportunities visit http://www.ceu.hu/sep/or contact [email protected]
AFFILIATED WITH CEU: IMC GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
The IMC Graduate School of Bussiness is affiliated with Central European University. Students interested in
the degree programs offered by the IMC Graduate School of Business should contact [email protected] or visit
http://www.imc.hu.
PART III: TEACHING SITES AND FACILITIES
Central European University operates two teaching sites and a Residence and Conference Center in Budapest,
Hungary. Its primary administrative offices are in Budapest, the teaching site of all departments and programs
except the Department of Sociology, which is located at the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, Poland.
In the years since the disintegration of the Soviet system, Central Europe has been steadily recovering its
traditional ways and roles. Arguably one of the most important of these is the region’s function as the
economic and cultural crossroads of Europe. A number of Central European countries incorporate bustling
international centers for business, diplomacy, tourism and education while also maintaining their distinctive,
rich cultural heritage. The capital cities of Budapest and Warsaw exemplify this.
BUDAPEST TEACHING SITE, HUNGARY
Nador u. 9. H-1051 Budapest
Telephone: (36-1) 327-3000, 3009, 3272, 3088, 3119
Fax: (36-1) 327-3211
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu
[email protected]
[email protected]
The City
Home to 1.9 million people, Budapest is the political, cultural, intellectual and economic center of Hungary.
The city incorporates the architectural elegance of nineteenth century Habsburg era buildings, fin de siecle, art
nouveau and art deco styles with the urban character of a sprawling metropolis. Budapest is divided by the
Danube river, which separates Buda from Pest. Buda, the older section, contains most of the medieval and
Roman areas, cultural attractions and monuments. Pest is a thriving commercial and administrative center,
brimming with restaurants, cafes, clubs, shops and offices.
Budapest offers something for everyone. For those interested in music, the State Opera House and the Ferenc
Liszt Music Academy produce world-class operas and concerts. Theater can be enjoyed at the Madach and
Nemzeti theaters as well as a variety of small venues around the city offering both contemporary and classical
repertoires in several languages. The city is home to numerous museums, including the Museum of Fine Arts,
the Mucsarnok Art Gallery, the National Museum and the Museum of Applied Arts. Sporting enthusiasts will
find numerous opportunities to watch or participate in European football, basketball, hockey and other
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competitive athletics. Budapest also offers many pleasant areas for cycling, running, roller-blading or hiking.
The city boasts numerous modern cinemas, cafes, pubs, discos and rock clubs where students can enjoy their
evenings. Several English-language publications advertise a variety of cultural and entertainment events around
the country.
Teaching Facilities
The CEU educational buildings are located in the heart of the capital. These buildings include both educational
facilities and administrative offices. The main buildings are two monument buildings and a newly constructed
faculty tower. One of the monument buildings, of particular historical importance, is a palace built for the
Festetics family, which had a leading role in the history of the Central and Eastern European countries from the
18th century onwards. The palace was designed by one of the most famous architects of Central and Eastern
Europe, Mihaly Pollack. For its careful renovation of the palace, CEU received the “Urban Rehabilitation of
1995” award from the Architects’ Association. A modern, ten-story faculty tower was constructed behind the
two monument buildings and now houses most of the university’s faculty offices and classrooms. The tower is
also the site of the library and the university auditorium, an amphitheater-style lecture hall. The Oktober 6
building, which is linked to the rest of the CEU complex, houses two of the university’s departments. There are
two further buildings housing administrative, service and recreation facilities.
Computer Services
Five computer laboratories on the main campus and one at the CEU Residence and Conference Center (CEU
dormitory), with more than 180 PCs and several Macintosh computers, are available for student use. The
dormitory rooms are equipped with an individual PC, connected to the CEU computer network. Furthermore, a
computer rental scheme has been initiated through which 100 PCs are available. PhD students have access to
study rooms specially designated for the use of doctoral students by their respective department.
Computer lab PCs are equipped with general software packages (MS Office software—MS Word, MS Excel,
MS PowerPoint and MS Access) and are connected to the Internet and email. Additionally, statistical packages
(SPSS and SAS), 60 CD-ROM databases, online databases (WestLaw, EBSCO) and other specialized software
packages are available.
Language Teaching Center
The Language Teaching Center (LTC), in collaboration with departmental writing instructors, provides writing
support for CEU students throughout the academic year. As well as introductory courses in academic writing
during the Pre-Session, the center also offers thesis writing courses, workshops and individual writing
consultations for both MA and PhD students all year round. The LTC also runs a Multimedia Learning Center
jointly with the CEU Library and has developed an extensive website for independent learning.
More information about the LTC can be found at http://www.ceu.hu/misc/ltc.html.
Library Resources
CEU’s Library holds the largest collection of English-language materials in social sciences and humanities in
Central and Eastern Europe. New materials are constantly acquired, particularly within the disciplines of
CEU’s academic departments and programs. Recently published English-language monographs and serials in
economics, environmental sciences, history, international relations and European studies, law and political
science can be found in the collection; many are unique to the region. The basic literature of specialized fields
such as gender studies or nationalism is also richly represented. The library aims to become a leading research
and information center in the region using all available means of information technology.
The library currently holds over 120,000 monographs and subscribes to approximately 1,200 periodicals, about
80 percent of which are in English. Also available are extensive back issues of numerous periodicals in
hardbound or microfiche form and a working papers and thesis collection containing various research
documents. The library also holds all working papers connected with the teaching activity of CEU.
Several web-access and CD-ROM databases are available to users through CEU’s local network. These
include Columbia International Affairs Online, Economist Intelligence Unit’s Country Reports, EBSCOhost,
EBSCO online, Environmental Abstracts, European Law Library Online, International Financial Statistics,
Justis Celex, Keesing’s Record of World Events Online, National Periodical Database and several
bibliographic databases.
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In order to utilize rapidly developing information technology more fully, a Multimedia Library has been
established to facilitate language improvement and individual study. There are four video-consoles, four taperecorders and six multimedia PCs for members' use. The Multimedia Library collection contains CD-ROMs,
tapes, discs, videocassettes and language books. Some of the library’s holdings are located in external
institutions serving as branch or affiliated libraries. The largest of these is a medieval studies collection of
approximately 10,000 volumes located in the Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE) Library, Budapest.
The library catalogue and additional information may be accessed on the website at http://www.library.ceu.hu.
Open Society Archives at Central European University
The Open Society Archives at Central European University was established in 1995. Its acquisition policy is to
provide research resources for the history of communism and the Cold War, for human rights issues, and the
activities of the Soros foundations network. The first acquisition was the records of the Research Institute of
Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty (RFE/RL). This is a wealth of documentation—press clippings and
reports, biographical information, in-house reports and external publications—on subjects, people and issues
monitored and reported by RFE/RL. Since its foundation, the Archives has supplemented and augmented this
core holding with material on war crimes in the former Yugoslavia from the International Human Rights Law
Institute in Chicago, the samizdat material of Budapest mayor Gabor Demszky (a complement to the Polish
and Russian samizdat in the RFE/RL records), the records of the International Helsinki Federation on Human
Rights, and the records of the Index on Censorship. The Archives holds a significant amount of audio-visual
material, the most important of which includes videos generated in a project to monitor television news
broadcasts in three countries of the former Yugoslavia, and video copies of proceedings of the Hague Tribunal
on War Crimes in the former Yugoslavia.
The Archives also has an associated library of books and periodicals (both paper and microfilm), the core of
which is the library of the RFE/RL. It holds the periodicals collection of both RFE/RL and the Open Media
Research Institute and includes publications from Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, as
well as journals from Western countries about the history, culture and politics of the region. There is
significant coverage from 1950 to the present in over 30 languages, consisting of approximately 6,000 serial
titles. In addition there is a small but rapidly growing collection of archival and information management
publications.
Additional information on the Open Society Archives may be obtained at http://www.osa.ceu.hu/.
CEU Academic Bookstore
The CEU Academic Bookstore serves the university community as well as other educational institutions in the
area. The bookstore covers two floors and a wide spectrum of academic subject areas from social sciences to
business and management. A free ordering service is also available.
HOUSING AND DORMITORY ARRANGEMENTS IN BUDAPEST
CEU students have two options for accommodation in Budapest: they may choose CEU dormitory housing or
rent an apartment in the city. Students are not guaranteed a place in the dormitory, but each option works
satisfactorily. Fellowship students will receive a stipend based on the housing option they select.
CEU Residence and Conference Center (Kerepesi Dormitory)
The CEU Residence and Conference Center (Kerepesi Dormitory or dormitory) is a modern residence complex
located in the 10th District in Budapest. It provides air-conditioned single rooms for up to 250 students; each
room is equipped with a personal computer and a private bathroom. The dormitory is run as a hotel-type
service, and students can find many other facilities such as a small shop for various personal articles; cafeteria,
restaurant and a pub; sports center with swimming pool and fitness room, basketball and tennis courts, etc. On
every floor there is a quiet lounge with a coffee machine, microwave oven and a refrigerator; a TV room; and a
laundry room. Bed linen is provided, but not towels and toiletries. It is not permitted to cook or keep food in
the rooms. Dormitory students are automatically enrolled in the CEU Meal Plan. Meals can be taken either at
the dormitory or at the cafeterias in the main academic building.
The dormitory accommodates single students only, from both Master’s and doctoral programs. Students with
families, children, partners, or with pets, must opt for the out-of-dormitory housing.
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Out-of-Dormitory (Off-Campus) Housing
Since the CEU Dormitory cannot house the entire student body, many students have to find off-campus
housing in Budapest. The Financial Aid & Residential Life Office maintains a database of flats and helps
students looking to rent a flat. Upon arrival in Budapest at the beginning of the academic year, those students
who need to find off-campus accommodation have two weeks to find an apartment. In the meantime, CEU
provides them with temporary hotel accommodation.
Meal Plan
Student residents of the dormitory who receive financial aid from CEU are automatically enrolled in the CEU
Meal Plan. They can use their ID cards to purchase breakfasts and main meals at the dormitory restaurant and
at the CEU dining facilities. The current Meal Plan provides one breakfast every day and one main meal on
every weekday. As of October 1, 2001 CEU is planning to initiate a new meal plan system which will be based
on a monthly credit allowance. Each student will be able to purchase a whole menu or individual meals, and
the price of the meal will be deducted as a unit from the total number of credits. There will be no restrictions as
to breakfasts and main meals. There will be a limit on the number of unused credits that can be carried forward
from one month to the next. Students will be informed of the details of the new Meal Plan shortly before the
new program is initiated.
Food Services
Food services are provided in several areas of the university, including a cafeteria, the Student Club Buffet,
and a restaurant on the top floor of Faculty Tower.
Fellowship students residing in the CEU Residence and Conference Center are automatically enrolled in the
CEU Meal Plan as a part of their financial aid packages, entitling them to a certain number of meals per month.
Non-fellowship students and those students living outside the Residence may purchase the CEU Meal Plan or
individual meals for a set fee.
WARSAW TEACHING SITE, POLAND
Nowy Swiat 72. 00 330 Warsaw, Poland
Telephone: (48-22) 828-8009
Fax: (48-39) 122-047
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu
The City
Warsaw, Poland’s capital, is often viewed as a powerful symbol of the Polish spirit. Completely destroyed by
the Nazis at the end of World War II, the city has painstakingly rebuilt its Old Town, reproduced from
collective memory, photographs and paintings. Visitors are nevertheless often surprised by the city’s
spaciousness, by its parks, gardens and riverside walks.
Old Town Square, the medieval Barbican Gate and the Royal Castle serve as the cornerstones of a vibrant
district bustling with cafes, restaurants and craft shops. Extending southward from the Old Town is the Royal
Way, winding through the most picturesque parts of the city to Wilanow Palace 15 kilometers away. Leaving
the Royal Castle, one passes beautiful churches as well as numerous aristocratic palaces and bourgeois
residences before arriving at the University of Warsaw and the Academy of Sciences’ nineteenth century
Staszic Palace, home of CEU’s Warsaw teaching site.
Poland is known for its strong academic traditions, especially in social sciences, and Warsaw has a rich
academic community with several universities. Where there are many students, there is always a dynamic
nightlife, and there are numerous cafes, pubs, clubs and sporting events around.
More cultural entertainment can be found in Warsaw’s numerous museums and galleries, including the
National Museum, the Ethnological Museum, the Zacheta Art Gallery and the City Historical Museum.
Classical concerts are held outdoors in many of the city’s parks, the Grand Opera House, the Philharmonic
Concert Hall, the Operetta Theater and the Warsaw Chamber Opera, among other venues. The Warsaw
Summer Jazz Days, the Warsaw Autumn (a contemporary music festival) and the Jazz Jamboree are popular
attractions for students. Attractive nature sites, easily reached by train or bus, provide numerous opportunities
for hiking, camping, skiing and other outdoor activities.
Teaching Facilities
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The buildings where CEU’s activities are regularly carried out belong to the Polish Academy of Sciences.
Teaching, administrative and student services offices, and language and computer labs are located at the
Academy’s Staszic Palace. Here, students take advantage of the historical setting of the Institute of Philosophy
and Sociology.
Library Resources
Resources available to students at the Warsaw teaching site can be found in two different libraries. The first,
housed in the Staszic Palace, holds approximately 10,000 volumes in English and subscribes to 60 journals on
all aspects of sociology, research methodology and other social sciences. A small collection of working papers,
general reference material and current affairs magazines are available for student use as well. A variety of CDROM databases are available on the premises, including Public Affairs Information Services (PAIS), Social
Sciences Source, Justis Celex and Sociofile. The other library, known as IFIS PAN, is the joint library of the
Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, the Faculty of Sociology and Philosophy of the University of Warsaw
and the Polish Philosophical Society. IFIS PAN is housed in a building near the Staszic Palace. This facility
contains over 210,000 items, including some 167,000 books, 37,000 periodicals and 12,000 items under the
heading “special collections.” Of these, one-third is in English, one-third is in Polish and the remainder is in
French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin and Russian.
The following additional CD-ROM databases are available to CEU students in the IFIS PAN Library: Index of
Philosophers, International Statistics Yearbook, EUROSTAT and Social Sciences Index (full text edition).
Computer Facilities
In Warsaw, a computer laboratory holds about 20 PCs equipped with general software packages (MS
Windows, NT Workstation, MS Office—MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint, MS Access), SPSS statistical
package, Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator. A number of PCs and two notebook computers are
available through a computer rental scheme to PhD students. The library has seven workstations with access to
the library catalogue and CD-ROMs.
Accommodation
CEU Warsaw arranges for students to reside in shared private flats throughout the city.
PART IV: STUDENT SERVICES AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES
DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT SERVICES
CEU offers a comprehensive range of services tailored to address the international character of the student
body and to enhance the overall CEU experience. The Department of Student Services forms a division under
the Vice President for Student Services. The offices are located on the second floor of Monument Building,
and a staff of about 20 full-time employees, many of whom are CEU graduates, work directly with the students.
The Student Advising Center is located in the passageway between the Nador u. complex and the Oktober 6 u.
building. The Budget and Finance Office of CEU is a separate division that also provides a number of services
to students. These two units provide most of the administrative support for students throughout the year.
The Vice President for Student Services (VPSS) is responsible for student recruitment and admissions, student
publications, financial aid, residential life and dormitory activities, student personal and academic records,
student educational and career advising, and alumni affairs. The VPSS also serves as liaison to the Academic
Pro-Rector, the Academic Secretary and the faculty on admissions and academic matters and faculty committee
work. The VPSS is responsible for student orientation (Pre-Session and Zero Week).
For a complete listing of the Department of Student Services and contact information, please visit at
www.ceu.hu, the section on “Student Services and Alumni.”
Admissions Office
The Admissions Office facilitates the selection process by relaying decisions made by the selection
committees, arranging English language proficiency and other admissions examinations for applicants residing
in countries where Soros foundations operate. The office monitors all selection activities to ensure compliance
with the university admissions policy. In addition, the Admissions Office coordinates a wide variety of
information sessions, open houses and visits by CEU faculty and staff members to introduce prospective
students to the university and its offerings.
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Financial Aid & Residential Life Office
The Financial Aid & Residential Life Office oversees all arrangements for residency in Hungary, housing in
Budapest, ID cards, stipend administration, and day-to-day logistical needs of the students. The Office
maintains all non-academic student records such as enrolment confirmation forms, financial aid forms,
residency permit documents, etc. The office organizes university-wide student social and cultural activities.
Staff members welcome student participation and programming suggestions.
Student Records Office and Registration
The Student Records Office maintains information about students’ academic progress, issues transcripts,
certificates and CEU diplomas, and verifies non-CEU transcripts. Academic files of the students are
maintained here, and any student who has not submitted certified copies and an official English language
translation of his/her previous degree/final transcript during the application procedure must present the missing
documents to the Student Records Office upon arrival. Until then enrollment at CEU will remain conditional.
CEU has designed, developed and implemented a unique, in-house academic information network called the
University Information System. Course registration, add/drop and grading are computerized, and students are
responsible for conducting all necessary procedures in connection with registration. This continually
developing system integrates most of the administrative functions students have to deal with during their stay at
CEU. The University Information System also provides online information about courses, grades and class
schedules.
Student Advising Center
The Student Advising Center is a resource and counseling center for students planning their careers after CEU.
A full-time Educational Advisor and a full-time Career Advisor meet with students for individual consultations
or in groups, organize workshops and pre-departure orientations. The center maintains a resource library and
database of educational materials and career information resources and job opportunities. Electronic
information is regularly posted for all CEU students and alumni. The Educational Advisor provides students
with information on post-graduate programs around the world and maintains an extensive collection of
university prospectuses, directories of higher education institutions and a database of funding opportunities
from a variety of sources. The Career Advisor helps students find employment upon graduation from CEU.
The mission of the career service is to empower students to develop career strategies, and to facilitate their
transition from study to employment.
The Student Advising Center also administers the Doctoral Research Support Grants: it maintains up-to-date
information on the existing student exchange agreements with other institutions, special scholarship
opportunities and individual relations with previous CEU student host institutions. Application forms for the
various programs and institutions are available at the Student Advising Center.
The Career Advisor works closely with the Alumni Affairs Office to deliver an alumni-student mentoring
program. This provides career networking and advice opportunities for current students from alumni who have
had similar experiences returning to the job market.
Alumni Affairs Office
The Alumni Affairs Office has been active since February 1998. It serves to develop closer links between the
university and its graduates, helping them to remain involved in university affairs, and provides assistance to
CEU’s educational and career advising services. CEU alumni provide a resource for current students on
opportunities available and experiences encountered after graduating from the university.
The Alumni Affairs Office provides a variety of ways for graduates to continue their involvement with the
university while offering a range of services either free of charge or at reduced rates. All graduates of the
university are automatically members of the CEU Alumni Association upon completing their CEU degrees.
OTHER SERVICES PROVIDED TO STUDENTS
Academic Advising
Upon entry to CEU, students participate in a three-week Pre-Session, during which time they become
acquainted with their academic programs and the resources which are available to them. Each department or
program provides information and advice on graduation requirements and general expectations for the
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academic program as well as advice on course offerings and general academic direction. Each department
offering doctoral studies also has a Doctoral Studies Director who guides the academic program of these
students. Furthermore, the Academic Pro-Rector holds office hours for students to discuss problems or
concerns of an academic nature.
Student Orientation (Pre-Session and Zero Week)
New students are normally expected to arrive in Budapest on the last weekend of August. For new students
CEU organizes a three-week comprehensive orientation to all university services, including the full range of
logistical arrangements accompanying their relocation to Hungary. The Pre-Session is mandatory for all new
students.
Similar but separate arrangements apply to the students of the Department of Sociology in Warsaw.
Pre-Session begins with an orientation to legal residence in Hungary, the collection of documents for residency
permits, distribution of ID cards and orientation for housing arrangements. Non-dormitory students are fully
assisted in finding suitable accommodation during the first two weeks after arrival. The Budget and Finance
Office advises on banking arrangements and various payment procedures. During the first week students are
also introduced to the buildings and facilities, including a tour of the CEU Library.
The second week of Pre-Session is normally dedicated to training on the University Information System, use of
library databases and use of all CEU computing resources. Students are required to take formal training and a
test in all these areas in order to receive log-in rights to the computer network and to matriculate. The
Information Technology Support Unit (ITSU) holds a training session on the ethical use of the computer
resources, information retrieval, storage and printing quotas, operation guidelines and procedures.
In the third week, students are normally introduced to the range of available advising and counseling services,
such as educational and career advising, as well as to student activities and the role of the Student Council. The
Alumni Affairs Office helps in organizing meetings between new students and alumni, while departments
supplement the general Pre-Session activities with department-orientated events and introductory courses.
Throughout the whole Pre-Session period, the Language Teaching Center (LTC) conducts an ongoing
academic writing program for CEU students. The purpose of this program is to ensure that students have the
necessary linguistic, stylistic and organizational skills to be able to complete any academic writing task
necessary for graduate level work at CEU, as well as in other professional or academic English-speaking
environments.
The last week, Zero Week, is dedicated to academic orientation. Departments and programs schedule lectures
and presentations by professors who summarize the content of the courses they will teach over the course of
the year. These lectures are open to all students, who are encouraged to attend in order to make the most of
their selection of courses.
Health Services and Insurance
Budapest
Two doctors hold office hours at the CEU teaching site in Budapest on a daily basis during the week, free of
charge to students. They maintain a network of specialists throughout Budapest who may treat patients under
the CEU Health Insurance service. Furthermore, the university maintains a cooperative arrangement with the
Transplantation Clinic, one of the best medical facilities in Hungary, and a medical facility in the vicinity of
the teaching site. Students covered through CEU’s Health Insurance service have full access to both clinics’
services free of charge.
CEU provides health insurance through a contract with a major international insurance company. This
insurance is available to those full-time students of CEU Budapest who do not hold a valid Hungarian Health
Insurance card. Effective January 1, 1997, this category includes all non-Hungarian students of CEU Budapest.
Other members of the CEU Budapest community may be eligible for this plan pending the approval of the
Executive Vice-President.
Students who do not wish to be covered by the health insurance provided through CEU must present proof of
adequate alternative insurance coverage valid for their entire stay in Hungary as a condition of enrollment.
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Warsaw
A private health insurance company covers Warsaw students.
Counseling Services
CEU takes the emotional care of its community very seriously. As the majority of students are studying abroad
for the first time in a demanding academic environment in which studies are conducted in a language that is
frequently not their own, CEU can, at times, be a stressful environment. The university offers the following
counseling services: strictly confidential psychological counseling for students, faculty, and staff by two inhouse psychologists; and peer counseling for students in the dormitory provided by Residence Advisors. The
aim of CEU’s counseling services is to provide help and support in the following areas: personal and emotional
problems, different forms of anxiety such as panic, performance or social anxiety, phobias, interpersonal
difficulties, depression, eating disorders, adjustment problems or coping with loneliness.
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
CEU students have the opportunity to get involved in many social and extra-curricular activities throughout the
academic year. Most of these initiatives are based on student interests and specific requests. The Office of
Residential Life & Financial Aid provides logistical and/or financial support. Students in Warsaw will receive
similar support from the administrative staff. In addition, Warsaw students visit the Budapest teaching site in
the spring semester.
Normally, at the beginning of the academic year, a survey is made among students, asking them for their
preferences. Following upon this various clubs are formed, e.g. drama club, literary club, special interest clubs.
Students are encouraged to submit proposals for activities that would fit with their busy academic schedules.
For example, CEU would provide support to celebrate national and cultural holidays or help organize
international events, dinners, or parties. In addition, there is a small exhibition hall on the first floor of the
Monument Building, which, during the past academic year, showed photo exhibitions of pictures taken by
several CEU students. In other cases, students participate in numerous activities organized by their department
or program or by their faculty. Again, they can obtain support from the Financial Aid & Residential Life
Office.
For students resident in the Kerepesi Dormitory, CEU supports a system of electing Residence Advisors (RAs)
for each floor. RAs collect ideas, organize student feedback, and maintain permanent contact with the
dormitory management. The dormitory is also prepared to support a film club, a DVD rental system, sports
tournaments, monthly national evenings and student-organized exhibitions.
Due to the relatively short time that most students spend in Budapest, many student activities start and end
within the given academic year because the next student generation may be interested in other topics. The
Residential Life Officer welcomes student ideas and suggestions and works with the students to enhance the
CEU living environment.
Athletics
For students interested in sports, CEU provides the facilities of two sports centers: one located in the main
complex, at Nador u. 15 building and another in the dormitory. If there is sufficient demand, CEU organizes
aerobics or yoga classes, games and tournaments. The Sports Center near the main academic complex offers
weight lifting, a work-out room, badminton, basketball, volleyball, indoor soccer, table tennis and sauna. The
CEU Residence and Conference Center offers exercise rooms, a sports field, a basketball court, a swimming
pool and a sauna. In Warsaw, arrangements are made with community facilities. Previous sports options have
included pre-paid passes for dance classes, swimming, basketball, table tennis and volleyball, as well as blocks
of time in local gyms. Intramural competitions are arranged according to student interest.
STUDENT COUNCIL
The Student Council at CEU is the primary student government body. Members are elected at the beginning of
each academic year and subsequently represent the student body on numerous university committees. The
Council has been active in a number of areas, including initiatives in the development of various student
services.
PART V: PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS, APPLYING TO CEU, THE
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ADMISSIONS PROCESS
PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS
CEU welcomes applications from students all over the world who accept its mission and a curriculum tuned to
that mission. CEU admits students based on academic merit. As a private institution of higher education, CEU
follows the admissions policy adopted by its Senate. The admissions criteria are set up in accordance with
internationally recognized standards and tests. Admission to Central European University is based upon an
overall evaluation of the candidate, including academic achievement, strength of recommendations, English
language proficiency and general compatibility with the aims of the department or program. Most departments
seek students who will contribute to the development of emerging democracies worldwide and in the CEE/fSU
region after their graduation from CEU, whether in academic or professional careers.
The admissions process lasts approximately five months, and is divided into four stages.
For the 2001/2002 academic year, CEU received 5069 applications from 64 countries. Prospective students
should bear in mind that admission to CEU is highly competitive.
Application forms and additional information can be obtained from:
Central European University
Admissions Office
Nador u. 9
1051 Budapest
Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3009, 327-3272, 327-3208, 327-3210
Fax: (36-1) 327-3211
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu (Prospective Students)
Eligibility and Language Requirements
The following admissions and eligibility requirements represent the university’s general policies. Individual
departments and programs may establish additional criteria for admission as deemed necessary, including, but
not limited to - specifying appropriate academic backgrounds and requiring higher minimum language test
scores. Please refer to the relevant department/program section of this Admissions Bulletin for additional
information.
Eligibility Requirements
Eligibility Requirements for Master’s Programs
Applicants must have earned a first degree from a recognized university or institution of higher education or
provide documentation indicating that they will earn their first degree from such an institution by the time of
enrolling in a CEU Master’s program.
Eligibility Requirements for Doctoral Programs
Applicants must have earned a Master’s degree from a recognized university or institution of higher education
or provide documentation indicating that they will earn such a degree by the time of enrolling in a CEU PhD or
SJD course of study.
Eligibility Requirements for Doctoral Support Programs
Applicants to Doctoral Support Programs must be enrolled in a doctoral program at another recognized
university or institution of higher education.
Language Requirements
Applicants must demonstrate proficiency in English. Those applicants whose first language is not English must
submit standardized English language test scores, e.g., the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).
Other substitute tests of English language are noted below.
Minimum test scores for Master’s, Doctoral Support and Doctoral programs are outlined in the tables below.
Minimum Test Scores Required by Master’s and Doctoral Support Programs:
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Test Type
TOEFL (Computer based)
TOEFL (Paper version)
CEU Administered TOEFL (Paper version)
International English Language Test (IELTS)
Cambridge Proficiency Examination
Cambridge Advanced English Test
Minimum Score Required
213
550
550
6.5
C
B
Minimum Test Scores Required by Doctoral Programs:
Test Type
TOEFL (Computer based)
TOEFL (Paper version)
CEU Administered TOEFL (Paper version)
International English Language Test (IELTS)
Cambridge Proficiency Examination
Cambridge Advanced English Test
Minimum Score Required
250
600
600
7
C
A
Some departments may require higher minimum test scores (see the departmental sections of this Bulletin for
details).
Exceptions to Minimum Requirements for English Language Proficiency
Candidates for admission who fall into one of the following categories may request exemption from the
language testing requirements:
a) Applicants who have spent a minimum of two consecutive academic years of study in a recognized Englishlanguage university or institution of higher education in Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom
or the United States of America within the last five years may be considered exempt from standardized
language testing at the discretion of the department head. All other non-native speakers of English will be
required to submit test scores.
b) Current CEU students and alumni applying to PhD programs are typically exempt from English language
proficiency testing requirements.
c) Applicants who do not reach the minimum entrance requirements for English Language Proficiency may be
offered admission only in exceptional cases as determined by the department/program head in consultation
with the Academic Pro-Rector.
English Language and Other Admissions Tests Organized by CEU
In the process of applying to CEU, students from CEE/fSU and other countries where Soros foundations
operate1 may request to take the institutional TOEFL administered annually by CEU. Candidates based in these
countries may sit for English language proficiency examinations provided through the Soros foundations
network. This examination will be in the form of an institutional paper-based TOEFL. CEU will administer
department-specific admissions examinations along the same procedure and on the same day as the
institutional TOEFL.
Applicants from all other countries will be required to take the standard tests indicated under “Language
Requirements,” offered throughout the world, and submit scores along with their applications, or by February
15, 2002 for Economics and by March 18, 2002 for all other departments and programs. These students may
be offered admission on a conditional basis. In such cases, CEU reserves the right to administer its own test
upon the student’s arrival in Budapest and require some additional coursework. These applicants may also
1
Complete listing available in the last section of this Admissions Bulletin
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apply for some financial contribution from CEU toward the cost of the relevant test. These applications will be
considered on a case-by-case reimbursement basis.
Additional Requirements
Departments and programs may establish additional requirements for admission as deemed necessary. Please
see the relevant department/program section of this Admissions Bulletin for details.
Note on Late Applications
CEU will consider all applications received by the deadline or postmarked by (including) January 7, 2002.
Applications received after the deadline will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Late applicants must
demonstrate outstanding potential to be considered for admission.
APPLYING TO CEU
APPLICATION DEADLINES: JANUARY 7, 2002 (for all applicants not currently enrolled at CEU)
FEBRUARY 15, 2002 (applicants enrolled at CEU applying to Economics PhD)
MARCH 29, 2002 (applicants enrolled at CEU applying to all other programs)
Applicants planning to submit their applications to the CEU coordinators in their home countries
should inquire about the internal deadline set by the coordinators. In some cases, there may be an earlier
deadline due to the holiday season in each country. Applications mailed directly to CEU must bear a postmark
no later than January 7, 2002.
ADMISSIONS CALENDAR:
February 15, 2002 (GRE and GMAT test results due for Economics applicants)
March 9, 2002 (CEU administered institutional TOEFL and department-specific examinations)
March 18, 2002 (applicants to all other departments and programs must submit standard test results)
April 8, 2002 – May 3, 2002 (Interviews)
May 21, 2002 (CEU decisions on acceptance offers and notifications to accepted students)
APPLICATION DOCUMENTS
All applicants must provide CEU with the following documents by the deadlines previously outlined. Students
must submit one original and one photocopy of the application materials for each degree program that
they are applying to. Students may apply to maxiumum of two departments or programs. All application
materials should be submitted to the Admissions Office or the CEU coordinator in the local Soros foundation
or educational advising center.
EMAIL ADDRESS
CEU suggests that all applicants who do not have a permanent email address set up an email account through
any of the free providers (Yahoo, Netscape, Hotmail) in order to facilitate faster communication with the
Admissions Office. These accounts should be checked at least once every week.
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General Admissions Requirements
Checklist
1. Completed CEU Application Form (one original and one copy for each degree)
2. Essay or statement of purpose (see department or program special requirements below)
3. A full curriculum vitae or resume, including a list of publications, if any
4. Academic Records:
4.1. Copy of the diploma in the original language with an ink stamp and a signature of a notary public
or an authorized university official
4.2. Official English language translation of the diploma with an ink stamp and a signature by an
official of the translating company or an authorized university official
4.3. Copy of the final transcript in the original language with an ink stamp and a signature of a notary
public or an authorized university official
4.4. Official English language translation of the transcript with an ink stamp and a signature of the
translating company or an authorized university official
4.5. If the applicant is enrolled in the final year of his/her academic program an official letter in
English with an ink stamp from the university, stating that the student is expected to complete his/her
course of study by August 1, 2002
5. Two (or three, depending on the department or program’s requirements) letters of recommendation assessing
the applicant’s ability to conduct graduate-level work and his/her potential for a successful academic or
professional career in, or related to, the region
6. Proof of English proficiency, defined as an official score report from one of the English language
examinations listed under Language Requirements; applicants from CEE/fSU and other countries where Soros
foundations operate may request to take the institutional TOEFL and CEU examinations administered and
sponsored annually by CEU.
7. Special requirements may also be requested by the particular department/program to which the applicant is
seeking admission.
Additional/Specific Department or Program Requirements:
Department of Economics
 Applicants must obtain a minimum TOEFL score of 570 (CTOEFL 230)
 Applicants to both MA program options must attach a 500-word typewritten essay on the relevance of
their academic/professional background to further studies at CEU, and indicate preferred research topic
and future career goals.

Applicants to the one-year MA degree option: attach a one-page typewritten letter along with outlines of
all relevant courses taken.
 Applicants to the MS in Banking and Finance must submit a GMAT score along with the application
materials by February 15, 2002, at the latest.
 Applicants to the PhD program: GRE test scores along with the application materials, by February 15,
2002, at the latest; three letters of recommendation, and a three-page typewritten research proposal
Department of Environmental Sciences and Policy
 Applicants must attach a 250-word typewritten statement of career goals and reasons for applying to this
program.
Program on Gender and Culture
 Applicants must attach a 500-word typewritten essay on the relevance of their academic/professional
background to further studies at CEU and future career goals.
Department of History
 Applicants to the MA program must attach a 500-word typewritten outline of their proposed research topic
and indicate a preferred stream of interest.
 Applicants to the PhD program must attach three letters of recommendation and a three-page typewritten
research proposal.
Department of International Relations and European Studies
 Applicants to the MA program must attach a 500-word typewritten statement outlining their study and
research interests.
 Applicants to the PhD program must refer to the entry requirements for the PhD in Political Science.
Department of Legal Studies
 Applicants to the LLM and MA programs must attach a 300-word handwritten essay, on a specific legal or
human rights issue of special interest to them.
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 Applicants to the SJD and DSP programs must attach a 2000-word typewritten detailed research project.
Department of Mathematics and its Applications
 Applicants to the PhD program must submit three letters of recommendation.
 Applicants to the PhD program must attach a 250-word summary of the applicant’s mathematical and
educational background, achievements and future goals.
Department of Medieval Studies
 Applicants to the MA program must attach a 500-word typewritten outline of their proposed research
topics.
 Applicants to the PhD program must attach a three- to five-page typewritten description of the proposed
PhD thesis and a one- to two-page research proposal.
Nationalism Studies Program
 Applicants to the MA program must attach a 500-word typewritten outline of their proposed research topic
and one writing sample, e.g., a term paper of minimum ten pages.
 Applicants to the History PhD program with a specialization in Nationalism Studies must attach a 500word typewritten outline of their proposed research topic and one writing sample, e.g., a term paper of a
minimum of ten pages.
Department of Philosophy
 Applicants must attach a 500-word typewritten statement of purpose.
Department of Political Science
 Applicants to the MA program must attach a 500-word typewritten essay on the relevance of their
academic/professional background to further studies at CEU and future career goals.

Applicants to the PhD program must attach a 500-word typewritten statement of purpose and a three-page
typewritten outline of their MA thesis.
Department of Sociology
 Applicants to the MA program must attach a 500-word typewritten essay on the relevance of their
academic/professional background to further studies at CEU and future career goals.
All applicants to Doctoral Support Programs must submit a three- to five-page page description of their
PhD theses including research questions, theory and methodology, current status of their projects, a one- to
two-page research proposal and a letter of support from their PhD advisor in addition to the required two
letters of recommendation.
THE ADMISSIONS PROCESS
Stage One: Evaluation of Documentation
Upon receipt of all application materials each departmental/program selection committee evaluates
applications on the basis of past academic performance, strength of recommendations, work experience, the
applicant’s expectations of the program and his/her future plans. After this initial evaluation, applicants are
either invited to continue with the selection process or are rejected.
Approximate date of notification: between February 15 and February 18, 2002.
Stage Two: Testing and Evaluation of Test Scores
English Language Testing
Applicants who pass the first stage of the admissions process and who have not submitted test scores according
to the language or department specific test requirements, are invited to take an institutional TOEFL
examination and other department specific tests on March 9, 2002. Students from CEE/fSU and other
countries where Soros foundations operate may take an institutional TOEFL examination and other department
specific tests at the local Soros foundation or educational advising center. Testing is held at the majority of the
Soros foundation offices listed in this Admissions Bulletin.
Applicants from all other countries will be required to take standard tests offered throughout the world, as
indicated in the entry requirements of each department, and may be offered admission on a conditional basis.
The deadline for submission of these test scores is February 15, 2002,for Economics and March 18, 2002,
for all other departments and programs. In such cases, CEU reserves the right to administer its own test
upon the student’s arrival in Budapest and to require some additional coursework.
All other applicants, who have submitted standard test scores together with their applications, are notified of
their progress.
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Economics MA applicants: Mathematics Examination
Since the Economics MA program incorporates a substantial mathematical component, all applicants are
required to take a mathematics examination covering basic calculus, probability theory and linear algebra. The
examination will be held on March 9, 2002, at the majority of the Soros foundation offices listed in this
Admissions Bulletin. Applicants not residing in countries where Soros foundations operate, or those who were
not able to attend the CEU mathematics examinations, are required to submit an official GRE score.
The GRE is a compulsory requirement for Economics PhD candidates, and must be taken indivudally by each
candidate. Scores are due by February 15, 2002.
Please note that samples of previous years’ mathematics tests may be obtained from the local Soros foundation
offices or from the CEU Admissions Office.
Legal Studies Applicants: Legal Reasoning Test/Legal Essay
Please refer to the description of the Department of Legal Studies for further details about the Legal Reasoning
Test, and the Legal Essay Test.
Mathematics PhD Applicants: Mathematics Examination
All applicants are required to take a mathematics examination covering analysis, basic algebra, and probability
theory. The examination will be held on March 9, 2002, at the majority of the Soros foundation offices listed in
this Admissions Bulletin. Applicants not residing in countries where Soros foundations operate, or those who
were not able to attend the CEU mathematics examinations, are required to submit an official GRE score by
March 18, 2002.
Medieval Studies Applicants: Greek, Latin and/or Old Church Slavonic Languages Examination
Due to the need for additional language skills, all applicants to the Department of Medieval Studies are
required to take a Greek, Latin and/or Old Church Slavonic examination depending on the nature of their
research interests. The department will specify language requirements. The examination will be held on March
9, 2002, at the majority of the Soros foundation offices listed in this Admissions Bulletin. Applicants not
residing in countries where Soros foundations operate will be notified of special arrangements.
Please note that samples of previous years’ tests may be obtained from the local Soros foundation offices, the
CEU Admissions Office or from the departmental web page: http://www.ceu.hu/medstud.
Evaluation of Test Scores
Upon receipt of examination scores, each departmental/program selection committee conducts a competitive
re-evaluation of the complete application file and invites selected individuals to continue with the admissions
process or rejects their application. Please note that meeting the minimum language requirement does not
automatically result in being invited for an interview.
Approximate date of notification: between March 25 and April 30, 2002
Stage Three: Interview
CEU faculty or local CEU representatives interview selected applicants in their home countries whenever
possible and necessary under the departmental evaluation procedures. Telephone interviews may also be
conducted under certain circumstances. In situations where the applicant cannot be interviewed in person or a
telephone interview is deemed impractical, the department/program may, at its discretion, accept the
applicant’s documentation as sufficient data for an evaluation. All interviewing is typically conducted during
the month of April. Some departments, such as Economics and Legal Studies, do not conduct interviews but
make their final decisions based on the application materials and test result.
Interviews are used to further evaluate the applicant’s knowledge of and interest in a particular academic field
as well as any related experience, language ability and his/her personal goals. Interviewers also evaluate the
extent to which the applicant will contribute to and benefit from the department/program in question.
Stage Four: Final Evaluation
Those applicants who passed the first three stages of the admissions process are once again evaluated at this
point by a departmental/program selection committee before final decisions of acceptance are made. Each
applicant is considered on the basis of past academic achievement, strength of recommendations, English
language competency, intellectual merit and general compatibility with the goals of the department/program.
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Departmental/program selection committees may choose to offer an applicant admission, place him/her
on a waiting list or decline admission.
Notifications of Acceptance, Waiting List or Rejection
The CEU Admissions Office issues the official notification of acceptance, waiting list or rejection. Decisions
may also be communicated through the CEU coordinators in the local Soros foundations. Students who are
offered acceptance or placed on the waiting list will be notified shortly after May 25, 2002. Rejected
candidates will be notified shortly after May 31, 2002.
Acceptance by Order of Student Choice
Students may apply to two separate departments at CEU by sending one original application with the
appropriate attachments and one photocopy for each degree program. Application materials should be sent
together and first and second choice should be clearly indicated. Admission will be offered on the basis of
“first choice” indicated on the application. If the “first choice” department rejects the applicant, but the
“second choice” department accepts the applicant, the student will be offered admission directly to his/her
“second choice”. If both departments accept the applicant, an admission offer will be made from the “first c
hoice” department, and not both. Only in exceptional cases and upon written justification, students may be
permitted to change the order of their preference if they notify the CEU Admissions Office by March 22, 2002.
Application Form
The CEU Application Form is available as a separate attachment to the Admissions Bulletin or can be
downloaded in electronic format from the CEU website at http://www.ceu.hu.
PART VI: TUITION AND FEES
TUITION AND FEES
Please note that the tuition and fees outlined below are based on academic year 2001/2002 and are subject to
change.
Tuition
Room and board and the Student Welfare Fee are not included in tuition fees.
Per Academic Year
Per Installment
One year Master’s Program
Two year Master’s Program
LLM, SJD and MA in Human Rights
First year of doctoral program up to the
Comprehensive Examination
Enrollment Fee for doctoral programs
after the Comprehensive Examination, up
to max. five years (with the exception of
Legal Studies)
Enrolment Fee for Legal Studies doctoral
students after the Comprehensive Exam,
up to max. five years
PhD in Economics (18 months
coursework)
PhD in Economics enrollment fee after
the Comprehensive Examination
For fellowship doctoral students who
have used up 46 stipends, work-scheme
extension up to six months
Doctoral Support Programs
Per Credit
$11,200
$11,200
$12,200
$11,200
$5,600
$5,600
$6,100
$5,600
$360
$360
$510
N/A
$1,530
$765
N/A
$1,670
$835
N/A
$16,830
$5,600
N/A
$3,060
$1,530
N/A
$2,550
N/A
Enrollment fee of $20
per month
$7,650
General Deposit
General Deposit
Non-Fellowship Students
Fellowship Students
Dormitory Damage Deposit
(Budapest only)
Budapest
Warsaw (guideline figures)
$500
$50
$25
$500
$50
N/A
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Student Activities Fee
Student Activities Fee
$500 per academic year
$500 per academic year
Accommodation at the CEU Residence and Conference Center (Budapest)
Single dormitory room
Breakfast
Lunch/dinner
CEU Meal Plan (mandatory for resident
students)
$5 per night
$1.35 per meal or
approximately $400 per academic year
$2.70 per meal or
approximately $750 per academic year
$105 per month
$1,050 per academic year
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Students residing in the CEU Residence and Conference Center are obliged to take the CEU Meal Plan. The
Meal Plan is available separately to students who do not reside in the CEU Residence and Conference Center.
Alternatively, students may pay for each individual meal without joining the CEU Meal Plan.
Accommodation in the City and Other Local Expenses
Local expenses are provided as estimates only and may vary.
Budapest
Approximate cost of a shared apartment
in Budapest and Warsaw per resident
Breakfast/lunch/dinner at a local
restaurant. Please note that meals at
student coffee bars are generally less
expensive.
Metro pass
Warsaw (guideline figures)
$100-200 per month plus utilities
$200-300 per month plus utilities
$2-5 per meal
$5-8 per meal
$14 per month
$15 per month
Miscellaneous Charges
Students must expect to pay some miscellaneous charges such as replacement of ID card, locker key, deposit
toward renting a computer, transcript costs, readers and other.
FINANCIAL REGULATIONS AND PAYMENT INFORMATION
General Deposit
A general deposit is due upon the student’s confirmation of acceptance of a place of study at CEU. For most
departments, the Enrollment Confirmation Form must be returned by the end of May. For fee-paying students,
the general deposit will be deducted from the first installment of tuition and fees due. From this amount, CEU
will retain a damage deposit of $300, which will be refunded at the end of the academic year. For students
receiving full or partial financial aid from CEU, the general deposit is $50. The deposit can be wire-transferred
directly to CEU or paid in other forms indicated under “Methods of Payment.” This deposit will be refunded
by CEU at the end of the academic year.
The general deposit is not refundable after June 30 except under the conditions outlined as follows:
After June 30, the general deposit is used as a damage deposit for the given academic year. The deposit will be
refunded shortly before graduation or departure from CEU, less any damage costs assessed or fees outstanding
on the student’s account.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
Tuition and fees are payable in two installments:
• 1st installment:
50% of tuition & fees due on or by September 13, 2002
(less general deposit paid by fee-paying students)
• 2nd installment:
50% of tuition & fees due on or by January 10, 2003
Individual payment plans may be negotiated with the Budget and Finance Office upon request.
Methods of Payment
Payment of tuition fees is determined - amount, deadline of installments – by the Budget and Finance Office
(BFO). There are several methods of payment: cash, wire-transfer, check, or money order.
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1. If a student chooses to pay in cash this should be in USD at the Budget and Finance Office cash desk.
2A. For wire transfers of the tuition fee in USD from the United States of America:
Bank name: Citibank N.A.
Bank address: 111 Wall Street, 6th Floor
New York, NY 10043, USA
ABA code: 21000089
Name of the account: Central European University Corporation
Account number: 40749438
2B. For wire transfers of the tuition fee in USD from other countries:
Bank name: Inter-Europa Bank Rt.
Bank address: 1054 Budapest, Szabadsag ter 15, Hungary
SWIFT code: INEBHUHB
Name of the account: Central European University Corporation
Account number: 9001983202
3. When payment of the tuition fee is in the form of a check, please make payable to Central European
University and mail to CEU, Budget and Finance Office, Nador u. 9, 1051 Budapest, Hungary.
All other forms of payment must be approved by the CEU Budget and Finance Office. For details, please
contact Romulus Filip, Financial Controller, Extension: 3057, Email: [email protected] Students who fail to make
these payments by the stated deadlines may forfeit their place of study or have university services (e.g.
transcripts, etc.) withheld until the account is paid in full.
Dormitory Room Fees
Dormitory room fees in the CEU Residence and Conference Center are due on the first day of each respective
month. The Budget and Finance Office will issue a Statement of Payment Due eight days before the due date.
Late Payments, Late Fees and Penalties
On tuition fee payment due dates, the BFO sends a Statement of Account to each student whose payment is
about to come due, detailing the status of his/her account.
If a student’s account becomes overdue, the BFO will issue a formal reminder, and a $20 late fee will be added
to the balance. The student will then be granted a period of five working days to pay the overdue amount. After
five working days, the student will be sent a second Reminder on Overdue Tuition Fee and the individual’s
access to university services will be suspended. If the student’s account is not settled within three working days
of the 2nd reminder, his/her student status will be terminated for non-payment.
Refund
In case of withdrawal, the following refund schedule will apply:
If a student withdraws before September 30 (Semester I) or January 20 (Semester II), CEU will refund 80%
of the tuition and fees installment paid.
If a student withdraws by the end of the official drop/add period (in the first and second semester), CEU will
refund 40% of the tuition and fees installment paid.
There will be no refund of tuition fees after the official end of the drop/add period or after April 1. Further
information on add/drop dates is available in the Student Records Manual. In the case of a student leaving
CEU before June 30, the General Deposit will be refunded before departure, less any outstanding dues.
Leaving Form
At the end of the academic year, each student is required to submit a leaving form signed by each major
administrative unit indicating that the individual has no outstanding debts or obligations to the university.
Failure to submit the form, or unresolved obligations, will result in the withholding of the individual’s diploma
and other university services, according to the CEU Policy on Holds.
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PART VII: FINANCIAL AID
GENERAL INFORMATION
Admission to CEU is based on an overall evaluation of the candidate including academic achievement, strength
of recommendations, English language competency and general compatibility with the goals of the
department/program. CEU admits candidates who accept the mission of CEU and its curriculum – tuned to that
mission. CEU admits students based on academic merit. Central European University does not discriminate on
the basis of – including, but not limited to – race, color, national and ethnic origin, religion, gender or sexual
orientation in administering its policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and
other school-administered programs.
Each academic year, CEU awards approximately 700 tuition waivers and a number of student living packages
in the form of a: 1) full CEU fellowship, or 2) partial financial aid.
Full or partial financial aid is awarded based on the department/program academic merit ranking and the
students’ “Request for Financial Aid” section H. of the Application Form. The full CEU fellowship covers
tuition, room and board, student activity fee, health insurance, and a monthly stipend. Travel and visa grants
are also available. CEU awards partial financial aid according to a sliding scale, starting with a full fellowship,
a full tuition waiver and a partial living scholarship, a full tuition waiver only, and partial tuition waiver. The
exact number of CEU fellowship awards is each year determined by the university’s management, within the
framework of the policy approved by the Board of Trustees.
Financial Aid Eligibility
From the 2001/2002 academic year, the university will continue to focus on individuals and organizations in
the CEE/fSU region while extending the CEU Fellowship Program worldwide. Continued priority concerning
the award of scholarships will be given to students from countries of the post-communist world and emerging
democracies. However, students from all over the world are eligible to apply for financial aid from CEU.
No student may receive more than one fellowship (or partial financial aid) to study at CEU, except in the event
of vertical movement along a course of study, e.g., MA to PhD (this does not preclude the award of a New
York MPhil from doctoral degree granting programs). Students seeking to pursue a horizontal course of study
(e.g., a second Master’s degree) may apply for admission, but will not be considered for a second CEU
fellowship award or partial financial assistance.
Recipients of full fellowships and partial financial assistance may be subject to means testing and must follow
the CEU guidelines attached to the fellowship. CEU reserves the right to alter the terms of the fellowship
award and eligibility requirements at any time.
Tuition waivers and scholarships are awarded for the immediately following academic year only. These awards
are valid for one year and are not transferable if the student defers enrollment. In the case of a two-year
Master’s program, the award can be extended for the second year, based on academic performance achieved
during the first year, and in accordance with the academic merit tuition waiver procedures.
For applicants from the United States: Central European University is not a participating institution in the
Student Financial Assistance Program authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act (Title IV, HEA
Program). However, CEU provides assistance to interested students in obtaining other loans.
In Summary
Each student offered admission to Central European University is accepted on the basis of academic merit.
Ability or willingness to pay tuition and fees does not strengthen a student’s application nor does it provide for
any kind of preferential treatment. Decisions on financial aid are made on the basis of merit ranking of the
students to be accepted. This list is drawn up by the departments/programs and decisions on financial aid based
on a sliding scale are taken in consultation between the department/program and a central Financial Aid
Committee. Decisions on financial aid will be announced together with the offer of acceptance to CEU.
Financial aid offers are not negotiable after the submission of the signed Enrollment Confirmation Form.
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FORMS OF FINANCIAL AID
CEU Fellowship
The CEU Fellowship is a full financial aid package, which covers tuition and all other fees. CEU fellowship
recipients will receive a monthly stipend determined by their housing choice.
Tuition Fee Waiver
Full or partial tuition fee waivers are awarded on the basis of academic merit ranking during the admissions
process.
Full Living Scholarship
The full Living Scholarship covers room and board, health insurance, student activity fee and a monthly
stipend.
Partial Living Scholarship
The Partial Living Scholarship provides students with accommodation in the CEU Residence and Conference
Center in Budapest, covers their meals, the student activity fee and health insurance. Student recipients of this
scholarship must provide their own pocket money.
Students accepted in the Sociology program in Warsaw, Poland, may apply for a Full or Partial Living
Scholarship. The partial scholarship will cover only housing costs.
Travel Grant
Students residing in countries that are not immediate neighbors to Hungary (or Poland in the case of those
applying for Sociology) may apply for a travel grant to cover the costs of return airfare from their home
countries. Travel grant decisions will be announced together with the admission results or shortly thereafter.
Request for Reimbursement of Test Fees
Applicants from countries without Soros foundations who are required to take standard substitute tests offered
throughout the world may apply for some financial contribution from CEU toward the cost of the relevant test.
These applications will be considered on a case-by-case reimbursement basis.
Other Scholarship Funds
Every year CEU raises a limited number of scholarships from private and governmental donors, foundations
and corporations. Decisions on these scholarship awards are made by the respective department on the basis of
outstanding academic merit. Applicants will be notified in their acceptance letter if they were also recipients of
a special individual scholarship.
External Sponsorship
Applicants who have secured external financial support for their studies at CEU must indicate so in their
application form. A notarized letter of support from the sponsor/employer should be attached to the
application. If the original letter is written in a language other than English, a certified translation should be
attached. Tuition fee payments, whether made directly by the sponsor or by the student, must reach CEU by the
due dates.
Inter-Europa Bank Tuition Loan Scheme
Through a special agreement with Inter-Europa Bank (IEB), based in Budapest, Hungary, CEU offers tuition
loans to students at the Master’s level. Bank loans are not available to PhD students. The loan program is
available only to students at the Budapest teaching site and is designed to help cover the cost of tuition.
Student loans can be taken for a minimum of 10 % of the tuition fee and a maximum of 100% of the tuition
fee, depending on the tuition waiver offered by CEU. The IEB loan is available to cover tuition costs only. The
loan contract is signed for a period of 48 months and the repayment period begins 12 months from the date of
the recipient's enrollment at CEU.
Individuals who have applied for and received Inter-Europa Bank student loans to cover the cost of their CEU
tuition, or part of it, will be informed by June 30, and upon arrival in Budapest will be invited to sign their loan
contract and a declaration. Under the conditions of this loan program, the bank will transfer directly to CEU
the amount of the loan. Failure to meet any of the obligations connected with the administration of the loan
program will result in the individual’s access to university services being suspended, according to the CEU
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Policy on Holds.
For information on the Inter-Europa Bank loan program, please contact Fatime Plotar, Financial Aid Officer.
Monument Building, Second floor, Room 203, Extension: 3287, Email: [email protected]
Funding Eligibility (46 Month Funding Rule)
Student recipients of financial aid at CEU are eligible for a maximum of 46 months of tuition waiver and
stipend payments. The maximum period of funding for Master’s level studies is 12 months, except for
Economics, which is a two-year program. The maximum period of funding for the British MPhil is 15 months.
The maximum period of funding for doctoral studies is 36 months.
Funding Conditions for Doctoral Programs
In the first 12 months of the doctoral program, students are required to spend a full academic year in residence
and take courses for credit (requirements vary between 10 and 32 credits) and are obligated to take a
comprehensive examination. In exceptional cases, students can petition to postpone this examination. Special
conditions apply for the Economics PhD program, which requires 18 months in residence.
For most departments, students are required to submit their doctoral dissertation within five years of passing
the comprehensive examination. During this time, the remaining 24 months of stipends can be used
consecutively or in separate “chunks” (for example, 6 months + 6 months + 12 months, with breaks between)
within five years, or the remaining funding can be spread over a maximum of five years by lowering the
monthly stipend. This can be done according to the individual study plan of the doctoral student, subject to
approval from the department and the Vice President for Student Services.
Doctoral students can take leave of absence for personal reasons or to pursue non-CEU funded research
abroad. Normally, leave may be taken for up to 12 months but cannot be shorter than three months. Fellowship
students can suspend their CEU stipend (“stop the clock”) for reasons of personal leave or research abroad.
The CEU-funded semester abroad (Doctoral Research Support Program) does not count within the 46-month
funding rule. However, doctoral students receiving the Doctoral Research Support Grant may not receive their
CEU stipend at the same time.
85
PART VIII: ADDRESSES OF
LOCAL CEU COORDINATORS
The individuals listed below may be contacted for
application materials and general information on
CEU and its affiliated programs. Please note those
offices marked as “CEU contacts” generally do not
provide a full-range of CEU-related services. For
persons in these countries, please contact the CEU
Admissions Office or the nearest full-service office
for questions beyond general inquiries or
information materials.
ALBANIA
Mr. Geron Kamberi
Open Society Foundation for Albania
Rr. Pjeter Bogdani, Pallati 23/1
Tirana
Tel: (355 42) 34 621, 34 223, 35 856
Fax: (355 42) 35 855
Email: [email protected]
ARMENIA
Ms. Anaida Papikyan
OSI Assistane Foundation, Armenia
1 Pushkin St., apt.2
Yerevan, 375010
Tel/Fax: (374 1) 54 2119; 54 17 19; 54 39 01
Email: [email protected]
AZERBAIJAN
Ms. Irada M. Iskenderova
Baku Education Information Centre (BEIC)
98 Sh. Badalbeily St.
Opera Studio, 3d floor
370014 Baku
Tel: (994 12) 937 746
Fax: (994 12) 93 77 46, 93 49 05
E-mail: [email protected]
BELARUS
Ms. Natalia Kamenkova (CEU Contact)
Yakub Kolas Science Library
Surganova 15/11
Minsk 220601
Tel/Fax: (375 17) 284 0852
Tel: (375 17) 284 1170
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Ms. Veska Karastoyanova
Open Society Foundation Sofia
56 Solunska Str.
Sofia 1000
Tel: (359 2) 930 66 40
Fax: (359 2) 951 63 48
Email: [email protected]
CROATIA
Mr. Ninoslav Scukanec
Ms. Ivana Puljiz
SRC - Student Resource Center
Petrova 119
HR-10000 Zagreb
Phone: (385-1) 2339-705
Fax: (385-1) 2339-426
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.sic.hr
CZECH REPUBLIC
Ms. Vlasta Hirtova
Open Society Fund - Prague
Seifertova 47
130 00 Praha 3
Tel: (420 2) 627 94 45
Fax: (420 2) 627 94 44
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ecn.cz/osf
ESTONIA
Ms. Siiri Maimets
Coordinator of CEU Scholarship Programs
EuroCollege, Tartu University
Lossi Str. 3
Tartu 51001
Tel: (372 7) 375 199
Fax: (372 7) 375 198
Email: [email protected]
Website: http:// ec.ut.ee
GEORGIA
Ms. Natia Nanava
Open Society Georgia Foundation -- International
Student Advising Center
10 Chovelidze St.
380008 Tbilisi
Tel: (995 32) 938999, 250463
Fax: (995 32) 29 10 52
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
Mr. Muhamed Serdarevic
Student Resource Center
Open Society Fund – Bosnia and Herzegovina
Pehlivanusa 3A/II
71 000 Sarajevo
Tel/Fax: (387 33) 472 580, 444 488, ext.: 222
Email: [email protected]
KAZAKHSTAN
Ms. Lena Kudryavtseva (Program Assistant)
Soros Educational Advising Center
171 Tulebaeva St.
Almaty 480021
Tel: 7 (3272) 69 67 25
Fax: 7 (3272) 69 69 95
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
BULGARIA
KYRGYZSTAN
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Mr. Valentin Deichman
Educational Advisor, Scholarships Coordinator
Soros Foundation - Kyrgyzstan
Logvinenko Str. 55a
Bishkek, 720040
Tel: (996-312) 66 42 49, 66 43 06
Fax: (996-312) 66 34 48
Email: [email protected]
LATVIA
Ms. Dace Visnola
Program Coordinator
Soros Foundation - Latvia
Public Service Language Center
Smilsu Str. 1/3, 3rd Floor
Riga, LV-1050
Tel: (371) 7211407
Fax: (371) 7213780
Email: [email protected]
LITHUANIA
Ms. Zaneta Savickiene
Open Society Fund - Lithuania
Educational Advising Center (Vilnius University)
Universiteto str. 3, Room 40
2734 Vilnius
Tel: (370 2) 687 165
Fax: (370 2) 687164
Email: [email protected]
MACEDONIA
Ms. Suzana Pecakovska
Open Society Institute - Macedonia
Bul. Jane Sandanski 111, p.o.b. 378
91000 Skopje
Tel: (389 2) 44 44 88, 44 67 87
Fax: (389 2) 44 44 99
Email: [email protected]
MOLDOVA
Ms. Angela Muset
Soros Foundation - Moldova
32 Bulgara St.
Chisinau
Tel: (373) 914 6200
Email: [email protected]
MONGOLIA
Ms. Oyuntulkhuur Jukov
OSI Information Office - Mongolia
Scientific and Technological Information Center
Baga Toiruu 49, Room #321
Ulaanbaatar-46
Tel: (976-11) 313 207
Fax: (976-11) 324 857
Email: [email protected]
POLAND
Mr. Daniel Skobla
Central European University - Warsaw
Nowy Swiat 72
00 330 Warsaw
Tel: (48 22) 828 8009
Fax: (48 39) 122 047
Email: [email protected]
ROMANIA
Ms. Ramona Jianu
Open Society Foundation - Romania
Calea Victoriei nr. 155, bl. D1, sc. 6, et. 2, sector 1
71102 Bucharest
Tel: (40 1) 212 5430, 212 5431, 312 7052, 312
8636
Fax: (40 1) 312 7053
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Agnes Fulop
Ethnocultural Diversity Resource Center
str. Tebei 21.
RO-3400 Cluj-Napoca
Tel: (40 64) 420 490
Fax: (40 64) 420 470
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.edrc.ro
RUSSIA
Ms. Marina Batalina
Ms. Natasha Ushakova
Open Society Institute – Russia
Ozerkovskaya nab. 8
113184 Moscow
Tel.: (7 095) 787 88 11
Fax: (7 095) 787 88 22
E-mail: [email protected]
[email protected]
Ms. Joulia Sivukhina
Open Society Institute
24/22, Gruzinskaya str.
Nizhny Novgorod, 603005
Tel: (7 8312) 77 40 33 (secretary), 77 40 34, 77 40
35, 77 40 36, 77 40 37 (reception)
Fax: (7 8312) 77 40 31
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Yuri Burlev
Open Society Institute - Novosibirsk
ul. Sovetskaya, 6
630007 Novosibirsk
Tel: (7 3832) 11 97 83
Fax: (7 3832) 11 97 82
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Ms. Marina Khotyakova
Open Society Institute - St. Petersburg
Mokhovaya street, 15 (right entrance)
191028 St.Petersburg
Tel.: (7 812) 346 70 57
Fax: (7 812) 346 70 60
87
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Lena Lugovaya
Open Society Institute
Molodogvardeyskaya str, 151, apt 224.
443001 Samara
Tel/Fax: (7 8462) 322 785, 421 515, 343 679
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
SLOVAKIA
Ms. Katarína Koubeková
Open Society Fund - Bratislava
Baštova 5
811 03 Bratislava
Tel: (421 2) 54 41 47 30, 54 41 69 13, ext: 115
Fax: (421 2) 54 41 88 67
Email: [email protected]
SLOVENIA
Ms. Neli Dimc
Faculty of Social Sciences
Kardeljeva pl. 5
1000 Ljubljana
Slovenia
Tel.: 386 1 58 05 305
Mobile phone: 386 41 524 381
Email: [email protected]
TAJIKISTAN
Ms. Zarina Usmanova
OSIAF-Tajikistan
65 L. Tolstoy street
Dushanbe 734003
Tel: (992 372) 213 260, 211 958
Fax: (992 372) 510 142, 510 102
Email: [email protected]
UKRAINE
Ms. Natalya Bulgakova
International Renaissance Foundation - Kharkov
4 Chernyshevskogo St, room 4
310057 Kharkov
Tel/Fax: (380 572) 30 21 65
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Vlad Galushko
International Renaissance Foundation - Kyiv
vul. Artema 46
Kyiv 04053
Tel/Fax: (380 44) 221 3276
Email: [email protected]
Mr. Andriy Hataliak
Educational Advising Center “Osvita”
prosp. Chornovola, 4
Lviv 79058
Tel: (380 322) 971 206
Fax: (380 322) 971 794
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://www.osvita.org
N.B. This address can be used for express mail
purposes (DHL, UPS, etc.)
Mailing address:
Andriy Hatalyak
Educational Advising Center “Osvita”
P.O. Box 1596
Lviv 79019
Ms. Larissa Shevchenko
Educational Advising Center “Osvita”
24, Preobrazhencka Str., Room 17
65026 Odessa
Tel/Fax: (380-482) 236-427, 246-337
Email: [email protected]
UZBEKISTAN
Mr. Kamol Diyarov
OSI Information Office
31 Zarbog St. (former Roza Luxemburg)
700031 Tashkent
Tel/fax: (998 71) 120 6854
Tel: (998 71) 152 27 41, 254 34 06
Email: [email protected]
YUGOSLAVIA
Ms. Radmila Maslovaric
Fund for an Open Society - Yugoslavia
Zmaj Jovina 34
11000 Belgrade
Tel: (381 11) 328 3076, 328 3077, 328 3087
Fax: (381 11) 328 3602
Email: [email protected]
Novi Sad branch office:
Tel: (381 21) 613 309
Fax: (381 21) 52 414
Ms. Aleksandra Redzic
Open Society Institute - Montenegro
Njegoseva 26
81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro
Tel: (381 81) 225 066
Fax: (381 81) 225 088
Email: [email protected]
Ms. Vera Pulja
Kosova Foundation for Open Society
Aktash II, No.38
38000 Pristina
Kosovo
Tel/fax: (381 38) 548 116, 549 117, 549 118, 549
119, Ext.: 110
Email: [email protected]
88
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
Addresses of Soros Foundations
Providing Information Only
The individuals listed below may be contacted for
application materials and general information on
CEU and its affiliated programs. However, other
services available at CEE/fSU Soros foundations,
such as purchasing tickets to Budapest etc., are not
provided by the offices listed below.
MYANMAR (BURMA)
Ms. Maureen Aung-Thwin, Director
Ms. Debby Corper, Program Associate
Burma Project
Open Society Institute
400 West 59th Street
New York, NY 10019
USA
Tel: (1 212) 548 0632
Fax: (1 212) 548 4655
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.burmaproject.org
SOUTH AFRICA
Open Society Foundation for South Africa
Colinton House, Norwich Oval,
1 Oakdale Road, Newlands 7700
PO Box 23161 Claremont 7735
Tel: (27 21) 683 3489
Fax: (27 21) 683 3550
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Ms. Kinga Rethy-Koller (Applications &
Prospectuses only)
Open Society Institute
400 West 59th Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: (1 212) 548 0600
Fax: (1 212) 548 4665
Email: [email protected]
Website: http//www.soros.org
89
Central European University
Office of Admissions
Nador u. 9
1051 Budapest
Hungary
Tel: (36-1) 327-3009, 327-3208, 327-3210, 372-3272
Fax: (36-1) 327-3211
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.ceu.hu
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY
91
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