Shasta College Program Review AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

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Shasta College
Program Review
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
CENTER FOR SCIENCE, INDUSTRY & NATURAL RESOURCES
PREPARED BY:
1ST LEVEL REVIEW TEAM
FRANCIS DUCHI
JIM MATHESON
TONY CAMPIDONICA
2ND LEVEL REVIEW TEAM
Lois Cushnie, Counseling
Bob Bittner, Mathematics Instructor
Roger Vines, S. J. Denham
2/97
Index
PART 1:
ANALYSIS OF QUANTITATIVE DATA ...
1
PART 2:
ANALYSIS OF QUALITATIVE DATA ....
1
PROGRAM MISSION/FUNCTION .............
CURRICULUM UPDATE ....................
CURRICULUM-ARTICULATION ..............
CURRICULUM-DIVERSITY .................
CURRICULUM-COMPETENCIES ..............
CURRICULUM-TITLE V REQUIREMENTS ......
CURRICULUM-STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES ..
TEXT ANALYSIS ........................
COURSE SCHEDULING AND SEQUENCING .....
INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY ............
STAFFING .............................
FACILITIES ...........................
EQUIPMENT ............................
ADVISORY COMMITTEE ...................
NEEDS ASSESSMENT .....................
PROGRAM SUCCESS AND PERFORMANCE ......
STUDENT SATISFACTION ................
SUPPORT SERVICES .....................
1
2
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
PART 3:
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................
8
PROGRAM STRENGTHS ....................
IMPROVEMENTS NEEDED ..................
PROGRAM GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND
STRATEGIES .........................
8
8
8
REFERENCES ................................
13
QUANTITATIVE DATA ...............
AUTOMOBILE MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS .
NATEF TASK LIST .................
14
16
17
AUTOMOTIVE PROGRAM REVIEW
PART 1:
ANALYSIS OF QUANTITATIVE DATA
There has been little change in course offerings since 199293. Course enrollments have remained stable; therefore, all
student data is relatively consistent throughout the four year
period. Class size is adequate.
F/T inst. by section is 50% or
greater because of Jim Matheson's automotive classes and the auto
electricity course taught by Dennis Yardley. An unduplicated
head count of automotive majors would be useful information.
Additional data analysis regarding math and English placement
scores for all students who dropped or received a D or F would
assist by identifying their basic skill level in order to help
determine why they withdrew or received a low grade.
Even though there has appeared to be a lack of cohesiveness
in the program, there has been a consistent enrollment pattern.
With an aggressive recruiting effort, a focus on retention
through proper placement and improved student satisfaction,
articulated courses, an up-to-date certified program, short
courses offering in-service to local shops, and a supportive
community, the potential exists for doubling this enrollment
data!!
The committee recommends a light teaching load during the
first semester so that curriculum and program changes can be made
prior to curriculum deadlines.
PART 2:
ANALYSIS OF QUALITATIVE DATA
Program Mission/Function
The Automotive Technology Program prepares students for
entry into the automotive industry and related trades. The
automotive curriculum is designed to develop skills in operation
and maintenance of the following areas:
Engine, chassis,
electrical, power train, and diagnostics. Students learn how to
operate and use diagnostic and special equipment related to the
automotive industry.
"The car repair industry is becoming more costly and
competitive," as stated in TERM, Dec., 1995, School-To-Work
Publication, Volume 4, #6. "36% of the 211 billion dollar car
1
industry goes to repairs. An auto tech shortage continues to
challenge dealers and independent shops alike." A similar
article in the COMMUNITY COLLEGE WEEK, March 25, 1996, titled
"High Tech Vehicles Increase Demands on Two-Year Automotive
Programs," also points to 60,000 job vacancies each year and a
need for community colleges to develop competency standards as a
way of making sure the required 1080 hours of auto technology are
offered by the school and covered by the student.
The college mission statement specifically addresses
occupational-technological programs and a need to remain
responsive to the community. Our Automotive Program meets the
college mission statement by preparing students to enter the
automotive industry. The possibility of some students
transferring to obtain a four-year degree should be investigated
after the goals of the two-year program are in place.
For the past 5 years, the Automotive Program has existed
with three part-time instructors. This year, the district has
committed to a full-time hire. This will help bring stability
and growth to a program which faces technological challenges and
an automotive community clamoring for help.
It should be noted that the recent publication, "Shasta County
Job Trends," indicates a need for auto technicians by
demonstrating a 17% growth in automotive occupations and the
fastest job growth.
Curriculum Update
During the 1994-95 school year, Dr. Jim Poulsen rewrote the
automotive curriculum to conform to the ASE 1080 total hours of
instruction in 8 subject areas (see Attachment A). Each of the
subject areas contains standards for certification set forth by
NATEF (National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation).
Meetings have been held with the Shasta-Trinity ROP and their
advisory committee regarding the integration of both programs to
serve the Northern California area. Support from industry is
strong and positive for this partnership. Through a combined
effort, national certification of this program is a top priority.
Instructors have attended industry sponsored sessions regarding
product updates, procedures, and teaching techniques. For
example, instructors regularly attend smog certification
workshops. They continually review new text materials. With a
full-time staff addition, a curriculum offering which is current
and can address future trends is envisioned.
Automotive courses include:
2
Auto 1
Vehicle Electrical Systems
Auto 110 Automotive Electronics
Auto 150 Auto Internal Comb. Engines
Auto 155 Auto Suspension, Steering
Auto 161 Manual Drive Train and Axles
Heating/Air Conditioning
Auto 167AB Intro to Auto Machinist
172 Clean Air Car Course
Auto 197 Special Topics in Auto Tech
Auto 2
Vehicle Tune-Up
Auto 147 Automotive Braking Systems
Auto 152 Auto Engines Laboratory
Auto 157 Automotive Fuel Systems
Auto 162 Automatic Transmissions Auto 163
/Transaxles
Auto 171AD General Shop Mechanics Auto
Auto 180AB Auto Machinist
Recent industry input suggests that some of the courses
should be delivered so that students can obtain skills in a
shorter time period, thus qualifying them for some job openings
(i.e. air-conditioning), in a shorter time. The names of some
courses should reflect present day trends (i.e. Vehicle Tune-Up
- change to "Engine Management").
None of the courses have been reviewed since 1994-95. Staff
and advisory committee review is necessary in order to achieve
ASE program certification. "Applied Academic and Workplace
Skills For Automobile Technicians," a National Automobile
Technicians Education Foundation(NATEF) publication, will serve
as the basis for curriculum updating. Worksite learning
curriculum and SCANS Competencies need to be given special
consideration.
Curriculum-Articulation
Presently, there is one course articulated with the ShastaTrinity ROP in Weaverville. No courses are articulated with four
year institutions. Plans include developing an articulation
agreement with the Shasta-Trinity ROP in Redding for two, entry
level automotive courses. Shasta College will emphasize more
advanced curriculum offerings.
Support courses include INDE 1-Career Planning for
Industrial Technology.
This course reviews the college catalog
and orients the student to the two year sequence for automotive
courses. WELD 70-Beginning Welding provides basic welding
skills. 18 units of Associate Degree general education are also
included. More specificity of English and mathematics in the
curriculum would be helpful.
The Automotive Certificate
consists of 50 units including 6 units of mathematics and
English.
A one year, Fast Track, 30 unit, Tune-up/Smog
Technician Program is also available to students. A need exists
to examine the total automotive course offerings and include the
Automotive Machine courses as an option or part of the
certificate/associate degree. All of the courses, degree
program, certificate, and Fast Track need review.
3
The committee recommends looking at Business English as the
possible general education English course. Reading and
interpersonal skills need special emphasis. A basic computer
class, as part of the certificate and Associate Degree, is also
recommended. The SCANS Competencies need to be addressed while
the curriculum is under review.
This will be accomplished under
the direction of the new staff hire.
4
With the exception of Warren Lytle's effort to connect
technical math, no additional effort has been made to integrate
math into the automotive courses. No effort has been made to
stress writing in the curriculum. The integration of English and
mathematics is imperative!
Curriculum-Diversity
No data exists that indicate student diversity or age. From
discussion with staff, it is evident that a significant number of
female and minority students are enrolled. Due to the technical
nature of the subject, it will be important to put heavy emphasis
on writing and verbal skills early in the sequence of courses.
Data needs to be developed which would identify students who are
under prepared in math and English.
Curriculum-Competencies
Curriculum competencies are listed in the course outlines
and first day handouts. These competencies were developed from
NATEF and are attached. The committee recommends that when each
course is reviewed, an evaluation standard be established for
each competency.
Curriculum-Title V Requirements
All of the program course outlines are on file. They need
to be revisited for the latest Title V requirements. This will
be done when the program matrix of courses, sequencing, and
content is reviewed. While certification is in progress, the
possibility of linking with a major manufacturer or local
business in order to provide access to expensive technology needs
to be explored.
Curriculum-Strengths and Weaknesses
Strengths include:
Excellent automotive machine and engine courses
Excellent automotive alignment and balance course; however,
there are insufficient work stations
Excellent lecture/classroom for all remaining automotive
courses
Weaknesses include:
5
Lack of equipment/computers for student work stations in
automotive courses
Lack of program ASE certification
Lack of integration with math and English
Text Analysis
Presently, a variety of texts are used to address the
subjects. Cost is a major factor for students. Perhaps one
comprehensive text may be a solution for the automotive major.
Alternative choices of texts for non-majors would be recommended.
Future textbook choices will be reviewed by staff with advisory
committee input.
Course Scheduling and Sequencing
Soon after the new instructor has been hired, a thorough
review of all the courses including content, scheduling, and
sequencing will be done. Industry input will be part of this
process. This will also be done in coordination with the ShastaTrinity ROP.
Instructional Methodology
Established methods of instruction in Automotive classes
include:
1.
2.
3.
Lecture/discussion supported by audio and video
Demonstration by instructor and video
Hands-on laboratory exercises
Staffing
One full-time instructor teaches Automotive Internal
Combustion Engines Theory and Lab, Auto Suspension Steering and
Wheel Alignment, Introductory Auto Machinist, and Auto Machinist.
One instructor who primarily teaches in other disciplines,
teaches Auto Electric. Vehicle Tune-Up, Braking Systems, Fuel
Systems, Automatic Transmissions, Clean Air Car Course,
Automotive Electronics, and Manual Drive Train are taught by
three, part-time instructors.
Staff development is a necessity given the rapid change in
automotive technology. There will be a need to provide
additional staff development as the program is reviewed in light
6
of obtaining ASE program certification. The specific areas have
not been identified. Jim Matheson regularly visits local
industry and frequently travels to areas such as Reno, Nevada.
Dan Bryant, part-time instructor, recently attended a smog
certification update. Even with the addition of a full-time
staff member, part-time staff will still be necessary. It is
anticipated that in the years to come, a second, permanent staff
member will be necessary. A teaching overload currently exists
for Jim Matheson.
Facilities
The 2400 building needs immediate attention. New metal
storage cabinets for tools and supplies are needed. Roll-up
doors need to be replaced; shop lights on reels need to be
installed; lighting for outside perimeter needs improvement;
floors need to be cleaned and polished, and a library for
service manuals and video equipment needs to be furnished. Airconditioning, additional classroom development upstairs, and
organized storage areas are also lacking at this time. An up-todate, environmentally approved, equipment wash area needs to be
developed. Some of these items are presently being addressed
through classroom improvement funds.
Equipment
Presently, $2700 of district funds and $1000 of VEA funds
exist in supply money. Approximately $3000 annually of
additional supply money will be necessary to equip and operate
the shop. Capital money is shared/rotated between the Diesel,
Welding, Construction, and Automotive Programs.
This year, approximately $20,000 has been allocated to Auto
Machine and Automotive. New equipment in this program area is
very expensive. For example, a new C.B.N. surfacing machine
costs $34,000; a valve guide and seat machine costs $35,000; a
valve resurfacing machine costs $4500; tune-up and test
equipment costs approximately $100,000; special tools for airconditioning, brakes, and transmissions cost approximately
$100,000. Specialty hand tools in alignment cost approximately
$10,000. Updates to the alignment rack and computer will cost
approximately $25,000. The program needs to consider requiring
7
students to supply a basic tool set of their own, and the college
providing specialty tools.
Advisory Committee
The program does not currently have an advisory committee;
however, a plan exists to use the same ROP automotive advisory
committee.
8
Needs Assessment
Automotive Program needs are assessed through the following:
_
Tri-county employment trends-a 17% job growth
_
ROP-Automotive Advisory Committee
_
Persistence of student enrollment
_
Discussion with community members
_
College of the Siskiyous closed their Automotive
Program
Program Success and Performance
There is a need to track student graduates and placement for
all technical programs. Presently, Jim Matheson has knowledge of
auto machine graduates and placement.
Employer demand, as indicated by Shasta County Job Trends,
shows a 17% job growth need. This was validated by recent
comments from local automotive repair shops. At this time, no
one has any data on the placement rate of automotive graduates.
No information exists as to the rate of student transfer;
however, it is anticipated to be low.
Student Satisfaction
No formal method presently exists regarding the collection
of student satisfaction data. This needs to be implemented as
soon as possible.
Support Services
It is estimated that over 50% of the students in the
Automotive Program receive some form of financial assistance. It
is also estimated that English and math skills are deficient in a
significant number of students. These students traditionally do
not use the library or learning centers, thus, there exists a
pressing need to integrate courses and offer support in the
auto/diesel areas particularly as noted under Facility Needs.
Other student support services include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
LINKS
GAIN
EOPS
ESL
9
5.
6.
Faculty Advising
Counseling
10
PART 3:
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Program strengths include:
•
•
•
•
•
A strong auto engines and machine program
With updating, an adequate shop facility
The potential for a new partnership with ROP
A very supportive community
Adequate part-time teaching assistance
Improvements needed include:
• A formal articulation program agreement with ROP
• National program certification
• A review of texts, courses, scheduling, and Title V
updates.
• Attention to worksite learning stations in the community
• A curriculum mix which includes automotive machine
courses
• Integration of math and English
• An investigation of linking with a major manufacturer
• Attention to shop facilities and additional equipment
including supply budget
• Formal student satisfaction surveys and an aggressive
recruiting effort
Program Goals, Objectives and Strategies
GOAL: Update curricula in response to learning requirements for
the 21st century.
Strategies for this goal:
• Using NATEF, ASE standards and SCANS Competencies, review all
auto courses for appropriate subject matter and integrate
SCANS
activities.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Auto and ROP staff
N/A
97-98
• Using input from industry and other community colleges, develop
course sequence and schedule to conform with worksite
opportunities, industry needs, and student needs.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Auto staff
N/A
11
Timeline:
97-98
• Revise program for l997-98 college catalog.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Auto staff
N/A
98-99
• Formally articulate courses and program with ROP.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Auto and ROP staff
N/A
97-98
• Formally adopt existing ROP advisory committee as Shasta
College's automotive advisory committee.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Auto staff
N/A
97-98
• Collaborate with the English and Math Departments to develop a
plan for integration of basic skills in appropriate
automotive
courses.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Director and staff
VEA and stipends
Begin in fall of 1997 and complete
in spring of 1998
• Offer Technical Mathematics and English 190 or Business English
in the automotive/technical facilities.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Directors and auto staff
N/A
Fall 1997
• Review curriculum in light of current trends (i.e. Auto TuneUp to Engine Management Diagnostics).
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Auto staff
N/A
Fall 1997
12
GOAL: Utilize innovative techniques and partnerships to improve
instructional programs.
Strategies for this goal:
• Investigate the possibility of industry sponsorship.
Persons Responsible:
Director, president and auto staff
Resources Needed:
N/A
Timeline:
Fall 1998
• Collaborate with local shops for worksite placement stations.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Director and auto staff
N/A
1998
• Investigate block schedules for some courses.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Auto staff
N/A
Fall 1997
• Investigate the possibility of a linked course with math or
English.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Director and auto staff
N/A
Fall 1997/spring 1998
• Develop a list of short courses for in-service training.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Auto staff
N/A
Fall 1999
• Initiate a recruitment program in local high schools.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Auto staff
N/A
Fall 1997
GOAL: Commit to major investments in new instructional
equipment, facilities, technologies and technical support.
13
Strategies for this goal:
•
Develop a library reference and computer room in 2400
building.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
•
Acquire 3 or 4 computers for student use.
director fall '98.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
•
Director and auto staff
Access to industry contacts
Fall 1998
Director and auto staff
Fall 1999
Seek industry support.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
•
Director and auto staff
Identify 486 computers-replaced by
Pentiums
Fall 1998
Link program to major manufacturer.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
•
Auto staff and
Seek foundation support for expensive pieces of equipment.
Director fall '98.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
•
Director and auto staff
Facilities Funds
Spring 1997
Director and auto staff
On-going
Secure a major grant.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
Director and auto staff
On-going
GOAL: Increase Automotive Program enrollment by 15% of existing
graduation rate by 2001.
14
Strategies for this goal:
•
Identify why students drop. Research 1997-98 review test
scores of students who receive W's, D's and F's in order to
determine their level of English and mathematics.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
•
•
Spring 1997
Identify present graduation rate.
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
•
Research Office
Research Office
N/A
1997-98
Initiate a recruitment program in local area high
schools during 1997-98.
Persons Responsible:
Auto staff/Public Relations
Resources Needed:
Instructor release time
Timeline:
1997-98
Follow-up with graduates to determine program modifications
1999-2000
Persons Responsible:
Resources Needed:
Timeline:
2/97
15
References
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