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Table of Contents
Introduction .......................................................................................................................1
Career Services Office .......................................................................................................2
Career Services Timeline ..................................................................................................3
Policies and Procedures .....................................................................................................4
Job Search Process .............................................................................................................5
Using Symplicity.................................................................................................................9
On Campus Interview (OCI) Procedures ......................................................................12
Purpose of Resume ...........................................................................................................14
Content Suggestions .........................................................................................................15
Traditional Lawyering Skills ..........................................................................................17
Action Verbs for Resume Writing ..................................................................................18
Sample Resumes ...............................................................................................................19
Cover Letters ....................................................................................................................23
Model Cover Letter Format ............................................................................................24
Writing Samples ...............................................................................................................25
Letter to Alumnus for Assistance ...................................................................................26
Sample Follow-up Letters ...............................................................................................27
Withdraw Name from Consideration/Defer Employment ...........................................29
Follow-up Letter after Completion of Clerkship ..........................................................30
Miscellaneous Guidelines ................................................................................................31
Interview Tips...................................................................................................................32
Sample Questions Frequently Asked by Interviewers ..................................................33
Sample Questions to Ask the Interviewer ......................................................................34
Using InterviewStream ....................................................................................................35
Networking .......................................................................................................................36
Sample Follow-up Letter after Networking Opportunity ............................................38
Career Services Print Resources ....................................................................................39
Career Services Web Resources .....................................................................................48
State Agencies – Baton Rouge .........................................................................................52
Intercollegiate Job Bank..................................................................................................53
Equal Justice Works ........................................................................................................58
PSLawNet .........................................................................................................................59
Public Interest Law Society (PILS) ................................................................................61
1L Job Search Overview and Timeline ..........................................................................62
1L Job Search Chart Based on Type of Employment ..................................................65
Introduction
Welcome to the Career Services Handbook and to your Career Services Office (CSO)!
All services provided by your CSO are student initiated. For us to help you, you must first seek
our assistance. However, it is very important to remember that Career Services is not an
employment agency. We cannot guarantee anyone a job. It is our goal to provide you with as
many resources as possible to assist you in YOUR search for employment.
Registration is open to all alumni and students. Students should register with Career
Services each Fall and Spring semester by updating your profile and uploading a new
resume to Symplicity. By uploading your resume to Symplicity, you are authorizing the Career
Services Office to release information to all/any prospective employer. If you do not agree with
these terms, you will need to contact Tracy Evans prior to any use of Symplicity.
The following services are available to all students of the LSU Law Center:
Career Guidance/Counseling
Personal / Professional Development
Resume / Cover Letter Formulation
Interview Skill Development
Job Search Assistance
Judicial Clerkship Application Program
Local Apply Direct Job Listings
Job Search Planning
Regional/National Job Listings
On-Campus Recruiting Program
Special Programming
Informational Panels
Skills Development Workshops
Job Fairs
Guest Speakers
Orientations
1
Career Services Office
Office Location:
101 Law Center
225/578-8787
Director of Career Services
Tracy N. Evans
225/578-8705
[email protected]
Associate Director of Career Services
Gwendolyn L. Ferrell
225/578-9707
[email protected]
Career Counselor
Suzanne Z. Bourgeois
225/578-0384
[email protected]
Interview Coordinator
Melanie Anderson
225/578-8787
[email protected]
2
Career Services Timeline
1L’s:
Pursuant to the National Association of Law Placement (NALP), the Career Services Office begins
working with freshman students after November 1. However, individual counseling sessions will not be
offered until after fall semester finals.
1L's -After November 1
Mandatory freshman career services orientation
One-on-one interviews with a career services professional
Ongoing individual career counseling sessions
Access to Symplicity
Participation in career services programming
Interviewing skills workshops
Mock interviews
Résumé and cover letter workshops
Career practice series
Preparing for your summer clerkship (mandatory for students preparing to work their first summer)
On-campus interviewing
PLEASE REFER TO THE 1L JOB SEARCH OVERVIEW ON PAGES 60 – 65.
2L’s:
Ongoing individual career counseling sessions
Résumé review and updates
Cover letter development
Continued interviewing skills development and mock interviews
Participation in career services programming
On-campus interviewing
Summer clerkship preparation
Identify employment goal & develop individual job search strategy
3L’s:
All services from 1st and 2nd year continued
Federal and state judicial clerkship application process begins
Develop your targeted job search strategy
Assessment of potential offers
Senior exit surveys
3
Career Services Policies and Procedures
Equal Employment Opportunity Statement
&
Student-Initiated Grievance Procedures
Employers who interview or list positions at the LSU Law Center agree to a policy of
non-discrimination. If you feel that you have been treated unfairly or discriminated against,
please notify Tracy Evans, Director of the Career Services Office, as soon as possible. Tracy
can be reached by calling (225) 578-8705 or e-mailing her at [email protected] or
stop by in person. The LSU Law Center EEO Policy is as follows:
―The LSU Paul M. Hebert Law Center strives to provide equal opportunity/access
employment for all its students without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation,
national origin, age, disability, marital status, veteran’s status or other non-performance
related criteria.‖ The LSU Paul M. Hebert Law Center requires that all those who recruit on
the campus or use the services of the Career Services Office are equal opportunity/access
employers.
Student Acknowledgement of OCI Terms and Conditions
By bidding on Symplicity, you are accepting the ―Terms and Conditions‖ regarding participation in
OCI set forth by the LSU Law Center. The Terms and Conditions you are agreeing to provide the
following:
In order to participate in OCI, students must acknowledge and agree to abide by the following terms
and conditions:
1) I shall attend all scheduled on-campus interviews with employers. Cancelling an interview is
for emergency purposes only. In such a situation, Melanie Anderson with the Career
Services Office should be contacted and informed of your missed interview. Melanie can be
contacted by calling (225) 578-8787. A written letter of explanation to the employer should
be submitting to Melanie no later than two days after the missed or cancelled interview.
2) By participating in the OCI process and uploading my resume to Symplicity, I give the
Career Services Office permission to submit documents such as a resume and transcript to
interested employers on my behalf.
3) I agree that all information on my Symplicity account is accurate.
4) I agree that all information, including my academic credentials, is accurate and up-to-date on
my resume. I understand that should I falsify such information, I will be reported to the Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs which could result in disciplinary action.
STUDENT NO-SHOW POLICY
By submitting an application to an employer through OCI, you are making
a commitment to interview with that employer should you be selected.
Any student who has two unexcused no-shows will have the remainder of
their interviews cancelled and will not be allowed to continue with OCI
that particular semester.
4
Job Search Process
Job Search Process
It is our mission and goal to teach you career development skills that will help
you to define your career objectives based on your interests, values, skills and
preferences. Your legal education will afford you many opportunities and it is our job to
assist you by providing you with information. It is your responsibility to use that
information to create and define your career goals.
Self Assessment
The first step in defining your career plan is to do a self assessment.
Unfortunately, this step is often overlooked by individuals, even though it is a vital part
of defining your career plan. There is a tendency in the legal field to believe that your
objective upon graduation is to have a legal career practicing any type of law. The ―I just
want a job‖ syndrome fails to take into account your interest, values, skills and
preferences and can lead to burnout, dissatisfaction with the legal field, unnecessary
stress and overall unhappiness.
In order for you to benefit most from doing a self assessment, you will need to
be honest with yourself and be willing to reflect on what you want and what you do not
want in a job. You should ask yourself the following questions:
1. What are my values? Family? Power? Prestige?
2. What skills do I have? Which skills do I enjoy using? Which skills do I not
want to use? What are my strengths and weaknesses?
3. What are my interests? What do I enjoy doing? Personal? Career? What is
and what is not important and meaningful to me?
4. What is my preferred working environment?
5. What do I want my lifestyle to be? How many hours do I want to work?
6. Why did I go to law school?
7. Why did I select my undergraduate major? What did I enjoy about the field?
Do I want to incorporate my undergraduate degree into practice?
8. What classes did I most enjoy in undergrad? In law school? Why?
9. What aspects of my previous jobs did I like? What aspects did I not like?
10. What do I want out of my personal life?
11. What do I want from my work life? A sense of accomplishment? Intellectual
stimulation? A feeling of helping others? Money? Job security?
Recognition?
12. How do I want work to fit into my personal life?
13. What type of workplace culture is pleasing to me?
14. What kind of people do I want to spend my time with? What type of clients
do I want to have?
15. Where do I want to live upon graduation? In the next five years?
16. Where do I see myself in five years? Ten years? Thirty years?
Self reflection is one way of identifying your values, interests, skills and
preferences. However, there are a number of self assessment instruments available to
you. If you are interested in taking a self assessment test, please speak with a career
counselor.
5
Career Exploration
After you have determined what your skills, values, interests and preferences are, your next step
is career exploration. Career exploration entails researching the various practice areas and work settings
to learn whether or not a particular field encompasses enough of your values, interests, preferences and
skills to provide job satisfaction.
Within the legal field, there are hundreds of different practice areas and a number of different
work settings. It is impossible to list all the different practice areas here, so we encourage you to go to
The Legal Information Institute website, http://topics.law.cornell.edu/wex/category/overview, created and
maintained by Cornell Law School, to get general information about different practice areas. We also
have many books in our Resource Room about various practice areas. In regards to the various work
settings, we have provided a list of the types of places a law school graduate could work. However, this
list is not intended to be exhaustive because you may be able to find legal employment in other settings as
well, depending on how open minded and creative you are.
WORK SETTINGS FOR LAW SCHOOL GRADUATES:
Government
o Federal
o State
o City
o County/Parish
o Municipal
o Military
Public Interest Organizations
o Legal Services
o Private Public Interest Law Firms
o Public Interest Litigation Organization
o Public Interest Research Groups
Private Practice
o Small Firm/Solo Practitioner
o Medium Firm
o Large Firm
The Court System
o Judicial Clerkships: Federal, state, city, family, bankruptcy, etc.
o Permanent Staff Attorneys/Law Clerks/Judicial Clerkships
ALTERNATIVE CAREER OPTIONS
Because a law degree is so versatile, you may be interested in exploring non-legal or law-related
careers. Our office is equally dedicated to those students who do not wish to practice law. We have a
number of resources available in your CSO Resource Room regarding alternative careers and we
welcome the opportunity to discuss your career plan with you.
The key to finding non-legal and law-related careers is demonstrating to potential employers how
the skills you developed in law school can benefit their organization. During the course of your legal
education, you will be developing skills that are beneficial to employers outside the legal field. Here are
just a few examples of the skills you will be able to use in a non-legal setting:
Research and writing
Time management
Negotiating
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Understanding technical, complex policies and programs
Communication, both oral and written
Analysis
Problem Solving
Identifying relevant concerns and issues
Just like the ―traditional‖ legal fields, there are a number of work settings available to someone
who is not interested in practicing law. The list below is not exhaustive, but is a small sampling of
possibilities. Like traditional legal job opportunities, the only limits for someone who wishes to follow an
alternative legal career path are those placed by the individual.
Government
o Regulatory Affairs
o Government Affairs
o Administration
o Lobbying
Investment Banking
Finance
Human Resources
Contract Management
Consulting
Journalism
Publishing
Politics
Mediation and Arbitration
Labor Relations
Law Enforcement
o Investigative Work
o Compliance Work
Public Policy or Legislation
Foundations and Non- Profit Organizations
o Administration
o Marketing
o Development
Law Librarians
Real Estate Sales and Development
Legal Recruiting
Representation of Actors, Musicians, Athletes, Authors
Union and Community Organizing
Attorney Training and Development
Law Firm Management
Legislative Research
Teaching
o Undergraduate
o Law School
o Paralegal Program
School Administration
o Law School
o Universities
7
Here are a few methods in which to conduct research on your potential careers:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
The Legal Information Institute (www.law.cornell.edu)
Shadowing attorneys
Joining organizations
Informational interviews
Legal professors/undergraduate professors
State and local bar association sections
ABA sections
Seminars and symposiums
Continuing legal education courses
Once you have explored your various career options, your next step is to create resumes and
cover letters geared towards these employers. The last step in the career development process is
evaluation. Once you have landed your ideal job, you will need to evaluate whether the job will change as
you become more experienced and your life changes. However, because you have followed the career
development process before, you will be better able to handle the bumps and turns in your career path.
8
Using Symplicity
Using Symplicity
This information will give you the basics for getting started on Symplicity.
Please feel free to navigate around the site and investigate the other functions of the
system. The information provided below will instruct you on how to update your contact
information, upload your resume, and use the job bank and OCI/Resume Forward
features.
GETTING STARTED
Step One:
You will need a Member ID and password from your Career Services
Office. This information will be emailed to you or you may contact
Career Services to obtain it. This information will remain the same
throughout your next five semesters unless you choose to change it.
Step Two:
Go to https://law-lsu-csm.symplicity.com/students/
Step Three:
Enter your Member ID (email address) and password (login and
passwords are case sensitive).
Step Four:
Select the ―Profile‖ tab at the top of the page
Step Five:
Update your contact information. Be sure to update your mailing
information, your e-mail address, and your telephone number. Your
correct e-mail address is extremely important, since this is the most
common way of communicating with you. We strongly encourage you to
use your PAWs e-mail account or to have your PAWs e-mail forwarded
into your most used e-mail account.
Step Six:
To upload a new document:
a. Select the ―Documents‖ tab at the top of the page.
b. Select ―Add New‖ on the bottom of the page to upload a new
document.
c. Label your document and select your document type. Please be sure
to choose a label that you will recognize when selecting it from the
list to apply to an employer. If you have a firm or city specific
resume, make sure to indicate that in your label.
d. Click on the ―Browse‖ button.
e. When the ―Choose file‖ window appears, search for your resume,
i.e. "A" drive, My Documents, etc.
f. Highlight your resume document and click on ―Open.‖
g. The document name will appear in the window on the Upload
Resume screen.
h. Click on ―Submit‖. Your document will then convert to pdf.
Step Seven:
Viewing your document:
a.
b.
To view your document, select the name of your document in the
list, after it has converted to pdf.
OR you may click the documents tab and select the document from
the list.
9
JOB BANK — NAVIGATING JOB LISTINGS
Many firms are unable to recruit on campus. Therefore, they submit position advertisements to
the CSO to post on Symplicity for LSU students. These positions will be posted in the ―LSU Jobs‖
section of Symplicity. We update the job bank on a daily basis, so be sure to check it frequently. Please
remember that many of these positions are immediate openings since small and mid sized firms often hire
on an as needed basis. Below are instructions on using the job bank.
Step One:
Select the ―LSU Jobs‖ tab at the top of the page.
Step Two:
Select the ―School Job Search‖ option on the left-hand side menu.
Step Three:
You may now perform a search to see which employers are collecting resumes, who is
posting jobs in the Career Services Office, and who wants students to mail resumes
directly to them.
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWING (OCI/Resume Forward)
Step One:
Select the ―OCI/Resume Forward‖ tab in the mini menu at the top of the page.
Step Two:
The Career Services Office will provide you with a list of employers (entitled ―Interview
Schedule‖) coming on campus to interview LSU law students. This document will
provide you with the name of the employer, which class year they will be interviewing,
the position they are interviewing for, when you will need to bid on this particular
employer (―to bid‖ means to ask Career Services to forward your resume to the employer
for consideration), what day they are interviewing, and any special requirements for that
particular employer. During OCI, new employers will contact us to make arrangements to
come on campus to interview LSU students. Therefore, throughout the interview season,
the number of employers coming on campus will change. We will notify students of these
changes by email.
TO BID ON AN EMPLOYER (to have your resume forwarded to an employer for consideration):
Step One:
You must first upload a resume under the ―Documents‖ tab before you may bid on any
employers
Step Two:
Select the ―OCI/Resume Forward‖ tab at the top of the page.
Step Two:
In the gray box, under Search Filters, ensure that the appropriate session is selected.
(refer to the Interview Schedule provided by CSO, i.e. OCI Week 1, OCI Week 2, etc.)
Step Three:
You will see a list of employers who are interested in interviewing students in your class.
To apply, click on the ―Apply‖ button on the right.
Step Four:
On the right, under ―Bid/Application Details‖, select the appropriate documents you wish
to submit to this firm under the drop down menu(s). Then click the ―Apply‖ button.
Bidding takes place one week at a time, starting with OCI week 1. It starts on Saturday at 8:00 a.m. and
continues until the following Friday at 10:00 a.m. For example, if bidding for Phase/OCI Week 1 starts
on Saturday the 20th at 8:00 a.m., the bidding week will remain open until the following Friday, the 27th,
at 10 a.m.
10
During the bidding period, you can also deselect an employer to whom you had previously requested your
resume be forwarded. After clicking the ―OCI/Resume Forward‖ tab, click on the ―Withdraw‖ button
on the right. Once the bidding period closes for a particular phase, you are no longer able to add or
remove employer(s) associated with that bid week. Instead, you will have to come to the Career Services
Office to discuss your desired actions.
TO SEE IF YOU HAVE BEEN SELECTED FOR AN INTERVIEW AND SCHEDULING YOUR
INTERVIEW:
Step One:
Under ―OCI/Resume Forward‖, make sure that the ―Employers/Bidding/Application‖
tab is selected, as well as the appropriate session. In the list of employers, you will see an
Invitation column. If you have been selected for an interview, it will state that you have
been invited. Hint: We will notify students via e-mail as soon as we receive the
employer’s selection list back from them, which is usually 3 to 4 days before the
scheduled interview.
Step Two:
Next go to the ―Scheduled Interviews‖ tab under the main ―OCI/Resume Forward‖ tab
to select your interview time. Hint: You should not miss class to attend an interview. If
you are unable to schedule your interview during the times provided, please contact CSO
to discuss.
Step Three:
You have now scheduled your interview. Hint: If you have a conflict or want to change
your interview time, you MUST call your CSO at (225) 578-8787.
IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO INTERVIEW AFTER BEING SELECTED, you MUST write a letter of
explanation to the employer and provide a copy to the Career Services Office prior to the interview date.
Declining an interview after you have been selected is acceptable only in extreme circumstances such as
illness, death, or acceptance of another position.
11
On Campus Interview (OCI) Procedures
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING IN ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
1. To register with the Career Services Office you must upload a current resume to the Symplicity
system. This should be done every semester since your GPA and Rank change each semester.
By registering with and uploading your resume to Symplicity, you are authorizing
the Career Services Office to release information to all/any prospective employers;
this includes your resume and transcript. If you do not agree with these terms, you
will need to contact Tracy Evans prior to any use of the Symplicity system.
2. Carefully check the interview schedule and submit on-line resumes only to those employers in
which you have a significant interest.
3. Keep a record of employers to whom you submit your resume.
INTERVIEW SCHEDULE
For the Fall and Spring OCI programs, we will provide you with a list of employers who will come
on campus to interview LSU law students. We will email the ―Interview Schedule‖ to you at the
beginning of each semester. When changes occur (e.g., employers are added), you will receive
another email notifying you of the change. The columns of the Interview Schedule are as follows:
Column 1:
Column 2:
Column 3:
Column 4:
Column 5:
Column 6:
Column 7:
INTERVIEW DATE - date employer will be on campus
KEY - indicates additions, rescheduled dates, cancellations
FIRM/CORP/JUDGE - the name of the employer
CANDIDATE - indicates what year student or alumni employer wants to interview
LOCATION - indicates the city/cities of employer vacancies
POSITION - type of position available
RESUME BID WEEK – the time period for students to submit resumes for that
particular employer on-line through Symplicity. You will be prompted to list
geographical preferences for employers with more than one location.
Resumes are due by 10:00 a.m. on the LAST DATE of drop-off week. Electronic
bidding will be closed at 10:00 a.m each Friday, and a new drop-off week will
begin at 8:00 a.m. the following Saturday.
Column 8:
ADDITIONAL NOTES - specific information provided by employer, i.e., GPA
requirements, requests for writing samples/transcripts, length of interviews and
interview times and area of practice
IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO INTERVIEW AFTER BEING SELECTED, you must write a letter of
explanation to the employer and provide a copy to the CSO prior to the interview date. Declining an
interview after selection is acceptable only in extreme circumstances such as illness, death, or acceptance
of another position.
12
DAY OF INTERVIEW
1. Arrive as early as possible. You should never leave an employer waiting.
2. Be well prepared. Research the firm, corporation or solo practitioner before your interview.
3. Do not go in empty-handed. Have available a note pad, an extra copy of your resume, writing
sample and transcript and be prepared to ask questions. This handbook includes a list of good
questions to ask firms.
4. Relax and be yourself. If you've been awarded an interview, the firm has somewhat
predetermined that you have the qualifications to do the work; now they want to see if your
personality fits with their firm.
5. Never speak badly about your school, a professor or another firm/attorney, even if they initiate
the negative conversation.
MISCELLANEOUS TIPS
1. Be somewhat selective with your firms. If you apply to 60 firms, you could very well receive 60
interviews. It is not feasible for a full-time student to also interview with 60 firms in one
semester. Apply only to those firms for which you are truly interested in working.
2. You should not skip class for interviews. If there are no available time slots to accommodate your
time between classes, let us know and we will contact the firm to make other arrangements.
3. Never schedule two interviews back to back. Rarely are firms on schedule and you will
inevitably be late for one of them.
4. Always send a thank you note after an interview. It lets them know that you are truly interested
and also gives you a second chance to get your name across their desk.
13
Purpose of Resume
Your resume is your introduction to a prospective employer. The resume and cover
letter represent you in your absence and provide employers with their first impression of
what you have to offer to the firm. In addition, the cover letter and resume are a
representation of your writing ability and organizational skills. When properly organized, it
should point to areas in your background, including education and work experience, that
would be of interest to a potential employer. Your resume may determine whether or not
you get an interview. It is the only means by which potential employers have of evaluating
whether you have the qualities and background to warrant an interview.
Resumes
DO NOT RISK YOUR INTEGRITY BY
EXAGGERATING OR FALSIFYING INFORMATION.
DO NOT ROUND OFF YOUR GPA OR USE A CLASS RANK
OTHER THAN THE ONE ON YOUR CURRENT OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT.
RESUME FORMAT
DOs
DON’Ts
BALANCE—keep your resume
balanced—left to right, top to bottom.
DO NOT overload your paper. Margins
of one inch at the top, bottom, and sides
are best. If you do need to go lower than
one inch do not go below 0.7 inches.
READABLE—use an easy-to-read
typeface/font.
DO NOT use dot matrix printers.
DESIGN TECHNIQUES—emphasize
information/sections (e.g., bold,
underlining, varied point size - but use the
same font throughout). Use italics
cautiously because it may be hard to read.
Be consistent.
DO NOT become obnoxious with design
techniques.
DO NOT abbreviate.
DO NOT hyphenate words.
LENGTH—keep your resume
commensurate with your experience. A
clear and concise one-page (8 1/2 X 11)
resume is usually sufficient. Never use
legal paper. If you need a second page,
then do so but check for moot and
redundant information and keep the most
important information on the first page.
ERRORS—eliminate all grammatical,
spelling and typographical errors.
Avoid redundancy. Have someone read
your resume. Read your resume
backwards for spelling errors.
PAPER—use good quality paper.
Most employers prefer white bond.
Reproduce copies on the same quality
as the original.
14
DO NOT use pronouns (e.g., ―I‖ or
―my‖).
CONTENT SUGGESTIONS
Before putting your resume together, take a general inventory of yourself. A well written resume is
painstaking and requires time. Furthermore, you may need to draft different resumes for different
employers. The following areas are usually included on resumes:
IDENTIFICATION: Your name should appear at the top of your resume. Nicknames are not acceptable.
Do not identify the document as a resume since this is self-evident. Provide your address, email address
and telephone number directly under your name.
Note: One way of showing that you have ties to a particular city/area is by providing a permanent
address and a school address. Only use this address format when you wish to show an employer
that you have geographic ties to the city/area.
Do not include personal information: e.g., race, marital status, disability status, health, number of
children, religion, sex, age or other personal information that legally has no relationship to your ability to
perform the job.
EDUCATION: List in reverse chronological order beginning with law school. Indicate all of the schools
you attended, degrees you received or will receive and when (Month and Year), and your major field of
study in college. Including your grade point average and rank is optional. Emphasize courses if you think
it would be of interest to a particular employer, but do not list all of them. All education should be under
one heading - do not separate legal from non-legal.
List your honors and activities under the relevant educational experience. Do not make this a separate
heading. Include scholastic honors, achievements, publications and activities you have participated in (i.e.
athletics, debate, sororities, fraternities, etc.). These items demonstrate your leadership ability and ability
to handle a variety of tasks at one time. DO NOT list dubious organizations (e.g., the Student Bar
Association of which every registered student is a member).
Note: Generally, your high school information is not included on your resume. However, for some
cities/areas this may be appropriate (e.g., New Orleans, Lafayette, Baton Rouge). If you are
planning to return to that area and if you went to a school that has a well known reputation for its
scholarship, then you may want to put your high school information on your resume.
EXPERIENCE: List in reverse chronological order and include the employer name, city and state, your
job title and when you worked for the employer. Include jobs even if they are not law related. If your job
title does not sufficiently describe your duties, summarize your job responsibilities using action verbs. Do
not leave gaps in time on your resume. It is not necessary to include the words ―job duties‖ or
―responsibilities included‖ prior to listing them because this is self-evident. List your duties as skills
oriented rather than task oriented. Refer to page 16 for some traditional lawyering skills that you may
want to highlight.
MILITARY SERVICE: Your resume should have a separate section for military service and should
include the branch of service, period of service, rank at the time of discharge, place where stationed at
time of discharge, and any other pertinent information.
LANGUAGE SKILLS: Foreign language skills and your fluency, both written and spoken should be
noted (e.g., French, conversational).
OTHER SKILLS: Proficient in Westlaw, Lexis, Real Estate License. List any relevant skills that would
be of interest to an employer.
15
INTERESTS: This section can add depth to your resume, but is not necessary. You should include
personal interests and hobbies that may serve as a conversation piece during an interview and that may
personalize your resume to make you stand out among the crowd. You may include statements regarding
extensive travel through Europe, government experience, etc.
REFERENCES: Highly recommended. Include each person’s title, employer name, address and
telephone number. References should be persons ready to attest to your abilities. Always ask permission
to list someone as a reference and supply them with a copy of your resume. Recent employers and law
school professors serve as the best references. You should list a minimum of one law school professor. If
you do not list your references, it is not necessary to print ―References furnished upon request‖; it is
assumed that you will provide them if asked.
PUBLICATIONS: List any publications in reverse chronological order by publication date, and use the
correct legal citation format.
DESCRIBING CURRENT OR PREVIOUS JOBS: When describing your current or previous job
duties, focus on the skills that lawyers need to be successful, and describe your specific duties using
action verbs and transferable skills. If you have not worked in a legal environment, you will need to
demonstrate to the employer how the skills developed in a different environment can be transferred to the
legal field. By describing your non-legal job duties using transferable skills, you will help the legal
employer see how the skills you developed in a non-legal setting can be applied to the legal field.
Job descriptions should be short phrases beginning with an action verb. Job descriptions should not be
written in the narrative format (e.g., I performed, I wrote, etc.). Job details for previous jobs should be
written in past tense, whereas current jobs should be written in the present tense. Job duties can be either
listed in bullet point format or in paragraph format. Last, you do not need to write ―Job Duties,‖ ―Duties‖
or ―Responsibilities Included‖ prior to describing your job requirements. By listing the job requirements,
the reader is aware of what this information purports to be.
TRANSFERABLE SKILLS
Adapting to new situations
Conflict resolution
Coping with deadline
Editing
Interpersonal skills
Materials Design
Organization of time/materials
Record keeping
Self-evaluation
Testing
Analyzing concepts
Consulting
Pressure
Effective communication
Learning new concepts
Motivation and persuasion
Problem solving
Research
Supervising
Using technology
16
Compiling information
Coordinating projects/plans
Designing new products
Evaluation of personal aptitudes
Management of people
Needs assessment
Public speaking
Scholarly writing
Task and analysis
TRADITIONAL LAWYERING SKILLS
Research:
What areas of the law did you research?
Were they federal, state or local laws?
Writing:
Drafted legal memoranda
Drafted legal opinions, bench memos
Drafted pleadings, motions, complaints,
answers
Drafted client correspondence
Summarized depositions
Prepared summaries of testimony
Trial preparation & participation:
Aided and prepared attorneys for trial
Handled discovery
Handled document production
Attended depositions, hearings or trials
Participated in trials and depositions
Analytical Skills:
Identified pertinent facts, issues
Analyzed case facts
Analyzed evidence
Analyzed and summarized evidence
Analyzed, explored and researched all
pertinent issues
Consultation:
Consulted with other attorneys about legal
issues
Suggested courses of legal actions under
supervision of attorney
Made recommendations to the court
Briefed attorneys on case issues
Met with attorneys to obtain or exchange
factual information concerning the case(s)
Interviewing:
Interviewed potential witnesses
Interviewed clients to determine case
issues
Trial Experience:
Argued motions
Observed negotiation settlements
Cross-examined witnesses
Case Management:
Briefed clients on case status
Handled cases from initial interview
through settlement negotiations
Words Often Misspelled:
Appellate
Committed/Commitment
Constitutional
Criterion (pl. criteria)
Alumnus (pl. alumni)
Alumna (pl. alumnae)
cum laude (italics and lower case)
summa cum laude (italics and lower case)
magna cum laude (italics and lower case)
Memorandum (pl. –dums or da)
Precede/Proceed
Words Misused:
Juris Doctor (not Doctorate)
Affect/Effect
Capital/Capitol
Complement/Compliment
Council/Counsel
Oriented (not orientated)
Perspective/Prospective
Regardless (not irregardless)
Advice/Advise
Principal/Principle
17
Action Verbs for Résumé Writing
The following is a list of action verbs which can be used to describe your duties and major
accomplishments. These verbs make your résumé active rather than passive.
adapted
addressed
administered
advised
analyzed
arranged
assembled
assessed
assisted
assumed
attained
audited
billed
budgeted
calculated
carried out
classified
coached
collected
communicated
compiled
completed
composed
computed
conducted
consolidated
constructed
coordinated
created
defined
delivered
designed
detected
determined
developed
devised
diagnosed
directed
discovered
displayed
documented
edited
eliminated
enforced
established
estimated
evaluated
examined
expanded
experimented
financed
formulated
gathered
generated
guided
handled
hauled
hypothesized
identified
illustrated
implemented
improved
influenced
initiated
inspected
installed
instituted
instructed
interpreted
interviewed
investigated
lectured
maintained
managed
marketed
mediated
modeled
monitored
motivated
negotiated
obtained
operated
ordered
organized
oversaw
performed
persuaded
photographed
18
planned
prepared
presented
printed
processed
produced
projected
proofread
provided
publicized
purchased
received
recommended
recorded
recruited
reduced
referred
refined
rehabilitated
repaired
reported
represented
researched
resolved
responded
restored
retrieved
reviewed
saved
scheduled
selected
served
sketched
solved
studied
summarized
supervised
supplied
surveyed
trained
translated
traveled
upgraded
wrote
Style Option 1
MIKE TIGER
333 Campus Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 • (225) 388-8888 • [email protected]
EDUCATION
( Note: If you
abbreviate your
degree in one
place you should
abbreviate all
degrees to be
consistent.)
Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA
Juris Doctor/Bachelor of Civil Law OR J.D./D.C.L. Candidate, May 2009
Average: 2.624 (3.571 highest average in class); Rank 120/240
• Student Bar Association: Vice President
• Phi Alpha Delta Legal Fraternity
• Chancellor’s List, Spring 2006
• CALI Award for Highest Grade in Federal Courts
Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA
Bachelor of Science OR B.S., Business Administration, May 2003
Average 3.7/4.0
• Alpha Kappa Psi Honorary Business Fraternity: Secretary, 1999-2000
• Union Governing Board, 1999-2000
EXPERIENCE
May 2006-Present
Evans, Lea, Ferrell & Lewis, Attorneys at Law, Baton Rouge, LA
Legal Assistant
Draft petitions and memoranda and perform legal research
Summer 2000
Tiger Express, Baton Rouge, LA
Accounting Clerk
Performed general accounting and data processing
MILITARY
(Mention only if appropriate)
SKILLS/COMMUNITY SERVICE/LANGUAGE/INTERESTS/LICENSES &
PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS – optional sections that you can include on
your resume (i.e., Proficient in Lexis, Westlaw; Golf, reading and Indian pottery,
Real Estate License, Louisiana Realtor Board, May 2001; French, conversational)
REFERENCES
Professor Patty Cake
Paul M. Hebert Law Center
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Telephone:(225) 388-8888
Vice Chancellor John Doe
Paul M. Hebert Law Center
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Telephone:(225) 388-8889
DATE PREPARED: Month Year (DATE PREPARED IS MANDATORY)
19
Mr. Robin Hood
Tiger Express
333 LSU Avenue
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
Telephone:(225) 388-3333
Style Option 2
MIKE TIGER
333 Campus Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
(225)388-8888; [email protected]
EDUCATION
Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Louisiana State University, J.D./D.C.L. Candidate, May 2008
Average: 2.624 (3.571 highest average in class); Rank 120/240
• Chancellor’s List: Spring 2006
• Student Bar Association: Vice President
• Flory Trial Club
• Phi Alpha Delta Legal Fraternity
Louisiana State University, B.S. in Business Administration, May 2000
Average: 3.7/4.0
• Alpha Kappa Psi Honorary Business Fraternity: Vice President, 1999-2000
• Social Rush Chairman, 1999-2000
EXPERIENCE
Evans, Lea & Ferrell, Law Clerk, Baton Rouge, LA, 2006-Present
[Describe duties]
Tiger Express, Summer Clerk, Baton Rouge, LA, 2004
Law Center Snack Shop, Waiter, Baton Rouge, LA, 1998-1999
MILITARY SERVICE
Include if applicable.
SKILLS/COMMUNITY SERVICE/ LANGUAGE/INTERESTS/
LICENSES & PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
Optional sections located here.
REFERENCES
Professor Patty Cake, Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Baton Rouge, LA (225) 388-8888
Vice Chancellor Joe Doe, Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Baton Rouge, LA (225) 388-8889
Mr. Robin Hood, Tiger Express, 777 LSU Avenue, Baton Rouge, LA (225) 222-3333
DATE PREPARED: June 2006 (Date Prepared is Mandatory)
20
Style Option 3
MIKE TIGER
School:
333 Campus Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
225/288-8888
Permanent:
999 Stadium Drive
New Orleans, LA 77777
504/999-9999
EDUCATION
Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Louisiana State University
J.D./D.C.L. Candidate, May 2008
Average: 2.578 (3.612 highest possible grade); Class Rank: 120/250
• Alumni Scholarship (2005 - 2006)
• Chancellor’s List, Fall 2005
University of Texas, Austin
B.S. Political Science, May 2002
• Cum laude
• President, Spanish Club
EXPERIENCE
Administrative Assistant, June 2006 - August 2006
Stern & Associates, Austin, Texas
Updated employment records on computer
Research Assistant, September 2005 - May 2006
Professor Cake, Political Science Department, University of Texas, Austin
Congressional Intern, June 2002 - August 2002
Congressman Jane Doe, Washington, D.C.
Assisted constituents in cases dealing with Social Security
SKILLS
Fluent in Spanish
REFERENCES
Professor John Doe
Paul M. Hebert Law Center
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
225/388-8888
Professor Patty Cake
University of Texas
Department of Political Science
Austin, TX 77777
777/777-7777
DATE PREPARED: June 2006 (Mandatory)
21
Style Option 4
Mike Tiger
333 Campus Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, 225/288-8888, [email protected]
EDUCATION
Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA
J.D./D.C.L. Candidate, May 2008
Class Rank: 120/250; Average: 2.613 (3.589 highest possible grade)
• Alumni Scholarship (2005 - 2006)
• Chancellor’s List, Fall 2005
University of Texas, Austin, TX
B.S. Political Science, 2002
• Graduated with Honors
• Phi Beta Kappa
• President, Spanish Club
EXPERIENCE
Administrative Assistant, Austin, Texas
Stern & Associates, June 2006 - August 2006
Updated employment records on computer
Research Assistant, Political Science Department, University of Texas, Austin
Professor Cake, September 2005 - May 2006
Researched proposed legislation
Congressional Intern, Washington, D.C.
Congressman Jane Doe, June 2002 - August 2002
Assisted constituents in cases dealing with Social Security
SKILLS
• Fluent in Spanish
• Proficient in WestLaw and Lexis
REFERENCES
Professor John Doe
Paul M. Hebert Law Center
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
225/388-8888
Professor Patty Cake
University of Texas
Department of Political Science
Austin, TX 77777
777/777-7777
DATE PREPARED: June 2006 (Mandatory)
22
COVER LETTERS
Cover Letters
Most of your communication with potential employers will be by mail. The language
with which you state your interest will help the reader decide whether to interview you. Each
letter should reflect your personality and strive to get your message across clearly and
professionally.
A cover letter should accompany your resume when you mail it in response to a listed
opening or as part of your direct mailing. Indicate your short or long term goals, your reasons for
applying, and your availability for interviewing. Your letter allows tailoring and amplification of
pertinent information not presented in your resume or to highlight an aspect of your resume in
which you wish to draw the reader’s attention. You may personalize each letter and make
reference to the recipient’s practice. This lends credibility to your request for consideration and
reflects the time you have spent in analyzing the firm’s practice. Avoid, whenever possible, mass
producing cover letters.
The letter should be no longer than one page. Use the same ―good quality‖ bond paper as
used for your resume. White paper is considered the most professional for the legal profession.
Make certain that your letter is well written and error free. Pay special attention to grammatical
and spelling accuracy.
Address each cover letter to a specific member of the firm or the recruiting coordinator.
If necessary, telephone the employer’s office and ask for the name of the hiring partner, the
spelling of that name (remember even Smith can be spelled many ways) and ascertain whether
the hiring partner is a Mr. or Ms.
CONTENT
Be brief and direct – do not use flowery language. Do not restate information contained
in your resume unless it would be of particular interest to the employer – you grew up in that city,
your family lives in that city, you have worked in that area. Use your letter to fill gaps in your
resume, such as available dates for employment or bar status.
State four important things: (1) why you are writing, i.e., summer clerkship, associate
position; (2) why you are interested in their organization, e.g., area of practice, size of the firm,
location, someone who knows of your interest suggested that you contact the employer (mention
the person’s name especially if that person is known to the prospective employer), a job notice
was posted, etc. (3) why the employer should hire you; and (4) when you are available for
interviewing.
Portray yourself as positive and confident. Avoid negative references, apologetic
comments, and beginning sentences with ―I am writing because….‖ Do not try to explain
―negatives‖ such as, low grades, late application, etc. Explanations sound defensive and your
cover letter will lose the positive tone it is meant to impart. Consider asking one of your
references to prepare a letter that can be included with each application. A reference is in a better
position of presenting the ―negative‖ in a ―positive‖ manner – you overcame it or did other things
in spite of it.
End your letter on an active note by requesting an interview date. If the employer is
located in another city, inform them that you will be in his/her city during a certain time period
and request an appointment.
To those employers who do not respond to your letter, follow-up with another letter or
telephone call. Often, it is the busy attorney who most needs to hire someone. Professional
persistence can pay off.
23
Model Cover Letter Format
Your Name
Street Address
City, State, Zip Code
Telephone Number
Date
Name of Person & Title
Firm/Agency
Street Address
City, State, Zip Code
Dear Mr./Ms._________:
First paragraph: \ The Basics. \ State the position you are interested in. Create an interest in
you. Include who you are, where you go to law school, when you plan to graduate, and where
you plan to obtain employment. Possibly mention the resource used in finding them, but this
does not include Westlaw, Lexis, or Martindale-Hubbell. Be sure to mention if a particular
person suggested that you contact this employer.
Second paragraph: Sell yourself! Highlight your resume. Talk about your interests. Explain
what you want to do and what your qualifications are. Because of these qualifications, you feel
you are uniquely qualified and would be an asset to the employer. Point out pertinent
achievements without duplicating exactly what is on your resume – expand on the resume.
Establish a connection through education, experience, interests, abilities, geographic ties to a
certain area, preference or expectations.
Third paragraph: Invite response. Ask for the interview. Be careful if you state that you will
call on a specific day - you do not want to aggravate the employer. Inform employer of dates you
plan to be in their city/state, and that you would like to arrange an interview during that time.
Sincerely,
Your Name
Enclosure(s) (If you send a resume, transcript, list of references and/or writing sample.)
24
Writing Samples
Writing Samples
Have samples of legal research memoranda, legal briefs, or in-depth
scholarly writing available. Writing samples provide employers with an
understanding of how you organize your thoughts, analyze and write clearly and
succinctly. It is appropriate to use legal documents prepared in your research and
writing class, as well as documents you prepare for an employer, requesting their
permission first. Follow these tips when choosing a writing sample:
1. Your writing sample should be 5 to 10 pages in length.
2. Remove/―white out‖ any confidential information.
3. If you are using a document that is not solely your own work, clearly
indicate where your contribution to the document begins and ends.
4. If you are using an excerpted piece, determine whether you need to prepare
an introduction to provide a context for the reader.
It is not necessary to include a sample with every resume and cover letter,
but it is a good idea to take a copy with you in an interview, in case the employer
asks for a writing sample.
Judicial clerkships – almost every clerkship listing requires a resume, transcript
and writing sample.
25
Letter to Alumnus for Assistance
333 Campus Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
October 10, 2006
DO NOT COPY THIS LETTER VERBATIM. USE THIS LETTER AS A GUIDE BUT DRAFT A
DOCUMENT THAT REFLECTS YOUR INTERESTS, PERSONALITY AND WRITING STYLE.
Mr./Ms. ____________
Hunt & Peck
4444 Graduation Blvd.
Dallas, TX 99999
Dear: Mr./Ms._____________:
I am in my third year at Louisiana State University Law Center and expect to graduate in May
20__. It was brought to my attention that you are also a law graduate of LSU (or Mr. So and So suggested
I contact you regarding patent law, practicing in Texas, etc.). Upon graduation, I plan to relocate to the
Dallas area in June 20__ and plan to sit for the July 20__ bar examination. I am wondering if you would
have some time to speak with me about practicing in Dallas and the surrounding area and the Texas bar
examination.
Specifically, I am interested in learning about the Texas legal market, networking opportunities,
hints for the bar examination, how you made the transition from Louisiana law to Texas law after
graduation and any other helpful information to someone in my position. If you know of anyone else I
should be speaking with, I would be interested in learning that as well.
I am enclosing my resume solely for the purpose of providing you with general background
information about myself and my work history. I completely understand that the purpose of our
discussion is for me to gather information about practicing law in Texas.
I will contact you via telephone within the next few weeks to arrange a time to discuss practicing
in the Dallas area. Thank you for your time and consideration and I look forward to meeting with you.
Sincerely,
Law Student
Enclosures
Tips:
SPECIFICALLY REQUEST GUIDANCE, NOT A JOB. This is networking.
Format:
1st ¶:
Introduce yourself and explain why you are writing. Establish a connection with
the reader: acknowledge his/her status as an alum, if applicable; acknowledge
your interest in a particular practice area; acknowledge the person who referred
you to the reader.
2nd ¶: Explain the type of assistance you are requesting.
3rd ¶: Explain the purpose of why you are enclosing your resume and let the reader
know that you understand the purpose of the discussion/meeting.
4th ¶: Explain how you plan to follow up with the individual and thank the reader for
their time.
26
Sample Follow-up Letter Style 1
333 Campus Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
October 24, 2005
Mr. Jonathan B. Partner
Thomas, Thomas & Jackson
7222 Becnel Avenue
Lafayette, LA 73333
Dear Mr. Partner:
Thank you for giving me the opportunity to interview with you on Friday, October 21, 2005. I
really enjoyed [the tour of your offices; our discussion on ___________; meeting John Doe in the Law
Practice Section; etc. If possible try to bring in relevant information from the interview.]
Furthermore, the interview reinforced my desire to be a [summer associate at, law clerk at or member of]
Thomas, Thomas & Jackson.
If I can provide you with any additional information, please do not hesitate to contact me. Thank
you again for your consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon.
Very truly yours,
Jason T. Thirdyear
Format:
Tips:
1st ¶: Extend thanks/appreciation for interview. State a fact remembered about the
interview. Restate your desire to affiliate/work with the firm.
2nd ¶: Offer to provide further information if necessary (e.g., transcripts, writing
samples and letters of recommendation). Express a desire to hear from the
firm.
Thank you letters should go out within 48 hours of your meeting. Letters should be no more than
one page long and if typed, should be printed on high quality bond paper.
If you feel that you did not address a question as well as you could have during the interview,
you can briefly address the issue in a thank you letter. However, if you choose to address the
issue here do not write in an apologetic and defensive manner.
A thank you letter should be sent to each attorney with whom you interview. IF you are able,
make each letter somewhat different (e.g., follow up on a portion of your conversation or provide
additional information the interviewer wanted). IF your letters would be the same, send one letter
to the person who arranged the interview, and ask within the letter that s/he extend your thanks to
the other people with whom you interviewed — name (spell correctly) all the people with whom
you interviewed.
27
Sample Follow-up Letter Style 2
333 Campus Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
October 24, 2005
Mr. Jonathan B. Partner
Thomas, Thomas & Jackson
7222 Becnel Avenue
Lafayette, LA 73333
Dear Mr. Partner:
Thank you for taking time from your busy schedule to meet with me last week on October 21,
2005, regarding a ___________ position with your firm. I especially appreciated our discussion on
products liability law and the legal job market in Lafayette. Meeting with other members of Thomas,
Thomas, and Jackson reinforced my desire to join your law firm upon graduation next May 2006.
I have enclosed a transcript and writing sample for your review. In addition to the references
listed on my resume, Professor Bob Tort, (225) 388-8888, has indicated to me he would like to serve as a
reference.
Thank you again for your consideration. I look forward to speaking with you soon.
Sincerely,
Jay B. Thirdyear
Enclosure
28
Withdraw Name from Consideration/Defer Employment
333 Campus Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
October 30, 1990
Mr. J. C. Go
Gett, Upp & Go
1111 Lone Avenue
Slowtown, LA 73333
Dear Mr. Go:
I appreciate the offer to work for Gett, Upp & Go as an associate. However, I have recently
accepted a law clerk position in the [federal] court with [Judge] in the [19th Judicial District Court] for
[one/two] year(s).
I am, however, still interested in an associate position with your firm when my clerkship is
finished and would welcome the opportunity to discuss the possibility of deferring my start date. I am
quite confident that the skills that I learn as a judicial clerk can be transferred into the law firm
environment.*
Thank you for your attentiveness.
Sincerely,
A. Law Student
Note: Look for factors which may make you a valuable asset to that firm. Firms don’t care what
you think about what they do or who they do it for. They care about what you can do for them.
29
Follow-up Letter After Completion of Clerkship
333 Campus Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
August 30, 2006
Mr. J. C. Go
Gett, Upp & Go
1111 Lone Avenue
Slowtown, LA 73333
Dear Mr. Go:
I would like to thank Gett, Upp & Go for the exciting and educational opportunity that was
extended to me this summer. The assignments assigned to me over the summer were challenging,
rewarding, broadened my knowledge of the legal field, and developed my lawyering skills. The work
assigned also reconfirmed my interest in [law practice area].
With my graduation date drawing near, I am currently exploring my options for permanent
employment. Securing employment with Gett, Upp & Go would allow me to work for a firm doing [law
practice], while giving me an opportunity to work in a high caliber law firm and realize my goals of
establishing residency in Slowtown.
Again, I thank you for my invaluable clerkship opportunity. I look forward to hearing from you
soon.
Sincerely,
A. Law Student
30
Miscellaneous Guidelines
REQUESTING AN EXTENSION OF A DEADLINE
1. Express appreciation for the offer.
2. Restate your interest in the employer.
3. Indicate that you are considering other employers and ask for an extension of time in
order to better evaluate all options.
4. Ask for one week, two weeks, whatever the minimum (or reasonable) amount of
time you need in order to make a decision.
5. When you have decided, immediately inform the employer.
ACCEPTANCE OF AN OFFER – GUIDELINES
1. Reflect your enthusiasm for the position.
2. Mention the starting date and other arrangements agreed upon. If specifics were not
decided upon in the initial offer, you should indicate that you are looking forward to
meeting with them to discuss your start date, etc.
―This letter confirms my acceptance of your offer to join Davis, Plaisance and Lea as
an associate following my graduation in May, 200__. I am delighted with the prospect
of working with you. I will contact you before graduation regarding my work schedule
and bar examination preparation.‖
DECLINING AN OFFER
1. Thank them for the opportunity or confirm your telephone conversation.
2. Mention why you are declining the opportunity.
―This letter confirms our telephone discussion of Month ___, 20__ declining the offer
extended by your firm to become an associate following graduation from Louisiana
State University Law Center in May. I will associate with Night and Day in New
Orleans to pursue my interest in environmental law and litigation.
Thank you for your consideration and patience.‖
or
―I am very pleased that you extended an offer of a summer associate position to me.
However, after careful review, I have decided to accept another position and must
decline your offer for next summer. (Note: if you accepted an offer in another city you
might mention this, i.e., ―I have decided to accept an offer in Los Angeles‖).
Thank you for your time and consideration.‖
31
Interview Tips
INTERVIEW TIPS
Do a self-assessment prior to interviewing. What are your accomplishments and transferable
skills? What are your strengths and weaknesses? What are your goals and objectives?
PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.
The best interviews are great conversations.
Be enthusiastic.
Know about the position and employer. When possible, know the name of the interviewer.
Know your resume, writing sample and transcript and be prepared to discuss them in detail.
Dress as a professional.
Be punctual.
Be assertive but professional.
Relax and be yourself - it is okay to be ―slightly‖ apprehensive.
Shake hands – make direct eye contact and smile.
Maintain a positive attitude – never criticize your school, past employers, etc. even if
instigated by the interviewer. No one likes a whiner, and it is unprofessional.
Ask well thought out questions – try not to ask question(s) where the answer(s) could have
been obtained by researching the firm.
Listen carefully and respond appropriately.
Highlight positive qualities.
Be prepared for difficult questions (i.e., grades, connections to the city, gaps in employment)
and answer directly and positively.
Reiterate your interest in the position.
End on a positive note (think about possibilities in advance, but be natural).
Thank the interviewer for his/her time.
Avoid giving answers with a negative component.
Take a pad of paper, pen and an extra resume, writing sample and transcript. Look prepared.
Upon leaving, express your desire to work for this firm.
Be aware that all employers are assessing the following qualities during interviews:
Self-confidence
Appearance
Preparedness, knowledge of employer or good questions about the employer
Maturity and common sense/good judgment
Personable and well rounded – looking for the person who will ―fit‖
Positive attitude and enthusiasm
Genuine interest in the position and location
Motivation and sense of purpose
Ability to solve complex problems
Ability to express oneself in a clear, concise and articulate manner
Negative factors evaluated by employers:
Tardy for interview without good reason
Poor appearance
Failure to make eye contact
Overbearing, too aggressive
Lack of interest, enthusiasm, or knowledge of employer
Lack of career planning, purpose and goals
Lack of confidence/poise or appearing meek
Did not ask thoughtful questions about the job or did not ask any questions
General negative attitude
Failure to express appreciation for the interviewer’s time
32
SAMPLE QUESTIONS
FREQUENTLY ASKED BY INTERVIEWERS
Personal Questions/Statements:
NOTE: Decide ahead of time how to handle personal questions which should not be asked, but may
come up. All interviewers are given our EEO statement, but through experience, we have learned that
some will ask questions regarding marital status, children, disability, etc.
Tell me about yourself.
What is your greatest strength or weakness?
What are your goals/objectives? What do you expect out of a law career?
Are you a leader? Any experience?
What do you consider to be your major successes and accomplishments? Your failures and
disappointments?
What is the most important event (or decision) in your life? Have you regretted any decisions you
have made and why?
How did you like your summer or previous jobs? What did you get out of it? What did you learn?
What did you dislike most? How would this help you work with our firm?
Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years?
How well do you work independently? With others?
How competitive are you? Do you consider yourself aggressive?
Which areas of practice interest you most? The least?
What would you prefer - counseling clients, researching, litigating?
Why, how and when did you decide to go to law school?
What sets you apart from the other candidates?
Educational Questions:
Why did you major in
?
Why did you choose this law school?
What was your LSAT score?
What courses do you like best/least?
Who are your favorite professors? Why?
How would you rate your legal education at this point?
Why aren’t your grades/rank on your resume?
Why aren't your grades better?
Other Questions:
When are you available to work?
Why do you want to work for our firm?
What do you know about our firm?
How do you perceive the future of the legal profession?
Do you have any questions regarding our practice?
Why should we hire you?
33
SAMPLE QUESTIONS TO ASK THE INTERVIEWER
Some of these questions may be answered by researching firm resumes, asking other students, etc. These
are merely examples; you should develop some of your own questions. When asked, ―Do you have any
questions?,‖ always be prepared to ask something. Asking questions is another way to convey your
interest in the firm.
CLERKSHIP POSITIONS:
• What type of work would I be doing?
• Are summer clerks assigned to work for more than one lawyer?
• How long are your summer clerkships? Do you offer split summers?
• How many clerks/associates do you plan to hire? How many clerks/associates were hired last
summer?
• How are summer clerks/associates evaluated? What criteria are used?
• Are permanent positions generally offered to previous summer clerks?
• Do you have a mentoring program for your summer clerks?
• What is the training structure for your summer clerkship program?
• Is there a chance for involvement in client meetings? Depositions? Hearings?
• What does the firm look for in a summer associate before making a job offer for after graduation
employment?
ASSOCIATE POSITIONS:
• How are new employees trained? How much access is there to the senior members of the firm or
office?
• How active are the lawyers in the firm in bar activities? Pro bono work?
• How does the firm or office feel about political activity and pro bono work?
• What type of work would I be doing?
• How would you describe the atmosphere of the organization?
• Do any one or two clients constitute the major percentage of your firms work?
• What do you like most about your job/firm?
• Did you clerk here?
• What kind of cases are you working on?
• Do you offer a mentor program to your associates?
• How is your partnership track structured (DEFENSE FIRMS). What is the average length of time to
make partner?
• How long have you been with the organization? What attracted you?
• How varied is the client base?
• What is the management structure?
• Are lawyers asked to travel often?
• What is the expectation of billable hours?
• What is the time period before I could expect to have a caseload and be going to court?
• What is the average caseload?
NOTE: Some questions should not be asked during an initial interview unless the subject matter is
brought up by the interviewer. Use professional judgment in developing your list of questions.
34
USING INTERVIEWSTREAM
InterviewStream is a software program that allows students to perform mock interviews on the computer
and then makes those interviews available online to both the students and career services counselors. A
camera attached to the computer monitor records the interview. A pre-recorded interviewer asks the
student typical interview questions (selected by the CSO) such as, ―Tell me about yourself.‖ Although
nobody likes to see themselves on camera or listen to their voices in a recording, these recorded mock
interviews give counselors and students the chance to see what the student may be doing right as well as
how a student can improve. We strongly encourage all students to take advantage of InterviewStream by
recording a mock interview and then reviewing that interview with a counselor.
If you have questions, feel free to stop by the Career Services Office.
GETTING STARTED:
1. Double-click on the ―InterviewStream Kiosk‖ icon on the desktop.
2. InterviewStream will load. Click on ―Start Kiosk.‖
3. If you are a registered user, click on ―Registered User‖ and login.
4. If you are a new user, click on ―New User‖ and register.
5. Click on ―School Recommended Interview Questions.‖
6. Choose a type of interview and then click ―Continue.‖
7. After an introduction, you will see yourself in the camera—make sure you are centered in the screen and then
click ―Ok.‖
8. You will hear the first question. Answer the question when prompted to do so. Click anywhere in the screen
when you are finished.
9. You will have the chance to review your answer (―Review‖), retry the answer (―Retry‖) or go to the second
question (―Ok‖).
10. Once you are satisfied with your first question and have clicked ―Ok,‖ you will hear the second question.
Repeat instructions above.
11. When you are finished, push the ―F1‖ button on the keyboard and type the word ―quit.‖ You may need to
wait a few minutes before doing this to give the interview time to upload.
REVIEWING YOUR ACCOUNT ONLINE:
Once you have registered with InterviewStream, you can view and edit your account on their website as well as
record a mock interview from the convenience of your home.
1. Go to www.interviewstream.com.
2. Enter your email address and password and click ―Go.‖
3. If you have access to a web camera, you can record an interview from home. Click on ―Interview Now From
Home.‖
4. Click on ―Update Your Account‖ to change your name, email address or password.
35
Networking
Networking
Networking is another method of searching for legal employment. However,
networking is not asking for a job. Instead it is a means of learning about potential
opportunities. Seventy-five to eighty percent of the opportunities in the legal market are not
advertised, and in order to find these opportunities, you have to be in the know. Networking
also helps you gain valuable information about the legal field, which can assist you in your
career planning efforts. You can contact people via email, letter or telephone.
Networking is not a short term proposition; instead, it is a lifelong process of connecting
with individuals to exchange information and ideas. Networking should not be a one way
relationship. Instead, members of your network should share a reciprocal relationship.
Reciprocation can be in the form of offering to pay for coffee/lunch, advising your contacts
of your willingness to provide assistance to them, or when you come across information/ideas
that may be of interest to them, pass the information along. In order to develop an effective
network, the following must occur:
1. Do a self-assessment. What type of information are you seeking? Who are your
current contacts?
2. Develop a plan. Networking takes time and you will need to devote adequate time to
developing your network in order to reap the rewards.
3. Develop contacts. Start with your family and friends by making a list of everybody
you know. Remind them that you are interested in speaking with attorneys.
4. Follow-up. Once you make contact make sure you follow-up on all your promises
and send thank you notes. Also, keep your contacts informed on how you are
progressing.
WHERE TO MAKE CONTACTS:
1. Family and friends
2. Law School alumni. You can find the names of alumni via our office or
www.martindale.com
3. Undergraduate alumni who are now practicing law
4. Professional Organizations, i.e. American Society of International Law, American
Heath Lawyer’s Association
5. Sections within the state bar association or the American Bar Association: volunteer,
attend their meetings, join their committees
6. Professors - both law school and undergraduate school
7. Your future colleagues
8. Former employers
9. Speakers from CSO programs
10. Student Organizations
11. National Minority Organizations: i.e. Women’s Bar Association, Black Women
Lawyer’s Association, Hispanic National Bar Association, Association of Lesbian &
Gay Lawyers
12. Sorority/Fraternity Members
13. Sports teammates
14. Members of the Church/Synagogue
15. People that you do business with: i.e. your doctor, barber/hair dresser, accountant,
bank tellers, etc.
16. Continuing Legal Education (CLE) Courses
36
TIPS:
1. Develop the right attitude about networking. This is an opportunity to learn about the profession and
all the things it has to offer.
2. Do not wait until someone approaches you. Make the first move.
3. Establish a weekly networking goal.
4. Develop your networking materials, i.e. professional business cards, your introduction.
5. Every time you meet someone try to get the name of one or two people that you can speak with.
6. When you meet someone, jot down information about that person, i.e. where you met them, who they
referred you to, what their interests are, etc. and organize this information.
7. Follow-up. ALWAYS send a thank you letter after meeting someone.
8. If you are nervous about networking, practice on your family and friends first.
37
Sample Follow-up Letter After Networking Opportunity
333 Campus Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
June 30, 2006
Mr./Ms.________________
Hunt & Peck
4444 Graduation Blvd.
Dallas, TX 99999
Dear Mr./Ms._____________:
Thank you for taking the time to speak with me about practicing law in Dallas and the
surrounding area and providing me with helpful hints for the Texas bar exam. It was most
interesting to learn that the Dallas area has a booming ___________ market. I would also like to
thank you for referring me to Texas Charlie and will let you know how my talk with him goes.
I will be in the Dallas area over the holiday break and would welcome the opportunity to
meet with you.
Sincerely,
Law Student
38
CAREER SERVICES PRINT RESOURCES
Type
Name of Publication
Subject Matter
Book
2007 Associate Salary Survey
Research
Book
A Counselor's Guide to Career Assessment Instruments
Career Counseling
Book
A Fair Shake; Lawful and Effective Interviewing
Interviewing
Book
A Lawyer's Journey: The Morris Dees Story
Public Interest
Book
After the JD: First Results of a National Study of Legal
Careers
Legal Career
Book
Almanac of the Federal Judiciary
Research; Judicial Clerkships
Book
America's Greatest Places to Work with a Law Degree
Legal Career
Book
Bankruptcy Law Careers
Legal Career; Bankruptcy
Book
Bar Admission Requirements 2004
Bar
Book
Behind the Bench: The Guide to Judicial Clerkships
Judicial Clerkships
Book
Best 109 Internships
Alternative Career; Legal Career
Book
Beyond L.A. Law: Break the Traditional "Lawyer"
Mold
Legal Career; Alternative Careers
Book
Biographies of Louisiana Judges
Research
Book
Business Lawyer's Handbook
Legal Career; Corporate
Book
Buyer's Guide: Services, Suppliers, Consultants to the
Legal Profession
Research
Book
Career Counseling of College Students
Career Counseling
Book
Career Opportunities for Minority College Graduates
Legal Career; Minorities
Book
Career Options for Law School Students
Legal Career
Book
Careers in Admiralty and Maritime Law
Legal Career; Admiralty
Book
Careers in Civil Litigation
Legal Career; Litigation
Book
Careers in Finance
Legal Careers; Alternative
Careers
Book
Careers in the FBI
Legal Careers; Alternative
Careers
Book
Careers in the Nonprofit Sector
Legal Careers; Alternative
Careers
Book
Choosing Small, Choosing Smart: Job Search Strategies
for Lawyers in the Small Firm Market
Legal Career; Small Firms
Book
Community Lawyering: Theory and Practice
Public Interest
39
Book
Comprehensive Fellowship Guide
Public Interest
Book
Comprehensive Guide to Bar Admission Requirements
Research
Book
Confessions of a Recruiting Director: The Insider's
Guide to Landing Your First Job
Job Search Advice
Book
Corporate Guide to United States Law Firms
Research
Book
Courting the Clerkship: Perspectives on the
Opportunities and Obstacles for Judicial Clerkships
Judicial Clerkships
Book
Dear Sisters, Dear Daughters
Women
Book
Directory of Employment and Recruitment Companies
Research
Book
Directory of Entertainment & Sports Attorneys
Research; Entertainment
Book
Directory of Expert Witnesses & Consultants
Research
Book
Entertainment Law Careers
Alternative Careers
Book
Excellence in the Workplace: Legal and Life Skills
Job Training
Book
Empowerment and Leadership: Tried and True Methods
for Women Lawyers
Women
Book
Family Law Careers
Legal Career; Family Law
Book
FBI Careers
Government
Book
Fed Law: Legal Internships with Federal Agencies
Legal Career; Government
Book
Federal Legal Employment Opportunities Guide
Legal Career; Federal
Government
Book
Federal Resume Guidebook: Strategies for Writing a
Winning Federal Electronic Resume, KSAs, and Essays
Book
For the Prosecution: Internships with America's
Prosecutors
Legal Career; Prosecution
Book
From Finals to the Firm: The Top Ten Things New Law
Firm Associates Should Know
Professional Skills
Book
From Law School to Law Practice
Professional Skills
Book
Full Disclosure: The New Lawyer's Must-Read Career
Guide
Book
Giant Killers: The Team and the Law that Help Whistleblowers Recover America's Stolen Billions
Ethics; Litigation
Book
Grants: A Short Course
Public Interest
Book
Guerilla Tacticts For Getting the Legal Job of Your
Dreams
Interviewing; Legal Career;
Alternative Career
Book
Guide to Education and Career Development in
International Law
Legal Career; International
Book
Guide to Foreign Law Firms
Legal Career; International
40
Book
Guide to the Leading 500 Lawyers in Canada
Research
Book
High Impact Interview Questions
Interviewing
Book
How to Start and Build a Law Practice
Legal Career
Book
How to Start and Build a Law Practice
Legal Career; Solo Practice
Book
How to Work a Room: The Ultimate Guide to Savvy
Socializing in Person and Online
Professional Skills
Book
International Opportunities Resource Guide
International
Book
Internships in International Affairs
International
Book
Internships with America's Top Companies
Legal Career; Alternative Careers
Book
It's Who You Know: The Magic of Networking in
Person and on the Internet
Professional Skills
Book
Job Search Handbook for People with Disabilities
Disabilities
Book
Jobs & J.D.'s: Employment and Salaries of New Law
Graduates
Research
Book
Jobs for Lawyers: Effective Techniques for Getting
Hired in Today's Legal Marketplace
Legal Career
Book
Judging: A Book for Student Clerks
Judicial Clerkships
Book
Key Questions in Career Counseling
Career Counseling
Book
Law Firm Diversity Programs
Diversity
Book
Law Firm Pro Bono Programs
Research
Book
Law Firms and Pro Bono
Research
Book
Law Office Technology
Technology; Research
Book
Law School Buzz Book
Research; Law School
Book
Law School Guide to Public Interest Careers
Public Interest
Book
Lawful Pursuit: Careers in Public Interest
Public Interest
Book
Leadership Directories
Legal Career
Book
Learning to Serve
Public Interest
Book
Legal Careers in Business
Legal Career; Business
Book
Litigation Law Careers
Legal Career; Litigation
Book
Louisiana Legal Directory
Research
Book
Mapping New Territory: A Joint Exploration of Legal
Employment
Career Counseling
Book
Martindale-Hubbell International Law Directory
Book
Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory
Research
Book
Minority Partners in Majority/Corporate Law Firms
Research; Minorities
41
Book
More than Part-time: The Effect of Reduced-Hours
Arrangements on Women Attorneys in Law Firms
Legal Career; Women
Book
NALP Directory of Law Schools
Research
Book
NALP Directory of Legal Employers
Research
Book
NALP Member Handbook and Membership Directory
Research
Book
National Directory of Law Schools
Research
Book
National Directory of Scholarships, Internships and
Fellowships for Latino Students
Research; Internships and
Scholarships
Book
National Directory of Women-owned Law Firms and
Women Lawyers, 2004-05
Research; Women
Book
Nonlegal Careers for Lawyers
Alternative Careers
Book
Objection Overruled: Overcoming Obstacles in the
Lawyer Job Search
Legal Career
Book
Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools
Research
Book
Orchestrating the Tempo of Legal Careers
Career Counseling
Book
Perspectives and Persuasion: 4,500 Law Students
Report on Recruitment, Employers & Job Choice
Decisions
Career Counseling
Book
Perspectives on Career Services
Career Counseling
Book
PIC's National Law List
Research
Book
Professional Responsibility
Study Aid
Book
Public Service in Time of Crisis
Public Interest
Book
Resource Careers: Options and Opportunities in
Environmental and Natural Resources Law
Legal Career; Environmental
Law
Book
Running from the Law: Why Good Lawyers are Getting
Out of the Legal Profession
Alternative Careers
Book
Serving the Public: A Job Search Guide
Public Interest
Book
Should You Really Be a Lawyer? The Guide to Smart
Choices Before, During, and After Law School
Alternative Careers
Book
Spotlight on Pro Bono Activities in the Philadelphia
Area
Public Interest
Book
Starting Salaries: What New Law Graduates Earn
Research
Book
Statement of Fundamental Lawyering Skills and
Professional Values
Professional Skills
Book
Ten Steps to a Federal Job: Navigating the Federal Job
System
Government
Book
The Best of the Job Goddess
Interviewing; Legal Career
42
Book
The Career Counseling Casebook: A Resource for
Practitioners, Students and Counselor Educators
Career Counseling
Book
The Career Counselor's Handbook
Career Counseling
Book
The City and County Attorney Internship Book
Legal Career; Prosecution
Book
The Complete Guide to Contract Lawyering
Legal Career
Book
The Comprehensive Fellowship Guide
Public Interest
Book
The Congressional Internship Book: Internships with
the 108th Congress
Legal Career; Congress
Book
The Directory of Federal Jobs and Employers
Book
The Eight Secrets of Top Exam Performance in Law
School
Law School; Professional Skills
Book
The Great Firm Escape: Breaking out of Private Practice
and into Public Service
Public Interest
Book
The Handbook of Student Affairs Administration
Career Counseling
Book
The Internship Series: Internships in International
Affairs
International
Book
The Law Firm Interview: A Guide for Law Students
Interviewing
Book
The Lawyer's Almanac 1994
Research
Book
The Lawyer's Almanac 2000
Research
Book
The Lawyer's Almanac 2002
Research
Book
The Lawyer's Almanac 2003
Research
Book
The Lawyer's Almanac 2005
Research
Book
The Lawyer's Guide to Balancing Life and Work
Law Career; Professional Skills
Book
The Lawyer's Guide to JobSurfing on the Internet
Research
Book
The Music and Entertainment Industry Internship Guide
Legal Career; Media
Book
The National Directory of Women-owned Law Firms
and Women Lawyers
Women
Book
The Non-Traditional Legal Career Report
Legal Career; Alternative Careers
Book
The Official Guide to Legal Specialties
Legal Career
Book
The Public Interest Employer Directory
Public Interest
Book
The Road Not Taken: A Practical Guide to Exploring
Non-Legal Career Options
Alternative Careers
Book
The Sports Internship Book
Legal Career; Alternative Careers
Book
Turning Points: New Paths for Second Careers for
Lawyers
Legal Career; Alternative Careers
Book
Vault Guide to Bankruptcy Careers
Legal Career; Bankruptcy
43
Book
Vault Guide to Capitol Hill Careers
Legal Careers; Government
Book
Vault Guide to Careers in Labor & Employment
Legal Career; Labor and
Employment
Book
Vault Guide to Corporate Law Careers
Legal Career; Corporate
Book
Vault Guide to International Careers
Legal Careers; International
Book
Vault Guide to Law Firm Diversity Programs
Research; Minorities
Book
Vault Guide to Law Resumes
Resumes
Book
Vault Guide to Litigation Careers
Legal Career; Litigatoin
Book
Vault Guide to Schmoozing: Insider Advice on Making
Contacts and Building Rapport to Boost Your Career
Professional Skills
Book
Vault Guide to Tax Law Careers
Legal Career; Tax
Book
Vault Guide to the Top 100 Law Firms
Research
Book
Vault Guide to the Top 50 Banking Employers
Banking; Alternative Careers
Book
Vault Guide to the Top Southeastern Law Firms
Research
Book
Vault Guide to Top Government and Non-Profit Legal
Employers
Legal Career; Government;
Public Interest
Book
Vault Guide to Top Internships
Book
Vault Guide to Top Texas Law Firms
Research
Book
View from the Top: Law Firm Leaders
Research
Book
Washington Internships in Law and Policy
Public Interest
Book
What Can You Do With a Law Degree?
Legal Career; Alternative Careers
Book
What Law School Doesn't Teach You…But You Really
Need to Know
Legal Career; Clerkships
Book
Where Do I Go From Here With My Life?
Legal Career; Legal Counseling
Book
Where Do I Go From Here? A Career Planning Manual
for Lawyers
Legal Career
Book
Who's Who in Congress
Research
Pamphlet
A Career in the Law: A Guide for Women Law Students
Legal Career; Women
Pamphlet
A Successful Transition: From Law Student to Lawyer
Legal Career; Professional Skills
Pamphlet
An Insider's Guide to Interviewing
Research; Professional Skills;
Interviewing
Pamphlet
Before You Hit Send
Research; Professional Skills
Pamphlet
Begin with a Successful Summer
Legal Career; Professional Skills;
Clerkships
Pamphlet
Can We Talk? How to Get the Feedback You Need
Professional Skills
44
Pamphlet
Careers in Compliance and Regulatory Affairs
Alternative Careers; Regulatory
Pamphlet
Careers in Financial Services
Alternative Careers; Financial
Pamphlet
Careers in Human Resources
Alternative Careers
Pamphlet
Careers in Legal Publishing
Alternative Careers; Publishing
Pamphlet
Careers in the Media
Alternative Careers;
Entertainment
Pamphlet
Careers in Writing
Alternative Careers;
Entertainment
Pamphlet
Doing Well at Doing Good
Internship; Public Interest
Pamphlet
EPA Honors Attorney Fellowship 2005
Public Interest
Pamphlet
Findlawjob.com: Targeted Mailing of Your Cover
Letter and Resume
Research
Pamphlet
Going In-house: A Guide for Law Students and Recent
Graduates
Legal Career; Corporate
Pamphlet
Guide to Small Firm Employment
Legal Career; Small Firms
Pamphlet
Interview for Success and Satisfaction
Interviewing
Pamphlet
Interviewing Tips for Law Students with Disabilities
Interviewing; Disabled
Pamphlet
Investigate the Excitement
Government
Pamphlet
Legal Careers
Legal Career
Pamphlet
Looking for a Job?
Legal Career
Pamphlet
Negotiating with Small Firms
Legal Career; Small Firms
Pamphlet
Public Service Careers
Public Interest
Pamphlet
Public Service Internships
Public Interest
Pamphlet
Resources for Conducting an Internet Job Search
Research
Pamphlet
Searching for an Alternative
Alternative Careers
Pamphlet
Starting Off in a New Direction: Job Search Strategies
for Second-Career Lawyers
Legal Career; Second-Career
Students
Pamphlet
Tax Officer Careers
Legal Career; Government; Tax
Pamphlet
The Attorney General's Honors Program
Legal Career; Government
Pamphlet
The Courts: An Excellent Place for Attorneys of Color
to Launch Their Careers
Judicial Clerkships; Minorities
Pamphlet
The How-Tos of Informational Interviewing
Interviewing; Research
Pamphlet
To Be Out or Not to be Out
GLBT
Pamphlet
US Marine Corps Judge Advocate
Legal Career; Government;
Marines
Pamphlet
What's the Secret to Getting Your Next Job?
Legal Career; Research
45
Pamphlet
When You Want to Hire a Lawyer
Career Services
Pamphlet
When You Want to Hire the Best and the Brightest
Legal Careers; Alternative
Careers
Pamphlet
Writing Resumes that Make an Impression
Research; Professional Skills
Pamphlet
www.laboremploymentjobs.com
Legal Career; Labor and
Employment
Video
A Career of Distinction: AG's Honor Program
Government
Video
Face Unique Challenges: Careers as an FBI Special
Agent
Government
Video
FBI Special Agent: America's Finest
Government
Video
Guerrilla Tactics
Legal Career; Professional Skills
Video
Make a Difference: Join the Washington State Attorney
Generals' Office
Government
Video
Miami Dade County State Attorney
Government
Video
Practice of Law in the United States Air Force
Government
Video
So Goes a Nation: Lawyers and Communities
Public Interest
Video
Ten Tough Times: Advice to Associates on Handling
some Hairy Situations
Practicing Law
Video
The Deadly Dozen: Twelve of the Most Common
Mistakes Lawyers make in Dealing with their Clients
Practicing Law
Video
The Perfect Interview
Interviewing
Video
United States Securities and Exchange Commission:
Recruitment
Government
Video
What Can You Do With a Law Degree?
Law Degree
Video
You've Graduated…What Now?
Interviewing
Video
Face Unique Challenges: Careers as an FBI Special
Agent
Government
Video
FBI Special Agent: America's Finest
Government
Video
Guerrilla Tactics
Legal Career; Professional Skills
Video
Make a Difference: Join the Washington State Attorney
Generals' Office
Government
Video
Miami Dade County State Attorney
Government
Video
Practice of Law in the United States Air Force
Government
Video
So Goes a Nation: Lawyers and Communities
Public Interest
Video
Ten Tough Times: Advice to Associates on Handling
some Hairy Situations
Practicing Law
Video
The Deadly Dozen: Twelve of the Most Common
46
Practicing Law
Mistakes Lawyers make in Dealing with their Clients
Video
The Perfect Interview
Interviewing
Video
United States Securities and Exchange Commission:
Recruitment
Government
Video
What Can You Do With a Law Degree?
Law Degree
Video
You've Graduated…What Now?
Interviewing
47
CAREER SERVICES WEB RESOURCES
Career Planning Links
ABA - Accredited Law Schools
ABA - Approved Study Abroad Programs
American Association of Law Libraries
Campus Career Center
Careers for Lawyers
Careers in Business
Career Magazine
Counsel Net
Federal Resume Writing
First Gov
University of Michigan Government
Resources on the Web
Internet Legal Resources Guide
Judicial Clerkships
Law Match
Law Runner
Legal 500.com
Legal Information Institute
Lexis-Nexis
LSU Main Campus Career Center
Martindale-Hubbell
National Association for Law Placement
National Association for Law Placement
Directory
Palidan Legal Resources
Political Resources on the Net
Study Aborad.com
Texas Lawyer
The Association of Trail Lawyers of America
The Monster Board
The Riley Guide
True Careers
Yahoo Directory Government / Law
Federal Government Links
Central Intelligence Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense
Department of Education
Department of Energy
Department of Health and Human Services
Department of Housing and Urban
Development
Department of Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Department of Transportation
Department of Treasury
www.abanet.org/legaled/approvedlawschools/approved.html
www.abanet.org/legaled/studyabroad/abroad.html
www.aallnet.org/index.asp
www.campuscareercenter.com
www.wetfeet.com/industries/law/home.asp
www.careers-in-business.com
www.careermag.com
www.counsel.net
www.resume-place.com
www.firstgov.gov
www.lib.umich.edu/govdocs/govweb.html
www.ilrg.com/gov.html
www.judicialclerkships.com
www.lawmatch.com
www.lawrunner.com
www.legal500.com
www.law.cornell.edu/topics/topic1.html
www.lexis-nexis.com/lncc
appl003.lsu.edu/slas/career/careerweb.nsf/index
www.martindale.com
www.nalp.org
www.nalpdirectory.com
www.palidan.com
www.politicalresources.net
www.studyabroad.com
www.law.com/tx
www.atlanet.org
www.monster.com
www.rileyguide.com
www.careercity.com
dir.yahoo.com/government/law/
www.cia.gov
www.usda.gov
www.commerce.gov
www.defenselink.mil
www.ed.gov
www.doe.gov
www.os.dhhs.gov
www.hud.gov
www.doi.gov
www.usdoj.gov
www.dol.gov
www.dot.gov
www.ustreas.gov
48
Environmental Protection Agency
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Federal Bureau of Investigations
Federal Communications Commission
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Federal Jobs Central
Federal Jobs Digest
Federal Judicial Center
Federal Trade Commissions
FedWord
Internal Revenue Service
Library of Congress
National Labor Relations Board
Office of Personnel Management/USAJobs
Attorney Positions: #0905 Series
Clerk Positions: #0904 Series
Social Security Administration
United States House of Representative
United States Senate
US Food and Drug Administration
US State Department
US Patent and Trademark Office
US Securities and Exchange Commission
Veteran Affairs
Yahoo Directory for Government
www.epa.gov
www.eeoc.gov
www.fbi.gov
www.fcc.gov
www.fema.gov
www.fedjobs.com
www.jobsfed.com
www.fjc.gov
www.ftc.gov
www.fedworld.gov
www.irs.gov
www.loc.gov
www.nlrb.gov
www.usajobs.opm.gov
www.ssa.gov
www.house.gov
www.senate.gov
www.fda.gov
www.state.gov
www.uspto.gov
www.sec.gov
www.va.gov
dir.yahoo.com/government
Federal Judicial Links
Courts Net
US Federal Judiciary
US Supreme Courts
First Gov
Judicial Clerkship
Federal Magistrate Judges Association
www.courts.net
www.uscourts.gov
www.supremecourtus.gov
www.firstgov.gov/Agencies/Federal/Judicial.shtml
www.judicialclerkships.com
www.fedjudge.org
State Judicial Links
LA Judicial Information
Supreme Court of Louisiana
The National Center for State Courts
www.state.la.us/gov_judicial.htm
www.lasc.org
www.ncsconline.org
Military Links
Air Force Judge Advocate General
Navy Judge Advocate General
Marine Judge Advocate General
Army Judge Advocate General
US Coast Guard Legal Department
www.jagusaf.hq.af.mil/FAQs/edopps.htm
www.jag.navy.mil/
sja.hqmc.usmc.mil
www.jagcnet.army.mil
www.uscg.mil/Legal/index.htm
International Links
ABA Section of International Law and
Practice
Access to Justice Network - Canada
AdminNet: World Governments
American Chamber of Commerce in Russia
www.abanet.org/intlaw/home.html
www.acjnet.org/splash/default.aspx
www.adminet.com/world/gov/
www.russianamericanchamber.org
49
American Society of International Law
British and Irish Association of Law Libraries
Canadian Legal Resources
Career Builder International Gateway
Chambers and Partners Legal Directories UK
European Union Online
Europages- European Business Directory
European Union in the US
Escape Artists - Living Abroad Resources
GoJobsite - United Kingdom
Governments on the Web
Inter-Parliamentary Union
International Center for Not-for-Profit Law
International Centre for Commercial Law
(Legal 500)
Law Research - Listing of Embassies
Law Research - Listing of International
Parliaments
Organization of American States –
Opportunities
Overseas Jobs.com
Peace Brigades International
Political Resources on the Net
The Riley Guide - International Job
Opportunities
The Riley Guide - Information on Working
Abroad
Foreign Governments
UN International Civil Service Commission
United Nations Vacancy Announcement
Bulletin
World Bank Group - Careers
International Organizations
Asian Development Bank
European Bank for Reconstruction and
Development
Inter-American Development Bank
International Court of Justice
International Monetary Fund
Law Research - List of International
Organizations
Organization of American States Opportunities
World Bank Organization
Unrepresented Nations and Peoples
Organisations
State Government
Info Louisiana
www.asil.org
www.biall.org.uk/index.asp
www.gahtan.com/cdnlaw/
www.careerbuilder.com
www.chambersandpartners.com/contact.cfm
europa.eu.int/index-en.htm
www.europages.net/
www.eurunion.org/index.htm
www.escapeartist.com/
www.jobsite.co.uk/
www.gksoft.com/govt/
www.ipu.org/english/home.htm
www.icnl.org/
www.legal500.com/index.php
www.lawresearch.com/v2/global/ciemb.htm
www.lawresearch.com/v2/global/ciparl.htm
www.oas.org
www.overseasjobs.com
www.peacebrigades.org/index.html
www.politicalresources.net
www.rileyguide.com/internat.html
www.rileyguide.com/intlinfo.html#info
icsc.un.org/
icsc.un.org/vab/index.htm
lnweb28.worldbank.org/hrs/careers.nsf
www.adb.org/
www.ebrd.com/
www.iadb.org/
www.icj-cij.org/
www.imf.org/
www.lawresearch.com/v2/global/ciorgs.htm
www.oas.org/
www.worldbank.org
www.unpo.org/
www.state.la.us
50
Supreme Court of Louisiana
Division of Administration
Department of Agriculture
Department of Civil Service
Department of Corrections
Department of Culture Recreation & Tourism
Department of Economic Development
Department of Education
Department of Environmental Quality
Ethics Commission
Department of Health & Hospitals
LSU Health Sciences Center
Department of Insurance
Department of Labor - Legal Division
Department of Natural Resources
Department of Public Safety
Department of Revenue & Taxation
Department of Social Services
Department of Wildlife & Fisheries
LA Public Service Commission
LA Real Estate Commission
Secretary of State’s Office
State Employees Group Benefits
State Employees Retirement System
State of Louisiana Attorney General
Transportation & Development
www.lasc.org
www.doa.state.la.us/doa/doa.htm
www.ldaf.state.la.us
www.dscs.state.la.us
www.corrections.state.la.us
www.crt.state.la.us
www.lded.state.la.us
www.doe.state.la.us
www.deq.state.la.us
www.ethics.state.la.us
www.dhh.louisiana.gov/
www.lsuhsc.edu
www.ldi.state.la.us
www.ldol.state.la.us
www.dnr.state.la.us
www.dps.state.la.us
www.rev.state.la.us
www.dss.state.la.us
www.wlf.state.la.us
www.lpsc.org
www.lrec.state.la.us
www.sec.state.la.us
www.groupbenefits.org
www.lasers.state.la.us
www.ag.state.la.us
www.dotd.state.la.us
51
STATE AGENCIES – BATON ROUGE
LA State Treasury Department
Mr. Jim Napper
P.O. Box 44154
Baton Rouge, LA 70804
225-342-0040
www.treasury.state.la.us
Department of Revenue & Taxation
Ms. Kimberly Robinson
P.O. Box 201
Baton Rouge, LA 70821
(225) 219- 2467
www.rev.state.la.us
Secretary of State's Office
Ms. Merietta Norton
P.O. Box 94125
Baton Rouge, LA 70804
(225) 922-0900
www.sec.state.la.us
Department of Social Services
Mr. Steve L. Mayer
P.O. Box 1887
Baton Rouge, LA 70821
(225) 342-1125
www.dss.state.la.us
State Employees Group Benefits
Mr. Richard N. Burtt
5825 Florida Boulevard
Baton Rouge, LA 70806
225-925-6625
www.groupbenefits.org
State Employees Retirement System
Mr. Kevin Torres
P.O. Box 44213
Baton Rouge, LA 70804
225-925-7197
www.lasers.state.la.us
State of Louisiana Attorney General
Mr. Rob Harroun
P.O. Box 94005
Baton Rouge, LA 70804
225- 326-6300
www.ag.state.la.us
Transportation & Development
Mr. Lawrence A. Durant
P.O. Box 94245
Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9425
225-379-1207
www.dotd.state.la.us
Department of Wildlife & Fisheries
Mr. Donald E. Puckett
P.O. Box 98000
Baton Rouge, La 70898-9000
225-763-3510
www.wlf.state.la.us
52
Intercollegiate Job Bank
The Law Center subscribes to the Intercollegiate Job Bank, which is compiled by
Brigham Young University Law School. The Job Bank includes job listings from those law
schools listed below. In order to access the Job Bank:
1. Go to http://www.law2.byu.edu/Career_Services/jobBank.htm
2. If for some reason, you are having trouble with this link:
Go to www.law2.byu.edu
o Click on Career Services
o Click on Visitors
o Click on Intercollegiate Job Bank
3. You will be prompted for a user name and password. The current user name is
―lawschool‖ and the current password is ―students.‖ Enter the user name and password
and click ―OK.‖
Note: The user name and password periodically change. If you are having trouble
logging in, please contact someone in the Career Services Office for the current user
name and password.
4. The Intercollegiate Job Bank will appear. Click on the appropriate state’s link for the law
school whose job listings you wish to view.
While the majority of the job listings are for 3Ls or attorneys with experience, you can
use these listings as a resource for the names of employers in a particular region. The listings are
updated periodically, so be sure to check those regions that you are targeting in your job search
often.
Occasionally we receive hard copy job listings from these and other law schools. These
listings are posted on our Symplicity job bank.
The following schools currently post job listings on the Job Bank:
LAW SCHOOL
LOCATION
ALABAMA
Alabama, University of – School of Law
Faulkner University, Thomas Goode Jones School of Law
Samford University, Cumberland School of Law
Tuscaloosa, Alabama
Montgomery, Alabama
Birmingham, Alabama
ARIZONA
Arizona – Tucson, University of
Tucson, Arizona
ARKANSAS
Arkansas – Fayetteville, University of
Arkansas – Little Rock, University of
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Little Rock, Arkansas
53
LAW SCHOOL
LOCATION
CALIFORNIA
California – Davis, University of
California – Hastings, University of
Chapman University School of Law
Golden Gate University School of Law
Pacific University (McGeorge) School of Law
Pepperdine University School of Law
San Diego, University of
San Francisco, University of
Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Davis, California
San Francisco, California
Orange, California
San Francisco, California
Sacramento, California
Malibu, California
San Diego, California
San Francisco, California
San Diego, California
COLORADO
Colorado – Boulder, University of
Denver, University of
Boulder, Colorado
Denver, Colorado
CONNECTICUT
Connecticut, University of
Hartford, Connecticut
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Howard University of Law
American University College of Law
Catholic University of American Canon School of Law
University of the District of Columbia
Washington, DC
Washington, DC
Washington, DC
Washington, DC
FLORIDA
Florida Coastal School of Law
Florida State University
Nova Southeastern University Law Center
St. Thomas University School of Law
University of Florida Levin College of Law
University of Miami
Jacksonville, Florida
Tallahassee, Florida
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Miami, Florida
Gainsville, Florida
Miami, Florida
GEORGIA
Emory University
Georgia, University of
Mercer School of Law
Atlanta, Georgia
Athens, Georgia
Macon, Georgia
IDAHO
University of Idaho College of Law
Moscow, Idaho
ILLINOIS
John Marshall Law School
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
DePaul University College of Law
University of Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
Carbondale, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
Champagne, Illinois
INDIANA
Indiana University – Bloomington
University of Notre Dame
Valparaiso University School of Law
Bloomington, Indiana
Notre Dame, Indiana
Valparaiso, Indiana
54
LAW SCHOOL
LOCATION
IOWA
Drake University School of Law
University of Iowa College of Law
Des Moines, Iowa
Iowa City, Iowa
KANSAS
Washburn University School of Law
University of Kansas School of Law
Topeka, Kansas
Lawrence, Kansas
KENTUCKY
University of Louisville
Louisville, Kentucky
LOUISIANA
Loyola University New Orleans School of Law
Tulane School of Law
New Orleans, Louisiana
New Orleans, Louisiana
MAINE
University of Maine Law School
Portland, Maine
MARYLAND
University of Maryland
Baltimore, Maryland
MASSACHUSETTS
Boston University School of Law
New England School of Law
Northeastern University School of Law
Western New England College School of Law
Boston, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
Springfield, Massachusetts
MICHIGAN
Ave Maria School of Law
Detroit Mercy, University of
Michigan, University of
Michigan State University
Thomas M. Cooley Law School
Wayne State University
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Detroit, Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan
East Lansing, Michigan
Lansing, Michigan
Detroit, Michigan
MINNESOTA
Hamline University School of Law
University of Minnesota School of Law
University of St. Thomas School of Law
William Mitchell College of Law
Saint Paul, Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Saint Paul, Minnesota
MISSISSIPPI
Mississippi College School of Law
University of Mississippi
Jackson, Mississippi
Oxford, Mississippi
MISSOURI
St. Louis University School of Law
Washington University School of Law
University of Missouri – Columbia School of Law
St. Louis, Missouri
St. Louis, Missouri
Columbia, Missouri
MONTONA
55
LAW SCHOOL
LOCATION
University of Montana School of Law
Missoula, Montana
NEBRASKA
Creighton University School of Law
University of Nebraska College of Law
Omaha, Nebraska
Lincoln, Nebraska
NEVADA
University of Nevada Las Vegas School of Law
Las Vegas, Nevada
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Franklin Pierce Law Center
Concord, New Hampshire
NEW MEXICO
University of New Mexico School of Law
Albuquerque, New Mexico
NEW YORK
Cornell University
CUNY Law School
State University of New York at Buffalo Law School
Touro College Law Center
Ithaca, New York
Flushing, New York
Buffalo, New York
Huntington, New York
NORTH CAROILNA
Wake Forest University School of Law
Winston-Salem, North Carolina
OHIO
Capital University Law School
Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Ohio State University Moritz College of Law
Toledo College of Law
University of Akron School of Law
University of Dayton School of Law
University of Toledo College of Law
Columbus, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio
Columbus, Ohio
Toledo, Ohio
Akron, Ohio
Dayton, Ohio
Toledo, Ohio
OKLAHOMA
University of Tulsa
University of Oklahoma
Oklahoma City University
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
OREGON
Lewis and Clark Law School
Willamette University School of Law
University of Oregon
Portland, Oregon
Salem, Oregon
Eugene, Oregon
PENNSYLVANIA
Dickinson School of Law – Pennsylvania State University
Duquesne University School of Law
University of Pittsburgh School of Law
Villanova University School of Law
Carlisle, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Villanova, Pennsylvania
RHODE ISLAND
Roger Williams School of Law
Bristol, Rhode Island
56
LAW SCHOOL
LOCATION
SOUTH CAROLINA
University of South Carolina School of Law
Columbia, South Carolina
TENNESSEE
University of Tennessee
Knoxville, Tennessee
TEXAS
Baylor University
St. Mary’s School of Law
Southern Methodist University School of Law
Texas Wesleyan University
University of Houston
University of Texas – Austin
Waco, Texas
San Antonio, Texas
Dallas, Texas
Ft. Worth, Texas
Houston, Texas
Austin, Texas
UTAH
Brigham Young University Law School
University of Utah School of Law
Provo, Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah
VERMONT
Vermont Law School
South Royalton, Vermont
VIRGINA
Appalachian School of Law
Washington & Lee University
William & Mary School of Law
Grundy, Virginia
Lexington, Virginia
Williamsburg, Virginia
WASHINGTON
Gonzaga University School of Law
Seattle University
University of Washington School of Law
Spokane, Washington
Seattle, Washington
Seattle, Washington
WEST VIRGINIA
West Virginia University College of Law
Morgantown, West Virginia
WISCONSIN
University of Wisconsin Law School
Madison, Wisconsin
WYOMING
University of Wyoming College of Law
Laramie, Wyoming
57
Equal Justice Works
Equal Justice Works maintains a public interest-related website, www.equaljusticeworks.org. Equal
Justice Works also hosts a public interest career fair in Washington, D.C. each fall semester, awards
fellowships to law students and attorneys for public interest-related projects, offers travel assistance for
certain public interest events and much more.
Because our law center is a member of Equal Justice Works, you have access to members-only content
on their website and to travel assistance offered by Equal Justice Works. Additionally, our membership level
includes free registration for the public interest career fair for 10 students.
The website contains information on financing a public interest career, the Summer Corps program
(which gives law students the opportunity to earn a $1,000 education award voucher for spending their
summer in a qualifying internship at a non-profit, public interest organization), advice for 1Ls and a directory
for public interest and pro bono programs. You will need to obtain the members-only password from the
Career Services Office. If you have questions, feel free to stop by the Career Services Office or call Annie
LeBlanc at (225) 578-0384.
58
PSLawNet
PSLawNet is a public service law network. Their website, www.pslawnet.org, includes a database of
public interest jobs and organizations from all over the U.S. and many other countries. Because our law center
is a member of PSLawNet, you have access to this database of over 12,000 public interest organizations. You
will need to register on their website to access the database, but registration is free. Other resources on the
website include a list of career fairs and information on obtaining fellowships. PSLawNet is a division of
NALP, the National Association of Law Placement.
If you have questions, feel free to stop by your Career Services Office or call Suzanne Bourgeois at
(225) 578-0384.
Getting Started…
12. Go to www.pslawnet.org.
13. Click on ―Sign Up Now.‖
14. Enter a valid email address and a password as indicated under ―Sign Up For PSLawNet.‖
15. Under ―User Type,‖ select ―Student.‖
16. Under ―Students Only,‖ select your law school, Louisiana State University.
17. Click ―Submit.‖
Searching for Jobs and Organizations; Updating Your Information
Once you have registered with PSLawNet and logged in to the website, you can search the database for
job opportunities, including attorney positions, fellowships, non-legal positions and public service internships.
You can limit your search to a particular city, state or country or by particular legal issue, such as Civil
Rights, Death Penalty and Tax. You can also search the database for information on particular organizations.
5. Under the Student Dashboard menu on the left side of the screen, click on ―Search Opportunities‖
to search the database for job opportunities. Enter any criteria you want to use for retrieving job
opportunities, and then click the ―Search Opportunities‖ button at the bottom of the screen.
6. Under the Student Dashboard menu, click on ―Search Organizations‖ to search the database for
information on particular organizations. Enter any criteria you want to use for retrieving particular
organizations, and then click the ―Search Organizations‖ button at the bottom of the screen.
7. Click on ―Receive Email Alerts?‖ under the Student Dashboard menu to sign up for email alerts
when new job opportunities are added to the database. You can designate particular regions, types of
jobs or practice areas for these notifications.
8. Click on ―Edit Profile‖ under the Student Dashboard menu to change your address, phone number
or graduation date.
59
9. You can also change your username or password by clicking on the appropriate links under the
Student Dashboard menu.
Other Resources
Other resources on the PSLawNet website include public service-related announcements, a list of public
service career fairs, sources for funding of summer internships and fellowship resources.
1. Click on ―Community/Resources‖ in the top right corner of the screen. You can then click on
―Helpful Resources‖ to access a list of public service career fairs, funding sources for summer
internships and public service brochures that can be downloaded; and ―Links‖ to access other public
service-related websites.
2. Click on ―Fellowship Corner‖ in the top right corner of the screen to access information on
applying for fellowships.
60
Public Interest Law Society
The purpose of the Public Interest Law Society (PILS) is to raise awareness in the student
body of the various public interest opportunities available and to increase the availability of such
opportunities. PILS is a student-run organization and works with faculty and Career Services
advisors.
PILS works to increase the number of public interest opportunities available to LSU law
students by organizing legal and non-legal projects to help the local community during the
school year and has administered a Fellowship Fund ($24,000) for students who spend their
summer in public interest internships.
PILS has several committees on which law students can serve: Pro Bono Legal Services,
Fellowship and Community Service. Sample projects from 2005 - 2006 include Capital Area
Legal Services, Hurricane Katrina disaster relief, Thirst for Justice, Everybody Reads and St.
Vincent De Paul.
If you are interested in joining PILS, please email [email protected] or stop by their office
in W156.
Both PILS members and other law students pursuing public interest careers are eligible to
attend the Equal Justice Works job fair and conference in Washington, DC. This job fair is held
every October. More information may be found at www.equaljusticeworks.org. In the past, PILS
has secured travel reimbursement from the law center to aid students who attended the job fair.
61
1L Job Search Overview and Timeline
November 1
Orientation
Attend the mandatory 1L Career Services Orientation.
Job Search Plan
Begin to formulate your career goals (e.g., practice areas, geographic
preferences, alternative careers, etc.)
Do a self-assessment. What are your career goals based on your interests,
values, skills and abilities?
December
Career Counselor
After fall semester finals, you are able to schedule individual counseling
sessions to discuss:
o Your career plan
o Ways to match your interests and values with your career goals
o Strategies for reaching your career goals
o Strategies for obtaining summer employment
Job Search Plan
Develop a job search ―to do list‖ by month, week and day.
Plan follow-up strategy for all resumes/applications sent.
Networking
Review the Networking section in your Career Services Handbook.
Start developing your list of contacts.
Arrange information interviews, job shadowing or volunteer opportunities
for Winter break.
Interviewing
Review the Interviewing section in your Career Services handbook.
Begin to prepare a list of individuals/companies you would like to
interview with and be prepared to discuss these with your career counselor.
Develop Your Marketing Tools
Draft your resume and a sample cover letter.
Career Services Programs
Attend the Resume and Cover Letter Workshop.
Attend Symplicity training.
Symplicity Job Bank
Check Symplicity job bank frequently for job listings.
CLE Programs
Attend CLE programs, if interested. CLE program announcements are
located on the LSU Law Center website.
Check your email daily for job listings and notices from the Career Services
Office.
62
January
Career Counselor
Schedule an appointment to meet with a career counselor to discuss your
status and review options for expanding your job search OR
Schedule an individual counseling session to discuss:
o Your career plan
o Ways to match your interests and values with your career goals
o Strategies for reaching your career goals
o Strategies for obtaining summer employment
Job Search Plan
Develop a job search ―to do list‖ by month, week and day or update your
―to do list.‖
Plan a follow-up strategy for all resumes/applications sent OR follow-up
on all resumes/applications sent.
Develop Your Marketing Tools
Draft your resume and cover letter.
Revise resume to include activities during Winter break, if applicable.
Networking
Arrange informational interviews and job shadowing opportunities.
Incorporate new networking strategies into your plan – attend professional
meetings.
Join the local bar association in the geographic regions you wish to
relocate to upon graduation.
Interviewing
Review the Interviewing section in your Career Services Handbook and
check out interviewing materials from the Resource Room.
Continue to arrange job interviews for either paid or volunteer
opportunities.
OCI (On Campus Interviews)
Attend the On-campus Interview Program orientation.
Bid for opportunities (submit requests for interviews).
Career Services Programs
Attend the Resume and Cover Letter workshop.
Attend Symplicity training.
Attend Networking workshop.
Attend Interviewing workshop.
Schedule a mock interview with a career counselor.
Attend practice area programs
Symplicity Job Bank
Check Symplicity job bank frequently for job listings.
Public Interest
Research and apply for public interest and government jobs. The Resource
Room has information on public/government opportunities. Review your
Career Services Handbook for information on public interest sources.
Alternative Legal Career
Arrange a non-legal internship if you are considering pursuing a nontraditional legal career.
Ask a career counselor for a list of non-legal careers.
Attend Alternative Careers panel.
Summer School
63
February March
April – July
Enroll in summer study abroad program if interested.
Be advised that the CSO strongly recommends that you attend summer
school after your first year of law school.
CLE Programs
Continue to attend CLE programs, if interested.
Email
Check your email daily for important notices from the CSO
Job Search Plan
Review your job search plan.
Are you following up on resumes sent and interviews already conducted?
Visit with your career counselor regularly.
OCI
Continue to bid for employers
Networking
Are you networking?
Symplicity Job Bank
Check Symplicity frequently for job listings.
Career Services Programs
Attend CSO educational programs.
Career Counselor
Meet with your career counselor to discuss how your job search is
progressing.
Judicial Clerkships
Conduct research on judges.
Prepare mailing to judges for VOLUNTEER judicial clerkship
opportunities.
Don’t forget that winter break is a great time to capitalize on these
opportunities.
Small Firm and Government
Conduct research on small firms and government agencies.
Prepare mailing for small firms and government agencies for
VOLUNTEER/SOME PAID clerkship opportunities.
Email
Check your email frequently for important notices from the CSO.
Job Search Plan
Review and update your job search plan.
Are you following up on resumes sent and interviews already conducted?
Symplicity Job Bank
Check Symplicity frequently for job listings.
CLEs and Career Services Programs
Attend programs if desired.
Summer School
We strongly recommend that you complete your summer school
requirement during your 1L summer for the following reasons: The
opportunities for summer jobs as a 1L are not as numerous; many
legal employers will not allow a clerk to split their time at the firm to
accommodate summer school; and many law firms select their
permanent employees from their 2L summer clerking pool. If you
have to complete your summer school requirement during your 2L
summer, you may lose opportunities.
64