Exercise Science Student Handbook

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Bachelor of Science in
Exercise Science
Student Handbook
2014-15 Academic Year
Policies in this handbook are for all
undergraduate students in the
Exercise Science Program
In addition to this handbook, students are to refer to the College of Health
and Human Services Student Handbook and the 2014 -2015 UNC Charlotte
Table of Contents
The Academic Plan of Study for Exercise Science
Check Sheet for Exercise Science
UNC Charlotte Catalog Information
Things ALL Pre-Kinesiology Students Must Know
Things ALL Pre-Kinesiology Students Should Know
Things ALL Exercise Science Students Must Know
Things ALL Exercise Science Students Should Know
Things ALL UNC Charlotte Students Should Know
UNC CHARLOTTE DEPARTMENT OF KINESIOLOGY
Vision Statement
Mission Statement
History of the Department
Exercise Science Program Goals and Objectives
Exercise Science Concentration Areas
Exercise Science Careers
Exercise Program Curriculum
Pre Kinesiology
Prerequisite Requirements
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
Suggested Course Sequence
Curricular Content
Exercise Science
Admission Requirements
Health Screening
Degree Requirements
Progression Criteria
Internship
Liability Insurance
Guideline for Formal Papers
Exercise Science Concentrations
Exercise Science Honors Program
Required Course Descriptions
Activity Course Descriptions
Other Required Course Descriptions
First Aid and CPR Requirement
Attendance Policy
Dismissal Policy
Appeal Procedures
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Readmission Policy
Student Folders
KSO Student Organizations
Student Awards
Frequently Asked Questions
UNC Charlotte
General Education Program
Writing Intensive Requirement
Academic Advising – Your Roadmap ….. to SUCCESS!
College of Health & Human Services (CHHS)
Academic Advising
Student Technical Standards
The American College of Sports Medicine
Code of Ethics
Required Form to move from PKNS to KNES
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
UNC Charlotte Catalog Information
PRE-KINESIOLOGY
Applicants who satisfy freshman or transfer requirements for admission to the University
and who apply to either the Athletic Training OR Exercise Science majors are eligible for
admission to the Pre-Kinesiology major. All students entering the university will be
required to complete the General Education requirements of the university. A suggested
sequence of courses for Pre-Kinesiology students that meet these General Education
requirements as well as the prerequisites for both Exercise Science and Athletic Training
can be found at online (http://kinesiology.uncc.edu).
Students who apply for either the Athletic Training OR Exercise Science major are
initially classified as Pre-Kinesiology majors (PKNS) until they meet the following
requirements: cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above; completion of 36 hours; and successful
(grade C or above) completion of KNES 2168, KNES 2168L, CHEM 1251, CHEM
1251L, STAT 1222, MATH 1101, KNES 2150 and KNES 2294.Students applying for
the Athletic Training or the Exercise Science major must make a grade C or above in the
required courses and have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above before making application
to either major. All of the required courses maybe attempted twice. Withdrawing from
the course after the Add/Drop deadline constitutes an attempt as does receiving any letter
grade. All pre or co requisite courses must be of a grade of C or above in order to be
deemed successful. All KNES courses taken at UNC Charlotte required for any degree
program in the Department of Kinesiology must be successfully completed at UNC
Charlotte.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EXERCISE SCIENCE
(EXER)
This degree program offers preparation for employment as Exercise Science practitioners
in: health agencies, hospitals, fitness centers, business and industry, research
laboratories, or any other setting which provides physical fitness enhancement programs
for clients and patients. The courses in this major prepare the student to sit for the
American College of Sports Medicine Health Fitness Specialist certification. The
Exercise Science program is accredited by Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health
Education Programs (CAAHEP).
REQUIREMENTS
Application Requirements
Minimum criteria for application to the Exercise Science major are:
 A grade point average of 2.5 or above
 A grade of C or above in the following required prerequisite courses:
o CHEM 1251 and CHEM 1251L
o KNES 2168 and KNES 2168L (or equivalents)
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
o KNES 2150
o KNES 2294
o STAT 1220, STAT 1221 or STAT 1222




Students can be admitted to the Exercise Science major in either the Fall or Spring
semesters and admission is competitive. Admission decisions are made by the
Coordinator of the Exercise Science major within the Department of Kinesiology.
Selection into the program is based on the satisfactory completion of the minimum
requirements but does not guarantee program admission. After evaluating the
credentials of all applicants meeting the minimum academic requirements, the
Coordinator of the Exercise Science major will make offers for admission to students
whose credentials demonstrate the highest level of academic achievement.
Exercise Science majors having more than three grades of D or below in required
upper level courses cannot remain in the Exercise Science major and must change
their major
A student transferring to UNC Charlotte with credit for CHEM 1251 and CHEM
1251L is not required to take CHEM 1200
*KNES 2150, KNES 2294 and STAT 1220, STAT 1221 or STAT 1222 are
recommended to be completed before entering the upper level but are not necessary
to make application, the courses do need to be completed before taking KNES 4490.
Things Pre-Kinesiology students must know:

There are certain courses that MUST be taken before you can become an Exercise
Science Major. ALL of the requirement courses must be completed before you
matriculate to the upper level courses.

The chemistry CHEM 1251 and 1251L courses are required for all PKNS
students. Most graduate schools with professional programs will most likely have
additional requirements beyond what is required in the Exercise Science major. If
you are thinking about pursuing further education in Allied-health Programs like
Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and/or Medical School, this is the level
of chemistry courses they are usually looking for you to have taken. For the Pre
Health Professions advising information click HERE.

You must receive a grade of C or higher in ALL required courses for the EXER
Major.

All KNES courses in which the student receives a grade less than a C must be
retaken at UNC Charlotte.

There are forms (transient study) that need to filled out and have appropriate
signatures BEFORE taking courses at another institution.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program


If you have not completed all the prerequisite courses for the Exercise Science
Major by the end of the spring semester prior to entry into the upper level there is
a form that needs to be filled out. This form is only used if you plan to complete
ALL required classes before the start of the fall semester.
You are responsible for the proper completion of your entire academic program.
Your advisor can counsel but you must meet all university and degree
requirements for graduation.

Each student is responsible for the proper completion of his or her academic
program, for familiarity with the University Undergraduate Catalog, for
maintaining the grade average required, and for meeting all other degree
requirements. The advisor will counsel, but the final responsibility remains
that of the student.

A student is required to have knowledge of and observe all regulations pertaining
to campus life and the student’s department. The University has enacted two
codes of student responsibility: The UNC Charlotte Code of Student
Academic Integrity and The UNC Charlotte Code of Student Responsibility
which are summarized in the Catalog and available in full online. As students
willingly accept the benefits of membership in the UNC Charlotte academic
community, they acquire obligations to observe and uphold the principles and
standards that define the terms of UNC Charlotte community cooperation and
make those benefits possible.

Each student is responsible for maintaining communication with the University
and keeping on file with the Registrar's Office at all times a current address,
including ZIP code, and telephone number.

Each student, while associated with the University, is expected to participate in
campus and community life in a manner that will reflect credit upon the student
and the University.

Advisors in the CHHS Advising Center have been assigned to help you in your
progression in the major. These advisors cannot help you unless you make an
appointment to see them.

A form must be completed and submitted to the Department of Kinesiology
before you move from a Pre-Kinesiology Major to an Exercise Science Major.

Transfer students need to review with the University Admissions Office and the
CHHS Advising Center that all transfer credit have been accepted and what is
needed to complete the general education requirements of the university.

As a student in a professional program in the College of Health and Human
Services, you will be asked by a clinical facility to undergo drug testing
and/or have a criminal background check before being allowed to participate
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
in a clinical experience at that facility. All costs associated with drug testing and
background checks are the responsibility of the student.

Exercise Science majors having more than three grades of D or below in required
upper level courses cannot remain in the Exercise Science major and must change
their major.

Cheating and Plagiarism will not be tolerated.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Things Pre-Kinesiology students should know:

Pre-Kinesiology FAQ’s

Careers in Exercise Science

The History of the Department of Kinesiology

The Harvey F. Murphy Scholarship and other Department Awards

Vision and Mission Statement of the Exercise Science Major

Guidelines for Formal Papers

Department of Kinesiology Appeal Procedures

Department of Kinesiology Attendance Policy

Department of Kinesiology Student Organization

The American College of Sports Medicine Code Of Ethics

College of Health and Human Services Student Technical Standards

UNC Charlotte Student Health Screening

UNC Charlotte Graduation Requirements
Things Exercise Science students must know:

There are certain courses that MUST be taken as an Exercise Science Major. ALL
of these courses must be completed before you can do your Exercise Science
Internship.

You must receive a grade of C or higher in ALL required courses for the EXER
Major.

All KNES courses in which the student receives a grade less than a C must be
retaken at UNC Charlotte.

You are responsible for the proper completion of your entire academic program.
Your advisor can counsel but you must meet all university and degree
requirements for graduation.

Each student is responsible for the proper completion of his or her academic
program, for familiarity with the University Undergraduate Catalog, for
maintaining the grade average required, and for meeting all other degree
requirements. The advisor will counsel, but the final responsibility remains
that of the student.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program

A student is required to have knowledge of and observe all regulations pertaining
to campus life and student deportment. The University has enacted two codes of
student responsibility: The UNC Charlotte Code of Student Academic
Integrity and The UNC Charlotte Code of Student Responsibility which are
summarized in this Catalog and available in full online. As students willingly
accept the benefits of membership in the UNC Charlotte academic community,
they acquire obligations to observe and uphold the principles and standards that
define the terms of UNC Charlotte community cooperation and make those
benefits possible.

Each student is responsible for maintaining communication with the University
and keeping on file with the Registrar's Office at all times a current address,
(including ZIP code) and telephone number(s).

Each student, while associated with the University, is expected to participate in
campus and community life in a manner that will reflect credit upon the student
and the University.

Advisors in the Department of Kinesiology have been assigned to help you in
your progression in the major. These advisors cannot help you unless you make
an appointment to see them. If you have any questions please see your advisor or
the Exercise Science Program Coordinator. Use Niner Advisor to help make
appointments.

All majors must maintain current certification in First Aid, CPR, Blood Borne
Pathogens and AED training. The department does offer annual recertification for
the majors at a minimal cost.

As a student in a professional program in the College of Health and Human
Services, you will be asked by a clinical facility to undergo drug testing and
have a criminal background check before being allowed to participate in a
clinical experience at that facility. All costs associated with drug testing and
background checks are the responsibility of the student.

During your senior year you will be taking a national credentialing examination
through the American College of Sports Medicine for the “Health Fitness
Specialist”. There is a fee for this exam that will be at your expense.

One of the last experiences in the Exercise Science Major will be an internship in
the health and fitness field. The Internship Site Supervisor will assist in the
successful completion of this internship experience. However, the ultimate
responsibility of obtaining, preparing for, and completing an internship rests
with you.

Graduation – Students completing ALL of their degree requirements in May,
participate in the May ceremony. Students completing ALL degree requirements
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
in a summer term as well as those completing in December, participate in the
December ceremony. The baccalaureate degree requires completion of 120-128
semester hours of credit, including all requirements for a major field of study.

Exercise Science majors having more than three grades of D or below in required
upper level courses cannot remain in the Exercise Science major and must change
their major.

Cheating and Plagiarism will not be tolerated.
Things the Exercise Science Major Should Know:

Exercise Science FAQ’s

Careers in Exercise Science

The History of the Department of Kinesiology

Kinesiology Faculty Information

The Harvey F. Murphy Scholarship and other Department Awards

Vision and Mission Statement of the Department

Guidelines for Formal Papers

Department of Kinesiology Appeal Procedures

Department of Kinesiology Attendance Policy

Department of Kinesiology Student Organization

Department of Kinesiology Laboratory Policies and Procedures

Exercise Science Internship Manual

The American College of Sports Medicine Code Of Ethics

College of Health and Human Services Student Technical Standards

UNC Charlotte Student Health Screening

UNC Charlotte Graduation Requirements
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
UNC CHARLOTTE’S EXERCISE SCIENCE PROGRAM
Vision Statement
The UNC Charlotte Exercise Science Program provides a stimulating and diverse
learning environment for undergraduate Exercise Science students. UNC Charlotte is
committed to becoming a leader in North Carolina for undergraduate Exercise Science
education.
Mission Statement
The mission of the UNC Charlotte Exercise Science Program is to promote optimal
health and well-being in the physically active population by providing educational
opportunities to prepare qualified undergraduate students for a career as entry-level
certified Exercise Science Instructors. The Education Program is structured according to
competencies and proficiencies provided by the American College of Sports Medicine.
We are committed to providing quality classroom and laboratory education as well as
rewarding internship experiences. We will use current technology and literature
supported by internship and educational research to provide these services.
The master plan of the Exercise Science Program at UNC Charlotte builds upon the
University’s “broad commitment to liberal education as the foundation for constructive
citizenship, professional practice, and lifelong learning” The Exercise Science Program
seeks to enhance student learning through a variety of interactive and problem solving
experiences that mandate the student demonstrate cognitive understanding of the health
sciences, work with diverse individuals and populations, and perform specific Exercise
Science skills and techniques. The development of competent Exercise Science
professionals is based on a program of curricular experiences that require students to
demonstrate and apply their knowledge, skills, and attributes in the internship setting.
The purpose of this program is to prepare well-rounded students for eligibility to sit for
the ACSM Health Fitness Specialist (HFS) examination. Students who successfully
complete the HFS examination will be qualified to design safe and effective exercise
prescriptions and conduct individual exercise programs, fitness testing, and health
education for low to moderate risk individuals, clients with controlled diseases, and those
in special populations (i.e. pregnancy, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus). Additionally,
this program aims to produce students who are committed to academic and internship
excellence, are socially responsible, and have demonstrated cultural sensitivity.
We are committed to an ongoing evaluation of our Exercise Science Program to ensure
our students are receiving the highest quality education possible. Furthermore, we are
committed to staying abreast of the ongoing changes in our profession in order to keep
our students current in our evolving field.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Finally, the UNC Charlotte Exercise Science Program aspires to be a program of
recognized excellence. It is our intentions to establish this program as a leader in
undergraduate Exercise Science education.
History of the Department of Kinesiology
In 1965, Dr. Harvey Murphy was hired to develop, coordinate, and implement all aspects
of the campus recreational, athletic, and health and physical education efforts. Initially,
Dr. Murphy's efforts were conducted in the "Area" of Health and Physical Education in
the "Division" of Education and included not only the academic courses in Health and
Physical Education, but also encompassed Intercollegiate Athletics and campus
Intramurals. In 1969, the Area of Health and Physical Education was moved to the
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences. In 1972, the "Department" of Health and
Physical Education was established within the College of Human Development and
Learning which became the College of Education and Allied Professions in 1985.
Reflecting the evolution of both Health Education and Physical Education from schoolbased activities to lifelong concerns, the Department transitioned to the Department of
Health Promotion and Kinesiology in 1993 and then moved to the College of Nursing and
Health Professions in 1995 which became the College of Health and Human Services in
2002.
Dr. Murphy’s retirement in 1996 as Professor and Chair of the Department of Health
Promotion and Kinesiology began a new era for the Department. Dr. Tim Lightfoot took
over leadership of the Department as Chair in 1996 (a position he held for 10 years),
which would soon experience another shift in its educational mission and philosophy.
Given the evolution of rapidly divergent philosophical underpinnings of the two areas in
Health Promotion and Kinesiology, in 2002, the Health Promotion faculty moved to the
new Department of Health Behavior and Administration and the Department now
focused its research, teaching, curricula, and service exclusively in Kinesiology. As can
be appreciated by this history, this Department has always served as an incubator for
other university activities with the best examples being the development and spin-off of
the UNC Charlotte Athletic Department in 1973, Intramurals and Recreational Services
in 1975, and Health Behavior and Administration in 2002, which later became the
Department of Public Health Sciences in 2008.
While the Department had continuously offered activity courses to the students to
encourage physical activity within the University since 1965, in 1983 the Department
established its first academic program, an M.Ed. in Health Education. This degree, while
popular over the years, evolved along with the encompassed disciplines, being renamed
Health Promotion in 1989, converted to a Masters of Science degree in 1997, and was
revised with the addition of three specialty areas and three graduate certificate programs
in 2000. Two of the specialty areas, Clinical Exercise Physiology and Community
Health, both rapidly grew and established a need for stand-alone graduate education in
each area. With the transition to the Department of Kinesiology (from Health Promotion
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
and Kinesiology), the M.S. in Clinical Exercise Physiology was developed from 20022004 and was officially implemented as a degree program in January 2005. In 2012, the
M.S. program was renamed as the M.S. Program in Kinesiology, and was expanded to
include both a Clinical Exercise Physiology Concentration (no thesis required) as well as
an Applied Physiology and Kinesiology Concentration (thesis required).
In 1994, after a seven-year effort, the undergraduate degree in Health Fitness was
established and quickly grew to approximately 200 students by the Fall of 1996. A "pre"
Health Fitness designation was added in 1998 and concentration areas were added to the
degree in 1997. One concentration area, Athletic Training, was first offered as an
internship program for several years for students seeking NATABOC certification. Five
years later, Athletic Training was spun off into its own degree granting program in the
Fall 2002 and later became nationally accredited by CAAHEP in October 2003. Also, to
reflect the true unified base education for our students, the "pre" Health Fitness
designation was changed to Pre-Kinesiology in 2003 and is used to denote all first- and
second-year students in Kinesiology. The start of the 2005-2006 academic year would
begin another chapter in the storied history of the Department of Kinesiology as Dr.
Mitch Cordova was hired as Chair to start the Fall 2005 semester. During the Spring
2006 semester, the Department took another major step forward in refining and
improving its degree programs. The BS degree in Health Fitness experienced a
significant curriculum revision that culminated into a BS degree in Exercise Science. The
change in the degree name was done to better reflect the content of the revised program.
During the 2007-2008 academic year, the Department created a new BS degree program
in Respiratory Therapy and hired its first Program Director. Due to a large amount of
interest expressed by local practicing Respiratory Therapists to offer the program online,
the Department quickly transitioned the newly developed “seated” curriculum to a
distance education program at the start of the 2008-2009 academic year. The BSRT
program graduated its first student in December 2008. During the 2008-2009 academic
year, the Department also achieved 3 more milestones in its history. The Athletic
Training Education program received its first CAATE-Accreditation for a 10-year period
(the maximum amount of time possible). In 2009, the Exercise Science undergraduate
and graduate Clinical Exercise Physiology programs were the first programs in North
Carolina to receive full accreditation status from the Commission on Accreditation of
Allied Health Educational Programs (CAAHEP). The newest baccalaureate program to
be added to the Department is the Neurodiagnostics and Sleep Science (NDSS) BS
degree, approved in 2012. The program is offered via distance education through the
UNC Charlotte Department of Kinesiology in collaboration with the UNC Chapel Hill
Department of Allied Health Sciences. A Minor in Outdoor Adventure Leadership was
also added to the repertoire of Departmental programs in 2012.
In addition to our formal academic programs, the Department of Kinesiology has played
a major role in the development and support of other academic programs on campus. The
Department continues to offer the state-mandated Health and Physical Education methods
courses for the College of Education students, and Department faculty have played key
roles in Interdisciplinary PhD Programs in Biomedicine and Health Services Research.
Particularly, the Department graduated its first PhD student from the Biomedicine
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Program in May 2007. This program is now called the Interdisciplinary PhD Program in
Biology, and Kinesiology faculty continue to mentor doctoral students within this
program. Until 2002, Kinesiology played a significant role in the development and
maintenance of the MHA program, with delivery of all campus Epidemiology courses
and the Information Resources Management course. Additionally, the Department
continues to offer the longest running set of experiential physical activity courses on
campus that are so critical to teaching behaviors and skills to the University community
that are essential for healthy living. Due to the expansion of research faculty hired since
Fall 2005, the Department significantly enhanced its research infrastructure by creating
the Biodynamics and Exercise Physiology Research Laboratories, both of which are 2500
sq. ft. in size and contain state of the art equipment. Departmental research space was
further expanded in 2011 with the creation of the Laboratory of Systems Physiology in
Cameron Hall, which is also 2500 sq. ft. and dedicated to molecular biology research
with a systems physiology approach. The creation of these laboratories has significantly
increased the Department’s research profile.
As can be appreciated, the mission of the Department of Kinesiology and its place in the
University has grown over the years. The Department has been successful in continuing
our original mission of providing physical and health education to the University and the
region, as well as developing our mission of providing unique, contemporary, and
innovative educational degree programs across sub-disciplines in Kinesiology. Our
continued emphasis on conducting cutting-edge research that furthers our scholarship in
Kinesiology rounds-out our mission and as such, we anticipate that Kinesiology will
continue to be a leader within the University in the future. Moreover, 2012 marked the
hiring of a new Department Chair, Dr. Scott Gordon, who is highly dedicated to
continuing this tradition of excellence in the Department of Kinesiology.
Exercise Science Program Goals and Objectives
The successful candidate will be able to design safe and effective exercise prescriptions,
and conduct individual exercise programs, fitness testing, and health education for lowto moderate-risk individuals, individuals with controlled diseases, and individuals in
special populations (i.e. pregnancy, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus).
Objectives
 Demonstrate competence in the KSA’s (Knowledge, Skills and Abilities) required
of the ACSM Health Fitness Specialist and Group Exercise Leader as listed in the
most current edition of ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription

Work-related experience within the health and fitness field

Adequate knowledge of and skill in risk factor and health status identification, fitness
appraisal, and exercise prescription

Demonstrated ability to incorporate suitable and innovative activities that will
improve an individual’s functional capacity
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program

Demonstrate the ability to effectively educate and/or counsel individuals regarding
lifestyle modification.

Knowledge of exercise science including kinesiology, functional anatomy, exercise
physiology, nutrition, program administration, psychology, and injury prevention
This educational program is ideal for personal trainers, fitness consultants, health/fitness
professionals, and those wishing to pursue graduate studies in the exercise science field
physical and occupational therapy.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Exercise Science Honors Program and Concentration Areas
Based on your interests or background, you may elect to pursue an area of concentration
in a specific Exercise Science field. Concentrations give students an opportunity to
enhance the general Exercise Science major, which may provide another competitive
advantage in the workplace.
 Aquatics Leadership Concentration (minimum 15 hours)
Must have and maintain a 2.5 GPA or higher for this concentration.
KNES 2212 Lifeguarding (3)
KNES 2213 Water Safety Instructor (3)
KNES 2218 Scuba Diving Lab (1)
KNES 2219 Scuba Diving (2)
KNES 2220 Advanced Scuba Diving (1)
KNES 4490 Senior year internship in aquatics (9) 100% of the internship involved in
aquatics
Outside certifications: must complete one of the following
Lifeguard Instructor
Lifeguard Management
Safety Training for Swim Coaches
 Strength and Conditioning Concentration (minimum 16 hours)
Must have and maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher for this concentration.
KNES 1202 Weight Training (1)
KNES 1263 Body Shaping (1)
KNES 3285L Foundations of Strength and Conditioning Lab (1)
PHYS 1101. Introductory Physics I. (3)
PHYS 1101L. Introductory Physics I Laboratory. (1)
KNES 4490 Senior year internship in strength and conditioning (9) 100% of the
internship involved in strength and conditioning
Sit for the CSCS certification and pass
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
APPLICATION FOR BEING ADMITTED INTO AN
EXERCISE SCIENCE CONCENTRATION
You would use this form the semester before going onto the upper level of Exercise Science. You
can use the second page to plan on what courses to take before applying for a specific
concentration. Most of the courses you can take whether or not you are in the concentration.
You would need to be in the Strength and Conditioning concentration to take KNES 3285L
Foundations of Strength and Conditioning Lab.
Directions: Fill this form out completely. Use your 49 Express Account to look up the information
needed below to insure accuracy. Turn this form into the Department of Kinesiology office (Belk
Gym 221) by one of the screening dates. Applications will be screened on the third Thursday in
November and July. If an application is not received before the screening date, it will be
deferred to the next screening date. Incomplete applications will be returned to the applicant.
The applicant will be notified by email as soon as the screening process is complete.
**Do not call the Kinesiology office asking for the screening results.**
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Applicant Name ____________________________ Student ID # _800__________________
Mailing Address______________________________________________________________
Telephone(s) _______________________________ UNCC e-mail________________________
Answer each of the following:
1. _____ What is your current cumulative GPA
2. _____ When will you be entering the Exercise Science major? (Fall 2011)
3. Which KNES concentration are you applying for?
____ Aquatics Leadership
Must have and maintain a 2.5 GPA or higher for this concentration.
____ Strength and Conditioning
Must have and maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher for this concentration.
Office Use Only: ______________ date and initials when approved for Exercise Science status
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
DEPARTMENT OF KINESIOLOGY HONORS PROGRAM
Requirements for Graduation with Honors in the Department of Kinesiology
To obtain Honors in in their respective Department of Kinesiology major, a student must:
a. complete at least six (6) units of Honors coursework (not including the
thesis)
offered by the Honors College
b. complete at least three hours of Honors Thesis (KNES 4700) with an A,
which includes writing an honors thesis under the supervision of a
single faculty member, and publicly presenting the results of that
research to the Department faculty;
c. explain, in writing, how their course of study in the department
developed a focused inquiry into the study of a Kinesiology major
(Athletic Training, Exercise Science, Neurodiagnostic & Sleep
Sciences, or Respiratory Therapy), to the satisfaction of the
Department of Kinesiology Honors Committee;
d. have a GPA of at least 3.20 for all course work at UNCC, and a GPA of at
least
3.50 for all work in their respective Kinesiology major at UNCC; and
e. comply with all procedural and substantial requirements established by
the Honors Council and the Faculty Council for graduating with
Honors in a department.
Admission to the Honors Program
Consideration for admission to the Honors Program may be initiated by the student or by
any faculty member in the Department of Kinesiology. A student may be removed from
the Honors Program at any time upon her/his own request or upon recommendation of
the Honors Program Committee in consultation with the Department Chair of
Kinesiology. There shall be no penalty for removal from the Honors Program. A student
is eligible to participate in the Honors Program in her/his Sophomore or Junior year of
study.
a. The student must have an overall GPA 3.20 and a GPA of 3.50 in their
respective Department of Kinesiology major.
b. The student must submit a typed statement (maximum length 500 words)
explaining:
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
1. What the students’ academic/career goals are in their respective
Department of Kinesiology Major.
2. How the Department of Kinesiology Honors Program is relevant to the
student’s academic and/or career interests.
c. The Department of Kinesiology Honors Program Committee will review
the materials of all eligible student applicants on an ad hoc basis and
recommend to the Department of Kinesiology Chair those individuals who
should be admitted into the Program.
The Department of Kinesiology Honors Committee
a. The Department of Kinesiology Honors Committee will be formed at the
end of each spring semester to serve for the following academic year. The
committee will consist of a Department of Kinesiology Program
Coordinator, a faculty member appointed for this purpose by their peers.
The two or more members in addition to the Program Coordinator will
serve staggered, two-year terms.
b. The Department of Kinesiology Honors Committee will choose its own
chair, and will establish its own procedures consistent with this
document. Among those procedures, the Committee will promulgate
written guidelines for admission to and removal from the program, and
any guidelines they deem appropriate for the Honors Thesis.
c. The Department of Kinesiology Honors Committee will be responsible
for recommending that students be admitted for candidacy to graduate
in their respective Department of Kinesiology major with Honors, and
that a candidate graduate with Honors in their respective major.
IV.
Modifications to the Department of Kinesiology Honors Program
a. Any full-time faculty member in the Department of Kinesiology may
propose changes to the Honors Program.
b. Proposed changes must be approved by a majority vote of a quorum of the
full- time faculty (two-thirds) taken at a duly called faculty meeting. Any
proposed changes approved by the Department must be subsequently
approved by the Honors Council.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Exercise Science Careers
1. What is Exercise Science?
Exercise Science is a career that encompasses all of the components involved in
the total well-being of an individual, exploring the social, biological, and environmental
aspects of optimal health. The Exercise Science curriculum covers a wide spectrum of
issues involving health promotion. The successful candidate will be able to design safe
and effective exercise prescriptions, and conduct individual exercise programs, fitness
testing, and health education for low- to moderate-risk individuals, individuals with
controlled diseases, and individuals in special populations (i.e. pregnancy, hypertension,
and diabetes mellitus).
2. What kind of job can I get with this degree?
Our graduates work in a variety of areas. Most commonly they work in:
- Commercial Fitness Centers
- Corporate Wellness Centers
- Internship Rehabilitation Centers
- Social Centers
- Community Recreation Centers
- Self-employment
Personal Trainer - These individuals design personalized exercise prescriptions
for individuals and/or groups according to the goals of the "client". They also
motivate, counsel, and educate their "clients".
Athletic Enhancement Programs - These programs are designed to improve
athletic performance of athletes in all categories (from the "weekend warrior" to
professional).
Strength and Conditioning Specialists - These individuals work for athletic
teams at all levels by designing, instructing, and implementing safe and effective
strength and conditioning programs.
Working as an Exercise Test Technologist (aka "non-invasive cardiovascular
specialist) - This individual's day usually consists of conducting stress tests in
private cardiology practices and hospitals.
Working in the various phases of Cardiac Rehabilitation - These individuals
help patients recover physically from heart attack, surgery, or other cardiovascular
and pulmonary complications, in addition to lifestyle counseling.
Working within a Corporate Wellness Program - These programs are
sponsored by employers, and are designed to increase worker moral, productivity
and reduce absenteeism (and health care costs). The professional designs fitness
programs, nutrition programs, educates to cause positive changes in health
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
behaviors. Currently over 80% of corporations have some form of corporate
fitness programs.
Working for a Private Company that "farms out" employees to a number of
corporations - Some companies cannot afford an in-house program, so they hire
private contractors to bring programs to them on a periodic basis
Private Sports Medicine Clinics - These clinics specialize in training athletes to
improve performance. Specialized training programs are devised by the exercise
physiologist. Some clinics also provide physical testing for public schools.
Physician Private Practice - Wellness programs. Many physicians are
beginning to open up private clinics designed to address the preventive aspects of
Wellness (diet counseling, exercise programming, smoking cessation, and
obesity/weight control, including bariatric). Exercise Science graduates will fit
this new market very well.
Commercial Health and Fitness Facilities - For profit "health clubs" of today
attract members not only with state of the art facilities, but with highly trained
professionals who are able to design individualized programs in a variety of
health and fitness areas. Graduates interested in the business aspects of the
Exercise Science field would do well in this area.
State and Federal Wellness Programs - Many state agencies sponsor health and
fitness initiatives, and have employee wellness programs. They often will seek
professionals who can educate other organizations, companies and small
businesses about Wellness in the workplace.
Community Health and Fitness Programs - There are more and more "YMCA
type" facilities that are sponsored by the communities and local schools. The
programs may include recreation programs, fitness programs, diet/weight control
programs, and health and fitness testing. Smaller communities are beginning to
build these types of facilities.
Work Hardening Programs - These programs are designed to help the injured
worker get back to work and perform at a productive level. Their programs may
also serve as a preventive type program to help workers avoid injury in the
workplace.
Physical Therapy - Some students obtain a BS in Wellness, and then seek
admission to PT school. Required course work can be obtained within our major
(including specific electives).
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
3. How much money can I make with this degree?
Your salary will depend somewhat on which area you work in. Our graduates can
start with a salary somewhere between $22,000/year to $35,000/year. Usually, those
graduates that work in Social Centers make less than those that work in Corporate and
Internship centers. However, there are exceptions to these guidelines.
4. Should money be my only motivation?
No. You are going to work hard for your degree. There are definitely fields
where you can make a lot more money a lot quicker. Therefore, you should really love
working with people and helping them get better if you want to be in this field.
5. Is this field protected by licensure?
Unlike fields like Nursing and Physical Therapy, our discipline is not protected by
state licensure. This means that folks that have different training can claim to be Exercise
Science practitioners. However, Louisiana requires a license for some Exercise Science
jobs, and there are several other states currently looking at this issue, including North
Carolina. In some aspects, the fact that we do not have licensure is very good for our
students. Because we are not narrowly confined by law, our students have the latitude to
go out and in many cases, develop their own jobs.
6. Is there anything else that will help my education put me ahead of everyone else
when it comes to jobs?
More and more, positions are requiring that you have a particular certification for
your job. The type of certification needed often depends upon the job. You should make
sure you talk to your advisors and professors about the appropriate certifications for you.
You should have this talk before you get to your Junior year!
7. How can I get more information?
You can get more information by accessing our web site or by calling the CHHS
Advising Center in our college (704-687-7922), or talking to the Kinesiology department
(either 704-687-0873 or 704-687-0874). You can also request other FAQs on the PreKinesiology designation and the Exercise Science major.
8. What do I need to do if I take classes at another institution?
Courses undertaken by UNC Charlotte undergraduate degree students at other accredited
institutions may be transferred to the University subject to the following regulations:
a. The University is not obligated to accept any credit from another institution
unless the student has obtained the prior approval of the dean of the college in
which he/she is enrolled. A Permit for Transient Study form should be completed
and filed in the UNC Charlotte Registrar's Office prior to enrollment at another
institution.
b. No credit will be accepted for courses below C level for undergraduate
students or below B level for graduate students.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
c. The student must request that an official transcript be mailed to the Registrar's
Office upon completion of the course. A “Transient Study Form” for this
purpose is available in the Registrar's Office or the department office.
Departmental approval is also needed for courses that are required for the
major.
9. Is there a career center on campus?
Yes, it always a good idea to visit this site often.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Program Coordinator
Roy Fielding (704-687-0860 [email protected] - Mr. Fielding works 86% with the
Department of Kinesiology and 14% with Recreational Services. As such, he is the
Aquatics Director for the University and supervises all facets of the campus swimming
pool. Mr. Fielding teaches all of our SCUBA classes as well as the water safety classes.
Importantly, Mr. Fielding is the Undergraduate Program Coordinator for our Exercise
Science program. Within that role, he has developed numerous materials for
undergraduate advising as well as being the primary developer of our Pre-Kinesiology
undergraduate designation. Mr. Fielding has taken several leadership roles within the
University; he is currently serving on numerous department, college and university
committees. Additionally, Mr. Fielding is extremely active in the National American
Red Cross and local Red Cross chapter, and is one of the few Instructor-certified
individuals in the state for the State Certified Pool Operator course. Mr. Fielding was the
developer of an extremely popular swimming pool management computer program (The
Pool Professor) that is in use in more than 22 different countries around the world. He
was recently named as one of the 25 most influential Aquatics professionals in the nation
for the year 2010. In October 2007 Mr. Fielding was inducted into the University of
Northern Iowa Athletic Hall of Fame for his efforts as a swimmer. Roy was also
inducted into the University of Northern Iowa’s Hall of Excellence for the School of
Health, Physical Education and Leisure Studies.
Internship Coordinators
Brenda Ward – 704-687-0870 ([email protected])
While serving as one of the coordinators for the Exercise Science Internship program,
Ms. Ward also teaches a wide variety of courses in the Kinesiology Department. Her area
of expertise is aquatics where she holds many certifications including, Lifeguard
Instructor Trainer, Water Safety Instructor Trainer, Aquatic Examiner and Certified Pool
Operator. She instructs courses in Beginning Swimming, Intermediate Swimming,
Lifeguard Training and Water Safety Instructor Training. Actively involved with the
local American Red Cross, Ms. Ward serves as Chairperson of the Quality Assurance
Committee for the Health Education Services division of the chapter. In addition, Ms.
Ward also instructs the First Aid: Responding to Emergencies and Exercise Leadership
and Instruction courses. Thus, she has exposure to both our undergraduates and general
college population. Prior to joining the faculty at UNC Charlotte, Ms. Ward was an
aquatics director and coach for the YMCA of Charlotte and served as faculty for the
YMCA of the USA, conducting trainings and educational sessions.
Tracy Bonoffski – 704-687-0858 (mailto:[email protected]) Ms. Bonoffski teaches
numerous courses such as KNES 3260 Nutrition for the Physically Active, KNES 3281
Exercise Physiology: Principles and Application, KNES 3287 Exercise Testing:
Principles and Application, and KNES 4132 Lifetime Weight Management and Behavior
Change. She is a registered dietitian through the American Dietetic Association and
certified exercise specialist through the American College of Sports Medicine. Previous
to taking the position at UNC-Charlotte, Ms. Bonoffski was the dietitian for NASCAR
and spent five years working as an exercise specialist in cardiac rehab. She has an
undergraduate degree from Cornell University in Nutrition and a Master's degree from
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Wake Forest University in Exercise Science. She completed a dietetic internship at
Syracuse University.
UNC CHARLOTTE’S EXERCISE SCIENCE CURRICULUM
Prerequisite Requirements
Pre-Kinesiology students applying for admission to the Exercise Science Major must
meet the following minimum academic requirements:
Minimum criteria for application to the Exercise Science major are:
 A grade point average of 2.5 or above
 A grade of C or above in the following required prerequisite courses:
o CHEM 1251 and CHEM 1251L
o KNES 2168 and KNES 2168L (or equivalents)
o KNES 2150
o KNES 2294
o STAT 1220, STAT 1221 or STAT 1222




Students can be admitted to the Exercise Science major in either the Fall or Spring
semesters and admission is competitive. Admission decisions are made by the
Coordinator of the Exercise Science major within the Department of Kinesiology.
Selection into the program is based on the satisfactory completion of the minimum
requirements but does not guarantee program admission. After evaluating the
credentials of all applicants meeting the minimum academic requirements, the
Coordinator of the Exercise Science major will make offers for admission to students
whose credentials demonstrate the highest level of academic achievement.
Exercise Science majors having more than three grades of D or below in required
upper level courses cannot remain in the Exercise Science major and must change
their major
A student transferring to UNC Charlotte with credit for CHEM 1251 and CHEM
1251L is not required to take CHEM 1200
*KNES 2150, KNES 2294 and STAT 1220, STAT 1221 or STAT 1222 are
recommended to be completed before entering the upper level but are not necessary
to make application, the courses do need to be completed before taking KNES 4490.
Pre Kinesiology
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
1. What is Pre-Kinesiology?
Pre-Kinesiology is a student classification that indicates that you are in a
preparatory program for the Exercise Science or the Athletic Training Major.
2. Is Pre-Kinesiology a degree program?
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
You can not get a degree in Pre-Kinesiology. However, being classified as a PreKinesiology major does indicate to the University that you have chosen a degree track.
3. Why should I be a Pre-Kinesiology major?
You can not get into the Exercise Science degree program unless you are first a
Pre-Kinesiology major. Therefore, if you are not a Pre-Kinesiology major, you can not
progress and take the Exercise Science major courses, nor can you take certain
prerequisite courses, like the Introduction to Kinesiology class (KNES2150).
4. Do I have to be a Pre-Kinesiology major first to get in the Exercise Science major
and take upper level Exercise Science courses?
Yes.
5. How do I become a Pre-Kinesiology major?
In most cases, this is done automatically for you when you indicate to the
University that you want to study in the Exercise Science program. So, this happens
when you apply to the University (as either an incoming freshman or transfer student) or
if you decide to change your major.
6. How do I become an Exercise Science major?
Becoming an Exercise Science major is fairly simple. All you have to do is the
following:
 Pick up a change of designation application from the Department of
Kinesiology offices (Belk 221 or 226) or download the form from the Dept. of
Kinesiology web site.
 Fill out this form; attach an unofficial transcript to the application.
 Turn in this form to the Kinesiology offices by the third Thursday in July or
October.
 If you meet the criteria, you will automatically be transferred to the Exercise
Science major (you will also receive a letter or email, so make sure your
address on the application form is correct!).
 You then should meet with your assigned advisor BEFORE registering for
your first semester of Exercise Science courses. Be sure to refer to the current
Department of Kinesiology Check Sheet for the Exercise Science Major.
7. Do I have to do all of this if I am a transfer student?
Yes. In most cases, as a transfer student you will still have a few prerequisites
that you need to take for the Exercise Science major. Therefore, you will be admitted to
the University as a Pre-Kinesiology major and you will need to apply to change your
designation as was outlined in question 6 above. The transcript that you provide, needs
to be an unofficial transcript from UNC-Charlotte, not transcripts from your past
education. You can get this type of transcript from the registrar’s system on the
university website.
8. What are the criteria for becoming an Exercise Science major?
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
There are only three criteria, all of which need to be fulfilled by the end of the
semester in which you are applying. For example, if you applied in March, you would
need to fulfill all of these criterions by the end of the spring semester (first of May). If
required courses are needed to be completed during summer before becoming an Exercise
Science major a separate form must be filed with the department. In other words you
need to successfully complete the entire list of required courses before you can
matriculate from Pre-Kinesiology to an Exercise Science Major. If you apply to become
an Exercise Science major, and you do not finish all of the criteria, you will need to
reactivate your application for the next screening period.
The criteria are:
 Minimum GPA of 2.5
 Completion of all required courses and prerequisites with a letter grade of
C or better.
 Completion of 36 credit hours
9. When are the screenings held to consider changing my designation to Exercise
Science?
Your application is required to be in our hands on the third Wednesday in either
July or November. The applications are then screened the next day. Applications that
are not turned in by the third Wednesday in July or November, are held until the next
screening date. There are no exceptions to this policy.
10. Where can I get help with any of this?
You are welcome to talk to any of the faculty in the Kinesiology department.
Another resource for information should be the CHHS Advising Center (704-687-7922)
within the College of Health and Human Services (our college). They have an extremely
helpful staff that can answer many questions. Additionally, we maintain a very extensive
web site that is located at http://kinesiology.uncc.edu/
11. Do I need to take activity courses as part of my major requirements?
Yes, majors are required to take three activity courses as part of your graduation
requirements. These three courses must be completed before you do KNES4490 Exercise
Science Internship. These courses do not have to be completed before matriculating from
a Pre-Kinesiology Major to an Exercise Science Major. KNES 2101 Foundations of
Physical Conditioning does NOT count as one of the three activity courses.
12. What do I need to do to take a course(s) at another institution?
Courses undertaken by UNC Charlotte undergraduate degree students at other accredited
institutions may be transferred to the University subject to the following regulations:
a. The University is not obligated to accept any credit from another institution unless the
student has obtained the prior approval of the dean of the college in which he/she is
enrolled. A Permit for Transient Study form should be completed and filed in the UNC
Charlotte Registrar's Office prior to enrollment at another institution.
b. No credit will be accepted for courses below C level for undergraduate students or
below B level for graduate students.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
c. The student must request that an official transcript be mailed to the Registrar's Office
upon completion of the course. A form for this purpose is available in the Registrar's
Office. Departmental approval is also needed for courses that are required for the
major.
13. What is the Drug and Criminal Background Check policy in our college?
As a student in a professional program in the College of Health and Human Services, you
will be asked by a clinical facility to undergo drug testing and have a criminal
background check before being allowed to participate in a clinical experience at that
facility. All costs associated with drug testing and background checks are the
responsibility of the student.
The Department of Kinesiology – Exercise Science Program
Suggested Course Sequence –Exercise Science Major
Freshman Year
Fall
CHEM 1200 Fundamentals of Chemistry
UWRT 1101 Writing and Inquiry Academic Context I
HAHS 1000 Prospect for Success in Health and Human Services
MATH 1100 College Algebra
LBST 1100 Arts and Society Series
Social Sciences requirement ANTH 1101, ECON 1101 or 2101, GEOG 1105, POLS 1110, SOCY 1101
Spring
KNES 2150 Introduction to Kinesiology
CHEM 1251 General Chemistry
CHEM 1251L General Chemistry Lab
UWRT 1101 Writing and Inquiry Academic Context I
STAT 1222 Statistics
Sophomore Year
Fall
KNES 2294 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
KNES 2168 Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions
KNES 2168L Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab for the Health Professions
LBST 2101 Western Tradition
LBST 2102 Global Understanding
Entry into the Exercise Science major
Spring
KNES 2101 Foundations of Physical Conditioning
KNES 2290 Emergency Medical Response
KNES 2298 Applied Kinesiology
KNES 2169 Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions II
KNES 2169L Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab for the Health Professions II
LBST 2200 Ethical issues and Cultural critique Series
Activity Courses can be taken any time before KNES 4490
Junior Year
Fall
KNES 3100 Organization and Administration of Exercise Science
KNES 3260 Nutrition for the Physically Active
KNES 3280 Exercise Physiology: Foundation and Theory
KNES 3281 Exercise Physiology: Principles and Application (Writing Intensive)
KNES Activity Course can be taken any time before KNES 4490
Spring
KNES 3285 Strength and Conditioning: Foundations and Theory
KNES 3286 Exercise Testing: Foundation and Theory
KNES 3287 Exercise Testing: Principles and Application (Writing and Oral Intensive)
KNES Activity Course can be taken any time before KNES 4490
Senior Year
Fall
KNES 4121 Pharmacology for the Physically Active
KNES 4286 Exercise Prescription
KNES 4293 Biomechanics
KNES 4660 Practitioner Seminar
KNES Activity Course can be taken any time before KNES 4490
Spring
KNES 4132 Lifetime Weight Management and Behavior Change
KNES 4490 Exercise Science Internship
Curricular Content
Freshman-Fall Semester (15hrs)
Freshman-Spring Semester (13hrs)
CHEM 1200
3
KNES 2150
3
UWRT 1101
3
LSBT 2101
3
MATH 1100
3
CHEM 1251
3
HAHS 1000
1
CHEM 1251L
1
Social Sciences Req. 3
UWRT 1102
3
LBST 1100 Series
3
Sophomore-Fall Semester (13)
Sophomore-Spring Semester (15)
KNES 2294
3
KNES 2101
2
LBST 2102
3
KNES 2290
3
KNES 2168
3
KNES 2298
3
KNES 2168L
1
KNES 2169
3
STAT 1222
3
KNES 2169L
1
LBST 2200 Series
3
Junior-Fall Semester (16-18)
KNES 3100
3
KNES 3260
3
Junior-Spring Semester (13-18)
KNES 3280
3
KNES 3285
3
KNES 3281(W)
3
KNES 3286
3
KNES Activity
1-3
KNES 3287(W, O) 3
Electives
3
KNES Activity
1-3
Electives
3-6
Senior-Fall Semester (16-18)
KNES 4121
3
KNES 4286
3
Senior-Spring Semester (12)
KNES 4293
3
KNES 4132
3
KNES 4660
3
KNES 4490
9
KNES Activity
1-3
Exercise Science Admission Requirements
New students who meet the University’s admission requirements are admitted to PreKinesiology. The Pre-Kinesiology major accounts for the first three semesters of the
program. During that time, students complete prerequisite courses in Chemistry, Biology,
Math, and Kinesiology along with a number of general education courses. Upon the
completion of all prerequisite courses students apply for a change of major into the upper
division of the Exercise Science major.
Students who have completed all of the Exercise Science Major prerequisites may apply
for the upper division of the program. Students are admitted to the major for the spring
semester and admission is competitive. Admission decisions are made by a committee
within the Department of Kinesiology. This selection committee is comprised of the
Department Chairperson, the Program Coordinator of Exercise Science Program and the
Internship Coordinator(s).
Application Instructions
Dates: Completed applications will be accepted until the third Wednesday in July and
November for the upcoming semester. Forms are available here. Admission decisions are
communicated in writing by the program. Applicants who are not admitted may reapply
for a future term.
Process:
1. Gain admission to the University.
2. Enroll as a Pre-Kinesiology Major.
3. Apply to the Upper Division Exercise Science Program in the spring semester
prior to the junior year (minimum of 36 credit hours completed). All
prerequisites must be completed or be in progress prior to consideration of
the application.
Exercise Science Student Health Screening
Prior to admission to the major, all students must submit evidence of a physical
examination. A TB test must be repeated and the results submitted annually as long as
the student is enrolled in internship courses. Students must present documentation of a
completed series of HBV immunizations* prior to any contact with patients/clients, or
sign a declination form indicating a refusal of the vaccination. This information must be
submitted and maintained in the office of the Program director.
*Students may enter the Program by showing proof of two HBV immunizations. The
final immunization must be completed at the earliest possible date to continue their
Program.
Exercise Science Degree Requirements

Credit Hours. The baccalaureate degrees require completion of 120-128 semester
hours of credit, including all requirements for the Exercise Science major.
Exercise Science Majors are required to take all the courses in the sequence.

Residence. A student must earn the last 25% of baccalaureate degree
requirements at UNC Charlotte, including the last 39 semester hours of work in
the Exercise Science Program. Exceptions to these hour provisions may be made
upon the recommendation of the student's major department and with the approval
of the dean of the college of the student's major.

Coursework taken in residence shall be construed to mean work offered by UNC
Charlotte and taken in courses on the UNC Charlotte campus or at an approved
off-campus center. Credit earned by challenge examinations or other advanced
standing examinations cannot be used to meet the residence requirement.

Grade Point Averages. To graduate, a student must have an overall grade point
average of at least 2.0 and a grade point average of at least 2.5 in the major.

General Education. All baccalaureate degrees at UNC Charlotte include a
common set of General Education requirements. Requests for exceptions to any
aspects of the General Education requirements for individual students must be
approved by the Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences. Such exceptions may be
requested by completing the Academic Petition Form, including
recommendations of approval by the student's Advisor, Chairperson and Dean,
and submitting it to the Registrar’s Office.

Possess English language proficiency. If the student uses English as a second
language, they must meet the minimum University requirement of at least 180 on
the computer-based TOEFL test.
All Exercise Science majors must complete three of the approved activity courses and
KNES 2101 before taking KNES 4490 Exercise Science Internship. Students must have
at least 120 hours to graduate. Therefore, depending on their choice of activity courses,
students will need to take up to 4 or more course credits in addition to the courses listed
below.
Exercise Science Progression Criteria
Students must achieve a grade of C or better in each Exercise Science course (any course
required to complete the program).
Taking a challenge examination constitutes one attempt at the course. Failure of a
challenge examination requires the student to enroll in the course.
Upper division Exercise Science courses must be completed in the sequence.
Any KNES course that was attempted first at UNC Charlotte that did not receive a grade
of at least a C must be repeated at UNC Charlotte.
No course in the Exercise Science major may be taken as transient study without
permission from the Department of Kinesiology.
Transfer credit for Exercise Science courses taken before admission to the upper division
will be considered on an individual basis.
Date of Origin: 8/02
Exercise Science Internship
The internship experience is the capstone activity as you complete your Bachelor of
Science Degree in Exercise Science at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. In
an attempt to assist you through the internship experience, this manual was put together
to address the responsibilities, activities, and evaluations that must be completed to meet
the internship requirements.
The internship experience will be the practical application of the information gained in
the classroom to the health and fitness field. The experience should be enjoyable, and
ideally increase your marketability for future employment. The Internship Site
Supervisor will assist in the successful completion of this internship experience.
However, the ultimate responsibility of obtaining, preparing for, and completing an
internship rests with the student. This manual should be used to guide you through
your preparations for obtaining and successfully completing your internship. Also, the
answers to many of your questions can be found in this manual.
As you perform your internship responsibilities, you will improve in your performance
and knowledge. Try to get involved with as many different activities as you can and
learn as much as possible in the short time that is provided. This will greatly enhance
your knowledge and experience as you complete your internship.
Your course work has prepared you well for this experience. It is now up to you to get
the most out of this opportunity. So work hard and make the most of your internship.
Keep in mind that your Internship Site Supervisor will be a reference for you in the
future, and may even become your future employer! Good luck and make us proud.
Exercise Science Health and Liability Insurance
Health insurance is required for undergraduate students enrolled in six or more credit
hours the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Information regarding student health
insurance can be found at:
http://studenthealth.uncc.edu/student%20health%20insurance%20home2.htm
All students who participate in internship are required to have personal liability
insurance. Proof of liability insurance must be presented prior to the start of internship
rotations. This insurance must provide coverage of not less than $1 million per incident
and $3 million aggregate. The policy must be in effect for any course with a internship
component, including research activities. Information on obtaining personal liability
insurance can be provided by Internship Coordinator.
Exercise Science Student Guidelines for Formal Papers
Policy: All formal papers are to be written and presented in accordance with the current
APA Manual and/or the Guidelines for Formal Papers.
Procedure: Please refer to the Code of Student Academic Integrity policy regarding
plagiarism. Also, Exercise Science Students should refer to the Plagiarism tutorial for
guidance.
Parts of the Paper: A paper is comprised of three main parts:
 The introductory section (title, table of contents if appropriate
 The text (introduction, review of literature, analysis, conclusions)
 The reference section
Format: All papers should follow the format of the current Publication Manual of the
American Psychological Association. Individual instructors will inform you of any
exceptions.
 The references will be current (published within the past five years or as specified
by faculty), or be considered classic source material.
 The references will be sufficient in number and scope to support the main body of
the paper.
The paper will be computer generated or typed and double-spaced -- NOT
HANDWRITTEN. The length of the paper will be determined by the assignment.
The paper must be written in grammatically correct form (grammar, spelling,
punctuation, sentence and paragraph structure, and organized presentation of the content.
Course Descriptions
Upper division Kinesiology courses (KNES 2101, KNES 2169, KNES 2169L, KNES 2290,
KNES 2294, KNES 2295, KNES 2296, KNES 2298 and all required 3000-level and
above) may be attempted only twice. Withdrawing from the course after the Add/Drop
deadline constitutes an attempt, as does receiving any letter grade. All prerequisite
courses must be of a grade of C or above in order to be deemed successful.
KNES 1099. Topics in Games/Exercise/Sports. (1-3) Specialized topics or innovations
in games, exercise, and sports. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.
KNES 1202. Weight Training. (1) Mechanics and programming of weight training.
KNES 1204. Aerobic Fitness. (1) Exercise designed to develop and maintain physical
fitness through aerobic activity to music.
KNES 1205. Beginning Yoga. (1) An introduction to the practice and philosophy of
yoga. Students learn how to apply the principles of yoga to enhance physical health and
mental wellbeing.
KNES 1206. Adaptive and Developmental Physical Education. (1) Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor. Prescribed ameliorative exercises adapted to individuals with
special needs, capacities and interests.
KNES 1208. Walk, Jog, Run. (1) Principles of walking, jogging and running as modes
for improving and maintaining cardiovascular health and physical fitness.
KNES 1209. Step Aerobics. (1) Physical fitness training emphasizing aerobic
conditioning via variations and combinations of step patterns on adjustable exercise
benches.
KNES 1210. Beginning Swimming. (1) For weak swimmers or nonswimmers.
Instruction in water safety fundamentals, basic body positioning, maneuvering in water,
and traveling skills, including basic strokes.
KNES 1211. Intermediate Swimming. (1) Emphasis on gaining competency in at least
four basic strokes and increasing endurance. Instruction in water safety, non-swimming
rescues and lap swimming for fitness.
KNES 1215. Aquatic Fitness. (1) Principles of safety and effectiveness of aquatic
exercise as a mode for improving and maintaining general health and physical fitness.
KNES 1220. Beginning Tennis. (1) The rules, basic skills and strategy.
KNES 1222. Racquet Sports. (1) Basic skills, tactics, safety, and rules of racquetball,
court and table tennis, squash, and badminton.
KNES 1223. Beginning Badminton. (1) The rules, basic skills and strategy.
KNES 1231. Introduction to Outdoor Adventure. (2) Prerequisite: KOAL minor or
permission of instructor. Introduction to outdoor adventures through active participation
in hikes, challenge courses, climbing wall, a solo experience, weekend trips, class
discussions and written reflection. Participation in a Venture public trip required,
individually selected from Venture’s offerings for the semester. Special fee assessed for
the trips.
KNES 1242. Archery. (1) The fundamental skills and selection, care, and repair of
equipment.
KNES 1250. Volleyball. (1) The rules, fundamental skills, and strategies of the game of
volleyball. Games are played each class to sharpen students’ skills, knowledge, and
sportsmanship.
KNES 1263. Body Shaping. (1) Selected methods of resistive exercises used to shape,
tone and define musculature in a gymnasium setting.
KNES 1290. First Aid: Responding to Emergencies. (3) The knowledge and skills
associated with being a first responder in case of injury or sudden illness. Qualifying
students may receive certifications in: Responding to Emergencies-First Aid, CPR/AED
for the Professional Rescuer, Preventing Disease Transmission (Bloodborne Pathogens
Training) and Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Open to all students during
Summer session. Not accepted for those wanting the ATRN major. There is a $20
course fee.
KNES 2101. Foundations of Physical Conditioning. (2) Prerequisite: Athletic Training
or Exercise Science major. The application and basic science of physical training
programs designed to improve and maintain physical fitness.
KNES 2150. Introduction to Kinesiology. (3) Prerequisite: Pre-Kinesiology major.
Introduction to the study of athletic training and exercise science relative to philosophies,
practices, work settings, trends, knowledge bases, skills, and licensures.
KNES 2168. Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions. (3)
Prerequisites: CHEM 1203 and CHEM 1203L; or CHEM 1251 and CHEM 1251L with
grades of C or above. Fundamentals of the anatomy and physiology of the human body
for the health professions. May not be attempted more than twice.
KNES 2168L. Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory for the Health
Professions. (1) Pre- or corequisite: KNES 2168. One laboratory period of three hours a
week. May not be attempted more than twice.
KNES 2169. Human Anatomy and Physiology II for the Health Professions. (3)
Prerequisites: KNES 2168 and KNES 2168L with grades of C or above. Continuation of
KNES 2168. May not be attempted more than twice.
KNES 2169L. Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II for the Health
Professions. (1) Pre- or corequisite: KNES 2169. One laboratory period of three hours a
week. May not be attempted more than twice.
KNES 2212. Lifeguard Training. (3) Prerequisites: Students must be able to swim 300
yards using a combination of front crawl and breast stroke continuously, swim 20 yards,
dive to 10 feet and retrieve a dive brick, and return within 1 minute and 40 seconds, and
tread water for two minutes legs only. The knowledge and skills associated with
lifeguarding. Qualifying students receive the American Red Cross Lifeguarding
Certificate. There is a $10 course fee.
KNES 2213. Water Safety Instructor. (3) Prerequisite: Competency in all basic
swimming strokes and other requirements of the American Red Cross. Techniques used
in teaching people aquatic skills. Qualifying students receive the American Red Cross
Water Safety Instructor’s (WSI) rating. There is a $10 course fee.
KNES 2219. Scuba Diving and Laboratory. (3) Prerequisite: Junior, Senior, or FifthYear status and appropriate swimming ability to current scuba standards as prescribed by
recognized scuba certifying organizations; open to all students during Summer Session.
The science and skills associated with the use of Self-Contained Underwater Breathing
Apparatus (SCUBA). Students who demonstrate the required knowledge and skills may
request licensure as an open water SCUBA diver. There is a $60 course fee.
KNES 2220. Advanced Scuba Diving. (1) Prerequisite: KNES 2219. The knowledge
and skill required for underwater navigation, search and recovery, limited visibility
diving and deep diving. There is a $35 course fee.
KNES 2230. Wilderness Experience. (2) Prerequisite: KOAL minor or permission of
instructor. Provides students with a series of progressive challenges, (including challenge
course and backcountry travel), and time to reflect on and discuss these challenges. The
course goals are two-fold; first, to gain deeper understanding of oneself and relationships
through participation in in-depth group experiences, and second, to gain the skills and
knowledge necessary for planning and conducting one’s own backpacking trips. Field
experiences during class and two weekend backpacking trips. A special fee is assessed to
cover the costs of the trips.
KNES 2233. Rock Climbing. (2) Prerequisite: KOAL minor or permission of
instructor. Introduction to rock climbing with emphasis on belaying and safety systems,
climbing techniques, and the metaphorical and psychological aspects of climbing.
Course includes: classroom sessions, use of indoor climbing wall, and weekend trips to
outdoor climbing sites. A special fee will be charged to cover the costs of the weekend
trips.
KNES 2236. Challenge Course Activities. (2) Prerequisite: KOAL minor or
permission of instructor. Immersion in a developmental small group team experience
using a wide variety of challenge course activities (i.e., ropes course, trust exercises,
group initiatives.)
The focus is on expanding students’ self-knowledge and
understanding of how to work effectively with and lead others.
KNES 2237. Raft Guiding. (2) Prerequisites: KOAL minor or permission of instructor.
Offered in conjunction with the U.S. National Whitewater Center (USNWC) and covers
the same information they provide in their Guide School. Successful completion of this
course along with current First Aid and CPR certification prepare students to work as raft
guides for the USNWC. Students taking this class must be comfortable being immersed
in turbulent water. A special fee is assessed.
KNES 2238. White Water Kayaking. (2) Prerequisite: KOAL minor or permission of
instructor. Offered in conjunction with the U.S. National Whitewater Center (USNWC).
An introduction to kayaking with an emphasis on; boat control, safety, the Eskimo roll,
river reading and whitewater paddling. Students taking this class must be comfortable
being immersed in turbulent water. A special fee is assessed.
KNES 2239. Rock Climbing Management. (2) Prerequisite: KNES 2233 or permission
of instructor. Intermediate rock climbing with emphasis on setting anchors, managing a
rock climbing site, safety systems and rescues, and climbing techniques. Includes:
classroom sessions, use of indoor climbing wall, and weekend trips to outdoor climbing
sites. A special fee is assessed to cover the costs of the weekend trips.
KNES 2290. Emergency Medical Response. (3) Prerequisite: Athletic Training or
Exercise Science major; open to all students during Summer Session. The knowledge
and skills necessary to work as an emergency medical responder (EMR) to help sustain
life, reduce pain and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until more
advanced medical care arrives and takes over.
Qualifying students may receive
certifications in: Emergency Medical Response, CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer
and Healthcare Provider, Preventing Disease Transmission (Bloodborne Pathogens
Training). There is a $20 course fee.
KNES 2294. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. (3) Prerequisite: PreKinesiology major. Focus on the healthcare competencies necessary for the prevention,
emergency management and acute care of athletic related injuries. Also provides an
introduction to the role of the Certified Athletic Trainer in providing health to the
physically active individual.
KNES 2295. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries Laboratory. (1) Prerequisite:
Athletic Training major. Focus on the psychomotor competencies and clinical
proficiencies necessary for the prevention, emergency management and acute care of
athletic-related injuries. There is a $30 course fee.
KNES 2296. Evidence-Based Practice. (3) Prerequisite: Athletic Training major and
Departmental Honors Students with permission of instructor. Gain knowledge of critical
appraisal and experience in the practice of evidence based healthcare.
KNES 2298. Applied Kinesiology. (3) Prerequisites: KNES 2168 and KNES 2168L, or
BIOL 2273 and BIOL 2273L; and Athletic Training or Exercise Science major. The
study of musculoskeletal anatomy and how it relates to normal function of the human
body.
KNES 2299. Medical Terminology. (3) Students learn proper medical and scientific
terminology usage within the context of human anatomy and physiology, and pathology.
KNES 2333. Baseball Through History and Playing. (3) First explores the
socioeconomic climate of baseball’s origins from the 1800s to the present. The second
half provides activity-oriented instruction that introduces softball’s emergence from
baseball through basic skills, rules, and strategies of the game.
KNES 3099. Movement Problems/Topics. (1-6) Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Movement problems/topics chosen by the student which relate to special areas of interest.
May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
KNES 3100. Organization and Administration of Exercise Science. (3) Prerequisite
Exercise Science major. Provides the necessary knowledge and skills of organization and
administration in various settings within exercise science field. Additionally, students
gain the knowledge and skills in professional development and responsibility necessary
to function as a professional in exercise science.
KNES 3221. Elementary Physical Activity and Health Education. (3) Prerequisites:
EDUC 2100 and SPED 2100 with grades of C or above; Elementary Education, Special
Education, or Special Education/Elementary Education Dual Licensure major.
Integrating physical activity and health education with elementary school curriculums.
KNES 3230. Wilderness Trip Leading. (3) Prerequisite: KOAL minor or permission
of instructor. The broadly accepted skills and knowledge necessary for leading group
adventure trips. Includes spring break backpacking trip(s) and classroom sessions. After
successful completion of this course students will be eligible to assist with Venture trips.
A special fee is assessed to cover the costs of the trips.
KNES 3235. Challenge Course Facilitation. (3) Prerequisite: KOAL minor or
permission of instructor. Focus on both the technical and facilitation skills and the
knowledge necessary for safely and effectively leading groups through high and low
challenge courses. In addition to class room sessions, weekend days at the High Team
Challenge Course, and observation/apprenticing of actual Venture programs are required.
KNES 3236. Theory and Foundations of Adventure Education. (3) Prerequisite:
KOAL minor or permission of instructor. An exploration of the history, philosophical
foundations, proposed outcomes, and operational theories that are common in outdoor
adventure education.
KNES 3260. Nutrition for the Physically Active. (3) Prerequisite: Athletic Training or
Exercise Science major. Introduction to principles and concepts of nutrition and how
dietary practices affect health and disease.
KNES 3280. Exercise Physiology: Foundation and Theory. (3) Prerequisite: KNES
2169 or BIOL 2274 with grade of C or above; and Athletic Training or Exercise Science
major. The physiological responses to exercise, adaptations to exercise training, and the
mechanisms responsible for them in relation to both health fitness and athletic
performance.
KNES 3281. Exercise Physiology: Principles and Application. (3) (W) Athletic
Training or Exercise Science major. Application of principles with laboratory
experiences and the development of writing strategies appropriate to the domain of
exercise physiology. Enhances the lecture material presented in KNES 3280.
KNES 3285. Principles of Strength and Conditioning. (3) Prerequisites: Athletic
Training or Exercise Science major. A study of biomechanical and physiological
principles of strength and conditioning for the physically active.
KNES 3285L. Principles of Strength and Conditioning Lab. (1) Corequisite: KNES
3285 and in the Strength and Conditioning Concentratio or permission of instructor.
Lecture material and laboratory experiences for the biomechanical and physiologic
principles of strength and conditioning programs. Strong focus on practical application
of strength and conditioning principles for training and testing techniques for special
populations, apparently healthy populations, and athletes.
KNES 3286. Exercise Testing: Foundation and Theory. (3) Prerequisites: KNES 3280
Athletic Training or Exercise Science major. Methods and protocols for collecting and
interpreting information collected on individuals concerning various fitness parameters
for the future development of individual and group conditioning programs.
KNES 3286L. Exercise Testing Lab. (1) Prerequisite: Athletic Training major.
Corequisite: KNES 3286. Practitioner lab in the use of appropriate data collection
methods and protocols.
KNES 3287. Exercise Testing: Principles and Applications. (3) (O, W) Prerequisite
KNES 3280, Corequisite: KNES 3286 or permission from the instructor. Application of
principles with laboratory experiences and the development of writing strategies and oral
presentation skills appropriate to the domain of exercise testing. Appropriate data
collection methods and protocols are used. Enhances the lecture material presented in
KNES 3286.
KNES 3288. Upper Body Injury Evaluation. (3) Prerequisite: Athletic Training major.
Orthopedic evaluation competencies for assessing athletic-related injuries and pathology
to the upper extremities, cervical and thoracic spine.
KNES 3289. Upper Body Injury Evaluation Laboratory. (1) Corequisite: KNES
3288. Practitioner lab focusing on the psychomotor competencies and clinical
proficiencies related to upper extremity, cervical and thoracic spine injury, and pathology
assessment.
KNES 3290. Lower Body Injury Evaluation. (3) Prerequisites: KNES 2295 and KNES
2298. Orthopedic evaluation competencies for assessing athletic-related injuries and
pathology to the lower extremities and lumbar spine.
KNES 3291. Therapeutic Modalities. (3) Prerequisite: KNES 2295 and KNES 2298.
Theories and techniques of therapeutic modalities within the scope of athletic training.
KNES 3292. Therapeutic Modalities Laboratory. (1) Corequisite: KNES 3291.
Practitioner lab focusing on the psychomotor competencies and clinical proficiencies
related to the use of therapeutic modalities within the scope of athletic training.
KNES 3293. General Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Athletic Training. (3)
Prerequisites: KNES 3290 and KNES 3295. Cognitive, psychomotor, and affective
competencies and proficiencies that the entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess
to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, the general medical conditions,
psychosocial situations, and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical
activity.
KNES 3295. Lower Body Injury Evaluation Laboratory. (1) Corequisite: KNES
3290. Practitioner lab focusing on the psychomotor competencies and clinical
proficiencies related to lower extremity and lumbar spine injury evaluations.
KNES 3298. Therapeutic Exercise Foundations. (3) Prerequisites: KNES 3290 and
KNES 3295. Study of the theory and principles that guide the application of therapeutic
exercise.
KNES 3400. Athletic Training Clinical I. (2) Prerequisites: KNES 2295 and KNES
2298.
Acquisition and application of clinical proficiencies and psychomotor
competencies necessary for the entry-level athletic trainer. Students must complete
approximately 20 hours of clinical experience per week at an approved athletic training
clinical agency.
KNES 3401. Athletic Training Clinical II. (2) Prerequisite: KNES 3400. Continuation
of KNES 3400. Students must complete approximately 20 hours of clinical experience
per week at an approved athletic training clinical agency.
KNES 3900. Undergraduate Research. (1-3) Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Enables Exercise Science majors to initiate research projects in their respective fields of
interest. Maximum credit toward major: nine hours. May be repeated for credit with
change of topic.
KNES 4121. Pharmacology for the Physically Active. (3) Prerequisite: Athletic
Training or Exercise Science major KNES 3280 or permission of instructor. An
examination of the historical aspects of use, abuse, and addiction within the realm of
health and human performance. Exposes students to a wide variety of drug issues and the
unique use and abuse patterns of individuals in the exercise science arena.
KNES 4130. Applied Nutrition. (3) Principles of nutrition, dietary guidelines, dietary
relationships to diseases and health, special populations, computerized dietary analysis.
KNES 4132. Lifetime Weight Management and Behavior Change. (3) Prerequisites:
KNES 3260 and KNES 4286. Examines factors in obesity and weight control,
emphasizing techniques in behavior modification and lifestyle change for effective
weight management.
KNES 4134. Assessment and Development of Physical Fitness. (3) Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor. Responses and adaptations to exercise, assessment techniques,
exercise prescription, leadership and programming.
KNES 4286. Exercise Prescription. (3) Prerequisites: Exercise Science major KNES
3286 and KNES 3287. Interpretation and prescription of exercise and various fitness
parameters for programs with healthy populations and general clinical populations.
KNES 4290. Therapeutic Exercise. (3) (W) Prerequisite: KNES 3298. Application of
the therapeutic techniques used in rehabilitation for upper and lower body injuries within
the scope of athletic training.
KNES 4292. Organization and Administration of Athletic Training. (3) (O) (W)
Prerequisite: KNES 4290. Athletic training organization and administration.
KNES 4293. Biomechanics. (3) Prerequisite: Athletic Training or Exercise Science
major, KNES 3280. Introduction to the study of physics principles as they govern human
movement, as well as understanding how the neuromuscular system controls human
movement. Also covers the mechanical principles that underlie musculoskeletal injury,
as well as the influence that gender and ethnicity may have on various musculoskeletal
pathologies.
KNES 4400. Athletic Training Clinical III. (2) Prerequisite: KNES 3401. Acquisition
and application of advanced clinical proficiencies and psychomotor competencies
necessary for the entry-level athletic trainer. Students must complete approximately 20
hours of clinical experience per week at an approved athletic training clinical agency.
KNES 4401. Athletic Training Clinical IV. (2)
Prerequisite: KNES 4400.
Continuation of KNES 4400. Students must complete approximately 20 hours of clinical
experience per week at an approved athletic training clinical agency.
KNES 4431. Outdoor Adventure Leadership Practicum. (2-4) Prerequisites: KOAL
minor or permission of instructor; and KNES 3230 or KNES 3235. Capstone course for
the Minor in Outdoor Adventure Leadership providing an opportunity to take on a
defined leadership role with Venture or other outdoor programs. In addition to actual
work in the field, there are professional development requirements and a journal of
lessons learned.
KNES 4490. Exercise Science Senior Internship. (6-15) Prerequisites: Completion of
all other courses for the Exercise Science major, except KNES 4132. Application of
acquired knowledge and skills in practitioner settings. Requires a minimum of 340
contact hours at the internship site.
KNES 4660. Practitioner Seminar. (3) Prerequisites: KNES 3286 and KNES 3287.
Contemporary practices regarding exercise, health, and wellness. Designed to help
students prepare for relevant certification exams and professional development.
KNES 4700. Honors Research I. (3) Prerequisites: permission of the Program Major
Coordinator; approval of a proposal through the Honors College Application to
Candidacy process the semester prior to taking the course. Honors project directed by
Exercise Science Honors committee or assigned faculty member. One faculty contact
hour per week and independent research.
KNES 2235. High Ropes Course Facilitation. (2) Prerequisite: KNES 2236, 2230 or
2234 or permission of instructor. Focus on both the technical and facilitation skills and
the knowledge necessary for safely and effectively leading groups through high ropes
courses. In addition to class room sessions, weekend days at the High Team Challenge
Course and observation/ apprenticing of actual Venture programs are required. (Fall)
KNES 2236. Challenge Course Activities. (2) Immersion in a developmental small
group team experience using a wide variety of challenge course activities (i.e., ropes
course, trust exercises, group initiatives.) The focus is on expanding students’ self
knowledge and understanding of how to work effectively with and lead others. (Spring)
KNES 2333. Baseball Through History and Playing. (3) This course first explores the
socioeconomic climate of baseball’s origins from the 1800s to the present. The second
half provides activity-oriented instruction that introduces softball’s emergence from
baseball through basic skills, rules, and strategies of the game. (Spring)
KNES 3230. Wilderness Trip Leading. (3) Prerequisite: KNES 1231 or KNES 2230
or permission of instructor. The focus is on the broadly accepted skills and knowledge
necessary for leading group adventure trips. Includes spring break backpacking trip(s)
and class room sessions. After successful completion of this course students will be
eligible to assist with Venture trips. A special fee will be charged to cover the costs of the
trips. (Spring)
Other Required Courses
CHEM 1251. Principles of Chemistry I. (3) A principles-oriented course for science
majors. Fundamental postulates and laws of chemistry; the relationship of atomic
structure to physical and chemical properties of the elements. Three lecture hours and one
Problem Session hour per week. (Students may attempt CHEM 1251 a total of three
times. Withdrawing from the course after the Add/Drop deadline constitutes an attempt
as does receiving any letter grade. Credit will be given for only one course: 1111, 1203,
or 1251.) (Fall, Spring, Summer) (Evenings)
CHEM 1251L. Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I. (1) Prerequisite or corequisite:
CHEM 1251. Experimental investigations involving the fundamental postulates and laws
of chemistry. One three-hour laboratory per week. (Students may attempt CHEM 1251L
a total of three times. Withdrawing from the course after the Add/Drop deadline
constitutes an attempt as does receiving any letter grade. Credit will be given for only one
course: 1111L, 1203L, or 1251L.) (Fall, Spring, Summer) (Evenings)
MATH 1100. College Algebra and Probability. (3) Prerequisite: appropriate score on
the Mathematics Placement Test or placement by the Department. The basic mathematics
course for undergraduates not majoring in Mathematics, Engineering, or the Physical
Sciences. Fundamental concepts of algebra. Students who already have credit for MATH
1103, 1120, 1121, or 1241 with a grade of C or better may not take 1100 for credit. (Fall,
Spring, Summer) (Evenings)
STAT 1220. Elements of Statistics I (BUSN). (3) Prerequisite: MATH 1100 or
placement by the department. Non-calculus based introduction to data summarization,
discrete and continuous random variables (e.g., binomial, normal), sampling, central limit
theorem, estimation, testing hypotheses, and linear regression. Applications of theory will
be drawn from areas related to business. May not be taken for credit if credit has been
received for STAT 1221 or 1222. (Fall, Spring, Summer) (Evenings)
or
STAT 1221. Elements of Statistics I. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 1100 or placement by the
department. Same topics as STAT 1220 with special emphasis on applications to the life
sciences. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for STAT 1220 or 1222.
(Fall, Spring)
or
STAT 1222. Introduction to Statistics. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 1100 or placement by
the department. Same topics as STAT 1220 with special emphasis on applications to the
social and behavioral sciences. May not be taken for credit if credit has been received for
STAT 1220 or 1221. (Fall, Spring, Summer) (Evenings)
First Aid and CPR Certification Requirements
For all internship courses, it is the student's responsibility to obtain and maintain AED,
First Aid and CPR for the Professional Rescuer Certification (adult, infant and child),
Blood Borne Pathogen Training. Evidence of current CPR Certification must be
submitted to the Internship Coordinator at the time your internship course KNES 4490.
Students that do not provide proof of certification will not be permitted to participate in
any Exercise Science courses.
Students must complete their First Aid and CPR Certification at UNC Charlotte or
through an approved provider.
Exercise Science Attendance Policy
The University of North Carolina Charlotte does not have a mandatory attendance policy.
Attendance policy is set at the discretion of each individual professor for his or her
classes. Class attendance is highly recommended.
Attendance is required and mandatory for all scheduled internship assignments. Students
are required to complete a minimum of 30 hours and maximum of 33 hours per week in
the internship setting. Three unexcused absences during an internship assignment will
result in the lowering of the final internship course grade by one letter. Five unexcused
absences will result in failure of the internship course. It is the student’s responsibility to
keep up with their scheduled internship responsibilities and events. If an Exercise
Science student cannot make a scheduled internship responsibility or event, it is his or her
responsibility to communicate directly with their supervising Internship Instructor in a
timely fashion. Exercise Science students are to be prompt, dressed appropriately and
follow all internship guidelines for all internship responsibilities and events. Three tardies
for an internship assignment will equal one unexcused absence.
Exercise Science Dismissal Policy
I.
The faculty members of the UNC Charlotte Exercise Science Program have
an academic, legal, and ethical responsibility to protect members of the
public and of the health care community from unsafe or unprofessional
Exercise Science practices. This policy reflects that obligation.
II.
A student may be dismissed from the program if he or she any one or
more of the following:
1.
Demonstrates behavior which conflicts with safety essential to
Exercise Science practice
2.
Presents physical or emotional problems which conflict
with safety essential to Exercise Science practice and do
not respond to appropriate treatment or counseling within a
reasonable period of time
3.
Engages in conduct which violates the Code of Ethics for
American College of Sports Medicine which has been
adopted by the Exercise Science Program as its standard for
ethical conduct by faculty and students
4.
Engages in an Exercise Science practice for which the
student has not been authorized or for which the student has
not been educated at the time of the incident
5.
Engages in conduct which threatens or has the potential to
threaten the physical, emotional, mental, or environmental
health or safety of a client, a clients family member or
substitute familial person, another student, a faculty
member, another health care provider, or the student
himself or herself
6.
Substantially disrupts the Programs of the Exercise Science
Program or its affiliates
7.
Fails to participate in or complete internship work for any
reason or fails to perform internship work which is
consistent with professional Exercise Science practice,
including satisfactory performance of all critical behaviors
specified on the evaluation tool for each course
8.
Fails to adhere to College and internship site policies and
procedures.
All students are regularly evaluated against the above standards in relation
to internship practice and may be dismissed from any course or from the
Exercise Science Program upon violation of any of the stated standards,
regardless of course grades.
III.
Where the Department of Kinesiology chairperson or his/her designee
determines that a student may have violated one or more of the standards
defined in Section II, that administrator will determine whether the
violation warrants dismissal (Section IV), or should be addressed through
warning and follow-up (Section V). The Department of Kinesiology
chairperson may temporarily suspend the student from further internship
activity pending the outcome of the procedure for dismissal (Section IV),
or issuance of the written and oral warning (Section V).
IV.
Where the Department of Kinesiology chairperson or designee determines
that the procedure for dismissal from the Program should be invoked, she
will provide the student a written statement of the facts upon which the
proposal to dismiss is based. The student will have the opportunity to
appear before the Department of Kinesiology chairperson and a panel of
Exercise Science Program faculty members to refute the facts, offer other
information, or make any other statement concerning the proposed
dismissal. The Department of Kinesiology chairperson and panel will
consider that information together with the information upon which the
proposal to dismiss was based and determine whether adequate cause for
dismissal has been established.
The Department of Kinesiology
chairperson will notify the student of the decision.
V.
Where the Department of Kinesiology chairperson or designee determines
that violation of any of the standards should be addressed through warning
and follow-up, the faculty member or internship instructor involved will
provide the student with oral and written warnings outlining the exact
nature of the behavior and possible consequences. The unsafe or
unprofessional behavior shall be corroborated by a second person, a staff
member at the Exercise Science internship site, another faculty member,
or by documentation of unsafe or unprofessional behavior in a prior course
evaluation. In appropriate circumstances the student may be afforded
opportunities to correct the behavior, as agreed upon by the faculty
member or internship supervisor in consultation with the Program
Coordinator and the Department Chair. Written evaluation of each
internship days work by the student shall be carried out by the faculty
member or internship instructor involved and shared with and signed by
the student. Should the student subsequently fail to meet any of the
academic standards stated, dismissal from the course with a failing grade
and/or from the College may be invoked. The review of students’
behaviors related to the above shall be carried out in a course team
meeting.
Date of Origin: 8/01
Reviewed: 8/02
VI.
POST-DISMISSAL PROCEDURE
Upon dismissal from a course or from the Exercise Science Program, the student
may invoke the "Academic Grievance Policy of the College of Health and Human
Services." The written grievance must be submitted within seven (7) working days
of receipt of the written dismissal and be sent to of the Director of the Exercise
Science Program, following steps 1 and 2 of the "Academic Grievance Policy."
Date of Origin for Nursing: 12/85
Revised: 4/94, 2/96, 7/02
Reviewed: 5/00, 8/02
Adapted for Exercise Science :
Exercise Science Appeal Procedures
Policy Appeals
A student who wishes to appeal a policy of the Department of Kinesiology or the
Exercise Science Program may do so by submitting a written appeal to the Department
Chairperson. This appeal will be reviewed and judgment made by the faculty of the
department. Students should refer to the grievance and appeals policy in the College of
Health and Human Services Student Handbook.
Final Grade Appeals
Final grades must follow the UNC Charlotte final grade appeal procedure described at
http://legal.uncc.edu/policies/up-410
Exercise Science Program Readmission Policy
Intent to Re-enroll following a Non-academic Absence
Permission to re-enroll is contingent on space availability. Any undergraduate Exercise
Science student who plans to enroll in an Exercise Science course after a non-academic
absence of one or more semesters (or one 8 week course period) from any Exercise
Science course must notify the Department of Kinesiology in writing no later than by
February 1 for admission to any fall course and October 15 for admission to any spring
course.
Date of Origin: 4/88
Revised: 2/91, 5/00
Adapted for Exercise Science : 6/02
Reviewed: 8/02
Exercise Science Student Folders
Academic and Health History Folder Policy
The College of Health and Human Services adheres to the requirement of the law
regarding review of student folders (See http://legal.uncc.edu/legal-topics/ferpa“The
Privacy of Educational Records”).
Students may review the contents of their academic folders only in the presence of a
College faculty member or secretary. The student reviewing his/her folder must sign and
date the College Student Folder Review Sheet.
Right of access to student academic folders is limited to College Health and Human
Services faculty who require access to the information in the folder to make decisions
about College business or for advising or evaluation purposes.
Any person outside the College of Health and Human Services who wishes to review a
student's folder must comply with http://legal.uncc.edu/legal-topics/ferpa, “The Privacy
of Educational Records.”
Exercise Science Majors: Health History information is maintained in a separate folder
from the Academic folder. Review of the Health History folder is subject to the same
policy and procedures as the Academic Folder. Results of Drug Testing and Criminal
Background checks will be maintained in the Health History Folder.
Drug Testing and Criminal Background Check Policy: As a student in a professional
program in the College of Health and Human Services, you will be asked by a clinical
facility to undergo drug testing and have a criminal background check before being
allowed to participate in a clinical experience at that facility. All costs associated with
drug testing and background checks are the responsibility of the student. For more
information regarding clinical agency mandates click here.
Kinesiology Student Organizations
The Department of Kinesiology sponsors the Kinesiology Student Organization for
students in their major program.
Kinesiology Student Awards
Dr. Harvey Murphy Scholarship
Selection Criteria
Overview:
This endowed scholarship is designated for students enrolled in the Department of
Kinesiology. Hired by Bonnie Cone in 1965, Dr. Murphy was charged with developing
all aspects of campus recreational, athletic, and health and physical education efforts. In
his 31 years at UNC Charlotte, Dr. Murphy was responsible for the evolution of the
Health & Physical Education area into the Department of Kinesiology that exists today.
Leading with integrity, compassion, and a sense of humor, Dr. Murphy is a beloved
scholar, mentor, coach and friend. The Dr. Harvey Murphy Scholarship will honor his
extraordinary contributions to UNC Charlotte and will support a meritorious student in
the Department of Kinesiology each year.
Award Criteria:
1. Award to be made to a senior who is enrolled in good academic standing in the
Athletic Training or Exercise Science degree programs in the Department of
Kinesiology.
2. Students must demonstrate their commitment to the field through academic
achievement, civic engagement and leadership.
3. Recipients must have a minimum GPA of 3.0.
4. Student must demonstrate financial need, as determined by the Office of Financial
Aid; or the student must describe their financial need in terms of financial sacrifices
they have made to pursue their degree, and how this award will help to lessen their
financial burden.
5. This award is non-renewable.
Criteria Priorities:
1. GPA- 50%
2. Civic Engagement-20%
3. Demonstrated Leadership- 20%
4. Communication Skills- 10%
Applications:
To be considered for the award, applicants are asked to submit a one page personal
statement, including how their academic pursuits, civic engagement and leadership
demonstrate their commitment to the field and to the Department.
Exercise Science Academic Excellence Award
Exercise Science Academic Excellence Award is given to the student who has the
highest GPA in the Kinesiology Department during his or her senior year. Learn more in
the History of the Department.
Exercise Science
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
1. How is the Exercise Science program different from the Pre-Kinesiology
program?
The Exercise Science program is the degree program from which you graduate
with a degree. This program is usually the last two and a half years of your degree
program and is where you take the majority of your major courses. The Pre-Kinesiology
program is a preparatory group of courses that help you finish your General Education
courses and get you ready for the Exercise Science program (see the Pre-Kinesiology
Frequently Asked Questions).
2. Do I have to take the Exercise Science courses in any particular order?
Absolutely. There is a recommended sequence of courses that your advisor will
be provided via an KNES Major check sheet. You should follow this sequence.
Following this sequence will insure that you take courses at the right time and that you
will have completed the appropriate prerequisites for the courses you are taking. If you
are not following the sequence of courses recommended, we can not guarantee that you
will graduate on time or that you will be able to get into classes.
3. Does the department waive prerequisites?
No! Therefore, pass all of your prerequisites (with at least a “C”) and take them
according to the sequence, and you will have no problems.
4. Does the department accept courses taken elsewhere?
It depends on the course. Many of the lower level, general education courses will
be accepted. However, attempting to transfer large numbers of major courses into the
program is not looked upon favorably. At best, you will be required to take competency
exams for the major courses you wish to transfer into the program. Also, do not forget,
that your last 30 hours of coursework, must be completed at UNC-Charlotte.
5. Is there any help for students?
Absolutely! You should never hesitate to see your advisor. We document when
we see students, so if you have problems and have not been consulting your advisor
regularly, we really can not help you much. Your advisor is the best source for
information and guidance.
Additionally, we maintain an extensive web site. Do not hesitate to pull this site
up. Another source of help is the student organization, the Kinesiology Student
Organization (KSO). You should get involved with this organization early in your career
at UNC-Charlotte. You never know when the contacts you make in the KSO will pay off
as a job or other benefits in the future.
6. Is there anything else I need to know?
Remember that your education is your responsibility. Make sure you are aware of
the procedures and courses that you are responsible for. No matter how good the faculty
and staff here at UNC-Charlotte are, if you are not interested in your education, you will
have problems. On the other hand, NEVER hesitate to ask questions. The more
information you have, the better able you will be to make decisions.
7. What is ACSM?
The American College of Sports Medicine. ACSM advances and integrates
scientific research to provide educational and practical applications of exercise science
and sports medicine.
8. Do I have to take an exam with ACSM?
Yes, the written exam for ACSM Certified Health Fitness Specialist® - The
ACSM Certified Health Fitness Specialist® (HFS) is a professional qualified to assess,
design, and implement individual and group exercise and fitness programs for apparently
healthy individuals and individuals with controlled disease. The HFS is skilled in
evaluating health behaviors and risk factors, conducting fitness assessments, writing
appropriate exercise prescriptions, and motivating individuals to modify negative health
habits and maintain positive lifestyle behaviors for health promotion. The HFS
certification provides professionals with recognition of their practical experience and
demonstrated competence as a leader of health and fitness programs in the university,
corporate, commercial or community settings in which their clients participate in health
promotion and fitness-related activities. You will sit for this exam during your senior
year.
9. Do I have to pass this exam?
Yes in order to get the ACSM Certified Health Fitness Specialist® certification.
However, you do not need to pass this exam in order to graduate from UNC Charlotte
with an Exercise Science degree.
10. Is there a cost to take the exam?
The current HFS exam fee for our students with a voucher code that is provided
by ACSM is: $175
The current HFS exam fee is: $279 for non-ACSM Members and $219 for ACSM
Members. The current HFS retest fee is: $150
The fee is set by ACSM.
11. What are the benefits of ACSM Credentialing?
ACSM credentials are recognized as the Gold Standard throughout the United
States and around the world. By obtaining an ACSM certification, your employer knows
that you have passed the most rigorous and up-to-date health/fitness and internship
certification(s) that exist. There are many benefits to being ACSM certified/registered.


Employers prefer ACSM certified/registered employees because this ensures a
higher standard of knowledge and better and safer service to clients.
An ACSM credentialed individual is capable of working with both apparently
healthy clients and clients with chronic diseases and disabilities.

ACSM credentials offer a quality of care that today's society demands.
Once you are certified/registered by ACSM, you have access to ACSM's Certified News,
a quarterly publication with up to date information in the health and wellness and
internship fields. Within this newsletter, you will find articles written by experts along
with educational opportunities to further your knowledge.
The ACSM ProFinder is a recently launched initiative available to ACSM credentialed
professionals as well as the general public. By submitting the application form, you are
giving permission for your contact information to be published on ACSM's website (only
currently certified/registered professionals will be enrolled in this service) for other
credentialed professionals, potential employers and the general public. By joining this
online service, you can market yourself as a qualified professional, allowing prospective
clients to locate the expert of their choice. If you have questions regarding inclusion in
this service, please contact the ACSM Certification Department at
[email protected]
12. Can I take classes somewhere else and transfer them into the Exercise Science
program?
Courses undertaken by UNC Charlotte undergraduate degree students at other
accredited institutions may be transferred to the University subject to the following
regulations:



The University is not obligated to accept any credit from another institution unless
the student has obtained the prior approval of the dean of the college in which
he/she is enrolled. A Permit for Transient Study form should be completed and
filed in the UNC Charlotte Registrar's Office prior to enrollment at another
institution.
No credit will be accepted for courses below C level for undergraduate students.
The student must request that an official transcript be mailed to the Registrar's
Office upon completion of the course. A form for this purpose is available in the
Registrar's Office. Departmental approval is also needed for courses that are
required for the major.
13. What is the Drug and Criminal Background Check policy in our college?
As a student in a professional program in the College of Health and Human
Services, you will be asked by a clinical facility to undergo drug testing and have a
criminal background check before being allowed to participate in a clinical experience
at that facility. All costs associated with drug testing and background checks are the
responsibility of the student. For more information regarding Clinical Agency Mandates
click here.
The General Education Program
The General Education Program is central to UNC Charlotte’s basic mission of
providing all of its undergraduates with a liberal arts education. The Program approaches
the liberal arts in its traditional meaning of learning the arts appropriate for living the
educated, responsible life of a free (liberalis) citizen. It provides all undergraduate
students, regardless of their majors, with the foundations of the liberal education they will
need to be informed people who have the ability to act thoughtfully in society, the ability
to make critical judgments, and the ability to enjoy a life dedicated to learning and the
pleasures of intellectual and artistic pursuits.
The Program is designed to address four areas of liberal education. First, it helps
students develop the foundational skills necessary for obtaining the full benefits of a
college education: basic college-level writing, basic use of information technology, and
basic college-level mathematical and logical skills. Second, it helps provide students with
an understanding of the methods of scientific inquiry and the ways that knowledge is
acquired and accredited in the life sciences, physical sciences, and social sciences. Third,
the General Education Program addresses major themes related to living as a liberally
educated person in the twenty-first century. Students take four Liberal Studies courses
designed especially for the General Education Program. These courses are organized
around major themes of liberal education: the arts, literature, the western cultural
tradition, global understanding, citizenship, ethics, issues of health, and issues of science,
technology, and society. Fourth, it helps students develop more specialized skills for
disciplinary writing and oral presentations.
I. Development of Fundamental Skills of Inquiry (9-12 semester hours)
Basic writing courses: Students take two courses, ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102.
Entering freshmen who qualify for the accelerated course in writing and rhetoric may
meet this requirement by completing one course, ENGL 1103. After completing these
courses students are expected to be able to write clearly and concisely in standard English
and to be generally prepared to do college-level writing and editing.
Mathematical and logical reasoning: One course in mathematics (MATH) and a
second course selected from mathematics (MATH), statistics (STAT), or deductive logic
(PHIL 2105). Most undergraduates at UNC Charlotte major in programs that require
mathematics or statistics as related work. For these students, the related mathematics
requirements determine the courses taken to meet the general education requirement.
Students in majors that do not require related work in mathematics normally take MATH
1100, followed by either MATH 1102 or PHIL 2105.
Basic skills of information technology: By the end of their first semester at UNC
Charlotte, students are expected to have developed the basic skills necessary to access
and create computer based information. These skills include the use of word processing,
email, file management, internet searches, and library database searches. These skills are
developed in English 1101 and 1103. Tutorial help is available at campus computer labs,
and help with bibliographical search skills is available in the information commons of
Atkins library. Students are expected to exhibit ethical behavior in the use of computers.
More advanced information technology skills are required by individual departments and
majors.
II. Social Sciences Requirements
One course in the social sciences. These courses introduce students to the methods of the
social sciences and to the applications of these methods for gaining a scientific
understanding of the social world. Selected from:
Anthropology (ANTH 1101)
Geography (GEOG 1105)
Economics (ECON 1101 or 2101)
Political Science (POLS 1110)
Sociology (SOCY 1101)
III. Themes of Liberal Education for Private and Public Life (12 semester hours)
The UNC Charlotte faculty has selected eight themes of a liberal arts education
around which to offer a core of Liberal Studies courses dedicated exclusively to general
education. All of these courses include the consideration of gender, race, and ethnic
diversity, as appropriate for understanding the individual themes of these courses.
Each student must take four of these courses as follows:
One course in the arts and society. Art is indispensable to the structure and fabric of
all societies, and each course examines this fundamental connection from the perspective
a specific art form. Selected from:
LBST 1101 The Arts and Society: Dance
LBST 1102 The Arts and Society: Film
LBST 1103 The Arts and Society: Music
LBST 1104 The Arts and Society: Theater
LBST 1105 The Arts and Society: Visual Arts
One course in the Western tradition. Each section of this course examines a major
aspect of western culture through the process of analyzing the present in terms of the
past.
LBST 2101 Western Cultural and Historical Awareness
One course in global understanding. All liberally educated people need to have the
ability to understand the world from the point of view of more than one culture and be
able to analyze issues from a global perspective.
LBST 2102 Global and Intercultural Connections
One course dealing with ethical issues and cultural critique. Each of these courses
deals with an important contemporary issue, and each one gives significant attention to
ethical analysis and cultural critique in the liberal arts. Selected from:
LBST 2211 Ethical Issues in Personal, Professional, and Public Life
LBST 2212 Literature and Culture
LBST 2213 Science, Technology, and Society
LBST 2214 Issues of Health and Quality of Life
LBST 2215 Citizenship
Writing Intensive Course
Writing in the disciplines: Six semester hours, including at least three semester
hours in the major. These courses are spread throughout the curriculum and are indicated
with a (W) after the course title. These courses assume that students have already
developed the basic grammatical and compositional skills needed to write college-level
English, and they build on these skills to develop writing strategies appropriate to the
discipline of the department offering the course.
Exercise Science courses that meet this requirement are:
KNES 3281 (3)
KNES 3287 (3)
EXERCISE SCIENCE STUDENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Academic Advising
The College of Health and Human Services CHHS Advising Center is responsible
for equitably assigning undergraduate student advisees in the Pre-Kinesiology
major to staff members in this office. Once the student becomes an Exercise
Science major they will be assigned to advising faculty within the Department of
Kinesiology. This will take place at each new admission cycle and students
should make sure that their advisor information is current and correct.
Faculty members are responsible for providing academic advice for assigned
students and for maintaining current student records in accord with College,
School and University forms.
Each student is responsible for the proper completion of his or her academic
Program, for familiarity with the University Catalog, for maintaining the grade
average required and for meeting all other degree requirements. The advisor
will counsel, but the final responsibility remains that of the student. (University
Catalog)
Students are responsible for communicating with their advisor throughout their
enrollment at the university.
Date of Origin: 8/02
College of Health and Human Services Student Technical Standards
Technical Standards define the attributes that are considered necessary for students to
possess in order to complete their educational program. These Technical Standards are
used to assist each prospective student in determining whether accommodations or
modifications are necessary in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.
These Technical Standards are determined to be pre-requisite for entrances to,
continuation in, and graduation from a student’s chosen discipline in the College of
Health and Human Services.
Students must possess aptitude, ability and skills in the following four areas:
Psychomotor Ability (Coordination/Mobility): Physical ability sufficient to move
within the client environment; gross and fine motor skills sufficient to provide safe and
effective services.
Senses (Visual, hearing, tactile, olfactory): Sensory ability necessary to observe and
perform skills essential in providing safe and effective services.
Communication (Verbal, Non-verbal, Written): Communication abilities sufficient for
interaction with others in verbal and written form in classroom, lab, and service settings.
Interpersonal verbal and nonverbal abilities sufficient to interact with individuals,
families and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual
backgrounds.
Behavioral/Social Attributes: Ability to fulfill professional behavioral and social
responsibilities in the role of a student, with faculty, professional staff, clients, and peers.
Candidates for selection to the Exercise Science Program will be required to verify they
understand and meet these technical standards or that they believe that, with certain
accommodations, they can meet the standards.
The Department of Disability Services will evaluate a student who states he or she could
meet the program’s technical standards with accommodation and confirm that the stated
condition qualifies as a disability under applicable laws.
If a student states he or she can meet the technical standards with accommodation, then
the University will determine whether it agrees that the student can meet the technical
standards with reasonable accommodation; this includes a review of whether the
accommodations requested are reasonable, taking into account whether accommodation
would jeopardize clinician/patient safety, or the educational process of the student or the
institution, including all coursework, internship experiences and internships deemed
essential to graduation.
Date of Origin: 8/01
Revised: 8/02
The American College of Sports Medicine Code of Ethics
A. Principles and purposes:
Preamble: These principles are intended to aid Fellows and members of the College
individually and collectively to maintain high level of ethical conduct. These are not laws
but standards by which a Fellow or a member may determine the propriety of his/her
conduct, relationship with colleagues, with members of allied professions, with the
public, and with all persons in which a professional relationship has been established.
The principal purpose of the College is the generation and dissemination of knowledge
concerning all aspects of persons engaged in exercise with full respect for the dignity of
people.
Section 1: members should strive continuously to improve knowledge and skill and make
available to their colleagues and the public the benefits of their professional expertise.
Section 2: members should maintain high professional and scientific standards and
should not voluntarily collaborate professionally with anyone who violates this principle.
Section 3: The College, and its members, should safeguard the public and itself against
members who are deficient in ethical conduct.
Section 4: The ideals of the College imply that the responsibilities of each Fellow or
member extend not only to the individual, but also to society with the purpose of
improving both the health and well-being of the individual and the community.
B. Maintenance of Good-standing in Regulated Professions:
Any Fellow or member required by law to be licensed, certified or otherwise regulated by
any governmental agency in order to practice his or her profession must remain in goodstanding before that agency as a condition of continued membership in the College. Any
expulsion, suspension, probation or other sanction imposed by such governmental agency
on any Fellow or member is grounds for disciplinary action by the College.
C. Public Disclosure of Affiliation:
Other than for commercial venture, any member or Fellow (FACSM) may disclose
his/her affiliation with the College in any context, oral or documented, provided it is
currently accurate. In doing so, no member or Fellow may imply College endorsement of
whatever is associated in context with the disclosure, unless expressly authorized by the
College. Disclosure of affiliation in connection with a commercial venture may be made
provided the disclosure is made in a professionally dignified manner, is not false,
misleading or deceptive, and does not imply licensure for the attainment of specialty or
diploma status. Members who are currently ACSM Certified or Registered may disclose
their certification status and Fellows may disclose their Fellow status. Because
membership and fellowship in ACSM is granted to individuals, disclosure of affiliation
and/or use of the initials ACSM are not to be made as part of a firm, partnership or
corporate name. Violation of this article may be grounds for disciplinary action.
D. Discipline:
Any Fellow or member of the College may be disciplined or expelled for conduct which,
in the opinion of the Board of Trustees, is derogatory to the dignity of or inconsistent
with the purposes of the College. The expulsion of a Fellow or member may be ordered
upon the affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members of the Board of Trustees present
at a regular or a special meeting, and only after such Fellow or member has been
informed of the charges preferred against him and has been given an opportunity to refute
such charges before the Board of Trustees. Other disciplinary action such as reprimand,
probation, or censure may be recommended by the Committee on Ethics and Professional
Conduct and ordered following the affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members of the
Board of Trustees present at a regular or special meeting or by mail ballot, provided a
quorum takes action.
THE UNC CHARLOTTE CODE OF STUDENT ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
The UNC Charlotte Code of Student Academic Integrity governs the responsibility of students to
maintain integrity in academic work, defines violations of the standards, describes procedures for
handling alleged violations of the standards, and lists applicable penalties. The following conduct
is prohibited in that Code as violating those standards:
A. Cheating. Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, notes,
study aids or other devices in any academic exercise. This definition includes unauthorized
communication of information during an academic exercise.
B. Fabrication and Falsification. Intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any
information or citation in an academic exercise. Falsification is a matter of altering information,
while fabrication is a matter of inventing or counterfeiting information for use in any academic
exercise.
C. Multiple Submission. The submission of substantial portions of the same academic work
(including oral reports) for credit more than once without authorization.
D. Plagiarism. Intentionally or knowingly presenting the work of another as one's own (i.e.,
without proper acknowledgment of the source). The sole exception to the requirement of
acknowledging sources is when the ideas, information, etc., are common knowledge. (NOTE: For
more information regarding plagiarism, see PLAGIARISM Appendix at
www.legal.uncc.edu/policies/ps-105.html#APP.)
E. Abuse of Academic Materials. Intentionally or knowingly destroying, stealing, or making
inaccessible library or other academic resource material.
F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty. Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to
help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.
A full explanation of these definitions, and a description of procedures used in cases where
student violations are alleged, is found in the complete text of The UNC Charlotte Code of
Student Academic Integrity. This Code may be modified from time to time. Students are advised
to contact the Office of the Dean of Students or go to www.legal.uncc.edu/policies/ps-105.html to
ensure they consult the most recent edition.
Application for a change major from the Pre-Kinesiology (PKNS)
to the Exercise Science (EXER) Major
Directions: Fill this form out completely. Use your 49 Express Account to look up the
information needed below to insure accuracy. Turn this form into the Department of Kinesiology
office (Belk Gym 221) anytime before one of the screening dates. Applications will be screened
on the third Wednesday in November and July. If an application is not received before the
screening date, it will be deferred to the next screening date. Incomplete applications will be
returned to the applicant. The applicant will be notified by email as soon as the screening process
is complete.
**Do not call the Kinesiology office asking for the screening results.**
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Applicant Name ____________________________ Student ID # _800__________________
Mailing Address______________________________________________________________
Telephone(s) _______________________________ UNCC e-mail________________________
Answer each of the following:
_____ 1. What is your current cumulative GPA? (your GPA must remain at 2.5 or higher at the
end of the semester you are applying)
_____ 2. How many earned credit hours will you have by the end of this semester? (You must
have completed 36 hours of coursework with at least a "C" or better in all prerequisite courses).
_____3. Indicate the semester taken, or will take. Put a TR and the semester taken if you
transferred this course to UNC Charlotte. You must have (or will have by the start of the fall
semester) completed the ALL the following prerequisites:
______Introduction to Kinesiology (KNES 2150)
______Care and Prevention to Athletic Injuries (KNES 2294)
______ Anatomy and PhysiologyKNES 2168 & Lab or BIOL 2273& Lab
______ CHEM 1251, ______ CHEM 1251L
______Statistics (STAT 1220, 1221, or 1222)
Office Use Only: ______________ date and initials when approved for Exercise Science status
KINESIOLOGY STUDENT ORGANIZATION
CONSTITUTION
Article I: Name
This organization shall be known as the Kinesiology Student Organization or KSO at the
University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC).
Article II: Club/Organization Purpose
Section I: The KSO will involve Pre-Kinesiology Majors, Exercise Science Majors,
Athletic Training Majors and other UNC Charlotte students interested in gaining
knowledge and experience in the field of Kinesiology.
Section II: KSO will encourage the application of knowledge, community interaction,
and awareness of current health and fitness trends.
Section III: The KSO will abide by all rules and regulations set forth by UNC Charlotte,
as well as all Federal, State and Local laws at all times.
Article III: Club/Organization Membership
Section I: Any UNC Charlotte student can become a member of the KSO. All members
will be expected to attend meetings, pay dues and participate in committee-related
activities.
Section II: The KSO will hold at least six meetings each semester. Members will be
required to attend scheduled meetings.
Section III: Dues shall be determined on a yearly basis by the executive board of the
KSO. Dues shall be payable at the second meeting in January. Failure to pay
dues will result in the termination of membership.
Section IV: Each member is required to participate on at least one committee or in one
committee-related event.
Section V: Any member can withdraw their membership by contacting the executive
board at any time. However, dues will not be refunded.
Section VI: In keeping with the UNC Charlotte’s policy of nondiscrimination, KSO
does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin,
age, sexual orientation, and physical or metal ability or disability.
Article IV: Executive Board
Section I: The KSO shall be governed by five officers. The KSO does reserve the right
to create other positions should the need arise. Officially, the five officers will be
called President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Historian. The officers
and faculty advisor will comprise the executive board of KSO. Any other
committee will be created as needed by the executive board and will be legislated
by the authority of the executive board.
Section II: The President of KSO shall be responsible for overseeing all other officers
and committee chairs.
Section III: The Vice President of KSO will assist the President. The Vice President
will also serve as chair of the Kinesiology Student Advisory Committee. If the
President is unable to perform his/her duties, the Vice President will assume all
Presidential responsibilities.
Section IV: The Secretary of KSO will be responsible for recording minutes at meetings
and taking attendance.
Section V: The Treasurer of KSO will handle all monetary issues (dues, fund-raisers,
etc.). If a member fails to pay the semester dues, the Treasurer should take
appropriate action (financial suspension from organization).
Section VI: The Historian of KSO shall be responsible for the advertisement and
information updates on the reserved bulletin board and around the community.
Article V: KSO Function/Operation
Section I: Officers are elected by open floor nominations. Any current member of KSO
in good standing is eligible to be an executive officer.
Section II: Nominations are to be held during the November meeting at the end of the
fall semester. Any current member in good standing is able to make nominations
for executive board positions.
Section III: All KSO member will participate in secret ballot vote. The votes will be
counted by the Advisor and President.
Section IV: Officers will serve on term (Spring through Fall semester). The elections
will be held the week prior to the last meeting at the end of the fall.
Section V: If office is vacated during the term, elections will be held for that office.
Section VI: Officers can be impeached by two-thirds vote of KSO members.
Section VII: The role of KSO advisor shall be to guide members through all activities
and decisions made by KSO members.
Article VI: Finances
Section I: KSO plans to finance its activities through semester dues and fund-raisers
contributed by present members.
Section II: KSO is currently working on a budget to submit to SGA’s Ways and Means
Committee (Financial Branch of SGA).
Article VII: Constitutional Amendments
Section I: Amendments can be proposed by any executive board member and can be
requested by any current member of KSO.
Section II: Rules regarding the proposal of the amendments are:
1) Amendments may be requested by any current member of KSO.
2) Amendments must be proposed by the executive board.
3) Amendments must be submitted in writing at the previous meeting to
executive board.
4) The by-laws may be amended at any monthly meeting.
Section III: The amendment shall be voted on as follows: The amendment requires
two-thirds majority of those present and voting.

Evaluating Your Progress

CAPP (Curriculum Advising and Program Planning)

Academic Enrichment & Support

Academic Policies

Career Counseling

Dates & Deadlines for the University

Forms and Resources

Registering for Classes

Improving Your Grades

Recommendation Letters

Graduation Information
B.S. in Exercise Science
Academic Plan of Study
College of Health & Human Services
Department of Kinesiology
kinesiology.uncc.edu
PROGRAM SUMMARY



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

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Credit Hours: 120 hours
Concentrations: No
Declaring the Major: Declaring the Pre-Kinesiology Major: Minimum GPA of 2.5 required;
change of major form accepted year-round; advising session required prior to declaration. Must
complete Pre-Kinesiology required curriculum prior to applying to Upper Division Exercise
Science (BS) major. Admissions to Upper Division Exercise Science (BS) major: Minimum
Prerequisite GPA of 2.5, Completion of 36 hours of coursework; successful completion (grade of
C or better) of all Pre-Kinesiology required courses.
Advising (For the Major): Required upon declaration of the pre-major and before application to
the Upper Division major; recommended more frequently as needed by the CHHS Advising
Center. Advising (Exercise Science major): Consult the Exercise Science Program Coordinator.
Advising (For General Education): Consult the Exercise Science Program Coordinator or CHHS
Advising Center.
Minimum Grades/GPA: minimum grades of C in Pre-Kinesiology prerequisite courses and
Exercise Science major courses. Major GPA of 2.0 required for graduation.
Teacher Licensure: No
Evening Classes Available: No
Weekend Classes Available: No
Other Information: No
Contact(s): Roy Fielding, Exercise Science Program Coordinator, Belk Gym 209, 704-687-0860,
[email protected]
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
The Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science program at UNC Charlotte is a career that encompasses all
of the components involved in the total well-being of an individual, exploring the social, biological, and
environmental aspects of optimal health. The Exercise Science curriculum covers a wide spectrum of
these issues. The Exercise Science major is nationally accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of
Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).
This degree program offers preparation for employment as Exercise Science practitioners in business
and industry, health agencies, hospitals, fitness centers or any other settings which provides health
enhancement programs for clients. The courses in this major prepare the student to sit for the American
College of Sports Medicine Health Fitness Specialist (HFS) certification.
The Pre-Kinesiology and Upper Division Exercise Science majors are relatively structured but contain
some flexibility during the Pre- Kinesiology major (years 1 & 2). The Upper Division Exercise Science
major (years 3 & 4) is very structured and re quires students to complete a precise curriculum in the order
in which it is scheduled by the Kinesiology Department. Exercise Science majors having more than three
grades of D or below or below in required upper level courses, or a two grades of D or below in any one
required upper level course cannot remain in the Exercise Science major and must change their major. All
Exercise Science Majors must complete 3 approved activity course before taking EXER 4490.The
culminating activity as you complete your Bachelor of Science Degree in Exercise Science is a 340 hour
internship experience.
Minimum criteria for Admission to the Upper Division Exercise Science major:
Admission decisions to the Upper Division Exercise Science Major are made by the Exercise Science
Admission Committee on the
third Wednesday of March, July, and November of each Academic Year. It is best to apply in the fall for
entry into the upper level for the spring semester.
Students who have completed all of the Pre-Kinesiology prerequisites may apply for the upper division of
the Exercise Science program. Applicants must meet the following minimum academic requirements:
1. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better in all college course work.
2. Completion of 36 hours of course work.
3. Successful completion (grade of C or better) of all the following prerequisite courses:
KNES 2150 Introduction to Kinesiology
KNES 2294 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
CHEM 1251 Principles of Chemistry CHEM 1251L Principles of Chemistry Lab STAT 1222
Introduction to Statistics
KNES 2168 Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions or BIOL 2273 Human
Anatomy and Physiology
KNES 2168L Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory for the Health Professions or BIOL
2273L Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab
4. Completion of an online “Statement of Understanding for Entering Exercise Science Majors”.
5. A student transferring to UNC Charlotte with credit for CHEM 1251 and CHEM 1251L is not required
to take CHEM 1200
Areas
Pre-Major/
Prerequisites
Major
Credit
Hours
20
63-69
General Education
24
Related Work
Foreign Language
Electives
7-13
Total Credit Hours
120
(not satisfied by
other
major requirements)
Description
Required courses in the pre-major will satisfy General Education
requirements for
Development of Fundamental Skills of Inquiry and Inquiry in the
Sciences.
Required courses also fulfill the General Education Communication Skills
requirements
(Writing in the Discipline and Oral Communication).
This includes the “Themes of Liberal Education for Private and Public
Life” (Liberal
Studies)
Foreign Language proficiency is not required for this major.
As needed to complete 120 hours total; depending upon total hours
earned in the Exercise
Science Major.
SUGGESTED PLAN OF STUDY
Freshman Year
Course Number
Fall Semester
UWRT 1101
CHEM 1200
MATH 1100
LBST 11XX
XXXX XXXX
HAHS 1000
Spring Semester
UWRT 1102
CHEM 1251
CHEM 1251L
STAT 1222
KNES 2150
Credit
Hours
General
Education
Writing and Inquiry in Academic Contexts I
Fundamentals of Chemistry
College Algebra and Probability
LBST 1100 Series: Arts and Society
Social Science for General Education Requirement
Prospect for Success in Health & Human Services
3
3
3
3
3
1
X
Writing and Inquiry in Academic Contexts II (or ENGL 1103)
Principles of Chemistry I
Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
Introduction to Statistics
Introduction to Kinesiology
3
3
1
3
3
X
X
X
X
Course Title
W/O
Course
Notes
X
X
X
29 Credit Hours for Year
Sophomore Year
Course Number
Fall Semester
KNES 2168
KNES 2168L
KNES 2294
LBST 2101
LBST 2102
LBST 2214
Spring Semester
KNES 2290
KNES 2101
KNES 2169
KNES 2169L
KNES 2298
Course Title
Credit
Hours
Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions
Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory for the Health
Professions
Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
Western Cultural and Historical Awareness
Global and Intercultural Connections
Issues of Health and Quality of Life
3
1
Emergency Medical Response
Foundations of Physical Conditioning
Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions
Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory for the Health
Professions II
Applied Kinesiology
3
2
3
1
General
Education
3
3
3
3
W/O
Course
Notes
X
X
X
3
31 Credit Hours for Year
Junior Year
Course Number
Fall Semester
KNES 3100
KNES 3260
KNES 3280
KNES 3281
XXXX XXXX
Spring Semester
KNES 3285
KNES 3286
KNES 3287
XXXX XXXX
Course Title
Credit
Hours
Organization and Administration of Exercise Science
Nutrition for the Physically Active
Exercise Physiology: Foundation and Theory
Exercise Physiology: Principles and Application
Elective and/or Activity Course
3
3
3
3
3
Principles of Strength and Conditioning
Exercise Testing: Foundation and Theory
Exercise Testing: Principles and Applications
Elective and/or Activity Course
3
3
3
3
General
Education
W/O
Course
X
W
X
W,O
Notes
27 Credit Hours for Year
Senior Year
Course Number
Fall Semester
KNES 4121
KNES 4286
KNES 4293
KNES 4660
XXXX XXXX
Spring Semester
KNES 4132
KNES 4490
XXXX XXXX
Course Title
Credit
Hours
Pharmacology for the Physically Active
Exercise Prescription
Biomechanics
Practitioner Seminar
Elective and/or Activity Course
3
3
3
3
3-7
Lifetime Weight Management and Behavior Change
Exercise Science Senior Internship
Electives
3
6-15
0-3
General
Education
W/O
Course
Notes
31-31+ Credit Hours for Year
ADVISING RESOURCES
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General Education Requirements for ALL Students: ucol.uncc.edu/general-education
Undergraduate Catalog: catalog.uncc.edu
Central Advising website: advising.uncc.edu
College of Health & Human Services advising website: health.uncc.edu/advising-center
University Advising Center website: advisingcenter.uncc.edu
Freshman Year/Pre Kinesiology
Course Title
Fundamentals of Chemistry*
Writing and Inquiry Academic Context I
Prospect for Success in Health & Human Services
Arts and Society
College Algebra*
1st Semester (16 Hours)
CHEM 1200(3)
UWRT 1101 (3)
HAHS 1000 (1)
LBST 1100 Series (3)
MATH 1100 (3)
Social Sciences Reqs (3)
ANTH 1101,GEOG 1105, ECON 1101 or 2101, POLS 1110,SOCY 1101
When Offered
Fall, Spring
All, Evenings
Fall
All
All, Evenings
All, Evenings
2nd Semester (13 Hours)
KNES 2150 (3)
LBST 2101(3)
CHEM 1251(3)
CHEM 1251L(1)
UWRT 1102 (3)
Course Title
Introduction to Kinesiology*
Western Tradition
General Chemistry I *
General Chemistry Lab I*
Writing and Inquiry Academic Context II
When Offered
Spring, Summer
All
All, Evenings
All, Evenings
All, Evenings
Prerequisites & Notes
UWRT 1103 ca n s ub. for both UWRT 1101 & 1102
Fi rs t Semes ter Fres hmen
Ma th Pl a cement Tes t
Prerequisites & Notes
PKNS Ma jor
Note: You mus t a l s o ta ke LBST 2102
5th Semester (16-18 Hours)
KNES 3100 (3)
KNES 3260 (3)
KNES 3280 (3)
KNES 3281 (3) (W)
UWRT 1101 (s ee note for UWRT 1101)
When Offered
Fall, Spring
All
Spring
Fall, Spring
Spring, Summer
Spring, Summer
Prerequisites & Notes
EXER Ma jors
EXER Ma jor
KNES 2168/L or BIOL 2273/L C or hi gher
Milestones 4 Year Degree
Complete KNES 2168 (>D)
Complete STAT 1222 (>D)
Complete KNES 2294 (>D)
GPA 2.5 or higher
At least 36 earned hours
Milestones 4 Year Degree
Complete KNES 2298 (>D)
Complete KNES 2290 (>D)
Complete KNES 2169 (>D)
LBST 2214 i s hi ghl y recommended*
Gra de of C or better i n KNES 2168
Prerequi s i te/corequi s i te: KNES 2168.
Junior Year/Exercise Science
Course Title
Organization & Administration of Exercise Science*
Nutrition for the Physically Active*
When Offered
Fall
Fall
Exercise Physiology: Foundation and Theory*
Fall
A gra de of C or hi gher i n KNES 2169 or BIOL 2274
Co-req to KNES 3281
Exercise Physiology: Principles and Application*
Fall
Co-req to KNES 3280
Electives (3)
Milestones 4 Year Degree
Complete KNES 2150 (>D)
Complete CHEM 1251 (>D)
Prerequi s i te or corequi s i te: CHEM 1251.
Sophomore Year/Pre-Kinesiology
3rd Semester (13 Hours)
Course Title
When Offered
Prerequisites & Notes
KNES 2168(3)
Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions*
Fall, Summer
CHEM 1251 wi th a gra de of C or better
KNES 2168L(1)
Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions Lab*
Fall, Summer
Prerequi s i te/corequi s i te: KNES 2168.
Note: You mus t a l s o ta ke LBST 2101
LBST 2102 (3)
Global and Intercultural Connections
All
PKNS Ma jor
KNES 2294 (3)
Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries*
Fall
MATH 1100/placement (KNES accepts STAT 1220/1221)
STAT 1222 (3)
Introduction to Statistics*
All, Evenings
Pre Kinesiology Majors must complete 36 hours with a minimum of a 2.5 GPA for the EXER Major .
Courses(*) required by the major must receive a grade of C/better to be accepted.
Bold and Italicized courses are required to be a part of the 36 hours to be accepted into the EXER major.
The Kinesiology Department will accept BIOL 2273 and 2273L as meeting the KNES 2168 and 2168L courses
PKNS students must apply the Fall Semester to the Dept. of Kinesiology to become an Exercise Science Major.
Refer to the EXER Student Handbooks for more information on the Dept. of Kinesiology website.
If the student has CHEM 1251 and CHEM 1251L with a C or better they do not need to take CHEM 1200
Sophomore Year/Exercise Science
4th Semester (15 Hours)
Course Title
KNES 2101(2)
Foundations of Physical Conditioning*
KNES 2290 (3)
Emergency Medical Response*
KNES 2298 (3)
Applied Kinesiology*
LBST 2200 series (3)
LBST 2214 Issues of Health and Quality of Life
KNES 2169(3)
Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions II*
KNES 2169L(1)
Human Anatomy and Physiology for the Health Professions Lab II*
Milestones 4 Year Degree
Complete CHEM 1200 (>D)
Complete MATH 1100 (>D)
Prerequisites & Notes
EXER Ma jor
EXER Ma jor
Milestones 4 Year Degree
Complete KNES 3280 (>D)
Complete KNES 3260 (>D)
All
Choice of Activity Course* or EXER Concentration Course* or Pre-Professional Health Program
6 th Semester (13 -18 Hours)
KNES 3285 (3)
KNES 3286 (3)
KNES 3287 (3) (W) (O)
Electives (3 to 6)
Course Title
Principles of Strength and Conditioning*
Exercise Testing : Foundation and Theory*
Exercise Testing: Principles and Application*
When Offered
Spring
Spring
Spring
Prerequisites & Notes
Milestones 4 Year Degree
KNES 2101
KNES 3280
Complete KNES 3286 (>D)
Complete KNES 3287 (>D)
GPA 2.25 or higher
Prerequisites & Notes
Milestones 4 Year Degree
KNES 3280
Complete KNES 4121 (>D)
Complete KNES 4286 (>D)
CAPP review with advisor
KNES 3280
All
Choice of Activity Course* or EXER Concentration Course* or Pre-Professional Health Program
Senior Year/Exercise Science
7th Semester (16 - 18 Hours)
KNES 4121 (3)
KNES 4286 (3)
KNES 4293 (3)
KNES 4660 (3)
Electives (3 )
Course Title
Pharmacology for the Physically Active*
Exercise Prescription*
When Offered
Fall
Fall
Biomechanics*
Practitioner Seminar*
Fall
Fall
KNES 3286 a nd KNES 3287
KNES 3280
KNES 3286 a nd KNES 3287
All
Choice of Activity Course* or EXER Concentration Course* or Pre-Professional Health Program
Course Title
When Offered
Prerequisites & Notes
KNES 4132 (3)
Lifetime Weight Management and Behavior Change *
Online course
Spring
KNES 3260 a nd KNES 4286
KNES 4490 (9)
Exercise Science Internship*
Spring, Summer
Compl eti on of a l l ma jor cours es except KNES
4132 whi ch i s a co or prerequi s i te
8th Semester (12 Hours)
Milestones 4 Year Degree
Apply for Graduation
Total Hours Major and GE 103-113
Notes
(Minimum total of 120 credit hours require to graduate from UNC Charlotte)
All Prerequisites & Notes must be successfully completed before taking a course. Minimum grade of C is required.
Courses(*) required by the major must receive a grade of C or better to be accepted.
The Kinesiology Department will accept BIOL 2274 and 2274L as meeting the KNES 2169 and 2169L courses
Refer to the EXER Student Handbook for more information on the Dept. of Kinesiology website.
All EXER majors must complete 3 of the approved activity courses before taking KNES 4490
GPA 2.00 or higher
APPLICATION FOR CHANGE FROM THE PRE-KINESIOLOGY (PKNS)
DESIGNATION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE (EXER) STUDENT DESIGNATION
Directions: Fill this form out completely. Use your 49 Express Account to look up the
information needed below to insure accuracy. Turn this form into the Department of
Kinesiology office (CHHS 335 ) by one of the screening dates. Applications will be
screened on the third Thursday in October and July. Applications can be turned in
at any time. If an application is not received before the screening date, it will be deferred
to the next screening date. Incomplete applications will be returned to the applicant. The
applicant will be notified by email as soon as the screening process is complete.
**Do not call the Kinesiology office asking for the screening results.**
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++
Applicant Name ____________________ Student ID # _800______________________
Mailing Address_______________________________________________________
Telephone(s) ____________________ UNCC e-mail_____________________________
Answer each of the following if it applies to you:
_____ 1. What is your current cumulative GPA? (your GPA must remain at 2.5 or higher
at the end of the semester you are applying)
_____ 2. How many earned credit hours will you have by the end of this semester? (You
must have completed 36 hours of coursework with at least a "C" or better in all
prerequisite courses).
_____3. You MUST have at least a grade of C or higher in CHEM 1251 & Lab and
KNES 2168 & Lab or BIOL 2273 and Lab with a current GPA of 2.5 or better to be
considered.
_____4.No decision can be made your request until all grades have received by the
Department of Kinesiology.
_____5. Indicate the semester taken. Put a TR and the semester taken if you transferred
this course to UNC Charlotte.
______ Introduction to Kinesiology (KNES 2150)
______ Care and Prevention of Athletics Injuries (KNES 2294)
______ KNES 2168 and Lab or BIOL 2273 and Lab
______ CHEM 1251, ______ Lab CHEM 1251L
______ Statistics (STAT 1220, 1221, or 1222)
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