MODULE 2

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2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
MODULE 2
LAB PROGRAMMING
October 2013
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
1. Getting Started
2. Scoping the Project
3. Lab Programming
• What is programming?
• Information gathering
• Organizing and presenting
data
P2
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Getting Started
•Project Manager
-- Owner representative
-- Responsible for budget and schedule
-- Conduit to the organization
-- Single point of communication
•Key User Representative for entire
project or at least for each user group
/ department
•Identify key users to inform design
team on their requirements
P3
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Who?
Develop The List Of Key Stakeholders:
•Owner
•Lab supply personnel
•Academic Faculty
•Building Facility personnel
•Senior Researchers (PI’s)
•IT managers / IT maintenance
•Lab Managers
•Security Department
•Graduate Students
•Building Maintenance personnel
•Occupational Health and
Safety departments
P4
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Develop A Series Of Committees For
Feedback And Decision Making
STEERING
COMMITTEE
GRAND USER
COMMITTEE
•Building Committee
•“Grand” User Committee
SPECIFIC
1
SPECIFIC
2
•Specific User Committees
COMMITTEES
•One key decision maker and one
conduit for information flow
STEERING
COMMITTEE
•One clear line of communication flow
•One key authority chain for committee
decisions. Are they advisory or do they
make decisions?
•What happens when flow is subverted?
SPECIFIC
3
USERS
PROJECT
MANAGER
CONSULTANT
INFORMATION FLOW
P5
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
•Consultant Team
-- Programmer
-- Architect and Engineers
-- Experienced firms and people
(not learning on your project)
P6
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
•Consider construction procurement model
-- eg. Design, Bid, Build
Construction Management
Construction Management at Risk
Design Build
-- Affects design process
-- Affects schedule
-- Can assist with buildability issues & costing
-- Can affect quality of end product
P7
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
•Scheduling Workshop
-- With the entire team Owner, Consultants and Builder
-- Establish completion date
-- Together build milestones, deliverables and action dates
-- Team building
P8
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Scoping the Project
Understand Key Drivers
•Research grant
•Private donor
•Large pharmaceutical
•Venture capital
•Company expansion
•Special funding programs
•Government funding
P9
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Understand The Rules Of The Game
•If a research grant there are significant
reporting – area rules; room
naming conventions
•Organization’s policies?
•Landlord requirements?
•What about other requirements – LEED;
University processes; site masterplanning
SFU SERVICE SPACE
FUTURE
CREM
ENTRY
FOYER
LEVEL 6000
CREM
MAIN
ENTRY
CFI Area CREM Diagram
P10
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Establish Key Goals with
Project Manager / Client Group
•Meeting with key stakeholders
•Whose agenda is the loudest?
•Are there un-stated elements?
•Phasing?
•Sustainability?
P11
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Work With The Budget
•BMW or Chevy?
•Does funding come with a time line?
?
P12
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Lab Programming
Program of Requirements
P R ELIMINA R Y SP A C E LIST
Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Langley, BC
PRELIMINARY SPACE LIST
PROPOSED
AREA S.M.
EXISTING
AREA S.M.
Existing Room
What A Program Is Not:
LABS:
All labs should incorporate the
following:
• Maximize storage
• Adequate lighting is important
• Safe traffic flow patterns are
critical
• Labs design should incorporate
sustainable features
•Only just numbers or areas
•Plan or drawing of space
Room: 1325
Biology/Horticulture/Sustainability Science
• Fixed benches with electrical
outlets and one sink per bench
• Fumehood
• Will be used as a teaching space
for theory and technique
• Space for large equipment such
as salt water tanks, fridges, etc
• Access to prep space and to the
bunker storage site
187
187
Room: 1345
Chemistry/Horticulture
106
(existing)
106
•
•
•
•
•
•
Room: 1365
Benches with gas, air, power
and water
Fumehoods
Distilled water
Access to prep space and to the
bunker storage site
Access to balance room
Access to analytical equipment
room
Environmental Protection Lab/Soil
Chemistry
• Benches with gas and air; one
side of bench to have a sink
running along entire length with
5 compartments and the
opposite side of the bench to
have a one compartment sink
CHERNOFF THOMPSON ARCHITECTS
Project 29032
137
98
February 10, 2010
Space List
P13
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
What A Program Is:
•Defines the problem, doesn’t solve it
•An understanding of the needs
University of Washington Ecogenomics Lab
P14
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Levels of Programming
•Strategic
The
University
of Victoria
A-3 ACU – CAGEWASH
SCIENCE BUILDING
Page 4
4 COMPONENT PLANNING CRITERIA
Functional Relationship Diagram
•Master
•Functional
•General Space Planning
•Detailed Space Planning
•Room by Room Data specific
information
Space Requirements
Ref
01
Space
Units
nsm/unit
nsm
Remarks
Dirty Cage Wash
1
62
62
Cage washer
02
Clean Cage Wash
1
50
50
Autoclave
03
Clean Staging/Storage
1
23
23
Filling stations
04
05
Total
Chernoff Thompson Architects
135
15/04/05
Project # 24040.1
P15
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Information In Program
LABORATORY
Wet Chemistry
•Clear and usable by architects
and engineers
•Practical
FUNCTIONAL
RELATIONSHIPS
from other areas to avoid cross contamination
-Leach area; could be near Digestion and not in wash-up as is currently
-Cyanide room; a separate room to avoid cross-contamination
-need transferring stations independent from digestion hoods for increased
safety and productivity
KEY ISSUES
-repetitive nature of weighing task requires ergonomic study
-weigh room is dusty; currently Hepa Vacuums at each station for use by
staff
-prefer the sample box storage in one area in the room for easy access and
alphabetizing
-the sample box storage area includes 2 days active storage
-sunlight on balances can affect readings
-green screens of weighing computers need careful lighting coordination
-a separate wash-up room required
-storage for racks and Teflon tubes
-Norm station has radioactive material under plastic cover
-transferring from flasks done under canopy-style fume hoods; further study
on this process needed
-Digestion is a very corrosive environment
-fume hoods are all perchloric-style
-samples are stored under canopy-style fume hood; need to study if this is
best storage method
-Hot Blocks are located in fume hoods and require significant power
-independent acid bottle changing station
-bigger bubbler station to hold 3 sample carts
•Not too long
Can include:
•Appendices
AREAS
•Room data sheets
•Equipment cut sheets
Spaces
Weighing:
Standards storage room
Weigh stations ([email protected]’X8’)
Equipment storage
Small PC stations (4 3 @40ft²) Special samples desk
Norm station
Net Area Characteristics
(ft²)
32
1440
80
160
40
120
PPE Storage
Supervisor workstation
Weighing manager workstation
Subtotal Weighing
64
64
2000
122
1031
80
110
40
20
-16’ long shelves secured storage room
-need new ergonomic design, need central vacuum (flat screen?)
-incl. storage area for supplies and gloves
-sits on 2 desks (small area) 10’ x 4’; weighing bench
Equip = 7’ x 2’, sits on work bench
133 below work benches
40 -to be near weighing area
45
1488 Net to Gross ratio = 1.1% (walls, corridors, etc. within the
department)
Weighing Gross Area = 2200ft²
1621 tual = 2315ft²
x 1.1% = 1783
Ac-
Sample Program Page 1
P16
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Process of Programming:
LABORATORY
Wet Chemistry
AREAS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Definition of scope before design
Gathering data
Synthesizing data
Understand wants vs. needs
Produce a final reference document
Spaces
Digestion:
Cyanide room
Main digestion lab:
Hoods (19 x 54ft² x 1.3)
Canopy (34’ x 9’ x 1.3)
Bench Space (19 x 36ft² x 1.3)
Bubbling Area (12’ x 8’ x 1.3)
Wash up area
Sample Holding Solutions
(12 x 15 x 1.3)
Feeder Room Area (12 x 15 x 1.3)
Manager workstation
Supervisor workstation office
PPE Storage
Leach Area +MS 81 Area
@ 135ft² require 2 Canopies
on top of 2 Furnaces
Subtotal Digestion:
Net Area
(ft²)
174
3500
64
64
80
200
______
Net Area
(ft²)
Characteristics
255
3190
-(current = 174ft²)
-(includes geo, assay, fusion) current = 2011ft² *SEE NOTE BELOW
1000
260
640
140
188
410
1350
400 (398)
890 (889)
125 Adj to Transfer Canopies and Dumping
200 Adj to Weighing; Including Dumping
250 (234)
250
100
120
70
135
______
4120
(234) Shelving Area for weighed samples and clean flasks
Adj to Weighing and Wash Up Area
-just outside main lab with window into main lab
“”
Net to Gross ratio = 1.1% (walls, corridors, etc. within the departme
nt)
Digestion Gross Area = 4532 ft²
(Current area = 5131ft²: Weighing = 2767ft², Digestion = 2364ft²)
Department Gross Area = 646 ft²
HOODS (6’x9’)
14 X 6’ perchloric
2 X 6’ Aqua Regia ME
3 X 6’ Aqua Regia AU = 19 X 6’ hoods
19 X 54 ft² = 1026 ft²
OTHER
1 X 12’ canopy (digestion 2’ depth)
6 X 4’ fusion furnace canopy
2 X 6’ canopy (transfer 4’ depth) 1 X 12’ canopy (transfer 4’ depth)
34’ X 9’ = 306 ft²
*include for 30, 6’ fume hoods within 5 year horizon. First Year: 12 perchloric-type for test tube digestion; 6 fume hoods
with 2 hot plates each; 1, 12’ long transferring canopy; 2 Aqua Regia Hoods.
-adjoining bench space near fume hoods
-allow for bench space equal to fume hood length; consider different arrangements at hoods and lab bench space for
more efficient / safe work area
-allow for transfer area at digestion entry (200ft²)
Sample Program Page 2
P17
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Information Gathering
Gathering Data -For Each
Department / Group
•What do they do?
•Staffing and hours of work
•Key issues
•Major space characteristics
•Rooms or spaces needed and
ideal dimensions
•Key adjacencies
•List of major equipment
•Future plans
SFU TASC II Bennet Lab
P18
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Visit Sites – Project & Other Examples
•Tour with knowledgable users
•Identify issues, priorities
•Limitations / opportunities
-- How much space
-- New vs. Reno
-- Context
-- More than one possible site?
-- Difficult to route new drains?
-- HVAC supply capacity
-- Power limits
-- Routing for duct shafts?
-- Access to natural light
Initial Site Visit SFU Podium 2
Site Visit Environment Canada Lab
P19
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Where / How To Gather Information:
Space Criteria – References?
Standards
Rules Of Thumb
•Biosafety Levels;
•Area per P.I.
•Lab bench area /
lineal distance per
•Transgenic Requirements
worker
•Funding Agency
•% support / prep. vs.
Lineal lab bench
•CSA/NIH Guidelines
•Clean Room Levels
•Other?
What Do They Have
For Space Now?
•Area summaries
•Lists
•Photos
•Area per equipment?
P20
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Metrics - “Rule of Thumb:”
The National Institutes of Health Standards / Principal Investigator
m²
ft²
16.5
8.25
2.79
0.84
2.88
31.26
177.5
89
30
9
31
336.5
Ancillary Office
Admin
Laboratory work space
Laboratory support space
Research staff space
Ancillary
Lab admin
Optimal Area
Work
Support
P21
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Process: Set Up A Series Of Meetings
Pre- Meeting 1 Questionnaire:
1.Who are you?
2.What do you do?
3.How do you fit in your organization?
4.What will you do differently in the future?
5.What works well now?
6.What doesn’t work?
7.What are your key concerns?
Meeting 1.0 – Review the above
Meeting 1.5 – Review existing situation on site – note areas of concern (boxes piled up, smells, spills, cleanliness issues, crowding, deteriorating finishes)
P22
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Process
Meeting 2 – Detailed Information:
•Wet lab; dry lab;
office space
•Structural concerns –
weight, hanging
•Large scale
equipment
(over 6’0” in any
direction?)
•Fume hoods
•Radioisotopes
•Perchloric hoods
•Create radiation /
shielded for radiation
•Lab waste
•Acid neutralization
•Biohazards
/ chemical /
radioactive – type
and quantities
•Neutralization
•Air requirements
•Glass – washing
•Chilled process water
•Clean room
•Cooled server room
•Emergency power
•Specialized lighting
•Controlled lighting
•Specialized power
(not 120/20A)
•Heat rejecting
equipment
•Piped lab gases
•Pure water-quality
P23
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Meeting Follow Ups With Users For Special Topics
Meet With:
•Occupational Health
and Safety departments
•Lab supply personnel
•Building Facility personnel
•IT managers / IT maintenance
•Security Department
•Sustainability Key Stakeholders
•Building Maintenance personnel
•Others ...
P24
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Shared Services
•Look for Duplicate Functions
-- Dishwashing
-- Sterilizing
-- Storage
-- Chemical storage
-- Gas storage
-- Meeting
-- Library
-- Special Equipment
•Find a Champion
UVic Chemical Storage
•Consider Shared Areas
with Fences
P25
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
•Servicing Areas - Program These Too!
-- Service
-- Delivery/receiving
-- Staging
-- Recyling
-- General storage
-- Security
-- IT
-- Facility equipment
-- Maintenance personnel space
-- Staff lockers
P26
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Analyzing the Data
•Prepare space list with areas
•Identify key space determinants
•Produce space relationship diagrams
•Space fit studies
Space List
Space Fit
Example Work Flow Diagram
P27
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Organizing & Presenting the Data
•Needs to be clear and usable by
Architects and Engineers
•Readable by Owners and scientists
•Practical
•Not too long
•Simple diagrams
Relationship Diagram
P28
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Organizing & Presenting the Data
•Deliverable
-- Report book
-- Verbal description of users
and their functional needs
-- Description of groups
-- Identify numbers of people now & projected, plus roles
-- Address future growth and change
anticipated
-- Security
-- Final space list with areas
Program Example
P29
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Can Include Detailed Appendices With:
•Room data sheets
•Equipment cut sheets
•Chemical lists
•Test fit layouts
•Adjacency Diagrams
Equipment Cut Sheet
P30
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Equipment Lists:
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON EQUIPMENT
BENJAMIN HALL BUILDING, STRAND LAB
EQUIPMENT COORDINATION LOG PROJECT #29038
•Useful for design, purchasing, moving,
contractor responsibilities
1
2
3
4
•Supplemented by cut sheets / product
data
•Keep track of the
updated versions
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Tender Required?
Equipment No.
•Continues through entire project
Equipment Description
Quantity
•Working document
Line No.
•Start it at programming
Location of
Equipment
(Room)
$+)
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P31
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON EQUIPMENT
BENJAMIN HALL BUILDING, STRAND LAB
Department:
Updated:
EQUIPMENT COORDINATION LOG PROJECT #29038
Completed by (name):
Equipment Specifications
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
4/14/201
37
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Glass bead sterilizer
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Water purifier
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5
4 computers
Date
Date
Vendor Name
Drain
Non Potable
DI Water
Potable Water
Outlet Height
Heat to Room
BAS
Diversity Factor
Institute Lan
DI
Required
Delivery
Date
Comments
x
Transilluminator, computer, printer should be close
Access to compressed He, Ar tanks, computer
110
%*1&
3 lights
Anticipated
Delivery
Time
110
Plate rack
MECHANICAL
110
*
44
UPS
110
+/
Condensate
11
+/#0.
Drain
M
Wilcox 169
LOAD (KVA)
Exhaust
+/
!
Steam
220
Comp.Air
110
10
City Water
7.5
N
01
depends
Gas
M
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LVP
-+
,+
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HVP
,+
,-
% &
Cycle
110
7.5
Phase
110
5
N
Weight (lb)
5
N
.)
New?
N
,+
,1
Existing?
,+
+1#.
0/
Used?
+1#.
0)
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0)
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Supplier 1
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Contractor
$+)
Nitrogen
Outlet Type
Emergency Power
Amps/Watts
Alarm Signal
Bench Top (Y-yes, Nno, M-maybe)
Tender Required?
Width (in.)
3
Location of
Equipment
(Room)
Utility Requirements
Electrical Load Requirements (refer to attached Electrical Equipment List)
Depth (in.)
2
Size Requirements
Height (in.)
1
Quantity
Equipment Description
Equipment No.
Line No.
Equipment Provided by:
5
110
110
110
110
x
x
Y
Equipment List
P32
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Hazardous Materials List:
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
Lab PI
•Start it at programming
•Important for Code Analysis
•Keep track of the versions
Name
Room No.
####
Material
Manufacturer
H
Glycerin
Antifreeze
Biodiesel
Diesel
acetic acid, glacial
Hydrogen
acetone
potassium hydroxide
sodium hydroxide
methylene chloride
chloroform
Methane
trifluoroacetic acid
potassium hydroxide 0.01N, in isopropanol
Potassium Cyanide
Potassium Hydroxide
potassium chloride reference solution conductivity standard
nitric acid
sulfuric acid
toluene
hexanes
N
N
Aldrich
Sigma
2‐propanol
acetone, >= 99.5%
benzene
acetonitril
N‐Propl Bromide, Aliphatic Alcohol, and Vishay CSM‐2 Degreaser
Butylene Oxide (I,2 Epoxybutane)
98% 2‐Propanol and 2.0% n‐
Vishay M‐Bond 200 Catalyst‐C
Phenyldiethanolamine
Methyl 2‐Cyanoacrylate, Ploy Methyl Vishay M‐Bond 200 Adhesive
Methacrylate, and Hydroquinone P33
Ethanol, 2‐Butanol, Rosin, 2‐Propanol, N
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
PROJECT NAME
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
Lab PI
Name
Room No.
####
Material
Manufacturer
Glycerin
Antifreeze
Biodiesel
Hazard Class
Solid Pounds
Gas
Boiling Point
Flash Point
Carcino‐ OSHA Monthly Flamm. State genic Hazards Usage Cabinet (L, S, G)
55
350F
260F
321F
Diesel
C II
55
>125F
combustible
acetic acid, glacial
C II
1.06
103F
combustible
Hydrogen
acetone
potassium hydroxide
sodium hydroxide
methylene chloride
Flammable gas
F IB
Cor
Cor
F IC
1.06
500g
1Kg
1.06
chloroform
Non‐Flammable
Non Flammable
0.53
0 53
Methane
trifluoroacetic acid
potassium hydroxide 0.01N, in isopropanol
Potassium Cyanide
Flammable gas
Cor
0.03
Potassium Hydroxide
potassium chloride reference solution conductivity standard
nitric acid
sulfuric acid
toluene
hexanes
2‐propanol
acetone, >= 99.5%
benzene
acetonitril
N‐Propl Bromide, Aliphatic Alcohol, and Butylene Oxide (I,2 Epoxybutane)
98% 2‐Propanol and 2.0% n‐
Phenyldiethanolamine
Methyl 2‐Cyanoacrylate, Ploy Methyl Methacrylate, and Hydroquinone Ethanol, 2‐Butanol, Rosin, 2‐Propanol, Methanol, and Dimethylammonium Chloride
Tin, Lead, Antimony, and Rosin
Isopropyl Alcohol, and Toluene
Xylene, Ethyl Benzene, and Oil Modified Polyurethane
Methylene Chloride, Chlorobromomethane, and rosin soap
Aromatic Hydrocarons, Xylenes (O‐, M‐, P‐ Isomers), and Isobutane / Propane Mixture
Vinlyl Ester Corrosion Resin
Vi l l E t C
i R i
NOROX Mekp‐9H
Loctite Brand Hysol Epoxy
Ethanol
Perchloric Acid
Picric Acid Hexane
Xylene Isopropyl Alchol
Sodium dodecyl sulfate
N,N,N',N'‐Tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED)
C IIIB
C IIIB
C IIIB
Liquid Gallons
Aldrich
Non‐Flammable
Poison
Sigma
NF
Vishay CSM‐2 Degreaser
Vishay M‐Bond 200 Catalyst‐C
Vishay M‐Bond 200 Adhesive
Vishay M‐Fulux AR (soldering flux)
Vishay Solder
Vishay M‐Line Rosin Solvent
Vishay M Coat A Air Drying Polyurethane
Stress Coat ST‐70F/21C Brittle Coating
Tracer Tech Penetrant 300A
Spray Resin
S
R i
Resin Catalyst
Hysol Resin w/ catalyst
0.09
extrememly flammable in presence of open flames, sparks and static discharge & oxidizing materials
Very hazardous in case of skin contact (corrosive, irritant), of eye contact (irritant, corrosive), of ingestion, of inhalation.
N/A
Corrosive
Corrosive
flammable
flammable
Heat, flame, strong oxidizers, acetaldehyde, acids, chlorine, ethylene oxide, hydrogen‐palladium combination, hydrogen peroxide‐sulfuric acid combination, potassium tert‐butoxide, hypochlorous acid, isocyanates, nitroform, phosgene, aluminum, oleum and perchloric acid.
54F
0.03
0.03
1
0.03
0.03
NFP
0.25
F IB
Strong caustics and chemically active metals such as aluminum, magnesium powder, sodium, or potassium; acetone, fluorine
potassium; acetone fluorine
0.03
C IIIB
Flammabl Aerosol
F1C
C3A
F1A
F 1B
F0, H3, R3, Contact 4
Class 1.1D Explosive H3, F3, R1, Contact 2
F3.3, H2, FIC
F 1B
C IIIB
G
extrememly flammable in presence of open flames, sparks and static discharge & oxidizing materials
Highly reactive with acids. Reactive with organic materials, metals, moisture.
500 gm
NFP
Incompatablility
hydrogen peroxide, bromide, and chromic acid
strong oxidizing agents, such as chlorates,nitrates, peroxides,
Corrosive
25 gm
1.06
1.06
1.06
1.06
F 1B
NFP
F 1B
L
0.26
F IA
F IB
F IB
F IB
F IB
C IIIA
G
flammable
Corrosive
Corrosive
flammable
health hazard
200
0.26
0.66
0.13
1.06
1.06
L
L
L
L
300
Non‐Flammable
Cor
Cor
F IB
F IB
F 1B
Y
Y
0.09
10
1
1
8
0.13
0.26
0.26
1.32
0.26
explosive
flammable
flammble
4 Gallons
20 ml
50 ml
50 ml
200 ml
250 ml
25 g
25 g
Hazardous Materials List1
P34
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Room Data Sheets:
•List items needed to be covered – including mech and elect.
•What does mech. and elec. need from a program?
P35
2
Getting Started/Lab Programming
Architectural / Mechanical Data
Electrical / Communications Data
P36
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