Improving Performance (HOW TO MANAGE THE WHITE SPACE ON

advertisement
Improving Performance
(HOW TO MANAGE THE WHITE
SPACE ON THE ORGANIZATIONAL CHART)
By Geary A. Rummler
and Alan P. Brache
Published by Jossey-Bass 1990
My criterion for outstanding books is:
1) They are always within arms reach.
2) I have read them several times and every time I highlight different
phrases or concepts.
3) They really aren’t for reading, but studying.
4) I put something to practice that I have learned.
Improving Performance is one of those books! Over the years it has
offered many practical applications. For example, the description on
analyzing cross functional work flows to identify areas for performance
improvement has been invaluable.
The majority of the book is made up of a detailed explanation of a 3 x 3
matrix:
PERFORMANCE NEEDS
Goals
Organization
Process
Job/Performer
Strategy
Customer
Requirements
Job Standards
Design
Structure
Effectiveness/Efficien
cy
Job Design
Management
Resource Allocation
Interfaces
Human Performance
Don’t be deceived by the simplicity of the above table. The authors do a superb
job of mixing case studies, tables, worksheets, summaries, and suggested
measures to drive home their points. The nine variables make up the
Performance Improvement Management System. In addition, they have
developed a set of questions for each variable that can guide the reader through
their own organization and development of a strategy for improvement.
I found the process section especially valuable. Several concepts are introduced
that at the time of the book’s introduction (1990) were ahead of their time:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Process (an activity with inputs and outputs) yields results (be they good or
bad).
An organization is only as good as its processes.
Most organizations approach the task of improving performance through
focusing on departmental efforts. Not enough attention is paid to interaction
between departments.
The boundaries of departments/functions provide the greatest source for
process improvement.
By using process-mapping techniques, an organization can see internal
customer and supplier relationships.
Process improvement projects need a process owner who can work across
functional areas.
If you are interested in developing an organizational approach to performance
improvement, I recommend Improving Performance as a guide to assist you
in your efforts.