NDMS exercise tests interoperability - San Antonio Express-News

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A PUBLICATION OF THE 502nd AIR BASE WING – JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO
L A C K L A N D A I R F O R C E B A S E , T E X A S • w w w. l a c k l a n d . a f . m i l • Vo l . 6 8 N o . 2 2 • J U N E 4 , 2 0 1 0
INSIDE
Commentary
2
Recognition
6
What’s Happening 21
News & Features
Promotion list
3
Photo by Senior Airman Nicole Mickle
Puppy program
9
Memorial Day Jam 14
JBSA tournament
22
View the Talespinner online
at www.lackland.af.mil
Members of the 59th Medical Wing manpower
team transport an exercise patient to be triaged
during a National Disaster Medical System
exercise May 27 at Port San Antonio. Forty volunteers simulated injured patients who had received
medical stabilization en route to Port San Antonio
and then were transported to area hospitals
according to injury and availability of bed spaces.
NDMS exercise tests interoperability
By Sue Campbell
59th Medical Wing Public Affairs
The City of San Antonio and local military bases conducted an exercise May 27
to test both military and civilian response
to a tornado occurring in another state
which may cause evacuation of patients to
San Antonio.
The exercise was an activation of the
National Disaster Medical System which,
in the San Antonio area, is organized by
the Federal Coordinating Center out of
Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam
Houston.
“It was imperative for us to test this
system to ensure proper execution and
that all participants are prepared with the
right personnel and equipment necessary
to execute this crucial mission,” said Maj.
Michael Hall, project officer from the 59th
Medical Wing.
The exercise involved approximately
250 participants from local emergency
medical services and hospitals, the
Southwest Texas Regional Advisory
Council for Trauma, support and security
forces units at Lackland, Wilford Hall
Medical Center and BAMC.
Forty volunteers from Air Force Basic
Military Training simulated injured
patients who would have received medical
stabilization en route to Port San Antonio.
Upon landing and medical triage, these
simulated patients would have been transported to area hospitals according to
injury and availability of bed spaces.
“In a real world scenario, this type of
response could see patients in the hundreds or even thousands,” said Major Hall.
“Overall, the event was quite successful. All parties involved displayed
immense cooperation and we demonstrated our ability to respond to this type of
mission.”
PAGE 2
TALESPINNER
COMMENTARY
Inspector General supports JBSA
By Lt. Col. Paul Kellner
502nd Air Base Wing Inspector General
Sam Houston, I will work with
Army IGs on post to determine
how to best handle the complaint.
The 502nd Air Base Wing
I also work with those outside
Inspector General office offers a
of the 502nd ABW. If you are not
wide range of services for Joint
assigned to a 502nd ABW unit, but
Base San Antonio. Reporting directwould like to file a complaint
ly to the 502nd ABW Commander,
against any of the many services
my office is responsible for overprovided by the wing, I am the IG
Lt. Col.
sight, management, tracking and
who would take the complaint.
Paul Kellner
resolution of complaints;
I recommend beginning with
Congressional Inquiries; and Fraud Waste
the proper chain of command to resolve
and Abuse programs within JBSA. As the
most issues. Many complaints can be
502nd ABW IG, I also serve as a trusted
quickly solved by your chain of command
agent outside the chain of command.
and I encourage you to give them the
Even though I work at the 502nd ABW
opportunity to help. However, you have
headquarters on Fort Sam Houston, I
the right to make an IG complaint at any
serve all 502nd ABW units in San Antonio
time without going to your chain of comincluding those at Lackland and Randolph. mand, and I am more than willing to take
If coming to or calling my office is inconyour complaint.
venient, any IG on any installation in San
Complaints can be submitted via callAntonio can take your complaint and foring, e-mail or visiting the IG office.
ward it to me. For Soldiers serving on Fort However, I prefer meeting face to face so I
can ask questions and make sure I fully
understand the issue.
Anonymous complaints are also accepted but the IG office will not be able to provide the outcome of the complaints. While
I can’t guarantee you absolute confidentiality, your personal information will be
kept to a need-to-know basis and will not
be released unless absolutely necessary. I
can serve you better if I know how to contact you.
The IG office is in a temporary building
just off Wilson Way, next to the government vehicle gas station and across from
the Jimmy Brought Fitness Center. My
address and contact information is:
502nd ABW Inspector General
2270 Rattlesnake
Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-1800
210-808-7524
DSN 420-7524
Fax: 210-808-6014 (not yet installed)
[email protected]
Early conflict resolution benefits all
By Pedro Canabal
502nd Air Base Wing
Conflict happens in all areas
of work or play. When employees spend 40 hours or more
together, they are bound to run
into disagreements or arguments that can damage not
only their productivity but the
productivity of their co-workers.
When issues are not
addressed, bad things can happen. Good people quit, profitable relationships dissolve,
and great organizations go
under. Unresolved conflict is
hazardous to the health of the
organization.
Allegations of discrimination
and unresolved workplace disputes can lead to lengthy
processes to resolve the situation and get the workplace
back on track. Disputes often
cause hostility, work delays,
and possibly expensive litigation as many man hours are
spent trying to fix the problem.
A way to early resolution is
alternative dispute resolution.
Mediation is the ADR technique used by the Air Force.
Mediation takes a problemsolving approach rather than
an adversarial one; parties are
not enemies but partners
engaged in solving mutual
problems. It is possible for
both sides to win; in fact in
mediation it is necessary.
Mediation helps the parties:
• vent feelings and reduce hostility;
• clear up misunderstandings;
• find areas of agreement; and
• incorporate the areas of
agreement into the solution.
Mediation provides an informal, flexible and creative way
for people to find agreement.
The process is voluntary, private and confidential and
enables parties to maintain
control while building longterm relationships. When
agreements are reached, they
are binding.
The process is also extremely cost effective. Last year,
mediation saved Lackland
thousands of dollars in processing fees and hundreds of
man hours.
Lackland has a small but
very effective pool of Air Force
trained, neutral mediators
available to help. The media-
Stay up-to-date during special events and rough skies.
tors, all collateral-duty volunteers, guide the parties
through the mediation process,
assisting them to reach a
mutually acceptable resolution.
If you don’t attempt early
resolution by using mediation
to resolve complaints of discrimination and workplace disputes, it can potentially cost
your organization more than
just money. It can create distrust, lack of confidence in
leadership and the destruction
of working relationships that
are vital to the mission. So let’s
mediate, mediate, mediate.
For more information about
mediation, contact the
Lackland Alternative Dispute
Resolution Program at 6713786.
Call 671-NEWS
JUNE 4, 2010
Editorial staff
BRIG. GEN. LEONARD PATRICK,
502ND AIR BASE WING
COMMANDER
OSCAR BALLADARES,
DIRECTOR, 502ND ABW OL-A
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
JOE BELA,
CHIEF OF INTERNAL
COMMUNICATIONS, 671-4111
SHANNON CARABAJAL,
MANAGING EDITOR, 671-1786
MIKE JOSEPH,
STAFF WRITER, 671-4357
PATRICK DESMOND,
SPORTS EDITOR/STAFF WRITER,
671-5049
PAUL NOVAK,
DESIGN/LAYOUT, 671-0478
Office:
1701 Kenly Ave. Suite 102
Lackland AFB, Texas
78236-5103
(210) 671-1786;
(fax) 671-2022
E-mail: [email protected]
Commander’s Action Line:
[email protected] af.mil.
Straight Talk: 671-6397 (NEWS)
For advertising information:
Prime Time Military Newspapers
2203 S. Hackberry
San Antonio, Texas 78210
(210) 534-8848
(fax) 534-7134
This newspaper is published by
Prime Time Military Newspapers, a
private firm in no way connected with
the U.S. Air Force, under exclusive
written contract with Lackland AFB,
Texas. This commercial enterprise Air
Force newspaper is an authorized
publication for members of the U.S.
military services. Contents of the
Talespinner are not necessarily the
official views of, or endorsed by, the
U.S. government, the Department of
Defense, or the Department of the Air
Force.
The appearance of advertising in
this publication, including inserts or
supplements, does not constitute
endorsement by the Department of
Defense, the Department of the Air
Force or Prime Time Military
Newspapers, of the products or services
advertised.
Everything advertised in this
publication shall be made available for
purchase, use or patronage without
regard to race, color, religion, sex,
national origin, age, marital status,
physical handicap, political affiliation,
or any other nonmerit factor of the
purchaser, user or patron.
Editorial content is edited,
prepared and provided by the Public
Affairs Office of the 502nd Air Base
Wing. All photos, unless otherwise
indicated, are U.S. Air Force photos.
Deadline for submissions is
noon Thursday the week prior to
publication.
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
PAGE 3
News
BRIEFS
LACKLAND ISD EARLY REGISTRATION
Persons with confirmed on base housing can register for the Lackland
Independent School District 2010-2011
school year.
The early registration is Monday
through Thursday, 8 a.m. to noon, at
Lackland Elementary, grades PreKindergarten - 6, and Stacey JR/SR High
School, grades 7-12.
Information needed includes a birth
certificate, Social Security number, proof
of immunization, student military identification card and the most recent report
card if applicable.
A letter from the housing office can
be used to show proof the family is
scheduled to occupy base housing with a
final agreement required before the
school year begins.
For questions or more information,
call 357-5053 for grades PreKindergarten - 6 or 357-5100 for grades
7-12.
CLICK IT OR TICKET AT GATES
Security forces will raise awareness
for safety belt laws by continuing to participate in the nationwide Click It or
Ticket campaign at all base gates
through Monday.
All passengers in a vehicle, including
adults in the back seat, are required by
law to be secured by a safety belt, and
children younger than 8 years old must
be in a child safety seat or booster seat
unless they are taller than 4 feet, 9 inches.
Military and civilians are subject to
tickets for violations.
CANCER SURVIVORS DAY
The fourth annual National Cancer
Survivors Day is June 12, 3-5 p.m., at the
Brooke Army Medical Center medical
mall.
Sponsored by the Wilford Hall Medical
Center and BAMC cancer care committees, all Department of Defense beneficiaries are invited to the event, which
includes barbeque.
Call 916-5778 to meet today’s deadline for reservations.
Photo by Robbin Cresswell
Air Force officials selected 274 technical sergeants from Joint Base San Antonio for promotion to master sergeant.
JBSA Airmen selected for master sergeant
Air Force officials selected 5,424 of
21,829 eligible technical sergeants for
promotion to master sergeant for a
selection rate of 24.85 percent. The
average score was based on the following point averages: 134.27 for
enlisted performance reports, 11.40
for decorations, 79.69 for the promotion fitness examination and 63.59 for
the specialty knowledge test.
The average score for those selected was 341.18, with an average time
in grade and time in service of 4.49
and 15.88 years respectively.
Congratulations to the following
JBSA Airmen selected for promotion
to master sergeant:
Gregory Adams
Kiren Adams
Arcadio Aguilar
Brian Ahern
Rondale Alexander
Karen Allen
Lateef Anderson
Christopher Anderson
Michael Arroyo
Arturo Ayala
Cynthia Bailey
James Bailey
Larry Baker
Lafrance Ballard
Steven Barbour
Brian Beck
Christin Bisson
Robert Blackburn
Noah Bliss
Michael Boehm
Anthony Boles
Melanie Bonebreak
Alexandro Bonilla
Demetrius Booth
Matthew Borders
Bradley Boucher
Robert Braddock
Timothy Braithwait
Tracy Brown Fluker
Leonard Buchanan
Joel Burton
Anthony Bushur
Brian Cadger
Gary Cain
Todd Camp
Michelle Cardassi
Mark Carver
Ros Castillosartin
Julio Cedillo
Tina Chaney
Nicholas Cichon
James Clawson
John Clowe
Christopher Cole
James Collins
David Colon
Denicia Conley
Michael Connelly
Robert Constable
Frederick Costales
John Cowan
Todd Cranston
Matthew Crum
Scott Cunningham
Christopher Curp
Tracy Daniel
David Daniel
Michael Daughtrey
Damon Davidson
Jeremy Davis
Christopher Decker
David Delgado
Henry Dempsey
Kevan Dent
See SELECTED P4
PAGE 4
SELECTED from P3
Matthew Dickens
James Dickerson
Barton Downey
Janet Dudley
Richard Durham
Arnie Dye
Troy Earleywine
Bobby Eaton
Caleb Ethridge
Matthew Falat
Felicia Fencl
Christopher Ferguson
Danny Fidler
Ernesto Figueroa
Jason Fitts
Edward Fivel
Gerald Fleming
Kenley Flemming
Andrew Fletcher
Andrew Flora
Rodolfo Flores
Steven Franco
Ricky Fredrickson
Adrian Gaines
Alejandro Galvan
Shelly Garcia
Thomas Gary
Randall Gearhart
Todd Geisler
TALESPINNER
David Goff
Heather Gonzales
Marcus Graham
Steven Green
George Greene
Sherri Guzman
Terry Hale
Jon Hanson
Thomas Harden
Jeremy Harnack
Timothy Harris
Erika Haskins
Clayton Henrickson
Darlene Herbert
Jesus Hernandez
Milburgo Hernandez
Adriana Hickman
Patrick Hill
Kelvin Hilliard
Juan Hinojosa
Kendrick Hinton
Trevor Hofacker
Brian Hoglen
Thomas Holguin
Anthony Horn
Aaron Horton
Chad Huffstutter
Dexter Huggins
Greg Jefferson
Jeffrey Jepsen
Michael Johnson
Okeshia Johnson
Carolyn Johnson
Tony Johnson
Jennifer Johnson
Sabra Jones
Laketha Jordan
Dandrea Joyce
James Kelley
Eric Kennedy
Gerald Kidby
Christopher Kidd
Sung Kim
Kimberly Kimrey
Timothy King
Kenneth Knodle
Jason Komlodi
Christop Koscinski
Jeremi Kretzschmar
Timothy Kronk
Donald Krummen
Brandon Kuretza
Joshua Lackey
John Lambert
Damien Larche
Deann Laufenburger
Clifford Lawton
Jere Lazard
Joseph Lindley
Randolp Livingston
Samuel Look
Ladarick Lucas
Dion Lynch
Christine Lynk
David Maez
Darek Malone
Noe Manrrique
Ballard Manzur
Jason Marks
Juan Marquezabundis
James Marshall
Robert Martinez
John Mascolo
Jason Masters
Royal Maxey
Toby May
Michelle Maydwell
Mirta Mayfield
James McCall
Jason McGee
James McKinney
Erskin McMickle
Michael McWhorter
Michelle Medford
Kenzie Miles
Amber Milliorn
Kevin Mills
Charles Minyard
Ian Mirkes
Raymond Moose
Raul Munguia
George Myers
Daniel Newbold
JUNE 4, 2010
Hilton Newell
Teresa Newsom
Charles Nichols
Kevin Nichols
Heather Nottingham
Jeremy Nylander
Timothy Okkerse
Gloria Olivas
Jose Ontiveros
Jennifer Ontiveros
Raul Pachecohernandez
Lisa Padberg
Jason Parks
Samuel Parms
Shakeisha Perkins
Jonathan Perkinson
Christopher Perry
Donna Pimentel
Velma Piotrowski
Carlos Pitre
Trisha Plummer
John Pollock
William Pond
Ranata Pottard
Leo Powers
Trisha Price
Jessica Price
Ryan Pruden
Lila Puentes
Steven Quick
Sandi Ratway
Jeremy Remley
Tony Rice
Kristin Richardson
Jennifer Richbourg
Barbara Ritson
Andy Rivera
Marques Roberts
Raymond Rodriguez
Mauricio Rodriguez
Daniel Roll
Pasquale Romano
Sanelle Romero
Jennifer Root
Aisha Ross
Melissa Ross
Gregory Ruppenkamp
Olivia Salas
Guillermo Salazarcuriel
Phelipe Salinas
Courtenay Sartain
Chad Schneider
Vanessa Sidney
Brian Smith
Anthony Smith
Richard Snell
Fulton Spriggs
Anthony Stevenson
Lori Stradford
Kerita Straw
See SELECTED P5
JUNE 4, 2010
SELECTED from P4
Gerardo Suarezflores
Mario Sulit
Darrell Swanson
Roger Swartz
Cameron Taylor
Aaron Tedrow
Robert Tharp
Sherod Thompson
Timothy Trace
Shokia Turner
Cesar Valencia
Rickey Vaughan
Rebecca Velazquez
Juan Villarreal
Sean Wallace
Randall Wallace
Aaron Ward
William Warren
Andrew Weyland
Marsha White
James Whitman
Maripi Whitman
Jeffery Wilcox
Steven Wilson
Marti Windbush
Dalhia Wise
Paul Zavitz
Jolie Zygulski
TALESPINNER
PAGE 5
CABLE MAINTENANCE
Photo by Tech . Sgt. Michelle Larche
Senior Airman Derek Oliver, 379th Expeditionary Communications Squadron cable maintenance technician, and Staff Sgt. Joshua Hall,
379th ECS technical control, conduct a fiber optic test at a non-disclosed Southwest Asia location May 25. Airman Oliver is deployed from
the 802nd Communications Squadron.
PAGE 6
TALESPINNER
JUNE 4, 2010
BMT HONORS
Congratulations to the following 71 Airmen for being
selected as honor graduates
among 717 trainees graduating today:
319th Training Squadron
Flight F319
Elizabeth O’Brien
320th Training Squadron
Flight 399
Daniel Brandt
Justin Bryant
James Dover
Eric Shea
Flight 400
Christopher Bolick
Donald Frenchik
Justin Kvantas
Joseph Lagreca
Benjamin Missel
Kenneth Palmer
321st Training Squadron
Flight 397
Christopher Balter
Eric Crews
Anthony Francia
Tyler Harvey
Patrick Lura
Anthony McClure
Joseph Miltenberger
Joshua Pennington
Christopher Rolff
Michael Stickner
Joseph Szczurek
Flight 398
Jaclyn Sanchez
Courtney Waters
322nd Training Squadron
Flight 391
Nathan Dickinson
Stephen Farrell
Foster Halcomb
Brandon Linamen
Michael Swiney
Ryan Zinter
Flight 392
Michelina Bonavito
Carlee Garza
Kelly Gorham
Laura Pappineau
323rd Training Squadron
Flight 387
Ryan Garcia
Dante Humphrey
James Ingalls
Justin Johnson
Aaron Lay
Justin Maddox
Thomas Moore
Pedro Reynoso
Joseph Vasquez
Flight 388
Ambrose Flores
Bryan Parker
324th Training Squadron
Flight 393
Adam Dewitt
Dennis Kotal
Andrew Ropp
Flight 394
James Eldridge
Scott Halligan
Jerrall Haynes
Brandyn Neuhaus
Andrew Santoro
Carl Schneider
326th Training Squadron
Flight 389
Kevin Cox
James Davis
Dean Murray
Flight 390
Donald Decoy
Daniel Kim
Shane Verhonich
331st Training Squadron
Flight 395
Alexander Allred
Gregory Karam
Michael Kohler
Douglas Perry
Bryar Robinson
Ian Schrader
Paul Waters
Flight 396
Jelliz Calata
Victoria Dempsey
Tiffany Johnson
Leslie Svoboda
Flight 387
Most Physically Fit
Male Airmen
Drew Palomo, 323rd TRS,
Flight 387
Joseph Lagreca, 320th TRS,
Flight 400
Female Airmen
Courtney Waters, 321st TRS,
Flight 398
Jessica Craig, 322nd TRS,
Flight 392
Male Flights
331st TRS, Flight 395
323rd TRS, Flight 387
Female Flights
321st TRS, Flight 398
331st TRS, Flight 396
Top Academic Flights
321st TRS, Flight 397
320th TRS, Flight 399
Top BMT Airman
Justin Maddox, 323rd TRS,
Wilford Hall nurses,medics celebrate nursing excellence
By Sue Campbell
59th Medical Wing Public Affairs
Nurses and aerospace medical
services technicians from the 59th
Medical Wing attended the wing’s
first Lamp Lighter Banquet and
Awards Ceremony May 21 at the
Gateway Club.
“Lamp Lighters are leaders and
future leaders who are lighting the
way in clinical nursing,” said 59th
MDW Chief Nurse Col. Kimberly Cox.
“The focus of this event was the
practice of nursing and igniting passion in nursing excellence.”
There are more than 600 active
duty and DoD civilian nurses and 700
aerospace medical service technicians in the 59th MDW.
“They operate 24/7 all the time,”
said Colonel Cox. “They deal with a
lot and are essential for this wing to
accomplish its mission.”
The theme of this year’s banquet
w a s “ N u r s e s C a r i n g To d a y f o r a
Healthier Tomorrow.”
“Our goal was to recognize the
broad scope of nursing, the hard
work and heavy lifting the nursing
team does, and to encourage a continued focus on quality patient-centered care,” said Colonel Cox. “This
is all in the interest of taking
better care of patients.”
The banquet included
an awards ceremony to
recognize nurses and
technicians
who
excelled in the areas of
patient safety, patient
care quality, professional practice excellence,
evidence-based practice,
and professional development.
Congratulations to the following
i n d i v i d u a l s w h o r e c e i v e d L a mp
Lighter Nursing Awards:
E d u c a t i o n a n d Tr a i n i n g E x p e rt
Nurse: Maj. Rhonda Richter
E d u c a t i o n a n d Tr a i n i n g E x p e rt
Technician: Tech. Sgt. Christopher
Cole
E d u c a t i o n a n d Tr a i n i n g N o v i c e
Technician: Senior Airman April
Martinez
E m e r g e n c y N o v i c e N u r s e : Capt.
Douglas Savey
Emergency
Novice
Technician: Senior Airman
Darrell Burt
E m e r g e n c y Expert
Nurse: Capt. Jonathan
Wurzelbacher
Emergency Expert
Technician: Staff Sgt.
Clarence Kelly
Critical Care Novice
Nurse: 1st Lt. Mark
Metzler
Critical
Care
Novice
Te c h n i c i a n : A i r m a n 1 s t C l a s s
Matthew Heavlin
Critical Care Expert Nurse: Maj.
Matthew Pfeiffer
Critical Care Expert Technician:
Senior Airman Douglas Goens II
Medical/Surgical Novice Nurse: 1st
Lt. Denise Hamilton
Medical/Surgical Expert Nurse:
Capt. Mefter Perkins
Inpatient Specialty Expert Nurse:
Capt. Jacqueline Johnson
Surgical Services Novice Nurse:
Capt. Yvonne Storey
Surgical Services Novice Technician:
Senior Airman Amber Powell
Surgical Services Expert Nurse: Maj.
Beth Brenek
Surgical
Services
E x p e rt
Technician: M a s t e r S g t . J o s e
Gonzalez
Primary Care Novice Technician:
Staff Sgt. Cendy Brown-Hernandez
Primary Care Expert Nurse: Dara
Tausch
Primary Care Expert Technician:
Tech. Sgt. William Kellagher
Specialty Clinic Novice Nurse: Capt.
Adrienne Fields
Specialty Clinic Expert Nurse:
Amber Lea
Nursing Leadership Expert Nurse:
Lt. Col. Valorie Baggenstoss
Nursing
Leadership
E x p e rt
Technician: Tech. Sgt. Tina Ditto
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
JBSA announces
quarterly award winners
PAGE 7
Airmen earn Diamond Sharp
Congratulations to the following recipients of the Lackland First
Sergeants’ Diamond Sharp Award for May, received in recognition of their
outstanding performance, appearance and dedication:
Junior Enlisted Member of the Quarter
Senior Airman Zavier Grier, 59th Medical Wing
Inter-American Air Forces Academy
Tech. Sgt. David Atilano
Tech. Sgt. Illiana Bonifacio
Tech. Sgt. Christopher Price
Tech. Sgt. Juan Villareal
NCO of the Quarter
Tech. Sgt. Phillip Sharpe, 59th MDW
802nd Security Forces Squadron
Tech. Sgt. David Hammond
Senior Enlisted Member of the Quarter
Senior Master Sgt. Jeffrey Gideon, Air Force Services Agency
59th Training Squadron
Staff Sgt. Phalyn Huggins
Company Grade Officer of the Quarter
Capt. Ryan Bodge, Air Education and Training Command
321st Training Squadron
Staff Sgt. Seneca Linder
Civilian of the Quarter Category I
Awilda Sierra, AFSVA
559th Medical Operations Squadron
Senior Airman Amanda Huber
Congratulations to the first quarter Joint Base San Antonio award winners:
Civilian of the Quarter Category II
Jimmy Washington, 453rd EWS
Civilian Supervisory of the Quarter Category I
Lisa Martinez, 802nd Force Support Squadron
Civilian Supervisory of the Quarter Category II
Raythell Wynn, 341st Training Squadron
Honor Guard Junior Enlisted Member of the Quarter
Senior Airman Monik Williams, 359th Medical Support Squadron
Honor Guard NCO of the Quarter
Staff Sgt. Renee Quenneville, Air Force Personnel Center
Thank YOU for YOUR service to our country!
Now it is our turn to serve you.
Enroll for VA health care.
Call 1-877-222-VETS
or
Visit http://www4.va.gov/healtheligibility/
PAGE 8
TALESPINNER
FAMILY TIME
Photo by Senior Airman Josie Walck
Tech. Sgt. Kristi Jordan, 59th Laboratory Squadron, makes a prayer rock with her 8-year-old son, Isaiah, during
the 59th Medical Wing deployers’ picnic May 28 at Wilford Hall Medical Center. The prayer rocks will remind
them to pray for each other during Sergeant Jordan’s upcoming deployment to Afghanistan. Deploying families
enjoyed free food and fun. Support organizations provided materials for spouses who will be left behind.
JUNE 4, 2010
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
PAGE 9
Commander fosters military working dog
By Mike Joseph
Staff Writer
Photo by Robbin Cresswell
Col. William H. Mott V, 37th Training Wing commander, talks
with Col. Richard M. Murphy, 12th Flying Training Wing
commander, before the Air Force Basic Military Training
graduation parade May 21 about his foster puppy Nnordo.
Highlighted on next week’s
calendar is the date – not that a
reminder will be needed.
An e-mail will be sent to the
base commander’s inbox. It will
offer support to the commander;
it takes someone who has participated in fostering a military
working dog puppy to understand what the day means.
“I know what it feels like to
turn one in,” said Sharon Witter,
Airman and Family Readiness
Center flight chief. “You’ve contributed to the mission but the
hardest thing is letting go.”
Nnordo, a Belgian Malinois
puppy, goes back into the military working dog program
Tuesday for training after being
fostered the past three months
by Col. William H. Mott V, 37th
Training Wing commander, and
his family.
The e-mail of support will
come from Ms. Witter, who was
part of a trio that fostered a
Belgian Malinois puppy at the
AFRC last year.
The puppy program is
designed to foster out military
working dog puppies to caregivers in the San Antonio area.
The puppies learn social skills
from the foster families from a
variety of social settings before
training.
The 341st Training Squadron
is home to the military working
dogs, a Department of Defense
program. Military working dogs
are used in patrol, drug and
explosive detection worldwide,
and for specialized DoD mission
functions and other government
agencies.
“It’s very fulfilling to get the
j o b d o n e , ” M s . Wi t t e r s a i d .
“Aamee (the AFRC puppy) is
going to TSA (Transportation
Security
Administration,
Department of Homeland
Security); when I go through an
airport, I’ll be looking for her.”
Colonel Mott said Maj. Gen.
Darrell Jones, former 37th TRW
commander, told him before he
arrived at Lackland last summer
that fostering a puppy would
connect the colonel to the mission, that he had done it and
“it’s great.”
“I thought this’ll be great, a
lot of fun,” Colonel Mott said.
“Then you start realizing this is
not just a dog but a dog with
rules. When this guy gets done
training, he’s a very valuable
asset.
“I bring him to work every
day unless I have a heavy schedule – then it’s not fun for him.
When I’m in and out of the car
and going places, that’s a good
day for him.”
Nnordo has fit in well around
the Mott house with the children
and their 8-year-old Labrador
retriever though he’s considered
See DOG P19
Lackland Conservation Corner
SAVE ENERGY!
During the cooling season, keep the
window coverings closed during the day
to prevent solar gain.
PAGE 10
TALESPINNER
JUNE 4, 2010
AU education database down
By Scott Knuteson
Air University Public Affairs
MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. –
A computer system managing various
aspects of Air Force education experienced a serious technical malfunction
May 13, impacting Air University distance learning, related education
records, and test control facilities Air
Force-wide.
Specifically affected are enlisted
and officer distance learning for professional military and continuing education, testing and delivery of enlisted
career development courses, and various specialty courses.
A team of technicians is working to
restore the system to a fully functioning state. A mirror backup of the system also failed shortly after the primary crashed. Technicians have been
able to replace server hard drives
without further failures, but are experiencing software restoral challenges.
In the interim, a number of
workarounds are being implemented
to mitigate the effects of the system
breakdown.
If a student completed course work
or finalized a test immediately prior to
May 13, the data may have successfully posted to their record. Active duty
Airmen can check the Air Force
Personnel Center website and Guard
or Reserve Airmen can check the Air
Reserve Personnel Center’s website to
ensure all education data has posted.
Of particular importance is the ability for upcoming promotion boards to
verify graduations and course completions since May 13, according to officials. Some senior noncommissioned
officers needing verification of Senior
NCO Academy completion for their
senior rater endorsements may also
experience difficulty accessing those
records. Many Air University distance
learning students may be unable to
complete testing at their local test
control facility since testing prerequisites and scores are primarily
accessed through the downed system.
Air Force Reserve and Air National
Guard majors scheduled to meet the
lieutenant colonel board in June can
contact the Air University Registrar at
[email protected] with any concerns regarding education records. An
active duty enlisted supplemental
board scheduled for June will not
require updating. The next enlisted
board, for chief master sergeants, will
not be until October.
Airmen with questions about the
status of their personnel records can
contact the Total Force Service Center
at 800-525-0102 or DSN 665-0102.
PAGE 12
TALESPINNER
JUNE 4, 2010
PHA cell adjusts 422a processing
By Staff Sgt. Brooke Llafet
559th Aerospace Medicine Squadron
The Preventive Health Assessment
cell is currently improving the process
of administering Air Force Form 422a,
Physical Profile Serial Report. These
clearances are used for special duty,
commissioning, reserve duty, overseas
clearances and more. New procedures
are providing a more dependable and
customer service oriented environment.
The Kelly Clinic now offers walk-in
hours on Mondays and Wednesdays
for processing of AF Form 422a. The
walk-in hours are Monday from 2-4
p.m. and Wednesday from 8-10 a.m.
When utilizing this walk-in service,
customers must bring documentation
identifying the AF Form 422a requirement and any specific statements or
tests.
Technicians will assist you with
anything needed for the clearance,
whether it is a vision test or an
appointment with a primary care
manager.
The clearance will not be completed in one day. The technician will
review the customer’s information,
perform any necessary tests and forward the clearance to the customer’s
primary care manager. Once the primary care manager receives this
information, it will be entered into the
Preventive Health Assessment and
Individual Medical Readiness database, generating an electronic AF
Form 422a for processing. Once in
PIMR, it will go through two quality
review checks before being signed and
e-mailed to the customer’s command
section. This process can take up to
three to five duty days depending on
the member’s medical needs.
We appreciate your patience as we
proceed with this transition and look
forward to providing you the best
medical care the Air Force has to
offer. For more information, call 9256082.
MILITARY JUSTICE SPOTLIGHT
The 802nd Mission
Support Group Office of
the Staff Judge Advocate
processed these judgments from May 19-25:
• An airman from the
59th Emergency Medical
Squadron was guilty of
wrongfully visiting an
off-limit establishment,
wrongfully using Spice
and wrongfully possessing drug paraphernalia
and received a reduction
to airman basic, 14 days
extra duty and a reprimand.
• An airman first class
from the 59th Dental
Training Squadron was
guilty of failing to report
to duty and falling asleep
during patient care and
received a reduction to
airman (suspended) and
forfeiture of $811 in pay
for one month.
• An airman from the
59th Surgical Inpatient
Squadron was guilty of
making prank phone
calls while on duty and
received a reduction to
airman basic and a reprimand.
• A senior airman
from the 59th SIS was
guilty of wrongfully
using marijuana and
received a reduction to
airman first class and a
reprimand.
• An airman first class
from the 345th Training
Squadron was guilty of
visiting the dorm room
of a member of the
opposite sex while in
technical training and
received a forfeiture of
$398 in pay for one
month and a reprimand.
• An airman basic
from the 345th TRS was
guilty of having a member of the opposite sex in
the dorm room while in
technical training and
received a forfeiture of
$312 in pay for one
month, 14 days restriction (suspended), 14
days extra duty (suspended) and a reprimand.
PROTECT THE NETWORK
The following removable flash media are
unauthorized on all DoD information systems:
• Memory sticks • Thumb drives • Camera flash memory cards •
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
PAGE 13
Hiring surge to employ thousands
By April Rowden
Air Force Personnel Center Public Affairs Office
RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE – With contractorto-civilian conversions, new organizations standing
up and overall increases in civilian positions, the
Air Force civil service continues to grow as officials look to employ thousands of U.S. citizens.
The Air Force Personnel Center has filled more
than 3,000 new positions since the surge began
earlier this year and is expected to advertise more
than 17,000 additional new positions by the end of
2011 on USAJOBS.
USAJOBS is an online repository used by multiple federal agencies to announce job vacancies
around the world.
“These career opportunities cover a broad spectrum of skill sets necessary to support national
defense and Air Force objectives, from information
technology specialists and aircraft simulator
instructors to housing management assistants and
biological scientists,” said Michelle LoweSolis,
civilian force integration director at AFPC. “The
importance of our civilian workforce cannot be
overstated, nor our desire to get the best qualified
people into these positions.”
“The importance of our civilian workforce cannot be overstated, nor
our desire to get the best qualified people into these positions.”
– Michelle LoweSolis
AFPC civilian force integration director
To guide individuals through the Air Force
application process, the AFPC Civilian Employment
website contains various resources to include tutorials, salary information, eligibility criteria, and
the hiring authorities for special populations, such
as military spouses, people with disabilities, students and veterans.
In November 2009, President Obama announced
the Veterans Employment Initiative, an initiative
that “underscores to federal agencies the importance of recruiting and training veterans” who
have valuable knowledge and technical skills.
The combination of the employment initiative
and the hiring surge gives transitioning Airmen
impacted by force management an opportunity to
be considered for federal employment.
When applying for federal jobs, veterans have
three hiring authorities for which they may be eli-
gible: VEOA, VRA and 30 percent or more disabled.
• VEOA: An individual who is eligible for veterans
preference; or who separates after three or more
years of continuous active service performed
under honorable conditions is generally eligible for
c o n s i d e r a t i o n u n d e r V E O A , o r t h e Veterans
Employment Opportunity Act of 1998.
• VRA: Any disabled veteran; a veteran who served
on active duty in the Armed Forces during a war
declared by Congress, or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized; a veteran who, while serving on active duty
in the Armed Forces, participated in a military
operation for which the Armed Forces Service
Medal was awarded; or a veteran separated from
See SURGE P19
PAGE 14
TALESPINNER
JUNE 4, 2010
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
PAGE 15
2010 Memorial Day Jam
Photos by Robbin Cresswell
Mrs. La Vernia Cynthia Hinojosa dances with trainees during the Memorial Day Jam Sunday.
Col. William H. Mott V, 37th Training Wing commander, welcomes Airmen to the Memorial Day Jam Sunday. The event
featured a dunking booth, volleyball, flag football and basketball. Volunteers served pizza, burgers, hot dogs, ice cream,
and an assortment of beverages to battle the summer heat.
Air Force basic military trainees get their food ready at the Memorial Day
Jam Sunday. The event, hosted by the Team Lackland First Sergeants’
Council, included volleyball, flag football, basketball and music.
Air Force basic military trainees play football at the at the Lackland
Amphitheater Sunday. The event was part of the annual Memorial Day Jam
event hosted by the Lackland First Sergeants’ Council.
Air Force basic military trainees play basketball during the Memorial Day Jam.
Airman 1st Class Gilmore Brown, 59th Dental Group,
returns the ball during a volleyball game at the Memorial
Day Jam Sunday.
PAGE 16
TALESPINNER
JUNE 4, 2010
Car Care Centers provide value at the pump
According to a recent Short-Term Energy
Outlook report from the U.S. Energy Information
Administration, “the annual average regulargrade retail gasoline price will increase from
$2.35 per gallon in 2009 to $2.84 in 2010.”
Forecasts of increasing energy prices has base
exchange officials reaching out to drivers to
ensure they are aware of the procedures in place
to determine pump prices at Lackland Car Care
Centers as well as the benefits available to
authorized exchange patrons.
While overall energy prices are beyond the
Army and Air Force Exchange Service’s control,
their Military Star Card, for example, can help
curb added expenses and, in turn, save Airmen
money when filling up.
“Anytime a customer uses a bank issued debit
or credit card, the retailer pays a portion of the
transaction to a third-party financial institution,”
said Car Care Center Manager Phyllis Keister.
“Because the Military Star Card is administered
by the Exchange Credit Program, our car care
centers are not subject to the additional fees
incurred through other ‘pay at the pump’ options.
As a result, we’re able to pass savings on to
authorized exchange shoppers by taking a nickel
off each gallon dispensed.”
In addition to the five-cents-a-gallon savings
Milita r y S t a r C a r d h o l d e r s e n j o y e v e r y d a y,
Lackland gas stations periodically also offer steeper discounts, up to 20 cents a gallon.
Photo by Patrick Desmond
Senior Airman Christopher Morris, 59th Medical
Operations Squadron, fills up his Mitsubishi Lancer at
the shoppette. Pump prices are set equal to the lowest
price surveyed for each grade of fuel available.
Drivers interested in learning more about the
Military Star Card fuel discount can visit the BX,
car care centers or log on to www.aafes.com and
click the Military Star Card icon for additional
details.
Beyond exclusive discounts, AAFES Car Care
Centers rely on a survey process to ensure prices
are fair and competitive with the local community.
Specifically, AAFES conducts daily surveys of at
least five locations selling motor fuel, deemed by
the local GM to be the competition.
Pump prices are then set equal to the lowest
price surveyed for each grade of fuel available.
“Because market-based pricing is not contingent on cost, we survey and change prices as frequently as necessary to remain competitive,” Ms.
Keister said. “In fact, even though AAFES is
responsible for charging sales tax on gasoline, the
surveys can result in prices that are actually even
below cost.”
Charging sales tax on fuel can raise the eyebrows of shoppers used to the tax-free benefit
that the exchange provides on almost everything,
except gas.
While it is true that AAFES, as a U.S. government instrumentality, is immune from state and
local taxes, the immunity specific to fuel has been
waived by Congress.
AAFES, and by extension its customers, also
pay federal tax pursuant the U.S. code that covers
federal tax on gasoline.
Accordingly, AAFES pump prices include state,
federal and local motor fuel taxes, as well as
underground storage fees, etc. The federal and
state taxes, as well as, other applicable fees are
included in the price and paid to the appropriate
taxing authority.
“Gas pricing is a very complex issue, impacted
by world markets, political and economic factors.
With that said, we remain focused on delivering
the best value possible to drivers at Lackland,”
Ms. Keister said.
(Courtesy AAFES Public Affairs)
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
PAGE 17
Bagpipes set tone at BMT parade
By Mike Joseph
Staff Writer
Emotions run rampant on the Lackland parade
grounds every Friday at the conclusion of the basic
military training graduation parade.
It’s a festive occasion – a time of unlimited smiles,
hugs and photographs.
And when 323rd Training Squadron military training instructors recognized one trainee’s unique musical skills, an opportunity to enhance that experience
occurred for the graduation parade May 28.
In the squadron was a professional bagpipe player
who would graduate that Friday, Memorial Day weekend. He was in the 737th Training Group drum and
bugle corps, an ever-changing group of selected 323rd
TRS trainees who perform for the BMT graduation
parade each Friday and BMT retreat on Thursdays.
He was in the 323rd TRS following his selection as
the Air Force’s first recruited professional bagpipe
player for the Pipe Band, an element of the Band of
the U.S. Air Force Reserve, Robins Air Force Base, Ga.
By utilizing Airman Adam Tianello’s musical talents on the bagpipes, a special Memorial Day act of
remembrance was created; the sounds of “Amazing
Grace” and “America the Beautiful” resonated
through the grandstands before nearly 800 BMT
graduates passed in review down the bomb run.
“It’s something people will remember for a long
time,” Lt. Col. Matthew Whiat, 323rd TRS commander, said. “Some in attendance might not have been to
an event like this, then to hear an instrument that
evokes such emotion as the bagpipes … I think they
left with a greater sense of appreciation and reflection
for the day.”
Airman Tianello has played the bagpipes for 12
years, beginning at age 14. He was chosen to be the
Pipe Band resident professional after auditioning and
meeting Air Force enlistment criteria.
“I was looking for a career path that I was very
passionate about,” said Airman Tianello, who quit
investment banking in that pursuit. “I felt strongly
about joining the military; this is a unique opportunity.”
Band members meet the same requirements to
become an Airman as all trainees, which includes
completing the Basic Expeditionary Airman Skills
Training course and passing the physical training test.
The exception is some drill practice is replaced by
band practice.
But before Airman Tianello could create an indescribable patriotic feeling at the parade, he had one
last audition two weeks prior: a solo in front of Col.
William H. Mott V, 37th Training Wing commander;
Col. Shane Courville, 737th TRG commander; and
Colonel Whiat.
Twenty minutes later, the three leaders walked
away impressed.
“It just so happened the stars and planets aligned,”
Colonel Whiat said. “This was good for all the right
reasons, and for the impression left on the newly
graduated Airmen and the audience.”
Photo by Alan Boedeker
Airman Adam Tianello, 323rd Training Squadron, plays a
bagpipe solo during the Air Force Basic Military Training
graduation parade May 28.
PAGE 18
TALESPINNER
JUNE 4, 2010
Residents participate in simulation grand rounds
Story and photo by Senior Airman Nicole Mickle
59th Medical Wing Public Affairs
Emergency medicine residents Capt. (Dr.) Tylan Muncy,
59th Surgical Specialties Squadron, and Capt. (Dr.) Carolyn
McDonald, 59th Emergency Medicine Squadron, evaluate a
burn patient during simulation grand rounds.
Members of the 59th Emergency Medicine
Squadron participated in a simulation grand rounds,
which incorporated the use of high-fidelity medical
simulation in the Wilford Hall Medical Center simulation center May 21.
The simulation grand rounds are held every few
months and are used to augment and improve resident education. The three-hour block of time is dedicated to covering medical and surgical cases that are
not frequently seen by residents here.
The first simulation grand rounds were held here
last fall.
“The feedback from last fall’s session was overwhelmingly positive,” said Maj. (Dr.) Adam Balls, a
59th EMDS Emergency Medicine staff physician. “Our
residents appreciated the addition of the simulation
into the formal curriculum and have indicated a
desire for more frequent use of this type of education
throughout the academic year.”
Historically, grand rounds involve the presentation
of a patient and his or her particular disease. They
are usually presented in front of an audience of medical students, residents and attending physicians.
Now, grand rounds are more of a lecture-based format that cover the major topics of EM.
San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education
Consortium EM Residency Program grand rounds are
held every Friday. Lectures are presented by invited
guest speakers, attending physicians at Brooke Army
and Wilford Hall Medical Centers, and residents.
“While the formal didactic EM grand rounds are
held each week, we have dedicated a majority of two
Fridays to a simulation grand rounds, in which-high
fidelity simulation is used to augment and improve
resident education,” Dr. Balls said.
Simulated cases are developed by local EM attending physicians. Occasionally, cases developed by other
national leaders in simulation, at other residency programs, are used.
“The cases can be adapted and created to focus on
the needs of a wide range of learners to include paramedics, nurses, medical students and physicians,” Dr.
Balls said.
Simulated cases ran included a burn patient, a
phosphorous poisoning patient, a pregnant woman
giving birth, and a code blue scenario with no recovery.
“We work closely with the medical simulation
branch at Wilford Hall, directed by John Metchel,” Dr.
Balls said. “They are vital to the success of our simulation curriculum. They spend countless hours behind
the scenes programming the cases into the computers, preparing needed equipment and operating the
high-fidelity simulators during our sessions.”
The simulations provide the staff physicians with
information on how well resident training is going.
Also, it prepares residents for their annual in-service
examinations, ultimately helping to prepare them to
become board-certified EM physicians, Dr. Balls said.
“The use of simulation provides a novel way to
teach and train our residents,” he said. “It takes them
out of the classroom setting and places them into a
high-fidelity simulation environment.”
Be Responsible! Seat Belts Save Lives! Buckle Up And Wear Yours!
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
DOG from P9
SURGE from P13
the thief of the household.
“I (Nnordo) will find
it, I’ll trot off with it
and you have to chase
me,” he said. “That’s
the most fun game.
And you always have
to be on the lookout
f o r w h a t ’s i n t h e
garbage cans and closet.”
And when Tuesday
comes, who will it hit
the hardest?
“I kid around and
say the kids, but it’s
me,” Colonel Mott
said. “They (341st
TRS) asked me if I
would take another
one and I absolutely
will. But I do want to
see how Nnordo does
first.”
For more information about the fostering program, call 6713686.
active duty within the last three
years may be eligible for consideration under the Veterans Recruitment
Appointment, or VRA.
• 30 percent or more disabled:
Veterans retired from active military
service with a disability rating of 30
percent or more; or veterans who
have been rated by the Department
of Veterans Affairs since 1991 or
later, to include disability determinations from a branch of the Armed
Forces at any time, as having a compensable service-connected disability
of 30 percent or more may be eligible for consideration under a special
appointing authority for 30 percent
or more disabled veterans.
Tony Garton, a programmer analyst at AFPC, was hired in 2002
under VEOA. “My veteran status didn’t guarantee me a job with the Air
Force. But it did help put my resume
in the hands of the hiring official, so
at least I had the opportunity to be
considered for a federal job.”
Family members may also be eligible for certain hiring authorities,
including:
• A spouse of a servicemember who
has received permanent change of
orders to relocate;
• A spouse of service members who
retired with a disability rating at the
time of retirement of 100 percent, or
retired/separated from the Air Force
and has a disability rating of 100
percent from the Department of
Veterans Affairs;
• Un-remarried widows or widowers
of service members killed while in
active-duty status; or
• Certain family members returning
to the U.S. from an overseas assignment in which they were a dependent.
The Airman and Family Readiness
Center can provide family members
and Airmen transitioning out of
active-duty service with additional
assistance on using USAJOBS, writing resumes and locating career
fairs.
For more information on hiring
authorities, visit AFPC’s Civilian
Employment Web site.
Air Force employees may also call
the 24-hour Total Force Service
Center at (800) 525-0102 or DSN
665-5000.
PAGE 19
Connect
With Us!
Lackland JBSA has entered the
social networking scene
Follow us on Facebook at:
http://www.facebook.com/home.php
?#!/pages/Lackland-JBSA/
114646985221400?ref=sgm
Follow us on Twitter at:
http://twitter.com/Lackland_JBSA
E-mail us at:
[email protected]
Or just go to our website at:
www.lackland.af.mil
and look for social media.
PAGE 20
TALESPINNER
COMMUNITY
Local
BRIEFS
WILFORD HALL BOOK FAIR
LPAG TO HOLD AUDITIONS
YOUTH THERAPY SERVICES
The Wilford Hall Medical Center
Auxiliary book fair is Friday and
Saturday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each
day, in the WHMC atrium with sale
profits going to WHMC programs
and equipment.
Contact Heather Lisenbee at
846-5194 for more information.
Auditions for an upcoming murder mystery, “Irritation of a Murder”
by the Lackland Performing Arts
Group, are Tuesday and Wednesday,
6 p.m., in the Bob Hope Theater.
Five male and five female roles
are available, and volunteers are
needed for director, assistant director and stage crew.
Call 671-2619 for more information.
The 802nd Force Support
Squadron pediatric therapy associates offer pediatric speech, occupational therapy, physical therapy and
applied behavioral analysis in Bldg.
2602, across from the Airman’s
Attic on the corner of Truemper
Avenue and Kelly Drive.
Call 646-8008 or 671-4987 for
more information.
THRIFT SHOP BAG SALE
The Lackland Thrift Shop bag
sale is Saturday, 9:30-11 a.m.
Call 671-3600 for more information.
HYPERTENSION EDUCATION CLASS
A hypertension education class
is Monday, 12:30-3:30 p.m., at
Wilford Hall Medical Center.
The class is open to any patient
or family member interested in
learning more about hypertension.
For more information or to register, call the Nephrology Clinic at
292-6868.
LRS CUSTOMER SERVICE
TECHNOLOGY EXPO SCHEDULED
The 16th annual communications and information technology
expo is June 23, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m., in Mitchell Hall.
The expo, featuring industry
exhibitors, is free and open to all
Department of Defense, government
and contractor personnel with base
access.
For more information, contact
Marissa Perez or Anita Rhude at
671-3200.
The 802nd Logistics Readiness
Squadron customer service is the
primary point of contact for all supply related questions, concerns and
complaints.
LRS customer service also manages the zero overpricing program
for pricing concerns or challenges,
and defense reutilization and marketing office transaction assistance.
To contact LRS customer service,
e-mail [email protected]
lackland.af.mil or call 671-2575,
671-3801 or 671-3802.
SUPPLY TRAINING
The 802nd Logistics Readiness
Squadron’s equipment accountability office conducts supply training
the third Wednesday each month in
Bldg. 5160, second floor commander’s conference room, 8 a.m.
The class covers introduction to
general supply training, benchstock
training and supplemental training
for supply custodians.
Contact Rosa Ledesma or
Bethany Cuevas at 671-3803 for
class registration.
OFFICERS SPOUSES CLUB
A membership roundup after a
summer break for the Lackland
Officers Spouses Club is scheduled
for Sept. 1, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the
Gateway Club.
Roundup activities include
learning to line dance and door
CHAPEL SERVICES
Christian
Catholic
Monday-Friday:
Freedom Chapel
Mass, 11:30 a.m.
Orthodox
Sunday:
Airmen Memorial Chapel
Divine Liturgy, 9:30 a.m.
Religious Education,
10:45 a.m.
Monday-Friday:
Wilford Hall Chapel
Mass, 11 a.m
Protestant
Sunday:
Airmen Memorial Chapel
Liturgical Service, 8 a.m.
Saturday:
Freedom Chapel
Confessions, 4:45 p.m.
Mass, 5:30 p.m.
Hope Chapel
Spanish Contemporary,
12:45 p.m.
Contemporary, 10:45 a.m.
Sunday:
Freedom Chapel
Religious Education, 9
a.m.
Mass, 11 a.m.
Freedom Chapel
Contemporary Service,
9:30 a.m.
Gospel Service, 12:30
p.m.
Children’s Church
provided
Religious Education, 11
a.m.
Wednesday and
Hope Chapel
Hispanic Mass, 9:15 a.m.
Wilford Hall Chapel
Mass, 3 p.m.
JUNE 4, 2010
For more information,
contact the chapel staff:
Freedom Chapel • 671-4208
Gateway Chapel • 671-2911
Hope Chapel • 671-2941
WHMC Chapel • 292-7373
Thursday:
Bible Study, 6 p.m.
Sunday:
Medina Chapel
Contemporary Service, 9
a.m.
Wilford Hall Chapel
Traditional Service, 1:30 p.m.
Islamic
Friday:
Defense Language
Institute
Student Center
Faith Study, 1:30 p.m.
Jummah Prayer, 1:30-2:30
p.m.
Sunday:
Religious Education, 10:00
a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Jewish
Friday:
Airmen Memorial Chapel
Sabbath Eve Service,
5:45 p.m.
Religious Education, 4:30
p.m.
Wicca
1st Wednesday:
Freedom Chapel
Room 8,
San Antonio Military
Open Circle,
6:15 p.m.
prizes will be awarded.
For membership information,
contact [email protected]
or www.lacklandosc.org.
TSU OFFERS COURSES
The first course in a seven-track
Texas State University certified public manager program begins June
11 at the Lackland Education
Office, Bldg. 5725.
The program addresses military
leadership and management.
Undergraduate and graduate
students in the occupational education program may request to use
these courses toward their Bachelor
of Applied Arts and Sciences or
Masters of Science Interdisciplinary
Studies program.
Undergraduate students in the
certified public manager program
can take up to seven courses, and
graduate students up to four.
For more information call 6712896 or e-mail [email protected]
KEY FAMILY SUPPORT RESOURCES
Air Force Aid Society
Airman & Family Readiness Center
Airman's Attic
Base Post Office
Bowling Center
DEERS
Family Child Care
Legal Office
Library
Medical Appointment Line
MPF ID Cards
Outdoor Recreation
TRICARE Info
Thrift Shop
Lackland Enlisted Spouses’ Club
Lackland Force Support Squadron
Lackland ISD
Lackland Officer Spouses’ Club
Lackland public Web site
My Air Force Life
Year of the Air Force Family
671-3722
671-3722
671-1780
671-1058
671-2271
800-538-9552
671-3376
671-3362
671-3610
916-9900
671-6006
925-5532
800-444-5445
671-3600
www.lacklandesc.org
www.lacklandfss.com
www.lacklandisd.net
www.lacklandosc.org
www.lackland.af.mil
www.MyAirForceLife.com
www.af.mil/yoaff
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
What’s Happening v
JUNE 5
JUNE 9
PARENTS DAY OUT
SEPARATION BRIEFING
Give Parents a Break/Parents Day
Out at the youth center is Saturday,
1-6 p.m., for children enrolled in fullday kindergarten through age 12.
Children can have an evening of
supervised fun and activities while
parents enjoy the night out.
Cost is $10 per child or free with
a referral.
For information, call 671-2388.
A briefing about Air Force
Reserve part-time and full-time
opportunities for Airmen scheduled to
separate is Wednesday, 10 a.m., in
the Military Personnel Flight building,
Bldg. 5616, room 104.
Areas discussed include traditional Reserve, Individual
Mobilization Augmentee, active Guard
Reserve and Air Reserve technician;
benefits and entitlements information is also included.
Briefings are held the second
Wednesday of each month. Contact
Master Sgt. Michael Barnes at 6713860 for more information.
JUNE 7
RETURN AND REUNION SEMINAR
A return and reunion seminar is
Monday, 2:30-3:30 p.m., at the
Airman and Family Readiness Center,
Bldg. 1249.
The seminar is an informal forum
about the stress families and individuals experience during separation.
Call 671-3722 for information.
JUNE 8
PROTESTANT WOMEN OF THE CHAPEL
Protestant Women of the Chapel
meets for Bible study Tuesday, 10
a.m., at Freedom Chapel with children ministry during the meeting.
Call 671-4208 for information.
JUNE 10
PROTESTANT WOMEN OF THE CHAPEL
Protestant Women of the Chapel
meets for Bible study Thursday, 6
p.m., at Freedom Chapel.
For more information, call 6714208.
PAGE 21
v Family Support Events
MONTHLY MEETINGS
ENLISTED SPOUSES CLUB
The Lackland Enlisted Spouses Club meets every third Tuesday of the month,
6:30 p.m., at AFRC, Bldg. 1249. For more information, visit www.lacklandesc.org.
OFFICERS SPOUSES CLUB
The Lackland Officers Spouses Club does not meet during the summer. Next
meeting is Sept. 1. For more information, visit www.lacklandosc.org.
MILITARY COUNCIL OF CATHOLIC WOMEN
The Military Council of Catholic Women meet the first Friday of the month, 10
a.m., at Freedom Chapel. For more information, call 671-4208.
ment is June 11, 10:30 to noon, at the
Airman and Family Readiness Center,
Bldg. 1249.
For more information, call 6713722.
JUNE 12
BOWL FOR KIDS
The American Society of Military
Comptrollers, Alamo City chapter, will
sponsor Dare to Love’s 12th annual
“Bowl for Kids” June 12 at Bandera
Bowl bowling center.
All proceeds benefit Dare to
Love’s Rainbow Room, operated by
the non-profit organization to supply
emergency clothing and supplies for
children referred to Child Protective
Services.
Costs are $125 per team or $25
for individuals for three games.
For more information, contact
Mary Lou Rendon at 337-3304 or visit
www.daretolove.info.
JUNE 11
BUDGET AND SPENDING CLASS
A budget and spending class
that teaches basic financial manage-
WWW.LACKLANDFSS.COM
JUNE 14
RETURN AND REUNION SEMINAR
A return and reunion seminar is
June 14, 2:30-3:30 p.m., at the
Airman and Family Readiness Center,
Bldg. 1249.
The seminar is an informal forum
about the stress families and individuals experience during separation.
Call 671-3722 for information.
JUNE 15
SMALL BUSINESS WORKSHOP
The Small Business Development
Center will sponsor a workshop, How
to Start Your Own Business, 1-4 p.m.,
June 15 at the Airman and Family
Readiness Center, Bldg. 1249.
Among the topics for discussion
will be writing an effective business
plan, doing market research, selecting a location and time management.
To enroll, call 671-3722.
JUNE 16
CREDIT MANAGEMENT CLASS
A credit management class is
June 16, 10 a.m. to noon, at the
Airman and Family Readiness Center,
Bldg. 1249.
The class will focus on under-
standing terms and conditions associated with credit, credit reporting
and credit scores.
For information, call 671-3722.
LPAG MEETING
The Lackland Performing Arts
Group meets June 16, 6-7 p.m., at
Arnold Hall Community Center.
“Expressions,” an open microphone forum, follows the meeting
from 7-9 p.m.
For more information, call 6712619 or 671-2352.
JUNE 17
HEART LINK ORIENTATION
Heart Link, the Air Force’s official
orientation program for spouses, is
June 17, 6-9 p.m., at the Airman and
Family Readiness Center, Bldg. 1249.
Heart Link is an interactive program targeted at all spouses new to
Lackland or the military, as well as
fiancées and other service branch
spouses assigned to the base.
Heart Link is designed to
increase awareness of the mission,
customs, traditions, protocol and
support resources in the Air Force.
Call 671-3722 for information.
PAGE 22
TALESPINNER
SCOREBOARD
SOFTBALL
Division I
1. 737th TRG
2. FSS
3. CPSG
4. 343rd TRS
5. 149th FW
6. 543rd Spt Sq
W L
8
7
5
4
2
1
1
2
4
5
7
8
June 1CPSG 11, 737th TRG 10
FSS 13, 543rd Spt Sq 4
343rd TRS 8, 149th FW 7
Division II
1. Clinical Support Gp
2. CES
3. Radiology
4. NIOC
5. 668th IOW
6. 701st MP Bn
8. 345th TRS
9. Navy-Marines
9. 668th ALIS
10. Security Forces
11. 717th MI Bn
W L
7
7
7
5
5
4
4
3
3
1
0
1
1
3
3
3
4
5
5
5
6
8
May 24Radiology 23, 688th IOW 10
Radiology 19, 717th MI Bn 0
Recreation
1. 93rd IS
2. 342nd TRS
3. IAAFA
4. 344th TRS
5. 802nd LRS
6. 70th ISR
7. 559th MDG
8. AFISR
9. 690th NSG
10. 59th ORS
11. 59th MED LRS
12. 433rd AW
Women’s
1. CPSG
2. 543rd ISR Gp
3. 802nd MSG
4. 559th MDG
5. Clinical Support Gp
W L
9
7
7
6
5
5
4
3
3
2
2
1
0
2
2
4
4
4
5
5
6
7
7
8
W L
5
3
2
1
1
0
3
2
3
4
May 25CPSG 12, 802nd MSG 5
543rd ISR Gp 12, Clinical Support
Gp 3
GOLF
Recreation
1. FSS
2. 433rd AW
3. COMM
4. 717th MI Bn
5. 737th TRG
6. JOIWC
7. 24th AF
8. 369th Recruiting Gp
9. AFISR
9. 343rd TRS
11. 668th ALIS
12. Security Forces
W L
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
2
3
3
3
3
2
3
JUNE 4, 2010
SPORTS
Bases, post align in golf
The 2010 Memorial Day
weekend saw plenty of competitive golf at Randolph Oaks,
Lackland’s Gateway Hills and
Fort Sam Houston’s Salado Del
Rio golf courses.
The Joint Base San Antonio
Military Golf Classic, formerly
known as the Military Classic,
received an Army infusion as
Fort Sam Houston was included
this year.
Two-man team Bob Hallender
and Rhett Morrow won the
championship flight with a
three-day stroke total of 206.
Fifty-six teams competed in
five flights Saturday, Sunday and
Monday starting at Randolph’s
Oaks course and finishing at
Salado Del Rio. The second
round was played Sunday at the
Gateway Hills. Each day saw a
different format, with scramble,
modified alternate shot and best
ball included.
Other flight winners and total
scores were: Mike Jewel and
Jerry Sirmans won the first flight
with 206; Justin Woodhouse and
Scott Hanschel won the second
flight with 217; Larry Boggio
and Hector De Luna won the
third flight with 223; Jack Miller
and Laurie Lengyel won the
fourth flight with 242.
The 502nd Air Base Wing
Commander Brig. Gen. Leonard
Patrick was one notable competitor, along with several teams
from each course and a number
of teams that traveled from as
far as Del Rio and Corpus
Christi. All teams vied for $7,000
in prizes during the three-day
event.
Craig Brooks, director of golf
at Gateway Hills, commented on
the significance of the event.
“This is a great opportunity
for the military to showcase
their courses,” he said. “With
the advent of Joint Base San
Antonio, the course managers
agreed bringing on Fort Sam
Houston was a great idea.”
(Courtesy of the 802nd Force
Support Squadron)
Championship’s
top finishers
1. Bob Hallender,
Rhett Morrow – 206
2. Mike Arnold,
Bruce Benner – 209
3. Randy Block,
Raymond Topp – 210
Photos by Robbin Cresswell
4. Bryan Cannon,
Matt Gove – 210
Jeff DeHart sinks a putt during the second round of the Joint
Base San Antonio Military Golf Classic at the Gateway Hills Golf
Course Sunday. Left, Lackland golfer Rick Johnston competes
in the championship flight.
JUNE 4, 2010
TALESPINNER
PAGE 23
BRIEFS
GATEWAY HILLS GOLF
The Take-a-Break-FromBRAC golf tournament is
June 30 at the Gateway Hills
Golf Course played in a fourplayer team scramble format.
The $40 per player covers green and cart fees and
lunch. Registration is due
June 25.
For more information,
call Veronica Rabey at 5362920 or Brandon Lewis at
536-4014.
SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT
Lackland is hosting an
11-team military softball
championship tournament
July 2-4.
The $315 registration fee
to cover game balls and
umpire fees is due June 28.
For more information
about the tournament, call
671-2725.
SPIN CLASS
The Warhawk Fitness
Center class, Cycle Blast, is
free to active-duty members
and civilians. The class is
Monday and Wednesday at 3
p.m., and Tuesday and
Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Each class is 45 minutes
to an hour.
SWIM LESSONS
Swimming lessons begin
Tuesday at the Medina pool.
Registration for the first
two-week session is today at
the Skylark Community
Center.
VOLUNTEER COACHES
The youth center is looking for volunteer coaches for
team sports. All training is
provided by the center.
For an interview, call
Johnny Bailey at 671-1245.
3
& out
Varsity football’s streak,
season cut short at state
Warhawk Ivan Thomas, right, jukes around a Purple Haze defender during the State Championship tournament at Fort Sam Houston this weekend.
Story and photo
by Patrick Desmond
Sports Editor
The Warhawks’ eight-game win streak, which carried it to a San
Antonio league championshp, was snapped this weekend at the
state championship at Fort Sam Houston, putting an end to the
varsity flag football team’s season.
The No. 14 Division B team in Texas, the Warhawks entered the
Texas Flag Football Association Super Shootout XXI tournament
with high hopes after winning the San Antonio Flag Football’s B
Division for the second time in 2010 and placing second in three of
four tournaments on the year.
However, the first-round win against the Dallas Purple Haze, 136, would be their last of the season as the Airmen fell in their next
two games in the double-elimination final tournament.
“Three and gone. It sucks,” Warhawks coach Winsome Culley
said. “The first two games, I was pleased. The last game was disappointing.”
Former coach and quarterback Ivan Thomas rejoined the team
during the team’s 7-0 run to a league title.
Alongside quarterback Rick Guajardo, Thomas played quasiquarterback – a position offering an option on the wing – which
proved effective against teams such as the Purple Haze.
“The other teams weren’t ready for that,” Culley said. “We
caught everyone off guard. Rick’s accuracy and Ivan’s speed, that
was crucial.”
The winning combination resulted in a sound tournament opening victory, and continued in a close game against the Laredo Ruff
Ryders, the state’s No. 3 Division B team.
Trailing 28-21, an interception on the Warhawks’ final offensive
drive sealed the team’s first loss.
It also disrupted the team’s winning quarterback combination,
as Thomas was sidelined with a broken foot during the contest.
The Warhawks fell to Santa Rosa Rush during in its final game
of the tournament, 21-14.
“With (Thomas) being hurt, it really took that chemistry away,”
Culley said. “We really didn’t have an answer for the two-man
rush, since we didn’t have that outlet.”
Despite the loss of Thomas to Ramstein Air Base, Germany, next
season and the early postseason exit, Culley is still optimistic about
the upcoming fall season which will also be his last.
“I think we’re growing. We’re a smart team, a strong team and
one of the best teams I’ve coached,” he said.
One of the major improvements during the winning season was
better communication on the offense, allowing the use of a nohuddle scheme.
Culley said his first year with Dental’s champion intramural
quarterback Guajardo was difficult, adding, “We kind of bumped
heads.”
But this season, he said Guajardo knew what he was looking for,
and “I knew what he was looking at and we definitely got a lot
closer.”
The Warhawks will continue to meet weekly, working on defensive sets and filling roster spots in anticipation of its next competition, the Flag Football X Summer Night tournament, in August.
Until then, Culley is hoping to build on the success of this year in
the hopes of leading his team to another league title.
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