Victim had lain dead for days

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Four-day schools may stay
CB superintendent
recommends district
‘stay the course’
■
BY THOMAS MORIARTY
The World
By Thomas Moriarty, The World
Coos Bay School Board Chair James Martin listens as Superintendent Dawn Granger
defends her recommendation to retain the district’s four-day week during Monday’s
work session.
COOS BAY — Public schools in
Coos Bay should stay on a four-day
schedule, Superintendent Dawn
Granger said Monday.
The district should retain its
current calendar in order to continue the academic progress it has
made since the schedule’s adop-
tion in 2011, Granger told the
school board during a Monday
night work session. The recommendation is her first formal advocacy regarding calendar changes,
and it sets the stage for a school
board vote next month.
“My recommendation to the
board is completely and solely
based on student achievement,”
Granger said. “I firmly believe the
best course is to stay the course
we’re on.”
Improvements by previously
struggling schools such as Millicoma should be enough to end the
debate, she said.
“Good people can disagree, but
data — student achievement data
— has got to trump anyone’s
beliefs,” she said.
Increases in academic performance within the district during the
past year have been attributed to
the use of Fridays for specialized
professional development. Called
Professional Learning Communities, the Friday work sessions are
intended to be set aside for collaborative strategy, analyzing data and
planning student interventions.
While not everyone is sold on
SEE SCHOOLS | A8
Jobless, cities Victim had lain dead for days
could be first
to feel pain of
budget cuts
BY JIM KUHNHENN AND ANDREW TAYLOR
The Associated Press
“
Photos by Lou Sennick, The World
Jesse Jack Longhenry, left, heads back to the Coos County jail Monday afternoon after his first court appearance before Circuit Court Judge Richard
Barron on murder charges. He is a co-defendant with Michael Lee Gertson in the death of Jesse Nathan Hayes in Coos Bay.
Two suspects
make their first
court appearance
BY TYLER RICHARDSON
The World
”
Police reports . . . . A2
What’s Up. . . . . . . . A3
South Coast. . . . . . A3
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . A4
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . B1
Comics . . . . . . . . . . C3
Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . C3
Classifieds . . . . . . . C4
Abuser takes 25-year plea deal
THE WORLD
COQUILLE — A Bandon man will
spend 25 years in prison after accepting a
sex abuse plea deal that will spare his
four victims from testifying at trial.
Steven Ray Perkins, 29, pleaded guilty
to four counts of first-degree sexual
abuse for abusing four girls under the
age of 12. Coos County District Attorney
DEATHS
INSIDE
SEE SEQUESTER | A8
COOS BAY — Police think the man
whose body was found outside a warehouse Sunday had been dead since
Wednesday, according to Coos County’s
district attorney.
As the suspects in Jesse Hayes’ homicide made their first appearance in court
Monday, The World learned that police
believe Hayes was killed Wednesday
night inside apartment No. 1 at 675 Hemlock Ave. District Attorney Paul Frasier
said Hayes’ body was covered with trash
outside the warehouse for “at least one or
two days” after he was killed.
Frasier declined to comment on
whether Hayes’ body had been kept in the
apartment before that.
Frasier said Gertson, Longhenry and
Hayes frequented apartment No.1, the
residence of a man who is not suspected
to be involved in Hayes’ death.
Frasier said various transients stayed at
the apartment. Kyle Robertson, 26, who
lives next door, agreed. He said alcohol,
drugs and fights were commonplace.
“It’s a constant nuisance,” he said.
“They were constantly arguing.They were
constantly drinking beer and tweaking.”
A 911 caller gave police information
that helped them locate Hayes’ body and
identify Gertson and Longhenry as suspects, Frasier said. After police located
the body around 3 a.m., both men were
Michael Lee Gertson enters for his first court in custody by 6:30 Sunday night.
appearance before Circuit Court Judge Richard
Gertson was arrested at the apartBarron on murder charges.
ment complex, Frasier said.
Frasier said police don’t think a
Police arrested Michael Gertson, 31, weapon was used to kill Hayes, and an
and Jesse Longhenry, 46, in connection autopsy performed Sunday determined
with Hayes’ death shortly after discover- he essentially was beaten to death. The
ing the body. A third man, whom Frasier autopsy revealed Hayes was strangled
declined to identify, is a “person of inter- with a ligature but ultimately died from
est” in the case. He was being held at the blunt-force head trauma.
Coos County Jail Monday on a parole violation charge.
SEE VICTIM | A8
Harle Nissen, North Bend
Ram Mishra, Coos Bay
Arthur Woodcock, Bandon
Mary Coleman, North Bend
Harry Guye Jr., Coos Bay
Alice Allen, Coos Bay
Paul Frasier said Perkins would be sentenced today to four consecutive 75month terms as part of the plea deal.
The Coos County Sheriff’s Office
began investigating Perkins in October,
after being called to Bay Area Hospital
for a possible sex abuse victim in the
emergency room. Perkins was set to
stand trial this week on charges of firstdegree rape, first-degree sodomy, first-
Ethel Wildman, North Bend
John Hawkins, Myrtle Point
Glenda Groth, Coos Bay
Obituaries | A5
FORECAST
WASHINGTON — Who’ll be the first to feel the
sting?
Jobless Americans who have been out of work for
a long time and local governments that are paying
off loans to fix roads and schools are in tough spots
when it comes to the automatic federal budget cuts
that are scheduled to kick in Friday.
About 2 million long-term unemployed people
could see checks now averaging $300 a week
reduced by about $30. There also could be reductions in federal payments that subsidize clean energy, school construction and state and local public
works projects. Low-income Americans seeking
heating assistance or housing or other aid might
encounter longer waits.
Government employees could get furlough
notices as early as next week, though cuts in their
work hours won’t occur until April.
The timing of the “sequester” spending cuts has
real consequences for Americans, but it also has a
political ramifications. How quickly and fiercely the
public feels the cuts could determine whether President Barack Obama and lawmakers seek to replace
them with a different deficit reduction plan.
Eager to put pressure on Republican lawmakers to
accept his blend of targeted cuts and tax
increases Obama has
been highlighting the
impact of the automatic
cuts in grim terms. He
did it again on Monday,
declaring the threat of
the cuts is already
harming the national
The impacts economy.
Republicans say he is
will not all be exaggerating and point
to rates of spending,
felt on day
even after the cuts, that
would be higher than in
one.
2008 when adjusted for
President Barack Obama inflation. All Obama has
on sequester spending cuts to do to avoid the damage, House Speaker John
Boehner said at the
Capitol, is agree to the GOP’s recommended spending cuts — with no tax increases.
By all accounts, most of the pain of the $85 billion
in spending reductions to this year’s federal budget
would be slow in coming. The dire consequences
that Obama officials say Americans will encounter
— from airport delays and weakened borders to
reduced parks programs and shuttered meatpacking
plants — would unfold over time as furloughs kick in
and agencies begin to adjust to their spending
reductions.
“These impacts will not all be felt on day one,”
Obama acknowledged in a meeting with governors
at the White House on Monday. “But rest assured
the uncertainty is already having an effect.”
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano
warned that the federal government would be
unable to “maintain the same level of security at all
places around the country” once the automatic cuts
began to take effect.
The public will feel the results “in the next few
weeks,” she said, and “it will keep growing.”
The majority of the federal budget is in fact
walled off from the cuts. Social Security and veterans’ programs are exempt, and cuts to Medicare are
generally limited to a 2 percent, $10 billion reduction
in payments to hospitals and doctors. Most programs that help the poor, like Medicaid, food
stamps, subsidized school lunches, Pell Grants and
degree sexual abuse and first-degree
attempted sexual abuse.
Frasier said the sentence shows his
office will do everything in its power to
seek justice for sex abuse victims. He
had a stern warning for abusers:
“If you molest young children, we will
do the best we can to make sure you are
held responsible,” he said. “Think
twice.”
Partly sunny
50/37
Weather | A8
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Y
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South Coast
City Editor Ryan Haas • 541-269-1222, ext. 239
theworldlink.com/news/local
Cabbie suffers beating after driving fare
POLICE
THE WORLD
Martin Halter, 26, in the
face while two other passengers looked on. One of
the passengers tried to stop
the alleged assault, but she
couldn’t control Palmer.
The Sheriff’s Office said
Halter stopped the cab and
got away from Palmer.
Palmer fled the scene and
was arrested less than an
hour later at his Harbor
Road residence in Coos Bay,
A 44-year-old man is
charged with punching a
Yellow Cab Taxi driver as
the cabbie drove him and
two other people to the
Millington area Sunday
night.
The Coos County Sheriff’s Office said a “highly
intoxicated” John Palmer of
Coos Bay repeatedly hit
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reckless endangerment and
theft of services.
R E P O R T S
Beating leaves wife
with bleeding brain
the Sheriff’s Office said.
Halter refused medical
attention at the scene.
Palmer was released from
the Coos County jail on his
own recognizance. He is
charged with fourth-degree
assault, three counts of
A Coos Bay man could
face a mandatory prison
term after an alleged assault
left his wife with bleeding in
her brain.
Steve Carson, 43, was
being held Monday at the
Coos County jail on second-
Oregon has five jobless
for every job vacancy
SALEM — Oregon’s private employers had approximately 31,230 job vacancies
during fall 2012, according to
a Job Vacancy Survey recently completed by the Oregon
Employment Department.
During the same month
there were 158,600 unemployed Oregonians, or
roughly 5 unemployed people for each vacancy. In the
fall of 2011 there were about
6 unemployed per vacancy.
Nationally there are roughly
three unemployed per
vacancy.
The health care and social
assistance industry accounted
for 22 percent of all vacancies,
more than double the number
reported by any other industry sector. The leisure and
hospitality; management,
administrative, and waste
services; and manufacturing
sectors also had many vacan-
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degree assault, third-degree
assault and parole violation
charges. The Coos County
Sheriff’s Office said Carson’s wife went to the emergency room Feb. 21 with
multiple bruises and a
“brain bleed.”
The second-degree
assault charge is a Measure
11 offense, carrying a
mandatory sentence of 70
months in prison.
Appointment space will be limited.
Don’t Wait!
cies. Each accounted for
roughly 10 percent of the
total.
Among occupation groups,
the office and administrative
support occupations (3,874)
and sales and related occupations (3,175) recorded the most
vacancies. Four specific occupations had more than 1,000
vacancies each: heavy and
tractor-trailer truck drivers,
personal care aides, customer
service representatives, and
retail salespersons.
Of Oregon’s 31,230 vacancies in fall 2012:
■ Three-fourths (74 percent) were for full-time positions.
■ Four out of five (82 percent) were for permanent
positions (neither temporary
nor seasonal).
■ Most vacancies (65 percent) required no education
beyond high school.
■ Two-thirds (68 percent)
required previous experience.
■ Two out of five (44 percent) were difficult to fill.
Oregon’s job vacancies
offered an average wage of
$17.92 per hour, although
average wages varied drastically by occupation, education requirement, and experience requirement. Vacancies that did not require education beyond high school
offered an average hourly
wage below $14 per hour,
compared with average
hourly wages of $21.74 per
hour for vacancies requiring
an associate degree, $29.62
per hour for a bachelor’s
degree, and $33.35 for a graduate degree.
Smaller employers, those
with less than 20 employees,
accounted for 39 percent of
all vacancies compared with
25 percent at medium sized
employers (20-99 employees) and 37 percent at large
employers (100+ employees).
Vacancies with large employers offered higher wages,
averaging $19.21 per hour,
compared with about $16.50
for medium sized and small
employers.
The survey captured data
for five sub-state regions:
N o r t h w e s t
Oregon/Willamette Valley;
the Portland Tri-County area;
Southwestern Oregon; Central Oregon; and Eastern Oregon.The Portland Tri-County
area had 14,864 vacancies, 48
percent of the statewide total.
Vacancies in the Portland TriCounty area were more likely
to require education beyond
high school, and offered higher wages on average, at $19.14
per hour. The average wage
exceeded $16.00 per hour in
every region.
The Oregon Job Vacancy
Survey has been conducted
each fall since 2008. The 2012
estimate of 31,230 vacancies
marked an increase from
30,384 vacancies in the fall of
2011, and 29,974 in the fall of
2010. Due to changes in survey methodology, these estimates over time are not
directly comparable.
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63690 Harriet Rd.,
Coos Bay
2709 D St.,
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daylight basement unfinished.
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63946 Wallace Rd.,
Coos Bay
Would you be willing to volunteer your skills
during an emergency or disaster?
Join the Coos County Medical Reserve Corps Today
The MRC is a national network of local groups
of volunteers committed to improving the health,
safety, and resilience of their communities.
MRC Volunteers have access to free emergency
preparedness and response trainings, as well as
the opportunity to participate in emergency
exercises and drills.
To learn more visit: https://medicalreservecorps.gov/
To become a volunteer, register at: https://serv-or.org/
Coos County MRC Unit Coordinator
Michelle Wyatt McClure
[email protected] • 541-751-2404
3 bedroom 2 bath double wide
manufactured home includes 3 bay shop.
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Editor
Localnew s
Sports
Com m unity events
O bituaries
P hoto
Clark W alw orth
R yan H aas
John G unther
B eth B urback
A m anda Johnson
Lou Sennick
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new [email protected] thew orldlink.com
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Advertising
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Classified ads
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Now serving Bandon, Coquille & Myrtle Point.
Buy, Sell, Rent, We Do It All…with Great Results!
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Cindy R aw lings x 24 8 cindy.raw [email protected] thew orldlink.com
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E.L. EDWARDS REALTY II, INC.
P ublisher
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Call Mark or your favorite realtor for details. Buy, Sell, Rent, We do it all... with great results!
REEDSPORT — Archaeologist Steve Samuels and
Loon Lake Park Manager
Mike Kelly from the Bureau
of Land Management will
discuss the past and future of
the O. Howard Hinsdale Gardens at the Reedsport Garden
Club’s meeting Tuesday,
March 5.
Through storytelling and
pictures, Samuels will walk
the audience through the
gardens from a time gone by.
Audience members may
share their own stories and
memories, and are encouraged to bring photographs of
the gardens and grounds.
Kelly will update the group
on the revitalization of the
gardens and future planned
improvements. The American Rhododendron Society
and community members
have been an integral part in
identifying plant species at
the garden, and Mike is looking to expand this community involvement. Recently,
local residents have formed
the Friends of the Hinsdale
Garden to give local residents
a forum for sharing their
ideas on how to transition the
gardens and grounds to a
tourist destination and a
place for locals to enjoy.
The meeting will start at
6:30 p.m. at the Presbyterian
Church at 2360 Longwood
Drive.
Thefts &
Mischief
COOS COUNTY
Feb. 24, 7:31 a.m., three unknown
cows in yard, 87800 block of
Two Mile Road.
Feb. 24, 12:11 p.m., threats by
neighbors, 63400 block of Wallace Road.
Feb. 24, 3:34 p.m., unlawful entry
into a motor vehicle, 91100
block of Cape Arago Highway.
Feb. 24, 4:38 p.m., unlawful entry
into a motor vehicle, 63300
block of Charleston Road.
NORTH BEND
Feb. 24, 10:57 a.m., harassment,
2200 block of Newmark Avenue.
Feb. 24, 3:24 p.m., criminal mischief leading to broken window,
1100 block of Virginia Avenue.
Feb. 24, 7:10 p.m., out of control
man with a knife arrested and
held on mental hold, 2100 block
of Jackson Street.
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COOS BAY
Feb. 24, 9:11 a.m., woman arrested for unauthorized entry into a
motor vehicle, conspiracy and
possession of a controlled substance, 100 block of South Seventh Street.
Feb. 24, 11:06 a.m., explosion
reported resulting in power outage, Second Street and Lockhart
Avenue.
Feb. 24, 11:56 a.m., criminal mischief, 200 block of South
Schoneman Street.
Feb. 24, 2:00 p.m., unlawful entry
into a motor vehicle, 100 block
of North Eighth Street.
Feb. 24, 6:02 p.m., theft of a boat
battery, 500 block of Date
Street.
Feb. 24, 8:44 p.m., traffic stop
results in arrest of man for possession of meth and driving
while suspended, 100 block of
East First Street.
Meetings
TODAY
Lakeside City Council — 9 a.m.,
city hall, 915 North Lake Road;
special meeting followed by
executive session.
Oregon Coast Community Action
council meeting — 10:30 a.m. noon, North Bend Housing
Authority, 1700 Monroe Street,
North Bend; regular meeting.
Carlson-Primrose Special Road
District — 7 p.m., Montalbano’s
residence, 94520 Carlson
Heights Lane, North Bend; regular meeting.
Myrtle Point Planning Commision
— 7 p.m., Flora M. Laird Memorial Library Meeting Room, 435
Fifth Street, Myrtle Point; regular meeting.
North Bend City Council — 7:30
p.m., council chambers, city hall,
835 California Street; regular
meeting.
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Tuesday, February 26,2013 • The World • A3 Y
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South Coast
City Editor Ryan Haas• 541-269-1222, ext. 239
St. Patty’s dinner in Elkton
TODAY
AARP Volunteer Tax Aide 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., College Park
Community Church, 2548
Newmark Ave., North Bend.
Bring photo ID, SS card,
2011 and 2012 tax info.
AARP Volunteer Tax Aide
9:30-11:30 a.m., Bandon
Senior Center, 1200 11th St.
SW, Bandon. Bring photo ID,
SS card, 2011 and 2012 tax
info.
AARP Tax Preparation Program noon-3 p.m., Holy
Name Catholic Church basement, 12 N. Dean, Coquille.
Those seeking assistance
should bring: last year’s
return, social security card,
photo ID, earnings statements and all other
required forms and statements. Please have totals
ready. Completed forms will
be filed electronically for
returns. For information,
call 541-888-7332.
“How Raccoon Earned His
Stripes” Performed by
Brent Florendo 4 p.m.,
Hales Center for the Performing Arts, 1988 Newmark Ave., Coos Bay. Traditional storytelling. 541-8887317
Friends of South Slough
Annual Members meeting
5:30-7:30 p.m., North Bend
Library, 1800 Sherman Ave.
Silent auction fundraiser.
RSVP 541-888-5558 or [email protected]
Jam session, 7 p.m., Pyramid
Club, 375 Central Ave., Coos
Bay. 541-267-6507
theworldlink.com/news/local
No bluff: Card sharps can help kids
THE WORLD
ELKTON — The next dinner at Elkton Community
Education Center will be a Saint Patrick’s Day Irish meal
March 14, with reservations suggested by March 11. The
menu includes both traditional and unusual dishes, and
coffee or punch and dessert. Enjoy a great meal and
wonderful company while supporting a community
organization.
The center is a nonprofit organization founded to provide educational and artistic opportunities to all ages of
participants. The center has a lending library, meeting
facilities, native plant areas, walking trails, butterfly
pavilion and gift and espresso shop.
The suggested donation is $10 per person and all proceeds go toward the center’s programs. Reservations
may be made at the ECEC office, 541-584-2692, or by
email to [email protected]
COOS BAY — A different
kind of March mania will hit
Coos Bay next month, with a
Texas Hold’em fundraiser
putting poker back on center
stage at the Broadway Theater.
The Boys & Girls Club of
Southwestern Oregon will
host the tournament March
16, with a $3,000 prize pool.
Rob Miles, development
director for the club, said
money raised will support
after-school programs.
The event is being spon-
sored by Shark Bite’s Seafood
Cafe at the Broadway Theater, 240 South Broadway. It
will include professional
tables and dealers. Food is
included with the ticket
price, and drinks will be
available for purchase.
Organizers say seats are
limited, so early registration
is best to guarantee a spot in
the tournament. The cost is
$75 to buy in with 4,000
chips. Another $50 brings
another 4,000 chips. The top
seven places will get a payout
in pre-paid debit cards.
Seat assignments will be
handed out at 4 p.m. Saturday, March 16, with the tournament to start at 5 p.m.
You can register in person
at the Boys & Girls Club of
Southwestern Oregon or call
541-267-3635.
Money
Advice on managing
your money.
See Page C1 Saturday
WEDNESDAY
CVH Auxiliary Scrub Sale 7
a.m. to 4 p.m., Coquille Valley Hospital rehabilitation
room, 940 E. Fifth St.,
Coquille.
Wednesday Business Connection 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
The Mill Casino-Hotel
Salmon Room East, 2201
Tremont, North Bend. RSVP
at 541-266-0868. No host
luncheon. Guest speaker
Roy Lowe on Bandon Marsh
project.
Bingo 6:30 p.m., Bay Area
Senior Activity Center, 886
S. Fourth St., Coos Bay.
Cost: Early bird, 25 cents;
regular, $5 pack and $1 specials. 541-269-2626
THURSDAY
AARP Volunteer Tax Aide
noon-3 p.m., Lakeside Lions
Club, 890 Bowron Road,
Lakeside. Bring photo ID, SS
card, 2011 and 2012 tax
info.
OSAA State Basketball Tournament, starts at 1:30 p.m.,
Marshfield High School,
10th & Ingersoll, Coos Bay
and North Bend High
School, 2323 Pacific, North
Bend. Tickets are $50 for
adults, $25 for students.
www.osaa.org/tickets.aspx/
Business After Hours 5-7
p.m., Electric Hospital, 988
S. Broadway, Coos Bay. 541266-0868.
Coquille Valley Seed Library
Meeting 6 p.m., Owens
Building, 225 N. Adams St.,
Coquille. For information,
visit www.CoquilleValleySeedLibrary.org, or call 541396-4764.
Sam Greer Peace Corps in
Ethiopia Presentation 7
p.m., North Bend Public
Library, 1800 Sherman
Ave., North Bend.
Bay Area Concert Band
Spring Concert 7:30 p.m.,
First Presbyterian Church,
2238 Pony Creek Road,
North Bend. Conducting,
Mark Allen and guest conductors Bob Campbell and
Stephen Simpkins.
FRIDAY
OSAA State Basketball Tournament, starts at 9 a.m.,
Marshfield High School,
10th & Ingersoll, Coos Bay
and North Bend High
School, 2323 Pacific, North
Bend. Tickets are $50 for
adults, $25 for students.
http://www.osaa.org/tickets.aspx/
Church Women United World
Day of Prayer 1 p.m., Holy
Redeemer Catholic Church,
2250 16th St., North Bend.
First Friday...Art for Everyone 5-7 p.m., Reedsport
Natural Foods, 1891 Winchester Ave., Reedsport.
Photography by Duane A.
Beach will be featured. Also
featured, Mariam Harvey ,
violinist. 541-271-2101
What’s Up features one-time events and
limited engagements in The World’s
coverage area. To submit an event,
email [email protected]
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Editorial Board
Jeff Precourt, Publisher
Clark Walworth, Editor
Ryan Haas, City Editor
Ron Jackimowicz, News Editor
Opinion
theworldlink.com/opinion
Thanks, but no thanks, Senator
Our view
Sen. Ron Wyden’s pursuit of
subsidies for rural counties
may do more harm than good.
What do you think?
The World welcomes
letters. Email us at
[email protected]
Tweets
Follow us on Twitter:
@ClarkTheWorld
@TheWorldLink
A drowning man can’t be
choosy about life preservers, and rural Oregon’s
sinking counties will take
anything Congress wants
to give. Even so, U.S. Sen.
Ron Wyden’s latest words
on timber payments are
disappointing.
Last week, the Oregon
Democrat pledged to renew
federal subsidies for the 18
so-called “O&C” counties,
and to expand them to
other parts of rural
America. His plan would
give county officials some
desperately needed money,
but it’s bad for rural Oregon
in at least four ways.
First, Wyden’s plan
would keep counties on the
dole, perpetual wards of a
fickle Congress. What
counties really need is a
reliable income stream —
the kind they had for many
decades, before the curtailment of logging dried up
timber harvest revenue.
Second, dangling the
uncertain promise of a federal bailout could torpedo
counties that ask voters for
property tax increases.
Third, subsidizing county budgets does virtually
nothing to strengthen local
economies. Worse, it
diverts attention from the
more important goal: a
timber policy that allows a
rational, sustainable timber
harvest, boosting rural
communities while generating revenue for counties.
Finally, Wyden’s proposal
to expandthe subsides
undermines Oregon’s legitimate claim on the federal
government. Sure, lots of
rural areas are hurting. But
the O&C counties (including Coos and Curry) have a
special distinction.
Decades ago, when the
federal government took
back lands formerly set
aside for the Oregon &
California Railroad, it
promised to share timber
revenue with the counties,
to compensate for property
taxes they never again
could collect. That
arrangement yielded revenue for counties as well as
forest-products jobs to
sustain communities.
By lumping the O&C
counties into a broader
program of federal handouts to rural counties,
Wyden undermines efforts
by others in Oregon’s congressional delegation to
increase timber harvest on
O&C lands. Yes, counties
need revenue. But swapping rural Oregon’s
birthright for uncertain
federal handouts helps perpetuate rural poverty.
Here comes yet another GOP-manufactured crisis
If you are reading this, then it’s
likely you’re one of the 27 percent
of the American people who told
Pew Research that they’ve heard “a
lot” about “sequester” — the term
most Washington politicians
probably never want to hear for the
rest of their careers.
Barely more than one-quarter of
Americans are aware that our
economy will
soon
suffer
another congressionally manufactured crisis.
After the last one,
President Obama
said, “Our economy didn’t need
Washington to
DONNA
come along with
a manufactured
BRAZILE
crisis to make
Columnist
things worse.
That was in our
hands.”
With so few voters aware of the
sequester — and probably even
fewer knowing much about it — no
wonder Republicans in Congress
have little motive to responsibly
address the national debt. And the
gerrymandering of House districts, creating large numbers of
Republican-safe or Democraticsafe seats, exacerbates the ideological divide. Simply put, there’s
no incentive for House members to
compromise, listen to national
public opinion or take responsibility for what they do — or don’t do.
Their seats are safe.
Republican leaders like Mitch
McConnell, John Boehner, and
their political strategists manufactured this impasse back in August
2011. At the time, the president
proposed the sequester as a lastditch effort to avoid a manufactured crisis over the debt ceiling.
McConnell called it “a crucial step
on the road to fiscal sanity,” and
Boehner persuaded the Republican-dominated House to vote for
it.
In political-speak, a sequester is a
deal designed to force Congress to
agree — i.e., compromise — on a
budget,because if it doesn’t,drastic,
paralyzing, unthinkable cuts automatically go into effect.
So a majority of Republicans in
both the Senate and the House voted
for sequester — and then merrily
refused to make any compromises.
They played political chicken with
the American economy.
John Boehner boasted, “I got 98
percent of what I wanted.” Later
Boehner lamented that he hadn’t
held out for more concessions.
The idea of sequester (drastic
cuts to force compromise), according to Business Insider, was “a
brilliant idea and Obama should be
proud of it.” Proud of it because it
would force compromise, not
because it would allow the Republicans to filibuster and obstruct us
into another manufactured crisis.
Boehner urged Republican representatives to vote for sequester by
saying that if they held firm on no
taxes, the Democrats wouldn’t
dare risk cuts to domestic programs. The Republicans would
once again save the wealthy from
paying more taxes than their
cleaning woman.
Republicans decided on this
strategy months ago. It’s why
McConnell and Boehner voted for
a very modest raise on taxes on the
wealthy last December. It would
allow them to say, “We already did
that; not again.” That strategy
explains why the House went on a
10-day vacation at Boehner’s
direction, rather than debate and
work out a compromise.
That strategy also explains why,
though they voted and pushed
sequester, Boehner and McConnell
now say, “Don’t blame us; this was
all the president’s idea. We compromised once. Now it’s all cuts —
our way.” So, while Curiosity is
collecting rock samples on Mars,
China is hacking our computers
and our infrastructure is crumbling, congressional Republicans
won’t address deficit reduction
rationally.
Spending cuts alone will slow
economic growth and keep unemployment high. Who gets hurt?
The poor, the elderly, the working
and the middle classes. Who benefits? Guess.
Boehner, while on vacation,
wrote a column for The Wall Street
Journal in which he says the
majority of American people
wants cuts, not taxes. Wrong. The
latest nonpartisan Pew Research
poll reveals that only 19 percent of
the American people want strictly
cuts. Seventy-four percent want
both cuts and taxes.
In five years, Obama both proposed and consented to a total of
$1.7 trillion in cuts, and just one
modest raise in taxes on the
wealthy. We have had five years of
tax cuts to domestic programs. In
five long years, we have had but
one raise in taxes — a modest raise
on the 1 percent whose tax-cut
benefits allow them to take home
nearly one-third of America’s total
national income.
What do Boehner and
McConnell propose we do? They
want to cut Social Security payments. They want Grandma and
Grandpa, who paid into Social
Security all their working lives, to
take a cut in the $500 to $1,500
monthly income they get to live on.
If it weren’t for McDonald’s dollar
menu, there would be a hunger crisis among our nation’s elderly.
But thanks to Boehner and
McConnell’s risky political strategy, the country is about to go
through another manufactured
crisis simply to avoid a vote to
close corporate loopholes that
benefit a select few.
Donna Brazile is a senior Democratic strategist, a political commentator and contributor to CNN
and ABC News, and a contributing
columnist to Ms. Magazine and O,
the Oprah Magazine.
Budget hawks question doomsday scenarios
There’s no doubt President Obama is using the socalled Washington Monument maneuver in the fight
with Republicans over
sequestration budget cuts.
It’s a time-honored tactic of
bureaucratic warfare: When
faced with cuts, pick the
b e s t known and
m o s t
revered
symbol of
government and
threaten to
shut
it
d o w n .
BYRON
Close the
Washing- YORK
ton Monu- Columnist
ment and
say, “See? This is what happens when you cut the budget.”
Meanwhile, all sorts of
other eminently cuttable
government expenditures go
untouched.
So now Obama is warning
of drastic cuts in food safety,
air traffic control, police and
fire protection — in all sorts
of services that will allegedly
be slashed if the rate of
growth of some parts of the
federal budget is slowed.
But perhaps the biggest
example of the Washington
Monument maneuver is
coming from the Defense
Department, where it goes
by another name. Over many
decades of defense budget
battles, the Pentagon has
often used a tactic known as
a “gold watch.” It means to
answer a budget cut propos-
al by selecting for elimination a program so important
and valued — a gold watch —
that Pentagon chiefs know
political leaders will restore
funding rather than go
through with the cut.
So now, with sequestration approaching, the Pentagon has announced that the
possibility of budget cuts has
forced the Navy to delay
deployment of the carrier
USS Harry S. Truman to the
Persian Gulf. With tensions
with Iran as high as they’ve
ever been, that would leave
the U.S. with just one carrier,
instead of the preferred two,
in that deeply troubled
region.
“Already, the threat of
these cuts has forced the
Navy to delay an aircraft carrier that was supposed to
deploy to the Persian Gulf,”
Obama said at a recent
White House appearance, in
case anyone missed the
news.
Some military analysts
were immediately suspicious. “A total gold watch,”
said one retired general officer who asked not to be
named. Military commentator and retired Army Lt. Col.
Ralph Peters called the
Navy’s move “ostentatious,”
comparing it to “Donald
Trump claiming he can’t
afford a cab.”
And Rep. Duncan Hunter,
R-Calif., a Marine veteran of
Iraq and Afghanistan, is worried not only about the Truman decision but also the
Navy’s announcement that it
cannot afford to refuel anoth-
er carrier, the USS Abraham
Lincoln. “I am concerned
that these decisions are being
made for the purpose of
adding drama to the sequestration debate,” Hunter wrote
in a Feb. 12 letter to the Pentagon, “given the continuation
of other programs that are
worthy of cost-cuts or even
elimination.”
Meanwhile, with a budget
higher than it was even at the
peak of the Iraq and
Afghanistan wars, the Pentagon is resisting attempts to
force it to audit its own
finances. Congress passed a
law back in 1990 requiring
such an audit, to no avail.
Last year, Sens. Tom
Coburn, R-Okla., and Joe
Manchin, D-W.Va., introduced the Audit the Pentagon Act, which would try
again to force a look inside
the maze of Pentagon
spending.
Now, with the Defense
Department sounding the
alarm about sequestration,
some budget hawks on Capitol Hill are doubtful. “It’s
difficult to take these
doomsday scenarios seriously when the Pentagon
can’t even audit its own
books,” says a spokesman for
Coburn. “We would argue
that the Defense Department has the authority to
reprioritize funding toward
vital needs and away from
less vital spending. As Sen.
Coburn has detailed, the
department spends nearly
$70 billion each year on
‘nondefense’
defense
spending that has nothing to
do with our national security.”
If the sequestration cuts
go into effect, many members of Congress will be
watching the Pentagon
closely. Hunter, for example,
will monitor the Navy’s
“Green Fleet” biofuel initiative that cost $170 million in
2012-2013, as well as a troubled battlefield software system that has cost $28 billion.
Others will be watching for
conventional waste. When
sequestration came, what
did Pentagon leaders cut?
“If you laid off these people, or you diverted this aircraft carrier, then why did
you go ahead and travel to a
conference in Bermuda or
continue to pay contractors’
inflated salaries?” says one
Senate aide. “Those are the
questions we are going to
ask.”
All the lawmakers
involved would rather see
more carefully considered
budget cuts than are called
for in the sequestration law.
And all realize the unique
and respected nature of the
Defense Department’s mission; one visit to Arlington
National Cemetery proves
that.
But budget hawks also
know that the Pentagon
houses some of the most
accomplished bureaucratic
infighters in government.
And with sequestration
nearly here, they know a gold
watch when they see one.
Byron York is chief political correspondent for The
Washington Examiner.
Write to us
The World welcomes your
letter. Write to [email protected], or P.O. Box
1840, Coos Bay, 97420.
■ Please use your real
name.
■ 400 words maximum.
■ No defamation, vulgarity,
business complaints, poetry or
religious testimony.
■ Please list your address
and daytime phone for verification.
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State
Husband’s
new attitude
wears thin on
wife at home
D E A R A B B Y : “Harold”
and I have been married for
more than 20 years and have
three children ranging in age
from teen to toddler. We are
both college graduates and
held middle-management
jobs until
recently.
DEAR
T w o
years ago,
Harold was
offered a
temporary
job in an
exotic location
in
another
country. We
jumped at
JEANNE
chance.
PHILLIPS the
I can’t work
due to the
regulations here, but the
money is good.
Now that I’m not working,
Harold suddenly believes he
has the right to tell me what
to do, how to manage daily
activities, how to care for the
children, etc. When we
explore our host country, he
loses his temper if I take a
photo of something he has
already photographed.
At Halloween, we invited
some local friends over to
share the American tradition
of pumpkin carving. He literally took the knife out of my
hand and shouldered me out
of the way so he could do it.
In previous years, he had no
interest in this activity — the
children and I carved the
pumpkins.
These are just two examples, but the scrutiny is daily
and relentless. I am instructed how to do the laundry,
wash dishes, clean the stove,
on and on.
How do I deal with this
new controlling behavior? If
I address it when it happens,
he becomes nasty. I have
tried discussing his overall
change in attitude, but he
says I am “imagining” it. If I
ignore his “suggestions,” it
results in angry outbursts.
I don’t know how to get
through to him that I’m the
same competent individual I
was before we made this
change and that I do not need
micromanaging. Any advice
is welcome. — JUST ABOUT
HAD IT
DEAR JUST ABOUT HAD
IT: Your husband may be
stressed in his new job and no
longer feel in control, which
is why he is attempting to
control you. Or, because he is
now the sole wage earner, he
may feel “entitled” to dictate
your every move. If you are
now living in a male-dominated culture where women
have no rights, his thinking
may be influenced by the
men around him.
If marriage counseling is
available, I urge you to get
some. If that’s not possible,
perhaps a long vacation for
you and the children with
your family would defuse the
tension.
D E A R A B B Y : My son
recently committed suicide.
He was only 24. Two weeks
before his death, he confided
to a family member that he
had been molested by his
uncle when he was between
the ages of 4 and 7.
I want this uncle to be
exposed, but the family
wants to keep it “quiet and in
the family.” I am very much
of the opinion that this
molestation could be behind
my son’s suicide. The uncle is
now in his 30s and would
have been in his teens when
this happened. Please tell me
what I should do. — SUFFERING IN OHIO
DEAR
SU FFE RING:
Because you are suffering, it
is important that you talk
with a therapist if you
haven’t already. While early
trauma may have played a
part in your son’s death, suicide is a complex act that is
not completely understood.
What IS clear is that what
this uncle did while in his
teens was predatory.
Others in the family — and
the community — should be
made aware so their children
can be protected, because
they may be at risk.
The therapist can help you
decide how to deal with this,
so please don’t wait.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
Oregon House approves
new Columbia River bridge
BY JONATHAN J. COOPER
The Associated Press
ABBY
The Associated Press
Emergency workers examine the wreckage after a truck hauling jet fuel overturned on railroad tracks and
then was struck by a train Monday, Feb. 25, near Umatilla. The truck driver escaped with minor injuries and
no environmental damage was reported.
Ore. gun control bill
sponsor says it’s flawed
STATE
PORTLAND (AP) — Even
an Oregon state legislator
who is the chief sponsor of a
bill to ban many semi-automatic firearms and highcapacity ammunition magazines says the measure is
“pretty flawed” in its current
form.
Democratic Rep. Mitch
Greenlick of Portland says he
doesn’t think House Bill
3200 “is in play.”
Greenlick tells The
Oregonian that the bill as
introduced goes too far in
not only banning the sale of
such weapons but in limiting
each gun owner to continued
possession of just one of the
firearms.
He says he also disagrees
with a provision that would
allow state police to investigate gun owners who possess
one of the weapons to make
sure the guns are safely
stored.
Train hits truck
hauling jet fuel
UMATILLA (AP) —
Oregon State Police say a
truck hauling 10,000 gallons
of jet fuel overturned onto
D I G E S T
railroad tracks in northeastern Oregon, where the truck
cab and a cargo tanker were
hit by a train. The truck driver escaped with minor
injuries and no environmental damage was reported.
Trooper Jerrad Little says
a truck driven by 72-year-old
Richard James of San
Antonio, Texas, ran off U.S.
Highway 730 on Monday
morning in the Umatilla area.
The truck and its tankers
went down an embankment
and overturned, with the
truck cab ending up on Union
Pacific tracks.
Twin guards accused of
impersonating police
MEDFORD (AP) — Twin
brothers who co-own a
Medford security business
have been accused of impersonating police.
Medford police say 29year-old Jason Lee Libby and
his brother Donald were
arrested late last week in
connection with January
incidents.
Police say Jason Libby
handcuffed a man who used
the bathroom but did not
bring any clothes to the
laundry business Libby was
hired to watch.
The following day, police
say, an officer found Donald
Libby performing field
sobriety tests on a teen driver. Libby wore a uniform and
had been driving an
unmarked Ford Crown
Victoria with a spotlight.
Gunman shot by
officers at RV park dies
SILVERTON (AP) —
Authorities say a gunman
who was shot by officers after
he wounded one person at a
Silverton, RV park has died.
Marion County sheriff’s
spokesman Don Thomson
also says a man wounded in
Monday’s shooting at the
Silver Spur RV park east of
Salem is hospitalized in stable
condition.
The
spokesman says a woman
initially reported as wounded was a witness who was
unhurt.
Obituaries
Ram Narayan Mishra
April 4, 1943 - Feb. 22, 2013
A viewing visitation for
Ram Narayan Mishra, 69, of
Coos Bay will be held from 5
to 7:30 p.m.
T h u r s d a y,
Feb. 28, at
Coos Bay
Chapel, 685
Anderson
Ave., followed by a
c h a p e l
funeral
Ram Mishra
service at
8:30 a.m. Friday, March 1,
with Hindu Priest Pandit
Salik Ram Mishra, of
Vancouver, B.C., Canada,
officiating. Cremation rites
will follow at Ocean View
Gardens
Memory
Crematory, 1525 Ocean Blvd.
NW in Coos Bay.
Ram was born April 4,
1943, in Viria, Fiji. He died
Feb. 22, 2013, in Coos Bay.
Ram went to school in the
Fiji Islands, having to travel
away from home to further
his education. In the Fiji
Islands, he served on the Fiji
Harley Nissen
Harley A. Nissen
Nov. 26, 1919 - Feb. 6, 2013
At his request, no pubilc
services will be held for
Harley A. Nissen, 93, of
North Bend.
Harley was born Nov. 26,
1919, in Oakland, Calif. He
died Feb. 6 2013, in North
Bend.
Harley had a great love for
flying and joined the U.S. Air
Force during World War II.
After his discharge, at the
end of the war, he remained
in the reserves and attained
the rank of major upon his
reitirement, but flying and
airplanes would remain an
everlasting love of his.
Harley retired after a long
career with Western Bank.
Police Force. Prior to his
migration to the United
States almost 50 years ago,
he married Bijay Datt whom
he was married to until her
death in 2006. Ram married
Kalian Sharma in 2006. In
Coos Bay, Ram worked for
Weyerhaeuser almost 25
years until their closing. He
was a reserve Coos Bay
police officer, was an active
casual longshoreman with
ILWU Local 12, and also
owned his own maintenance
service and operated rentals
in the Coos Bay, Portland
and San Francisco Bay areas.
Most recently Ram worked
as a classroom assistant in
the special education classrooms in Coos County.
Wherever, and with
whomever he worked, he left
a lasting memory with his
friendly smile and great attitude. Ram will be remembered for his tireless work
ethic and desire to have his
children succeed in life.
Ram is survived by his
wife, Kalian Mishra of Coos
Bay; son and daughter-in-
law, Dr. Jon Ram and Loreena
Mishra of Hermiston; son
and daughter-in-law, Dr.
Naveen Ram and Purnima
Mishra of Roseville, Calif.;
nephew raised as son,
Narendra Awasthi of
Phoeniz, Ariz.; grandchildren, Kaajal, Varsha and
Aakash Ram Mishra of
Hermiston and Nayan and
Shiven Mishra of Roseville,
Calif.; siblings, Ram Lagan
Mishra of Fiji Islands, Jai
Narain Mishra, Shiu Narain
Mishra and Satya Wati of
Coos Bay; numerous uncles,
aunts, cousins, nieces,
nephews; and other family
relatives and friends.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Uma and Shiu
Kuar Dutt Mishra; wife, Bijay
Mishra; sister, Kushma Wati;
and brother, Lalu Prasad
Mishra.
Arrangements are under
the direction of Coos Bay
Chapel, 541-267-3131.
Friends and family are
encouraged to sign the guest
book at www.coosbayfh.com
and www.theworld.ink.com.
Upon his retirement, he and
Gladys spent many years
traveling the western United
States in their RV. This
brought great joy to both of
them and they made many
new friends duing their travels.
Harley is survived by his
brother, Wesley E. Nissen;
son, Donald L. Nissen and
wife, Donna; daughter, Linda
Brown-Bolda and husband,
Tom; daughter-in-law,
Karen; six grandchidren; and
nine great-grandchildrne.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Hans and
Hilda (Lax) Nissen; loving
wife of 68 years, Gladys
(Shulte) Nissen; and son,
Wesley A. Nissen.
Harley and Gladys will be
interred at the Veterans
Memorial Cemetery in
White City in a private ceremony for family.
Sign the guestbook at
www.theworldlink.com.
The World publishes
death notices and service
listings as a free public
service. Obituaries and
“Card of Thanks” items are
supplied by families or
funeral homes and are published for a fee. For details,
contact Amanda at [email protected], or
541-269-1222 ext. 269.
• Cremation
• Funeral Service
“Our family
serving your family”
Locally
Owned
&
Operated
541-267-4216
405 Elrod • Coos Bay
John & Tanya Nelson
SALEM — Efforts to
replace a bridge connecting
Portland with Vancouver,
Wash., are headed toward
speed bumps in the form of a
familiar point of contention
in the area — light rail.
A $3.4 billion plan to add
lanes to the perpetually bottlenecked span over
Interstate 5 sailed through
the Oregon House on
Monday, and the proposal,
which Gov. John Kitzhaber
supports, could clear the
state Senate next week.
It
will
then
be
Washington state’s turn to
decide whether fund its
share of the project, and
political leaders in the area
are divided.
“It would be a disaster for
our county,” said David
Madore, a commissioner in
Clark County, which
includes Vancouver.
Madore’s opposition centers on a plan to expand light
rail service with the bridge.
Madore says he supports an
expanded vehicle bridge, but
considers light rail a waste of
money that could be better
spent on roads and highways. He fears the metro
Portland transit agency,
TriMet, is trying to expand
its tax base into Washington
state.
“Clark County is not to be
a parking lot for Portland or a
bedroom community for
Portland,” he said. “Clark
County is not Portland, and
we’d like to be able to keep
Clark County, Clark County.”
Vancouver voters have
signaled opposition to the
light rail expansion plan as
well, rejecting a new sales tax
to help pay for such a project
in November.
Light rail supporters,
however, say that component is necessary to get fed-
eral transit funds for the
project. Three Democratic
lawmakers from Vancouver
wrote Washington Gov. Jay
Inslee earlier this month
backing the construction
project, including light rail.
Opposition to the project
goes beyond light rail. Critics
of government spending
question the cost of the project and neighborhood groups
worry about the impact of
pollution and congestion at
other chokepoints on
Interstate 5.
Still, there are powerful
supporters, including the
governors of Oregon and
Washington and the mayor
of Vancouver. Business
groups are eager to speed the
flow of freight through the I5 corridor. And unions are
looking forward to thousands of construction jobs.
“We’ve all got a responsibility to help future generations, our children, their
children, just as we are benefiting from the infrastructure
investments” made by earlier generations, said
Democratic Rep. Tobias Read
of Beaverton, one of the project’s chief proponents. “We
are coasting, in many ways,
on the fumes of the investments that they made.”
The existing bridges are a
chokepoint for traffic on I-5
and are vulnerable to damage
in a major earthquake.
Severe traffic snarls are
common when a section is
lifted to allow tall river traffic
to pass.
The $3.4 billion project
would include two new double-decker bridges with five
travel lanes in each direction
— up from three — and space
for pedestrians, bicyclists
and light-rail trains.
Oregon and Washington
are each responsible for $450
million, with the federal government and toll revenue
paying the rest.
Death Notices
Arthur Woodcock — 70,
of Bandon, died Feb. 21, 2013,
in Bandon. Arrangements
are pending with Amling
Schroeder Funeral Service,
Bandon, 541-347-2907.
Mary J. Coleman — 95,
of North Bend, died Feb. 25,
2013, in North Bend.
Arrangements are pending
with Coos Bay Chapel, 541267-3131.
Harry J. Guye Jr. — 70, of
Coos Bay, died Feb. 24, 2013,
in Coos Bay. Arrangements
are pending with Coos Bay
Chapel, 541-267-3131.
Alice Valerie Allen —
61, of Coos Bay, passed away
Feb. 22, 2013, at Coos Bay.
Arrangements are pending
with Nelson’s Bay Area
Mortuary, 541-267-4216.
Ethel I. Wildman — 94,
of North Bend, passed away
Feb. 24, 2013, in North Bend.
Arrangements are pending
with Coos Bay Chapel, 541267-3131.
John Thomas Hawkins
— 77, of Myrtle Point, died
Feb. 23, 2013, in Florence.
Services entrusted to
Amling/Schroeder of Myrtle
Point, 541-572-2524.
Glenda “Kay” Groth —
71, of Coos Bay, died Feb. 15,
2013, in Coos Bay. Services
pending
with
are
of
Amling/Schroeder
Coquille, 541-396-3846.
Funerals
Saturday, March 2
Timothy Byron Pruett,
2 p.m., memorial service,
Family Worship Center, 465
NW Lillie Dr., Winston.
Sunday, March 3
John Thomas Hawkins,
1 to 5 p.m., celebration of life,
94304 Matheney Creek.
Healthy CAN Be Simple
FREE Public Events!
- Wednesday, March 6th 3pm: Discover Essential Oils @ Kaffee 101, Coos Bay
7pm: Women’s Health @ Red Lion Hotel, Coos Bay
Questions? Call Jennifer 907-252-1128
and see our ad at TheWorldLink.com on March 2 & 3!
North
N o r t h Bend
B e n d Chapel
Chapel
Cremation
C re m a t i o n & FFuneral
u n e r a l SService
ervice
Established in 1913, formerly Peterson, Grimm &
Campbell-Watkins Funeral Homes.
• Simple cremation & burial.
• Convenient downtown location.
• Full-service facility including large chapel, reception,
private viewing & conference rooms.
• Merchandise options include caskets, urns, burial &
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• Pet cremation.
• Payment terms & options.
• All funeral & insurance plans accepted.
Locally owned by Tom Boynton
Est. 1913
541-756-0440
2014 McPherson Avenue
North Bend, OR
www.coosbayfh.com
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Mediterranean-style diets
found to cut heart risks
Former
surgeon
general
dies
NEW YORK (AP) — Dr. C.
Everett Koop has long been
regarded as the nation’s doctor— even though it has been
nearly a quarter-century
since he was surgeon general.
Koop, who died Monday at
his home in Hanover, N.H., at
age 96, was by far the best
known and most influential
person to carry that title.
Koop, a 6-foot-1 evangelical
Presbyterian with a biblical
prophet’s beard, donned a
public health uniform in the
early 1980s and became an
enduring, science-based
national spokesman on
health issues.
He served for eight years
during the Reagan administration and was a breed apart from
his political bosses. He thundered about the evils of tobacco companies during a multiyear campaign to drive down
smoking rates, and he became
the government’s spokesman
on AIDS when it was still considered a “gay disease” by
much of the public.
Even before that, he had
been a leading figure in medicine. He
was one of
the first U.S.
doctors to
specialize in
pediatric
surgery at a
time when
children
C. Everett Koop with comFormer Surgeon
plicated
General
conditions
were often
simply written off as
untreatable. In the 1950s, he
drew national headlines for
innovative surgeries such as
separating conjoined twins.
His medical heroics are
well noted, but he may be
better remembered for transforming from a pariah in the
eyes of the public health
community into a remarkable
servant who elevated the
influence of the surgeon general — if only temporarily.
“He set the bar high for all
who followed in his footsteps,” said Dr. Richard Carmona, who served as surgeon
general a decade later under
President George W. Bush.
Koop’s religious beliefs
grew after the 1968 death of
his son David in a mountainclimbing accident, and he
became an outspoken opponent of abortion. His
activism is what brought him
to the attention of the
administration of President
Ronald Reagan, who decided
to nominate him for surgeon
general in 1981. Though once
a position with real power,
surgeon generals had been
stripped of most of their
responsibilities in the 1960s.
He surprised the officials
who had appointed him by
setting aside his religious
beliefs and feelings about
abortion and instead waging
a series of science-based
public health crusades.
He was arguably most
effective on smoking.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pour on the olive oil,
preferably over fish and vegetables: One of the longest
and most scientific tests of a
Mediterranean diet suggests
this style of eating can cut
the chance of suffering
heart-related problems,
especially strokes, in older
people at high risk of them.
The study lasted five years
and involved about 7,500
people in Spain. Those who
ate Mediterranean-style with
lots of olive oil or nuts had a
30 percent lower risk of major
cardiovascular problems
compared to those who were
told to follow a low-fat diet
but who in reality, didn’t cut
fat very much. Mediterranean
The Associated Press
Two-year-old Rylee Muths of Lawrence, Kan., puts her mark on a
14-foot-plus snowman in Lawrence, Kan. on Monday.
Second winter
storm blasts
central U.S.
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)
— The second major snowstorm in a week battered
the nation’s midsection
today, dropping a half-foot
or more of snow across
Missouri and Kansas and
cutting power to thousands. At least three deaths
were blamed on the blizzard, and gusting winds
blew drifts more than 2 feet
high and created treacherous driving conditions for
those who dared the morning commute.
About 80,000 homes
and businesses in northwest Missouri, northeast
Kansas and western Oklahoma awoke to no power
as heavy, wet snow
weighed on power lines.
Kansas City, Mo., was in a
state of emergency as
blinding snowfall — worsened by sustained gusts
estimated at 30 mph or
higher — made road traffic
too dangerous. About 8
inches of new snow had
fallen on parts of the
Kansas City metro area as
the sun rose today.
Flights in and out of
Kansas City International
Airport were canceled,
schools, government
offices and businesses
across the region were
closed. City buses were
getting stuck.
Numerous accidents
were reported in the area,
and Mayor Sly James
declared the emergency in
an unwanted encore to a
major snowstorm that
dumped nearly a foot of
snow on his city just five
days earlier. He urged residents to stay home, given
that the new storm was
expected to dump nearly a
foot of new snow on the
city.
“This one has the
potential to be quite serious,” James said.
In rural Kansas, blowing,
wet snow forced truckers
off the road and many had
no idea when they’d be able
to get going again. Robert
Branscecum, a trucker from
Campton, Ill., hauling WalMart merchandise to Dallas,
had been stuck at Beto
Junction near Lebo since
Monday evening.
“It’s hell,it’s straight hell.
It’s snowing,blowing,drifting, everything,” Branscecum said. “The cars are
stuck in the parking lot.
Some of the trucks that
tried to leave got stuck. I’m
not leaving anytime soon.”
A strong low pressure
system fueled the storm,
which also included heavy
rain and thunderstorms in
eastern Oklahoma and
Texas.
The storm knocked
power out to tens of thousands of homes in Texas
and Oklahoma and was
blamed for the death of a
21-year-old man whose
SUV hit an icy patch on
Interstate 70 in northwestern Kansas and overturned
Monday. A separate crash
on I-70 in western Kansas
killed a female passenger
and injured three others
after their pickup truck
rolled on the ice Monday
night. In Oklahoma, a person was killed after 15 inches of snow brought down
part of a roof in the northwest town of Woodward.
In the Texas Panhandle
on Monday, strong wind
gusts and heavy snow created whiteout conditions
and made all roads
impassable.
L i s a M . Po r t e r, C . P. A .
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®
meant lots of fruit, fish,
chicken, beans, tomato sauce,
salads, and wine and little
baked goods and pastries.
Mediterranean diets have
long been touted as hearthealthy, but that’s based on
observational studies that
can’t prove the point. The
new research is much
stronger because people
were assigned diets to follow
for a long time and carefully
monitored. Doctors even did
lab tests to verify that the
Mediterranean diet folks
were consuming more olive
oil or nuts as recommended.
Most of these people were
taking medicines for high
cholesterol and blood pressure, and researchers did not
alter those proven treat-
ments, said one study leader,
Dr. Ramon Estruch of Hospital Clinic in Barcelona.
But as a first step to prevent
heart problems,“we think diet
is better than a drug” because
it has few if any side effects,
Estruch said. “Diet works.”
Results were published
online Monday by the New
England Journal of Medicine.
People in the study were not
given rigid menus or calorie
goals because weight loss was
not the aim.That could be why
they found the “diets” easy to
stick with — only about 7 percent dropped out within two
years. There were twice as
many dropouts in the low-fat
group than among those eating Mediterranean-style.
N.Y. wife: Officer wanted
to kill me, eat others
BY LARRY NEUMEISTER
AND TOM HAYS
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — The
estranged wife of a police
officer struggled to keep her
composure Monday as she
testified about discovering
shocking online chats and
other evidence on his computer showing he had discussed killing her and
abducting, torturing and
eating other women.
“I was going to be tied up
by my feet and my throat slit,
and they would have fun
watching the blood gush out
of me because I was young,”
Kathleen Mangan-Valle told
a Manhattan jury that one
chat revealed.
Mangan-Valle, 27, also
read about plans to put one
friend in a suitcase, wheel
her out of her building and
murder her. Two other
women were “going to be
raped in front of each other
to heighten their fears,” while
another was going to be
roasted alive over an open
fire, she said.
“The suffering was for his
enjoyment, and he wanted to
make it last as long as possible,” she said.
Mangan-Valle broke down
in tears several times, but the
that prosecutors say he used
to help build a list of potential targets. A conviction on
the kidnapping count carries
a possible life sentence.
The officer has claimed his
online discussions of cannibalism were harmless fetish
fantasies. But in opening
statements Monday, a prosecutor said “very real women”
were put in jeopardy.
“Make no mistake,” said
Assistant U.S. Attorney Randall Jackson. “Gilbert Valle
The Associated Press
was very serious about these
This undated photo submitted plans.”
into evidence by Assistant Federal
Defense attorney Julia
Defender Julia L. Gatto shows Gatto argued that her client
Gilberto Valle with his daughter.
“never intended to kidnap
anyone.” She added: “You
emotional peak of the day can’t convict people for their
came when a defense attor- thoughts, even if they’re sick.”
A college graduate and
ney showed her pictures of
Officer Gilberto Valle in uni- New York Police Department
form feeding their newborn patrolman, Valle appeared to
daughter, prompting her and be leading a normal life
Valle to openly weep as the before “things got bad,” his
judge sent the jury away for wife said. “Weird stuff started happening.”
an afternoon break.
Mangan-Valle testified her
The drama came on the first
day of testimony at the closely husband began asking queswatched trial of the 28-year- tions about where she liked to
old Valle, a baby-faced defen- jog, what the lighting was like
dant dubbed the “Cannibal and whether other people
Cop” by city tabloids.
were around. Using spyware
Valle is accused of con- on his computer, she said, she
spiracy to kidnap a woman uncovered gruesome photos
and unauthorized use of a and the names, heights and
law enforcement database weights of women.
Macy’s CEO
testifies in
Martha
Stewart trial
NEW YORK (AP) —
Macy’s CEO Terry Lundgren
testified on Monday that he
hung up on home diva
Martha Stewart after she
called to tell him that the
The Associated Press
company that bears her name
had inked a deal with J.C. Macy’s Chairman, President and CEO Terry Lundgren arrives to court in
Penney to open shops within New York on Monday.
most of the chain’s stores.
Lundgren, whose company ney’s CEO Ron Johnson and sales. That’s because even
had been the exclusive carrier Martha Stewart, who found- though the home area is typof some Martha Stewart’s ed Martha Stewart Living.
ically slow turning, it drives
branded products, hasn’t
Martha Stewart’s brand, shoppers to the store.
spoken to her since that which has been at Macy’s
“I need the Martha Stewphone call on Dec. 6, 2011 — stores since 2007, has been art business to be exclusive,”
even though he used to be important to the department Lundgren said. “I don’t have
store chain. Under Lund- a substitute.”
good friends with Stewart.
His testimony is a culmina“I was sick to my stomach,” gren’s leadership, Macy’s has
Lundgren testified on Monday focused on building exclusive tion of a legal battle between
in New York Supreme Court. brands like Martha Stewart the three companies that
“I can’t remember hanging up that are not carried by rivals started shortly after the Penney-Martha Stewart deal was
to get shoppers to the store.
on anyone in my life.”
In the home area, exclusiv- announced in December 2011.
The testimony comes as
Macy’s sued Martha StewMacy’s Inc. and J.C. Penney ity is key. Lundgren testified
Co. duke it out in court over on Monday that Macy’s had art Living in January 2012,
the partnership with Martha built the Martha Stewart saying the company breached
Stewart Living Omnimedia. brand to be the biggest in its a long-standing contract
The trial, which began home business. Sales last year when it penned the deal with
Wednesday, focuses on were up 8 percent, double the Penney, which invested $38.5
million in a nearly 17 percent
whether Macy’s has the rate for the entire company.
Lundgren said Macy’s has stake. In a separate lawsuit,
exclusive right to sell some of
Martha Stewart branded spent 40 percent of its over- Macy’s sued Penney claiming
products such as cookware, all marketing on the Martha it had no regard for the Macy’s
bedding and bath items. Stewart brand and other contract and that Johnson
Other witnesses that are labels in the home area, even had set out to steal the busiexpected to take the stand in though the home category ness that it had worked hard
coming days include Pen- represents 17 percent of total to develop.
Jindal faces troubles in his home state
®
Financial Advisor
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2182 Broadway
North Bend, OR 97459
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BATON ROUGE, La. (AP)
— Gov. Bobby Jindal faces
deepening troubles in his
home state even as he dishes
out advice on how the divided GOP can regroup and
looks to position himself as a
national party front man.
The new head of the
Republican Governors Association has made a series of
cuts to health services and
colleges, drawing criticism
from affected constituents
and Republicans who say
he’s not cut enough.
And while he delighted
conservative policy wonks
nationally with his signature measures overhauling
education and public
employee pensions, those
laws are tied up in state
court as Republican judges
claim constitutional concerns.
Recent polls also suggest
that Jindal’s once-formidable job performance rating
has fallen below 50 percent
just over a year after he was
re-elected without serious
opposition.
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World
Syrian missiles kill
at least 141 in Aleppo
WORLD
D I G E S T
First Gaza rocket in 3
mos. rattles ceasefire
JERUSALEM (AP) — A
rocket fired from the Gaza
Strip struck Israel today as
tensions are mounting in the
region weeks ahead of President Barack Obama’s visit.
Police spokesman Micky
Rosenfeld said remains of the
rocket were found south of the
city of Ashkelon, in southern
Israel. The attack caused damage to a road but no injuries, he
said. It was the first such projectile from the Palestinian territory to hit Israel since IsraelGaza hostilities last November.
The Associated Press
The rocket fire came one
day after Israeli troops injured Rescue workers remove a body from the scene of a balloon crash outside al-Dhabaa village, just west of the
two Palestinian teenagers city of Luxor, 320 miles south of Cairo, Egypt, today.
near a holy site close to Bethlehem, during one of the
many demonstrations Palestinians in the West Bank have
staged in recent days.
Gunmen kill Pakistani
escorting polio team
PESHAWAR, Pakistan (AP)
— Gunmen shot and killed a
police officer today who was
protecting a team of polio
workers during a U.N.backed vaccination campaign
in northwestern Pakistan.
It was the latest of several
attacks on Pakistan’s efforts
to eradicate the deadly disease, found in only three
countries in the world. Militant extremists view the vaccination campaigns as Western-backed plots to gain
intelligence in sensitive areas
and have frequently targeted
the medical staff and those
protecting polio teams.
No polio workers were
wounded in today’s attack in
the Mardan district of Khyber
Pakhtunkhwa province, said
police officer Fazal Wahid.
Kerry pushes European
free trade in Germany
BERLIN (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
pushed today for a free-trade
agreement between the
United States and Europe,
saying it is a priority for
President Barack Obama’s
second term that would help
create jobs and growth on
both sides of the Atlantic.
Germany, Europe’s largest
economy, has strongly supported the idea and Westerwelle said that he hoped the
groundwork could be done
quicikly to begin negotiations
with the U.S. on the agreement by the summer.
Still, negotiations may not
be easy or short, with agriculture likely to be one tricky area.
Kerry’s swing through
Berlin was his second stop on
a nine-country dash through
Europe and the Middle East,
Kerry’s first trip as secretary
of state.
Senate to end stall on
nominee Hagel vote
WASHINGTON (AP) — A
deeply divided Senate is
moving toward a vote on
President Barack Obama’s
contentious choice of Chuck
Hagel to head the Defense
Department, with the former
Republican senator on track
to win confirmation after a
protracted political fight.
Twelve days after Republicans stalled the nomination,
the Senate was slated to vote
today on proceeding with the
Hagel selection after GOP lawmakers signaled late Monday
they would end their delaying
tactics. If Hagel gets the necessary votes, it would just be a
matter of time for a simple upor-down vote, although
Republicans could insist on the
maximum 30 hours of debate
before a final vote.
area by a HRW researcher.
Aleppo, Syria’s largest city,
has been the scene of some of
the heaviest fighting of the
civil war pitting President
Bashar Assad’s regime against
rebels bent on ousting him.
Rebels quickly seized several
neighborhoods in an offensive
on the city in July, but the government still controls some
districts and the battle has
developed into a bloody stalemate,with heavy street fighting
that has ruined neighborhoods
and forced thousands to flee.
Egypt hot air balloon
crash leaves 19 dead
LUXOR, Egypt (AP) — A
hot air balloon flying over
Egypt’s ancient city of Luxor
caught fire and crashed into a
sugar cane field today, killing
at least 19 foreign tourists in
one of the world’s deadliest
ballooning accidents and
handing a new blow to Egypt’s
ailing tourism industry.
The casualties included
French, British, Belgian,
Hungarian, Japanese nationals and nine tourists from
Hong Kong, Luxor Governor
Ezzat Saad told reporters.
Three survivors — two British
tourists and the Egyptian
pilots — were taken to a local
hospital, but one of the
Britons later died of injuries.
Egypt’s civil aviation minister, Wael el-Maadawi, suspended hot air balloon flights
and flew to Luxor to lead the
investigation into the crash.
The balloon, which was
carrying 20 tourists and a
pilot, was landing after a
flight over the southern town,
when a landing cable got
caught around a helium tube
and a fire erupted, according
to an investigator with the
state prosecutor’s office.
The balloon then shot up in
the air, the investigator said.
The fire set off an explosion of
a gas canister and the balloon
plunged some 1,000 feet to
the ground, according to an
Egyptian security official. It
crashed in a sugar cane field
outside al-Dhabaa village just
west of Luxor, 320 miles south
of Cairo, the official said.
The official and the investigator spoke on condition of
anonymity because they
were not authorized to talk to
the media.
Hot air ballooning is a popular pastime for tourists in
Luxor, usually at sunrise to
give a dramatic view over the
pharaonic temples of Karnak
and Luxor and the Valley of the
Kings, a desert valley where
many pharaoh, notably King
Tutenkhamun, were buried.
New talks on Iran nuclear
program offer slim hope
BY LARA JAKES AND
PETER LEONARD
mise will yield any major
breakthroughs, but negotiators are optimistically casting
it as a stepping stone toward
reaching a workable solution.
Officials described the latest diplomatic discussions as
a way to build confidence with
Iran as the country steadfastly
maintains its right to enrich
uranium in the face of harsh
international sanctions.
Mehdi Mohammadi, a
member of the Iranian delegation, said Tehran was prepared to make an offer of its
own to end the deadlock but
will resist some of the West’s
core demands.
The Obama administration
is pushing for diplomacy to
solve the impasse but has not
ruled out the possibility of
military intervention in Iran
to prevent it from acquiring a
nuclear weapon. Israel has
threatened it will use all
means to stop Iran from being
able to build a bomb, potentially as soon as this summer,
raising the specter of a possible Mideast war.
Italian election unclear;
global markets drop
5 ACRES PLUS
The Associated Press
ALMATY, Kazakhstan —
World powers began a new
round of high-level talks with
Iranian officials today, trying
to find a way out of a yearslong tussle over Tehran’s
nuclear program and its
feared ability to make atomic
weapons in the future.
Few believe the latest
attempt to forge a compro-
ROME (AP) — Italy
emerged from elections
today with no clear winner,
driving markets around the
world markedly lower as
investors worried that one of
Europe’s biggest economies
would be unable to build a
governing coalition that can
stay the course on unpopular
austerity measures.
A day after polling ended, a
few seats in Parliament based
on Italians’ voting abroad still
remained to be decided, but
their numbers won’t ease the
gridlock. European leaders
pleaded with politicians in
Italy to quickly form a government to continue to enact
reforms to lower Italy’s critically high debt and spare
Europe another spike in its
four-year financial crisis.
If Italian parties fail to form
a governing coalition, new
elections would be required,
causing more uncertainty and
a leadership vacuum.
The results of the election
are a rejection of the tough
austerity approach of the
previous technocratic government led by Mario Monti.
A center-left coalition led by
Pier Luigi Bersani appears to
have won a narrow victory in
the lower house of parliament, while the Senate looks
split with no party in control.
Italy’s FTSE MIB index was
trading 3.8 percent lower having earlier been nearly 5 percent down at one point today.
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Increase in indigent
burials for counties
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) —
Counties across Kentucky, like
much of the country, are seeing more cases of unclaimed
bodies and families who can’t
afford to bury or cremate a
loved one. Every situation is
unique, but coroners and local
government officials tell a
similar story: The economic
downturn has left many people without the money to pay
for funeral services that can
cost thousands of dollars, and
it’s falling on cities and states
to cover the bills.
How unclaimed remains are
handled varies by state, and in
many cases, in which county
the person dies. Sixteen states
now subsidize the burial or
cremation of unclaimed bodies. Most of the state programs
provide disposition services to
people on Medicaid, a cost
that has grown along with
Medicaid rolls.
BEIRUT (AP) — At least
141 people, half of them children, were killed when the
Syrian military fired at least
four missiles into the northern province of Aleppo last
week, Human Rights Watch
said today.
The international rights
group said the strikes hit residential areas and called them
an “escalation of unlawful
attacks against Syria’s civilian
population.” The statement
from the New York-based
group followed a visit to the
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K A8 •The World • Tuesday, February 26,2013
Y
K
Weather
South Coast
National forecast
Forecast highs for Wednesday, Feb. 27
Sunny
Pt. Cloudy
Cloudy
Seattle
39° | 50°
Billings
21° | 39°
San Francisco
45° | 64°
Minneapolis
25° | 36°
Curry County Coast
Chicago
30° | 36°
Denver
12° | 36°
New York
37° | 52°
Detroit
28° | 36°
Washington D.C.
41° | 55°
Los Angeles
50° | 75°
Atlanta
41° | 55°
El Paso
30° | 55°
Houston
41° | 70°
Fronts
Cold
-0s
0s
10s
20s 30s 40s
Warm Stationary
50s 60s
70s
80s
Pressure
Low
High
90s 100s 110s
12 14B
pcdy Philadelphia
Temperatures indicate Monday’s high and Fairbanks
47 28
rn
overnightShowers
low to 5 a.m.
Fargo
19
cdy Phoenix
64Ice43
clr
Rain
T-storms 28 Flurries
Snow
Hi Lo Prc Otlk Flagstaff
42 18
clr Pittsburgh
47 32
rn
Albuquerque
49 25
clr Fresno
67 40
clr Pocatello
33 17 .06 cdy
Anchorage
31 26
cdy Green Bay
36 20
cdy Portland,Maine
41 32
pcdy
Atlanta
49 38 1.51 rn Hartford Spgfld
41 29
cdy Providence
42 34
pcdy
Light
to
heavy
snow
in
the
Ohio
Valley
Valley
and
Great
Lakes
will
Atlantic City
48 23
rn Honolulu
79 72
clr Raleigh-Durham
41 33
rn
Austin spread into
65 42northern
clr New
HoustonEngland76as45a winter
.01 clr storm
Reno lifts
57 27
clr
Baltimore
48 26 from
rn the
Indianapolis
44 Meanwhile,
33 .23 rn Richmond
29
rn
northeastward
Ohio Valley.
the focus of46
Billings
46 31
cdy Jackson,Miss.
64 46 .75 cdy Sacramento
63 37
clr
heavy
rains
will
shift
into
southern
New
England.
Birmingham
58 49 1.07 pcdy Jacksonville
62 59 2.17 rn St Louis
43 35 1.00 sno
Boise
38 22 .12 cdy Kansas City
36 31 .51 sno Salt Lake City
36 22
sno
Boston
41 29
cdy Key West
82 77
pcdy Weather
San AngeloUnderground
46 30• AP clr
Buffalo
34 26
cdy Las Vegas
58 39
clr San Diego
69 47
clr
Burlington,Vt.
36 30
cdy Lexington
49 39 .02 rn San Francisco
58 41
clr
Casper
29 24 .03 sno Little Rock
50 43 1.46 cdy San Jose
61 40
clr
Charleston,S.C.
50 41 .56 rn Los Angeles
71 45
clr Santa Fe
44 17
clr
49 36 .03 rn Louisville
Charleston,W.Va.
53 41 .19 rn Seattle
51 38
cdy
Charlotte,N.C.
43 33 .47 rn Madison
39 27
clr Sioux Falls
28 16
cdy
Cheyenne
33 16
sno Memphis
60 46 .72 cdy Spokane
42 27 .13 cdy
Chicago
43 34
sno Miami Beach
86 76
pcdy Syracuse
38 19
pcdy
Cincinnati
45 36 .15 rn Midland-Odessa
48 22
clr Tampa
81 73
rn
Cleveland
41 26
rn Milwaukee
38 31
sno Toledo
41 29
cdy
Colorado Springs 33 14
sno Mpls-St Paul
37 17
cdy Tucson
58 34
clr
Columbus,Ohio
46 35
rn Missoula
43 29 .01 cdy Tulsa
42 33 1.35 cdy
Concord,N.H.
37 28
cdy Nashville
66 51 .16 rn Washington,D.C.
52 33
rn
62 41
clr New Orleans
Dallas-Ft Worth
67 47 1.05 clr W. Palm Beach
84 75
cdy
Daytona Beach
81 69 .25 rn New York City
45 35
cdy Wichita
35 30 .30 clr
Denver
29 08
sno Norfolk,Va.
42 34
rn Wilmington,Del.
49 26
rn
Des Moines
40 32
sno Oklahoma City
41 33 .78 pcdy National Temperature Extremes
Detroit
41 30
sno Omaha
34 27
cdy High Monday 88 at Orlando, Fla.
El Paso
53 37
clr Orlando
88 67 .12 rn Low Tuesday -8 at Gunnison County, Colo.
Heavy Precipitation Continues In East
SEQUESTER
Heat program
faces 13% cut
Continued from Page A1
supplemental security
income payments are also
exempt.
Still, the Pentagon will
feel the brunt of half the
cuts. Pay for active military
is off-limits for cuts, so the
rest of the defense budget
must absorb the hit. The
Obama administration says
defense contractors have
already ramped down work,
contributing to a dip in economic activity in the fourth
quarter of last year. The
Navy has decided not to
deploy an aircraft carrier as
planned to the Persian Gulf.
VICTIM
Continued from Page A1
Gertson and Longhenry
appeared before Coos County Circuit Court Judge
Richard Barron for a brief
hearing Monday afternoon,
in which bail was set at $1.5
million each. Both men were
assigned public defenders,
and a grand jury is scheduled
to convene Thursday to determine whether there is enough
evidence to indict them on
murder charges.
If they are indicted, they
will be arraigned next at 8:30
Tonight: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 37. Light
and variable wind.
Wednesday: Partly sunny, with a high near 56. East
southeast wind 5 to 9 mph.
Wednesday Night: A 40 percent chance of rain. Cloudy,
with a low around 41. South southeast wind to 10 mph.
Thursday: A 50 percent chance of rain. Cloudy, with a
high near 56. South wind 11 to 13 mph.
Stock . . . . . . . . . Close
Frontier. . . . . . . . . . . 4.04
Intel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20.23
Kroger . . . . . . . . . . . 28.35
Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.23
8:30
4.06
20.76
28.51
1.22
Elsewhere, the White
House’s budget office says
long-term unemployed
Americans would lose an
average of more than $400 in
benefits over the year. The
cuts do not affect state unemployment benefits,which jobless workers typically get soon
after their loss of work. The
federal reductions could begin
immediately, though some
analysts say the government
could delay them for a short
period to avoid a harmful hit
on the economy.
Bill Hoagland, a former top
Republican Senate budget
aide and now senior vice president at the Bipartisan Policy
Center, a Washington think
tank, said the administration
must be “ betwixt and
between” when it comes to
addressing reductions in programs like jobless aid.
a.m. March 5.
Apartment neighbor
William Mutton, 56, said he
knew Hayes from their time
together at T.H.E. House, a
nearby temporary housing
shelter.
He said the victim was a
man who “had issues” but
was trying to get his life going
in the right direction.
“He isn’t the type to go out
looking for trouble,” he said.
“When I talked to him, he was
trying to better himself.”
Frasier refused to say
whether any evidence was
found inside the apartment
linking either suspect to
Microsoft . . . . . . . . . 27.37
Nike. . . . . . . . . . . . . 54.04
NW Natural. . . . . . . 45.26
Safeway. . . . . . . . . . 22.76
SkyWest. . . . . . . . . . 13.69
Starbucks. . . . . . . . . 53.21
27.43
54.14
45.29
23.03
13.63
53.08
Lowtemperatures
| High temps
Underground
daytime
Weather
forecast for
Feb.
27 conditions, low/high
Forecast
for Wednesday,
WASH.
Portland
39° | 52°
Newport
41° | 52°
Tonight: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 31. Calm
wind becoming south southeast around 5 mph.
Wednesday: Partly sunny, with a high near 55. East
southeast wind around 5 mph.
Wednesday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around
35. Northwest wind around 5 mph.
Thursday: A 20 percent chance of rain. Mostly cloudy,
with a high near 57. Southeast wind around 6 mph.
Willamette Valley
Tonight: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 36. South
wind around 6 mph.
Wednesday: Partly sunny, with a high near 51. Calm
wind becoming south southwest 5 to 7 mph.
Wednesday Night: A 40 percent chance of rain. Cloudy,
with a low around 39. South wind around 8 mph.
Thursday: Rain likely. Cloudy, with a high near 51.
South wind 9 to 11 mph. Chance of rain is 60%.
Portland area
Tonight: A chance of rain or drizzle. Mostly cloudy,
with a low around 40. South wind around 7 mph.
Wednesday: A 20 percent chance of showers. Mostly
cloudy, with a high near 52. Calm wind.
Wednesday Night: A 50 percent chance of rain. Cloudy,
with a low around 42. South southeast wind to 8 mph.
Thursday: Rain likely. Cloudy, with a high near 53.
Pendleton
34° | 54°
Bend
23° | 48°
Salem
34° | 52°
Klamath Falls
CALIF. 19° | 48°
Partly
Cloudy
Showers
Ice
Flurries
Rain
Snow
Weather Underground• AP
Oregon Temps
Temperature extremes and precipitation
for the 24 hours ending at 5 a.m. today.
Hi
Lo Prec
Astoria
48 35 0.11
Brookings
48 39
M
Corvallis
51
30 0.18
Eugene
50 29 0.10
Klamath Falls
41
19
T
La Grande
45 32 0.01
Medford
51
28 0.03
Newport
48 36 0.11
Pendleton
49 32 0.07
Portland
50 37 0.10
Redmond
43
17
T
Roseburg
51
32 0.02
Salem
50 33 0.04
Extended outlook
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
Chance of rain
53/41
Rain likely
55/45
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Mostly cloudy
60/45
Chance of rain
57/44
Central Oregon
Tonight: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 25. Light
and variable wind.
Wednesday: Partly sunny, with a high near 53.
Southwest wind around 7 mph.
Wednesday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around
28. South wind 3 to 8 mph.
Thursday: A 20 percent chance of rain. Mostly cloudy,
with a high near 50. Southwest wind 6 to 13 mph.
© 2013 Wunderground.com
Thunderstorms
Cloudy
North Coast
Tonight: Rain likely. Mostly cloudy, with a low around
43. South wind 11 to 18 mph. Chance of rain is 70%.
Wednesday: A slight chance of showers. Mostly
cloudy, with a high near 49. Chance of rain is 30%.
Wednesday Night: Rain likely. Cloudy, with a low
around 45. South wind 10 to 16 mph.
Thursday: Rain. High near 50. South southwest wind
17 to 20 mph. Chance of rain is 80%.
IDAHO
Ontario
27° | 46°
Eugene
36° | 52°
North Bend
Coos Bay
37° | 52°
Medford
28° | 55°
Local high, low, rainfall
Monday: High 48, low 41
Rain: N/A
Total rainfall to date: 6.25 inches
Rainfall to date last year: 7.32 inches
Average rainfall to date: 16.96 inches
The Tide Tables
To find the tide prediction for your area, add or
subtract minutes as indicated. To find your estimated tidal height, multiply the listed height by
the high or low ratio for your area.
Location High time
-0:18
Bandon
-0:40
Brookings
Charleston
-0:11
Coos Bay
+1:20
Florence
+0:38
-0:28
Port Orford
+1:05
Reedsport
Umpqua River -0:01
HIGH TIDE
LOW TIDE
Date
26-Feb
27-Feb
28-Feb
1-Mar
2-Mar
A.M.
time
12:46
1:16
1:47
2:16
2:54
Date
26-Feb
27-Feb
28-Feb
1-Mar
2-Mar
ratio Low time
.81
-0:06
.81
-0:30
.89
-0:04
.86
+1:24
.77
+0:54
.86
-0:23
.79
+1:20
.81
-0:01
ft.
7.9
8.2
8.5
9.0
9.1
A.M.
ratio
.84
.91
.91
.84
.75
.99
.75
.91
P.M.
time ft.
12:37 8.2
1:20 8.0
2:06 7.6
2:46 7.6
3:41 7.0
P.M.
time ft.
time ft.
6:38 1.6
6:57 0.2
7:19 1.1
7:30 0.6
8:02 0.8
8:05 1.0
8:32 0.5
8:29 1.5
9:22 0.4
9:11 2.2
Sunrise, sunset
Feb. 24-28 — 7:01, 6:05
Moon watch
Last Quarter — Mar. 4
tion efforts.
The sequester, says Douglas Rice of the Center on
Budget and Policy priorities,
also would mean that families that leave subsidized
housing would be less likely
to be replaced with people
from waiting lists, and that
eventually some families
could lose their apartments.
Many federal programs,
like heating aid for the poor,
already have many more
people seeking assistance
than the program budgets
The Associated Press
can cover. Funding for the
White House press secretary Jay Carney, right, laughs as Transportation
Low Income Home Energy
Secretary Ray LaHood arrives to brief reporters regarding the sequester
Assistance Program, for
instance, has fluctuated last Friday at the White House.
greatly in recent years, with
the administration propos- nant women and their chil- nursing mothers keep their
ing to cut it by 13 percent this dren, the government has aid but post-partum women
year. In such cases, it may be generally tried to make sure who do not breastfeed could
impossible for people denied that every eligible woman lose their aid.
Who gets hit first also
aid to know whether it’s can get food aid. States
because of the sequester aren’t permitted to cut the depends on how the governsince they might have been food benefit, which means ment’s budget flows. Educafewer people will be served. tion aid to school districts, for
Hayes’ death.
denied help anyway.
Mutton said the slaying has
In the case of the Women, The Agriculture Department instance, is delivered in the
shaken residents of the apart- Infants and Children pro- says it will prioritize things fall, so impacts won’t be felt
ment complex, where all the gram for low-income preg- so that pregnant women and until the new school year.
men involved in the incident
were frequent visitors.
opposition to the four-day rent schedule, while return“With something like that
week has come from Marsh- ing some Friday class time to
happening in your own backfield High School educators. Marshfield and the two eleContinued from Page A1
yard, you lose your peace of
They say the condensed mentary schools, Blossom
mind,” he said. “You never the four-day week, board schedule leaves them Gulch and Madison.
think something like that members seemed reluctant rushed, with little prep time
The board is expected to
would happen in your own to abandon the PLC concept. before classes.
decide in March.
backyard.”
Reporter Thomas Moriarty
Chairman James Martin
“It seems like its tough to
Reporter Tyler Richardson assess after two years,” asked whether the calendar can be reached at 541-269can be reached at 541-269- Christiana said. “I don’t could be split between 1222, ext. 240, or by email at
1222,
ext.
236,
at want to keep jumping sched- schools. Martin’s proposed t h o m a s . m o r i a rt y @ t h e t y l e r. r i c h a rd s o n @ t h e - ules and making big split would leave the two worldlink.com. Follow him on
at
intermediate schools, Sunset Twitter
worldlink.com, or on Twitter changes.”
@ThomasDMoriarty.
and
Millicoma,
with
the
curSome
of
the
strongest
at @COPSTheWorld.
“They want to make sure
the American public knows
this sequester is a bad thing,
but they also don’t want to
disrupt the economy too
much,” he said. “It’s not that
the reductions won’t take
place.But they could delay the
impact of that until later in the
year.”
Administration officials
also say the Treasury
Department is prepared to
begin reducing subsidies
that cover interest payments
by state and local governments on public works,
school and renewable energy
projects. That means those
governments will have to
find money in their budgets
to make up the difference in
bond interest payments, and
while that might not affect
projects already under way,
it could delay new construc-
SCHOOLS
NORTHWEST STOCKS
Closing and 8:30 a.m. quotations:
Oregon
weather
Wednesday,
Feb. 27
Tonight/Wednesday
City/Region
Rogue Valley
Miami
Miami
81°
72° | 76°
-10s
Tonight: A 30 percent chance of rain. Mostly cloudy,
with a low around 37. South wind around 7 mph.
Wednesday: A slight chance of showers. Cloudy, with
a high near 53. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Wednesday Night: A 50 percent chance of rain.
Cloudy, with a low around 41. South wind to 14 mph.
Thursday: Rain likely. Cloudy, with a high near 55. South
southwest wind 15 to 18 mph. Chance of rain is 70%.
LOTTERY
Sterling Fncl.. . . . . . 21.28 21.33
Umpqua Bank . . . . . 12.51 12.48
Weyerhaeuser . . . . 28.78 29.02
Xerox . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.89 7.98
Dow Jones closed at 13,784.17
Provided by Coos Bay Edward Jones
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Monday’s winning numbers:
1 p.m.: 8-7-2-7
4 p.m.: 7-9-7-4
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To report news: 269-1222
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email:
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Sports
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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2013
theworldlink.com/sports ■ Sports Editor John Gunther ■ 541-269-1222, ext. 241
College ‘long shot’ will share story this week
BY JOHN GUNTHER
The World
Kevin Laue went from being cut from his
seventh-grade basketball team because he
had only one full arm to playing for
Manhattan College.
His inspirational story will be shared
multiple times this week on the South
Coast, including during a special screening
of the documentary about his life story,
“Long Shot,” on Friday night at Marshfield
High School.
Laue also will speak to students at both
Marshfield and North Bend high schools
and will be the guest speaker for the participants of the Class 3A basketball tournament Wednesday night.
A big part of Laue’s visit is the documentary showing Friday night, which is a
fundraiser for the FOR Club at Harding
Learning Center.
Tickets for the showing are $5. Laue will
introduce the film, which has been shown in
Tourney event is open to the public
THE WORLD
Inspirational basketball player Henry
Laue will be the guest speaker for the
players and coaches at Wednesday night’s
pre-Class 3A tournament festivities at
North Bend High School.
The event also includes a 3-point cononly a few places around the country.
Many schools around the country,
including the Harding Learning Center and
Marshfield, have started FOR (Friends of
Rachel) clubs in memory of Rachel Scott,
the first victim in the Columbine High
School shooting in Colorado in 1999.
Scott had started a movement to make all
students feel welcome at Columbine, and
FOR clubs do the same thing in what has
test for the participating schools.
Laue played basketball for Manhattan
College even though his left arm ends just
below the elbow.
He will give his keynote address about
7 p.m. Wednesday in the North Bend gym,
followed by the 3-point contest. The
event is free and open to the public.
become known as Rachel’s Challenge, said
Shelly McKnight, principal at Harding
Learning Center.
“She had worked with school officials to
have welcoming buddies whenever there
was a new student in school,” McKnight
said.
The club’s goal is to make students feel
welcome, comfortable and safe in their
learning environment and feel connected
with the community, McKnight said.
The fundraiser will help the club with
various activities, such as providing scholarships for students who can’t afford caps
and gowns for graduation, she said.
“This is about doing something good in
their community and in their school,”
McKnight said.
Laue is tied to the McKnight family
because he was coached by Patrick
McKnight, Shelly’s husband, in an AAU
basketball program in Livermore, Calif.
Laue’s left arm ends just below the
elbow, and he was cut from his seventhgrade team. But Patrick McKnight coached
him for several years in the AAU program,
and he ultimately played for Manhattan.
“We’re really proud of him and proud
to know him,” Shelly McKnight said. “He’s
so grounded, so well-rounded and humble.”
But Laue also was determined that
nobody would tell him what he couldn’t do.
“It’s a very inspiring story,” she said.
Waller
posts
fast time
at meet
THE WORLD
By Lou Sennick, The World
Myrtle Point’s Matt Newton fights with Stanfield’s Michael Martinez for a rebound during Friday’s game. The Bobcats face Irrigon in the Class 2A quarterfinals Wednesday.
Journey takes MP seniors to Pendleton
BY JOHN GUNTHER
The World
MYRTLE POINT — Brad Larsen, Matt
Newton and Kyle Seals were rebels before third
grade.
It wasn’t their fault.
Myrtle Point’s youth basketball program
needed a coach for the combined third- and
fourth-grade basketball team. Dave Larsen
offered to step in, but only if his son, then a second-grader, could join the squad.
Then, as the story goes, three moms stepped
in. If Brad was allowed to play, they wanted
their sons (Newton, Seals and Matt Miranda) to
play, too.
So it was that the core of this year’s Myrtle
Point team started playing together.
“We’ve been on the same team every year
since second grade,” Newton said.
“All that hard work paid off,” Seals added.
Miranda ended up at Coquille High School,
but the other three form half of Myrtle Point’s
primary rotation that will take the court in
Pendleton against Irrigon on Wednesday in the
quarterfinals of the Class 2A state tournament.
Dave Larsen coached the boys for three
years when they were young and then helped
out when they were eighth-graders, before
becoming their high school coach three years
ago. He can’t wait to share the state tournament experience with them.
“I couldn’t be more pleased,” he said. “Matt
(Newton) said something early in the season,
Class 2A Boys State Tournament
At Pendleton
Quarterfinals
Wednesday
Irrigon vs. Myrtle Point, 1:30 p.m.
Western Mennonite vs. Central Linn, 3:15 p.m.
Vernonia vs. Oakland, 6:30 p.m.
Oakridge vs. Pilot Rock, 8:15 p.m.
Note: Myrtle Point games will be broadcast locally by
KTEE (94.9 FM and 95.7 FM).
‘I’d really like to go to state. I’ve never been to
state in my life.’”
Brad Larsen has been to the state meet in
track and field. Seals and Newton never have
experienced the postseason.
“To be able to go to state in basketball, it’s a
pretty big deal,” Dave Larsen said.
He envisioned it happening all those years
ago, when his son and the others were having
success.
“When they were little, I thought for sure
that’s where we’d be,” he said. “I didn’t know
I’d be the coach. That’s just the way things
worked out.”
Myrtle Point hasn’t been in the state tournament since before the current players were
born. The last time was 1994, when Larsen was
the assistant to Steve Perkins.
They face long odds, at least according to
the rankings.
Irrigon is unbeaten and has the top spot in
the OSAA power rankings for Class 2A.
“They’re very quick,” Larsen said. “They’ve
got some really good guards. But I’ve got good
guards, too.”
Irrigon likes to run a motion offense based
around its four guards. The Bobcats like to play
a fast pace with guards Larsen, Cooper Stateler
and Thomas Nathan running the floor and getting the ball inside to Seals and Newton. Taylor
Fischer adds a deep threat off the bench.
“I think we match up with them really well,”
Dave Larsen said.
And though Myrtle Point hasn’t been to the
tournament in ages, the coach pointed out that
Irrigon never has been there.
“It’s their first time in Pendleton, too.”
Myrtle Point got to the tournament by beating Stanfield, one of Irrigon’s league rivals, in
the playoffs Friday.
The game showed how good the Bobcats
have become.
“I was happy with how we finished,” Larsen
said. “We did not play as well as we can. We
hung in there and we grinded it out.
“I knew it wasn’t going to be easy. At that
level, there is no easy.”
The Bobcats leave for Pendleton today, with
a plan to practice at Blue Mountain Community
College. They’ve been working out at 1:30 p.m.
the past few days to get ready for their start
time Wednesday.
“We’re excited,” Larsen said. “We’re going
to get to bed early and come out and play as
hard as we can and see what we can do.”
Bulldog bowlers finish second at state
THE WORLD
North Bend continued the South Coast’s
strong tradition at the state bowling tournament by placing second Sunday.
Marshfield’s boys also competed in the state
tournament, but were eliminated before the
championship rounds.
The Bulldogs did well in qualifying during
the tournament, especially Saturday. They
were in second place after the first 24 Baker
games, in which the five team members alternate frames. North Bend fell to fifth place after
the final six games Sunday morning.
The Bulldogs beat the No. 12 seed, but then
came up against Grants Pass, and lost by eight
pins.
“The girls were worried that we would go
home,” said North Bend coach Tracie Ball.
“Fortunately, we kept our spirits high and for
the second time our team persevered to the
end.”
The Bulldogs won four straight matches and
then met Cottage Grove in the semifinals. The
Bulldogs had beaten the Lions in the championship match of the district tournament, and
they prevailed again, reaching the title match
against Mazama.
North Bend beat Mazama, but since the
Vikings hadn’t lost in the double-elimination
tournament, North Bend needed to win again.
“Mazama came out strong and had the
game of their life,” Ball said. “With a solid 238,
the girls sealed the deal and the victory was
theirs.”
Ball praised her own team for its efforts.
North Bend’s bowling
team poses with its
trophy from state,
including back row,
from left: Arianna
Campbell, Amy Kress,
Jaimie Katherman,
Josie Dixon and
Sierra Smith; and
front row, coach
Tracie Ball and Micah
Lowery.
Contributed Photo
“At the end of the day, we took second and
could not have asked for anything more,” she
said. “(The girls) handled themselves well and
stayed positive throughout the entire weekend.
“They had six 200-plus games and accomplished team goals that they never thought
were possible.”
Ball credited Amy Kress with keeping the
team’s motivation up throughout the event.
“Our only senior, Micah Lowery, is ending
her high school career in a positive way, and the
younger team members know that they are
capable of doing this all over again,” Ball said.
Other team members were Arianna
Campbell, Jaimie Katherman, Josie Dixon and
Sierra Smith.
The coach extended thanks to the parents,
coaches, faculty and booster club members, as
well as the staff at North Bend Lanes, for supporting the program.
“We represented our town well, and this
experience will never be forgotten,” Ball said.
North Bend graduate Kevin
Waller briefly held the University
of Wyoming’s 1,000-yard swimming record after a fast swim at
the Mountain Pacific Sports
Federation championships, but it
was soon broken by a teammate.
Waller’s time for the 1,000 was
his split at that point in the mile.
He posted a big personal best in
the mile, finishing
in 15:26.55, the
second-best
time in school
history, until
Ryan Nelson
broke the school
record (as well as
the 1,000-yard record) with a time
of 15:16.77.
Waller’s time was good enough
to place fifth and also met the B
qualifying standard for the NCAA
championships. The freshman
also finished 14th in the 500
freestyle with another personal
best (4:29.01) and helped
Wyoming place second in the meet
behind UNLV.
Boise State swimming:
North Bend graduate Rachel
Heaney helped the Broncos finish
second in the Mountain West
Conference championships by
winning the 200-yard butterfly
with a time of 1:57.40. That was
just off her own school record of
1:57.39, set in the preliminaries,
and met the NCAA provisional
qualifying standard.
Heaney, a junior, also placed
fourth in the 400 individual medley (4:17.04) and 11th in the 100
butterfly (55.19).
Southern Oregon basketball: The Raiders play Warner
Pacific in Portland for the Cascade
Collegiate Conference championship, after a run through the
conference playoffs led in part by
Marshfield graduate Kyle Tedder.
On Saturday, the Raiders upset
No. 4 Eastern Oregon in Pendleton
to clinch their spot in the championship game and a berth in the
NAIA Division II national tournament next week.
Tedder, a junior, had 13 points
in the team’s 89-71 win over
Eastern Oregon. That came after
a 100-88 win over Concordia in
the opener of the conference
tournament, when Tedder had 33
points, including nailing five 3pointers.
The junior averages 15.3 points,
second on the team to Eric
Thompson’s 15.8 points.
University of Oregon Track
& Field: Redshirt freshman Blake
Kemp finished third in the heptathlon at the Mountain Pacific
Sports Federation indoor track and
field championships over the
weekend.
Kemp had personal bests of
8.32 seconds for the 60 hurdles
and 2:43.49 for the 1,000 meters
on the final day of the meet. He
had three personal bests the opening day, with a time of 7.08 for the
60 meters, a leap of 22 feet, 5 inches in the long jump and a clearance
of 6-3.25 in the high jump. He also
had an effort of 41-4.25 in the shot
put.
North Bend graduate Sammie
Clark placed fifth in the pole vault,
clearing 12-11. Earlier in the season, the junior from North Bend
won a meet at Seattle by matching
her personal best and clearing 134.25.
Alumni
Report
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Brady’s new deal
helps New England
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tom Brady will be a
Patriot until he is 40 years
old.
Brady agreed to a threeyear contract extension
through 2017 with New
England on Monday, a person
familiar with
the contract
told The
Associated
Press. The
extension is
worth about
$27 million and will free up
nearly $15 million in salary
cap room for the team, which
has several younger players it
needs to re-sign or negotiate
new deals with.
Sports Illustrated first
reported the extension.
The 35-year-old twotime league MVP was signed
through 2014, and has said he
wants to play at least five
more years.
A three-time Super Bowl
champion, Brady will make
far less in those three seasons
than the going rate for star
quarterbacks. Brady currently has a four-year, $72 million
deal with $48 million guaranteed.
Drew Brees and Peyton
Manning are the NFL’s highest-paid quarterbacks, at an
average of $20 million and $18
million a year, respectively.
Sports
Shorts
The Associated Press
Portland’s Wesley Matthews, right, goes to the hoop against Miami’s Chris Bosh during a Feb. 12 game.
Matthews plays through pain for Blazers
PORTLAND (AP) — Trail
Blazers guard Wesley
Matthews sees only one
option left after trying all the
treatments he can on his sore
left leg.
“Pray,” he says in all seriousness.
Matthews hurt his leg and
ankle, along with his left
elbow, just before the AllStar break. But he’s playing —
and praying — through the
pain, hoping to help push
Portland into the playoffs.
The Trail Blazers (26-30),
are four games back of
Houston for the eighth and
final playoff spot in the West.
1
The Lakers are 2 ⁄2 games out
of eighth.
The Blazers need their
affable shooting guard down
the stretch. He is averaging 15
points, 2.8 rebounds and 2.8
assists in 35 minutes per
game. His importance to the
team was evident Sunday
night when he made a clutch
3-pointer with just under a
minute left in Portland’s 9286 victory over the Celtics.
“God bless him,” Boston
coach Doc Rivers said. “He’s
done it all year. He’s made
some great shots.”
Matthews finished with
24 points, including five 3pointers, but often winced in
pain. His limp grew more
pronounced as the game
went on.
“Ankle, elbow, I’m not
even close to 80 percent,”
Matthews said. “But I’m out
there fighting and my teammates are bringing me along.
They’re supporting me.”
According to the Blazers,
Matthews has made six of
seven 3-point attempts in the
final minute of games when
the score is within three
points. On Jan. 10, he hit
another memorable 3 with
26.9 seconds to go in a 92-90
victory over the Miami Heat.
The son of nine-year NBA
veteran Wes Matthews, the
6-foot-5 Texas native went
undrafted out of Marquette
but signed with Utah before
the 2009 season. He went on
to start in 48 games for the
Jazz his rookie season, averaging 9.4 points. The Blazers
signed him in July 2010.
Earlier this season, a hip
injury put Matthews briefly
on the bench in street clothes
for the first time in his fouryear NBA career. He had
played in 250 straight games,
second-most among active
players behind Oklahoma
City’s Russell Westbrook.
In a game at New Orleans
just before the All-Star
break, Matthews collided
with rookie Austin Rivers and
fell awkwardly. He couldn’t
put weight on the leg and
needed to be helped off the
court.
Matthews
missed
Portland’s first game back
after the break, but returned
to face the Lakers and Celtics.
The victory over Boston
snapped a seven-game
Portland losing streak, the
team’s longest of the season.
“As long as I feel I’m not
going to further damage my
future, I’m going to keep
playing,” he said.
But it clearly isn’t easy, by
the looks of his limp. And
after the big 3-pointer
against
the
Celtics,
Matthews grabbed his elbow.
“Every game I’m looking
up and praying, ‘Let me get
through this quarter,”’ he
said.
Matthews continues to
receive treatment on both his
leg and elbow. The plan after
the Boston game was to hook
up to electric stimulation
machines at home and watch
the movie “Ironman.”
He’s putting himself
through all this for one reason: hope. While the Blazers
were hurt by the seven-game
losing streak, they are not out
of it yet by any means.
Matthews even has a theory
that if the team can put
together five three-game
winning streaks over the next
26 games, it will be enough to
get into the playoffs.
Portland missed the postseason last year.
“We haven’t lost hope. We
haven’t lost belief,”
Matthews said. “We still feel
we can make these playoffs.
We know what we’ve got to
do.”
Denver stops Lakers’ win streak at four
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVERf—
Wilson
Chandler scored 23 points in
place of an injured Danilo
Gallinari, and
Ty Lawson
added 22 in
the Denver
Nuggets’
119-108 victory
over the Los Angeles Lakers
on Monday night.
Gallinari, the Nuggets’
leading scorer, sat out with a
bruised left thigh. He wasn’t
needed as the Nuggets won
their ninth straight game at
home, snapped the Lakers’
four-game winning streak
and took the season series
from their long-time nemesis 3-1.
The Lakers, who were
NBA
Recap
shut out on the offensive
glass in the first half, wanted
to slow down the Nuggets
but Denver outscored Los
Angeles 33-3 in fast-break
points.
Kobe Bryant led the
Lakers with 29 points, and
Dwight Howard added 15
points and 14 boards but
missed 11 of his last 12 free
throws.
Celtics 110, Jazz 107,
OT: Paul Pierce scored 26
points, including seven
straight in overtime, and
Boston beat Utah to close out
a five-game road trip.
Pierce had a chance to win
it in regulation, but his 19footer at the buzzer rimmed
out.
Courtney Lee made two
free throws with 1.2 seconds
(541) 267-2173 • 1595 N. Bayshore Dr • Coos Bay
DON’T SETTLE FOR LES!
Te’o struggles in 40 at
NFL scouting combine
INDIANAPOLIS — Manti
Te’o’s first appearance on a
football field since the BCS
championship game didn’t
go as well as planned.
The Notre Dame star and
Heisman Trophy runner-up
was clocked at 4.82 seconds
in the 40-yard dash at the
NFL scouting combine. NFL
Network draft analyst Mike
Mayock had said Sunday
anything faster than 4.7
would be “phenomenal.”
Anything 4.8 or over would
be a “concern.”
The workout came more
than a month after Te’o’s
highly-publicized online
romance with a girlfriend
was exposed as a hoax and
that he was a victim of the
hoax.
The linebacker said
Saturday the hoax had no
impact on that game. And he
insists it has not affected his
preparation for the combine,
either.
But instead of putting
those concerns to rest with a
good showing, Te’o fell short
of his goals again — and not
just in the 40.
Te’o participated in five of
the seven drills, opting out of
the bench press and 60-yard
shuttle, and did not finish
ranked among the top five at
his position in any of them.
Utah star will have
extensive heart tests
The Associated Press
Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, front right, is fouled while driving for a shot by Denver center Kosta Koufos, back right, on Monday.
left in overtime to bump
Boston’s lead to three, and
Randy Foye’s 26-footer at the
buzzer missed everything.
Avery Bradley added a
season-high 18 points for
Boston.
Gordon Hayward led Utah
with 26 points, Paul Millsap
had 16 and Al Jefferson finished with 15 points and 11
rebounds.
Hawks 114, Pistons 103:
Al Horford had 23 points and
22 rebounds, and Atlanta
beat Detroit for its fifth win
in six games.
Josh Smith added 23
points for the Hawks, who
were ahead 61-51 at halftime
and led by as many as 26 in
the third quarter.
The Pistons have lost
three straight, all without
guard Brandon Knight, who
has a hyperextended right
knee. Will Bynum was also
out Monday because of a
suspension.
Jeff Teague had 20 points
for Atlanta, which shot 14 of
33 from 3-point range. Kyle
Korver scored 15 points, all
from beyond the arc.
Rodney Stuckey led
Detroit with 22 points, and
Jonas Jerebko added 21.
Wizards 90, Raptors
84: Bradley Beal scored 20
points, Nene had 11 points
and nine rebounds, and
Washington beat Toronto for
its third straight victory.
A.J. Price and Martell
Webster each added 12 points
for the Wizards, who won for
just the fifth time in 27 road
games
this
season.
Washington’s road record is
the worst in the NBA.
DeMar DeRozan scored 25
points and Kyle Lowry had 18
for the Raptors, who had won
six of their previous seven.
pt,
Prom able
Reli
INDIANAPOLIS — Top
draft prospect Star Lotulelei
will undergo more extensive
heart tests when he returns to
Utah.
Doctors at the NFL’s
scouting combine found the
star defensive tackle and
likely high pick has a heart
condition, Lotulelei’s agent,
Bruce Tollner, confirmed in a
series of emails with The
Associated Press.
Tollner said Lotulelei
would not take questions
regarding the diagnosis yet.
But the 6-foot-2, 311-pound
defensive tackle still plans to
do a full workout in front of
scouts at his regularly scheduled Pro Day on March 20.
The Tonga native was scheduled to fly to Utah on Monday
night, Tollner said.
Eagles release veterans
in cost-saving measure
PHILADELPHIA — The
Philadelphia Eagles have
released veteran defensive
tackles Cullen Jenkins and
Mike Patterson.
Member, S.H.A.R.P. Alliance
Jenkins signed a five-year,
$30 million contract with the
Eagles in 2011 and started
every game the past two seasons. He was due to make $5.5
million this season, but
Philadelphia cut the 32-yearold with an eye toward
rebuilding.
After spending the first
seven seasons of his NFL
career with Green Bay,
Jenkins left for Philadelphia.
1
He had 5 ⁄2 sacks in 2011 and
four in 2012.
PRO BASKETBALL
Oklahoma City signs
Fisher for stretch run
OKLAHOMA CITY — The
Oklahoma City Thunder
signed veteran Derek Fisher,
filling an opening for a third
point guard that was created
when Eric Maynor got traded
to Portland.
Fisher joins Oklahoma
City for the stretch run for
the second straight season.
He played in 20 regular-season games and then all 20
playoff games last season. He
played briefly for the Dallas
Mavericks this season, asking
for his release in December
after injuring his right knee.
Fisher won five NBA
championships with the Los
Angeles Lakers before getting
traded to Houston last season, then buying his way out
of his contract with the
Rockets.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Gonzaga moves up to
No. 2 for first time
Indiana is No. 1 in The
Associated Press’ Top 25 for
the fourth straight week,
while Gonzaga moved to No.
2 for the first time in school
history.
Duke moved up three
spots to third and is followed
by Michigan and Miami,
which dropped from second
after falling to Wake Forest,
the Hurricanes’ first Atlantic
Coast Conference loss this
season.
Baylor remains No. 1 in
The Associated Press
women’s basketball poll for
an eighth straight week after
topping UConn last Monday
night.
The first seven stayed
unchanged with Notre Dame,
UConn, Stanford and Duke
following Baylor.
Self gets 500th win as
Kanas edges Iowa State
AMES, Iowa — Elijah
Johnson scored a career-high
39 points — 12 in overtime —
and No. 6 Kansas rallied to
beat Iowa State 108-96 on
Monday night for coach Bill
Self’s 500th career win.
Travis Releford added 19
points for the Jayhawks (244, 12-3 Big 12), who snapped
Iowa State’s 22-game home
winning streak and kept pace
with No. 13 Kansas State atop
the Big 12.
Korie Lucious scored 23
points and Tyrus McGee had
22 for the Cyclones (19-9, 96), who dropped their third
overtime game in Big 12 play
— and their second straight
at the hands of the Jayhawks.
AUTO RACING
Danica helps Daytona’s
TV ratings improve
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.
— With Danica Patrick starting from the pole, the
Daytona 500’s preliminary
television ratings were much
higher than last year’s.
Sunday afternoon’s race
earned a 10.0 overnight rating and 22 share on Fox, the
network said. That’s up 30
percent from 2012, when rain
pushed the event to a
Monday night. It was the
highest overnight rating
since 2006.
Jimmie Johnson won the
race while Patrick was
eighth, the best finish by a
woman at the Daytona 500.
* 24-Hour Emergency
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North Bend, OR • 541.756.0581
Bandon, OR • 541.347.3066
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CCB# 23563
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Tuesday,February 26, 2013 • The World • B3 Y
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Johnson rewards crew chief with Daytona victory
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) —
As Jimmie Johnson racked up win
after win, championship after
championship, he was always chasing one important victory.
Johnson already had one
Daytona 500 victory on his resume.
But he needed one more.
He needed it for Chad Knaus,
the crew chief who has been with
Johnson since the start of their ride
into the record books. Knaus wasn’t
there the day Johnson won his first
500; he had been suspended by
NASCAR after a technical violation
found the week before the race was
deemed to be deliberate.
So Darian Grubb, still a
Hendrick Motorsports employee at
the time, called the 2006 Daytona
victory in Knaus’ place. Ever since,
Johnson has wanted to win another
so Knaus would have a chance to
celebrate winning “The Great
American Race.”
The time came Sunday when
Johnson won his second Daytona
500, forcing the intensely private
Knaus to admit just how badly he
wanted the win with his No. 48 team.
“As you guys know, I eat, sleep
and breathe 48,” Knaus said.
“Anytime that I’m taken away from
that race car, I’m pretty sad. But
when those guys were able to come
down here and win the Daytona 500
in 2006 in my absence, I think that
really solidified the strength of the
48 car. Was I here? No. Was I here in
spirit? Most definitely. I couldn’t
have been prouder of the group of
guys we had there.
“But to finally be able to come
down here and win, and be a part of
this is definitely a huge dream come
true.”
It was a moment Knaus has been
working toward his entire life.
He has sacrificed plenty in his
personal life to get here. With no wife
and no kids, he’s not kidding when he
says he devotes most of his time to
Hendrick Motorsports and building
championship race cars. He is not
satisfied with what he and Johnson
have accomplished since they were
paired before Johnson’s 2002 rookie
season — and that includes five
Sprint Cup championships.
No amount of wins or titles has
so far satisfied Knaus. It’s been two
years since Johnson’s last title, and
he went down to the wire with Brad
Keselowski last season before bad
breaks in the final two races gave
Keselowski his first championship.
So Knaus was relentless — of
course — during offseason preparations. And he devoted a considerable amount of time to the Daytona
500, the first race for NASCAR’s
new Gen-6 car.
“I know we worked at least 35
days straight on the car that we
raced in the Daytona 500,” Knaus
said. “I know I put in personally one
day of 38 hours straight. I actually
sent Jimmie a text, saying ‘I’ve seen
6:48 three times today and haven’t
been to bed yet.’ “
Knaus believes that drive is the
difference between the No. 48 team
and the competition.
“I think what we have above
everybody else is the desire to go
out and win races,” he said. “We’ve
got 500 plus employees at Hendrick
Motorsports. When they all want to
go out and win races, you put guys
like (Johnson) behind the seat,
you’re going to see magic happen.”
This Daytona 500 win comes at
a time of change for Knaus, who is
trying as hard as he can to have a life
away from racing. He got engaged
in December to longtime girlfriend
Lisa Rockelmann, who understands
when he doesn’t come home for 38
consecutive hours.
Team owner Rick Hendrick
believes Knaus is in a far better place
now than he was in 2006, and the
balance Knaus has added to his life
might not be enough for everyone,
but it’s working for the crew chief.
“You can’t be 100 percent and live
in the shop and work on the car and if
you don’t win, you can’t live with
yourself,” Hendrick said.“He’s learned
to have other pieces in his life.”
Scoreboard
On The Air
Today
High School Girls Basketball — Dallas at
Marshfield, 7 p.m., KMHS (1420 AM).
M e n ’ s C o l l e g e B a s k e t b a l l — Indiana at
Minnesota, 4 p.m., ESPN; Memphis at Xavier, 4
p.m., ESPN2; Florida at Tennessee, 6 p.m.,
ESPN; Wyoming at Air Force, 6 p.m., Root
Sports.
Hockey — Boston at New York Islanders, 4:30
p.m., NBC Sports Network.
Wednesday, Feb. 27
High School Basketball — Class 2A state tournament, Myrtle Point vs. Irrigon, 1:30 p.m., KTEE
(94.9 FM and 95.7 FM).
NBA Basketball — Golden State at New York, 5
p.m., ESPN; Denver at Portland, 7:30 p.m., ESPN.
Men’s College Basketball — Georgetown at
Connecticut, 4 p.m., ESPN2; Oklahoma at Texas,
6 p.m., ESPN2; Colorado at Stanford, 8 p.m.,
ESPN2.
Hockey — Washington at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.,
NBC Sports Network; Detroit at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.,
NBC Sports Network.
Thursday, Feb. 28
High School Boys Basketball — Myrtle Point at
Class 2A state tournament, TBA, 9 a.m., KTEE
(94.9 FM and 95.7 FM).
Men’s College Basketball — Teams TBA, 4 p.m.
and 6 p.m., ESPN and ESPN2; Drexel at Old
Dominion, 4 p.m., NBC Sports Network; Loyola
Marymount at Santa Clara, 7 p.m., Root Sports;
Gonzaga at BYU, 8 p.m., ESPN2.
NBA Baksetball — Philadelphia at Chicago, 5
p.m., TNT; Minnesota at Los Angeles Lakers, 7:30
p.m., TNT.
Local Schedule
Today
High School Girls Basketball — Class 5A play-in
round: Dallas at Marshfield, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 27
High School Boys Basketball — Class 2A State
Tournament at Pendleton: Myrtle Point vs.
Irrigon, 1:30 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 28
High School Boys Basketball — Class 3A State
Tournament at North Bend High School: Horizon
Christian vs. Oregon Episcopal, 1:30 p.m.;
Portland Adventist vs. Dayton, 3:15 p.m.;
Blanchet Catholic vs. De La Salle North Catholic,
6:30 p.m.; Cascade Christian vs. Valley Catholic,
8:15 p.m. Class 2A State Tournament at
Pendleton: Myrtle Point TBA, 9 a.m. (if the
Bobcats lose Wednesday).
High School Girls Baksetball — Class 3A State
Tournament at Marshfield: Valley Catholic vs.
Santiam Christian, 1:30 p.m.; Nyssa vs. Rainier,
3:15 p.m.; St. Mary’s vs. Scio, 6:30 p.m.;
Willamina vs. Vale, 8:15 p.m.
High School Playoffs
OSAA/U.S. Bank/Les Schwab Tires
Basketball
Quarterfinals
Wednesday
Irrigon vs. Myrtle Point, 1:30 p.m.
Western Mennonite vs. Central Linn, 3:15 p.m.
Vernonia vs. Oakland, 6:30 p.m.
Oakridge vs. Pilot Rock, 8:15 p.m.
Class 1A Boys
State Tournament
At Baker City
Quarterfinals
Wednesday
Horizon Christian vs. Country Christian, 1:30
p.m.
Hosanna Christian vs. Imbler, 3:15 p.m.
Elkton vs. Crane, 6:30 p.m.
Columbia Christian vs. City Christian, 8:15 p.m.
Class 5A Girls
Play-in Round
Today
Dallas at Marshfield
Silverton at Eagle Point
Pendleton at Liberty
Churchill at Mountain View
Wilson at The Dalles-Wahtonka
Parkrose at Summit
Wednesday
Redmond at Crescent Valley
Ashland at Marist
Class 4A Girls
First Round
Winner to state tournament
Saturday
Sisters at Mazama
Brookings-Harbor at Cottage Grove
Gladstone at Cascade
Phoenix at La Salle Prep
Madras at La Grande
Philomath at Banks
Seaside at Junction City
Central at Sutherlin
Class 3A Girls
State Tournament
Quarterfinals
At Marshfield High School
Thursday
Valley Catholic vs. Santiam Christian, 1:30 p.m.
Nyssa vs. Rainier, 3:15 p.m.
St. Mary’s vs. Scio, 6:30 p.m.
Willamina vs. Vale, 8:15 p.m.
Class 2A Girls
State Tournament
At Pendleton
Quarterfinals
Thursday
Lost River vs. Heppner, 1:30 p.m.
Union vs. Oakland, 3:15 p.m.
Regis vs. Pilot Rock, 6:30 p.m.
Enterprise vs. Western Mennonite, 8:15 p.m.
Class 1A Girls
State Tournament
At Baker City
Quarterfinals
Thursday
Damascus Christian vs. Triangle Lake, 1:30 p.m.
Hosanna Christian vs. City Christian, 3:15 p.m.
St. Paul vs. McKenzie, 6:30 p.m.
Perrydale vs. Condon/Wheeler, 8:15 p.m.
Class 4A Boys
Pro Basketball
First Round
Friday
Winner to State Tournament
Ridgeview at Cascade
South Umpqua at Elmira
Newport at North Bend
Baker at Philomath
Scappoose at La Salle Prep
Gladstone at Central
Madras at Sutherlin
Brookings-Harbor at North Valley
NBA
Class 3A Boys
State Tournament
Quarterfinals
Thursday
At North Bend High School
Horizon Christian vs. Oregon Episcopal, 1:30
p.m.
Portland Adventist vs. Dayton, 3:15 p.m.
Blanchet Catholic vs. De La Salle North Catholic,
6:30 p.m.
Cascade Christian vs. Valley Catholic, 8:15 p.m.
Class 2A Boys
State Tournament
At Pendleton
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
33
New York
Brooklyn
33
Boston
30
Philadelphia
22
Toronto
23
Southeast Division W
40
Miami
Atlanta
32
Washington
18
Orlando
15
Charlotte
13
Central Division
W
Indiana
35
Chicago
32
Milwaukee
26
22
Detroit
Cleveland
18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division W
45
San Antonio
Memphis
37
D
E
R T
H OY S !
BU
L
20
24
27
32
34
L
14
23
37
41
43
L
21
24
28
37
38
Pct
.623
.579
.526
.407
.404
Pct
.741
.582
.327
.268
.232
Pct
.625
.571
.481
.373
.321
GB
—
2
5
1
11 ⁄2
12
GB
—
81⁄2
1
22 ⁄2
26
28
GB
—
3
8
1
14 ⁄2
17
L
13
18
Pct
.776
.673
GB
—
61⁄2
Houston
31 27 .534
Dallas
25 30 .455
New Orleans
20 37
.351
Northwest Division W
L
Pct
Oklahoma City
41 15
.732
Denver
36 22 .621
Utah
31 26 .544
Portland
26 30 .464
Minnesota
20 33 .377
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
L.A. Clippers
40 18 .690
Golden State
33 23 .589
L.A. Lakers
28 30 .483
Sacramento
19 38 .333
Phoenix
18 39 .316
Monday’s Games
Washington 90, Toronto 84
Atlanta 114, Detroit 103
Denver 119, L.A. Lakers 108
Boston 110, Utah 107, OT
Today’s Games
Orlando at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Golden State at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Sacramento at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Brooklyn at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Milwaukee at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Toronto at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Sacramento at Orlando, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Washington, 4 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 5 p.m.
Dallas at Memphis, 5 p.m.
New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.
Golden State at New York, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Utah, 6 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 7:30 p.m.
College Basketball
College Polls
The Associated Press Top 25
The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Feb. 24, total
points based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote and last
week’s ranking:
Record Pts Prv
1. Indiana (64)
24-3 1,624
1
2. Gonzaga (1)
27-2 1,530
3
3. Duke
24-3 1,461
6
4. Michigan
23-4 1,411
7
2
22-4 1,317
5. Miami
6. Kansas
23-4 1,272
9
7. Georgetown
21-4 1,236 11
5
22-4 1,164
8. Florida
22-6 1,105
4
9. Michigan St.
22-5 1,047 10
10. Louisville
11. Arizona
23-4 998 12
915
8
22-5
12. Syracuse
13. Kansas St.
22-5
875
13
14. New Mexico
23-4 764 16
15. Oklahoma St.
20-6 692 14
16. Ohio St.
20-7
675 18
17. Wisconsin
19-8 558 19
18. Saint Louis
21-5
495
—
19. Memphis
24-3
453
21
22-6
351
15
20. Butler
21. Notre Dame
22-6 328 25
22. Marquette
19-7
317
17
23. Pittsburgh
21-7
158 20
24. Oregon
22-6
61
23
25. Louisiana Tech
24-3
54
—
Others receiving votes: Colorado St. 49, VCU
45, Akron 43, Wichita St. 35, Saint Mary’s (Cal)
24, Illinois 19, UConn 18, UNLV 13, North Carolina
8, California 5, Middle Tennessee 2, Belmont 1,
Missouri 1, Stephen F. Austin 1.
USA Today Men’s Top 25
The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Feb. 24, points
based on 25 points for a first-place vote through
one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Indiana (28)
24-3
772
1
2. Gonzaga (3)
27-2
738
3
3. Duke
24-3 700
6
7
23-4 654
4. Michigan
5. Kansas
23-4 619
9
9
Pleated Furnace
Air Filter
Various sizes
available. 4044327
99
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3
The Associated Press Women’s Top 25
The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press’
women’s college basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 24,
total points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and
last week’s ranking:
Record Pts Prv
1. Baylor (40)
26-1 1,000
1
2. Notre Dame
25-1
957
2
3. UConn
25-2 909
3
4. Stanford
26-2
875
4
5. Duke
26-1
850
5
6. California
25-2 804
6
7. Penn St.
23-3
755
7
8. Tennessee
22-5
676
11
9. Maryland
22-5 665
8
10. Kentucky
23-4 634
8
11. Georgia
23-4 607 13
12. Dayton
24-1
492 14
13. Texas A&M
21-7
486 10
14. South Carolina
22-5
455
15
15. North Carolina
25-4 443 16
22-6 426 12
16. Louisville
17. UCLA
21-6
417
17
24-3
319
18
18. Delaware
19. Colorado
22-5
288 20
21-6
215 24
20. Nebraska
21. Green Bay
22-2
139 25
131
21
22-4
22. Syracuse
23. Iowa St.
19-6
122
—
90
19
20-7
24. Florida St.
25. Purdue
20-7
74
22
Others receiving votes: Oklahoma St. 58,
Toledo 34, South Florida 21, Vanderbilt 13, LSU
10, SMU 7, Gonzaga 6, San Diego St. 6, Texas
Tech 6, West Virginia 4, Chattanooga 3, Michigan
St. 2, Florida Gulf Coast 1.
Hockey
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 19 13 6 0 26 65 48
New Jersey 19 10 5 4 24 48 49
Philadelphia 21 9 11 1 19 60 66
N.Y. Rangers 17 8 7 2 18 41 44
N.Y. Islanders 19 8 10 1 17 56 64
Northeast GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal
19 12 4 3 27 53 41
Ottawa
20 12 6 2 26 48 37
Boston
15 11 2 2 24 45 34
Toronto
20 12 8 0 24 57 46
Buffalo
19 6 12 1 13 48 63
Southeast GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina
17 9 7 1 19 50 51
Tampa Bay 18 9 8 1 19 69 58
Winnipeg
18 8 9 1 17 48 57
Florida
18 5 9 4 14 42 65
Washington 17 6 10 1 13 48 55
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago
19 16 0 3 35 61 37
Nashville
20 9 6 5 23 44 47
St. Louis
18 10 6 2 22 55 52
19 9 7 3 21 57 54
Detroit
Columbus
19 5 12 2 12 40 56
Northwest GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 18 10 4 4 24 52 48
Edmonton 18 7 7 4 18 42 49
Minnesota 17 8 7 2 18 37 42
Calgary
17 7 7 3 17 48 59
17 7 8 2 16 42 51
Colorado
Pacific
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
17 13 3 1 27 59 47
Anaheim
Dallas
19 9 8 2 20 51 53
Los Angeles 17 9 6 2 20 45 41
Phoenix
18 8 7 3 19 50 49
17 8 6 3 19 41 39
San Jose
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.
Monday’s Games
Ottawa 2, Montreal 1, SO
Toronto 4, Philadelphia 2
Nashville 5, Dallas 4, OT
Chicago 3, Edmonton 2, OT
Los Angeles 5, Anaheim 2
Today’s Games
Dallas at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Carolina at Washington, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 4:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 4:30 p.m.
Calgary at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Colorado at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
Montreal at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
NWAACC Tournament
At Kennewick, Wash.
Saturday’s first-round games
Men
Whatcom vs. Centralia, 8 a.m.
Big Bend vs. Lane, 10 a.m.
Tacoma vs. Peninsula, noon
Chemeketa vs. Walla Walla, 2 p.m.
Yakima Valley vs. Clackamas, 4 p.m.
Edmonds vs. Lower Columbia, 6 p.m.
Pierce vs. Everett, 8 p.m.
SWOCC vs. Spokane, 10 p.m.
Women
Columbia Basin vs. Chemeketa, 8 a.m.
Bellevue vs. Tacoma, 10 a.m.
Lane vs. Yakima Valley, noon
Centralia vs. Peninsula, 2 p.m.
Skagit Valley vs. Lower Columbia, 4 p.m.
Walla Walla vs. SWOCC, 6 p.m.
Clackamas vs. Spokane, 8 p.m.
Clark vs. Whatcom, 10 p.m.
College Baseball
College Polls
Collegiate Baseball Poll
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — The Collegiate Baseball
poll with records through Feb. 24, points and
previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports
writers and sports information directors:
Record Pts Pvs
1. North Carolina
6-0
496
1
2. Arkansas
7-1
494
2
3. Vanderbilt
7-1
493
3
4. LSU
6-1
489
4
5. Oregon State
8-0
486
9
6. Oregon
6-1
485
5
7. South Carolina
5-1
483
7
5-1
478
8
8. Kentucky
9. Mississippi State
9-0
475
12
10. Oklahoma
9-0
471 14
11. N.C. State
12. UCLA
13. Rice
14. Stanford
15. Arizona
16. Mississippi
17. Cal State Fullerton
18. Florida State
19. Georgia Tech
20. Miami
21. UC Irvine
22. Texas
23. Louisville
24. Virginia
25. Florida Gulf Coast
26. Arizona State
27. Cal Poly
28. Clemson
29. Pepperdine
30. South Alabama
5-1
4-2
5-2
5-2
7-1
7-0
8-0
7-0
6-1
7-0
6-1
6-1
6-1
7-0
5-1
4-2
7-0
5-1
6-2
7-0
469
468
465
464
463
461
459
457
456
453
450
448
447
445
442
439
438
436
433
429
13
6
10
11
15
16
19
18
17
20
21
25
26
29
—
23
—
28
—
—
Baseball America Top 25
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — The top 25 teams in the
Baseball America poll with records through Feb.
24 and ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball
America):
Record Pvs
1. North Carolina
6-0
1
2. Vanderbilt
7-1
2
3. Arkansas
7-1
3
4. Louisville
6-1
4
5. Mississippi State
9-0
5
6. Oregon State
8-0
6
7. South Carolina
5-1
7
8. Mississippi
7-0
8
9. LSU
6-1
9
10. N.C. State
5-1
10
11. Kentucky
5-1
11
12. UCLA
4-2
12
13. Rice
5-2
13
14. Oregon
6-1
14
15
5-2
15. Stanford
6-1
16
16. Georgia Tech
8-0
20
17. Cal State Fullerton
9-0
18
18. Oklahoma
7-0
19
19. Florida State
20. Arizona
7-1
23
21. UC Irvine
6-1
25
22. Notre Dame
5-1
—
23. Florida Gulf Coast
5-1
—
24. Southern Miss.
5-2
21
25. Virginia Tech
6-1
24
Transactions
BASEBALL
MLB—Announced the retirements of umpires
Ed Rapuano, Tim Tschida and Derryl Cousins.
Promoted umpires Jim Joyce, Ted Barrett and
Fieldin Culbreth to crew chiefs. Named Vic
Carapazza, Manny Gonzalez and Alan Porter
full-time umpires.
American League
TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Claimed 1B Lars
Anderson off waivers from the Chicago White Sox.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS—Signed C Tim Ohlbrecht.
OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER—Signed G Derek
Fisher.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Named Wesley
McGriff secondary coach.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Released DT Cullen
Jenkins.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL—Suspended San Jose F Ryane Clowe two
games for leaving the bench on a legal line
change and starting an altercation during
Friday’s game against Chicago.
COLLEGE
MIAMI (OHIO)—Named Andrew Marlatt football special teams coordinator.
NEW MEXICO—Reinstated QB David Vega to
the football team.
2 for
00
12
7 2 Q t C l e a r To t e
6208326
699
VALUE
10 Lb. Sunrise Blend
8 Lb. Premium Blend
8337214
8337222
32 Gal.
Tr a s h C a n
7208366
1399
VALUE
Coquille
Supply
“Everything for your home but the view.”
3A Play
Play begins Thursday, February 28, ends Saturday, March 2
999
VALUE
6. Florida
22-4 596
4
7. Miami
22-4
581
2
8. Georgetown
21-4
552
11
9. Louisville
22-5
535 10
10. Michigan State
22-6 520
5
11. Arizona
23-4 458 12
12. Syracuse
22-5 420
8
13. Kansas State
22-5 398 13
14. New Mexico
23-4 369 16
15. Ohio State
20-7
328 18
16. Wisconsin
19-8 284 17
17. Memphis
24-3
281
19
20-6 277 14
18. Oklahoma State
21-5
199
—
19. Saint Louis
20. Notre Dame
22-6
169 25
21. Butler
22-6
161
15
22. Marquette
19-7
104 20
23. Saint Mary’s
24-5
54
—
24. Akron
22-4
53
—
25. VCU
22-6
52
24
O t h e r s r e c e i v i n g v o t e s : Pittsburgh 38,
Oregon 37, Middle Tennessee 29, Louisiana
Tech 24, San Diego State 13, UNLV 12,
Wichita State 12, Colorado State 10, UConn
5, Illinois 5, Oklahoma 5, California 3, North
Carolina 3, UCLA 2, Belmont 1, Creighton 1,
Kentucky 1.
NOW THROUGH FEBRUARY 28TH
3 for
99
599
14
1
18 ⁄2
1
24 ⁄2
GB
—
6
1
10 ⁄2
15
1
19 ⁄2
GB
—
6
12
1
20 ⁄2
1
21 ⁄2
The helpful place.
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C M
C M
Y
Y
K
K
C
M
C
M
Y
K B4•The World • Tuesday, February 26,2013
Y
K
Education
Fastest ever
Assignment: Research one of the
fastest animals or machines and
write a paragraph with three facts
and one opinion.
Jessika M., a student at North
Bay Elementary School, North
Bend, will receive a prize for her
submission on this topic:
The short fin Mako Shark is
amazing because of its speed. The
short fin Mako Shark can go fast,
really fast like 46 mph. The short fin
Mako Shark can jump more than six
feet out of watur. The short fin Mako
Shark’s tail helps the shark go fast.
This is the fastes animal I know of.
NORTH BAY ELEMENTARY
From Mrs. Johnson’s 4th grade class
The SR-71 is one of the fastest
planes. The SR-71 Black Bird can fly
faster than about 2,200 mph. It can go
around the same speed as a bullet. I
set a lot of records on speed. I hope I
can fly the SR-71 Black Bird because
it’s really fast! The SR-71 Black Bird is
aswome!
By Dominic
The Cheetah is one of the fastest
animals on earth. One of the reasons
why the cheetah can run up to 71 mph.
The Cheetah is also fast because it has
a flexible spine. The long tail helps the
Cheetah balance while running.
Brittany S.
The Thrust SSC is one of the
fastest veilical in the world. Durring
october 1979, the Thrust SSC reached
763 m.p.h. The Thrust SSC has three
tires at the front that are squished to
go faster. Durring a race the Thrust
SSC got first place by a speed of 763
m.p.h. for 50 miles in 1 hour and 10
mins. The Thrust SSC is awesome!
Jeffrey H.
I think Cheetahs are amazing animals becuase how fast they go.
Cheetahs get there energy by resting.
They resen why cheetas are fast when
they chase food is becuse there food is
faster then them then they want to be
fast. The cheetah goes 60 to 90 mph.
But I wish I could see a cheetah.
Ayla B.
I think the sailfish is an amazing
creature because it is so fast. One reason a sailfish can go fast is that it has a
big tailfin that works as a sail to help
them run from danger or to catch
food. Another reason a sailfish can go
fast is that it has a skinney and narrow
body. The sailfishes fastest speed is 63
mph, which can help them get away
from danger. It was fun learning
about sailfish, shame it went by so
fast.
Michael S.
I think that the Tiger beetle is the
most amazing of the beetle population. It can a lital bit faster than the
fastest man sprinter. It can allmost
run as fast as 494 km/h. After a count
of time they coud go blind.
Tabor B.
The Baskilisk lizard is so fast it can
sipp acros the water. The Baskilisk
Lizard can run to about 7.5 mph. That
mite not seem like a lot but for a lizard
thats fast. The baskilisk lizzard has
large, webed feet to help it balince on
water.
Thomas J.
I think that gazelles are cool. the
gazelles can run from their predators
at speeds of 40 mph. They are so fast
they can out run a cheetahs. They eat
grass and drink water all night and
days. I wish I could see a gazelles.
Jessica P.
Did you know a horse is one of the
fastest animals in the world? The
American Quarter horse can run 47.5
miles per hour. and that makes it the
worlds seventh fastest animal and
thats actually really good. This breed
of horse was actually bred to be the
fastest horse in the world. The ability
to beat other horses in races is what
gives this horse its name. I now think
the American Quarter horse is one of
the most interesting animals because
I learned about its speed.
Emma W.
The Thrust SSC is the fastest car
ever built. The Thrust SSC happend
to make a world record in 1997 When
it went faster than 760 mph (miles per
hour) and left a scar on the land. It
broke through the sound barrier on
the ground. The things that make the
Thrust SSC move are two Rolls Ryce
turboan engines. If you want to see
this magnificent thing go to the
Coventry Transport Museum in
Coventry, England. I think that it
whould be fun to ride the Thrust SSC
and experience the joy of being free
form the worldly things.
Tyler H.
I think that cheetahs are vary fast.
So that they can run away from danger and catch it’s pray. For example.
The cheetah can run 75 mph at the
fastest. It has a long leagd body that
helps it run faster. Olso it can sprint
45 mph in 2.5 seconds at a time. The
Cheetahs are so fast they are hard to
lern about. See ya cheetah.
Destinee C.
I think that cheetahs are amazing
animals because they can run fast.
Cheetahs use their tails when they are
running to guide them. The fastest a
cheetah has ben recorded in 70 mph.
Hop you had fun learning!
Mackenzie B.
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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2013
theworldlink.com/cuisine • Cuisine Editor Ron Jackimowicz • 541-269-1222, ext. 238 • [email protected]
BAY AREA IRON CHEF — BATTLE CITRUS
Everything goes better with Rice
Bandon chef puts her spin on Hawaiian theme to win title
Chef Lacey Rice cooked and presented six
courses in the Iron Chef competition, the
Rotary Club’s main fundraiser, at the Red
Lion Hotel in Coos Bay on Saturday.
Story by Thomas Moriarty
Photos by Alysha Beck,
The World
C
OOS BAY — The competition
was as hot as the food
Saturday at the Red Lion
Hotel in Coos Bay, as two area chefs
battled for culinary supremacy.
When the flour had settled at the
2013 Bay Area Iron Chef competition,
Lacey Rice of Bandon restaurant Lord
Bennett’s emerged victorious over
Oregon Coast Culinary Institute’s Tara
Pryor. The event, put on by North
Bend High School’s Interact Club in
conjunction with the Bay Area Sunrise
Rotary Club, is in its sixth year.
Both Pryor and Rice are OCCI
graduates. Pryor
returned to the
Inside
school three years
Chef Rice’s menu.
ago to serve as the
Page C2
assistant to Executive Director
Shawn Hanlin.
Organizer Lynda Kristoffersen said
each competitor was given a fully
equipped kitchen, $400 for ingredients, and five hours to cook dinner for
150 people. Each chef was required to
make an appetizer, a sweet dish, a
savory dish, a dish of their choice, a
vegetarian dish and a dessert.
Competitors pulled out all the
stops in choosing choice ingredients
for the Hawaiian-themed event. Rice
ordered an airlift of monchong, a
type of Hawaiian snapper. Pryor
hauled out short ribs.
When the cooking began at noon
sharp, Pryor and Rice opened their
baskets to reveal their secret ingredient: Citrus. Rice and Pryor mostly
used it in sauces, although both vegetarian options brought the fruit center
stage. Kristoffersen said previous
competitions’ mystery ingredients
have included bacon and Greek
yogurt.
Each was paired with two professional sous chefs, a Rotarian sous
chef and student sous chef from the
Interact Club.
Kristoffersen, who helps run the
Interact program at NBHS, said the
process for selecting student sous
chefs is competitive. “The one that
attends the most meetings and has
the most valuable input gets to be a
sous chef.”
The judging panel was composed of
restaurateur Joe Benetti, Walt’s Pourhouse owner Anneka Davis and Kathi
Simonetti of Cone 9. All are members
of local Rotary organizations.
Former Iron Chef Larry Moore of
Fresh Beginnings Catering served as
master of ceremonies.
“I’ve done a lot of competitions
and this is tough — 150 portions,”
Pryor said. “Five hours go by way too
fast.”
Chefs Tara Pryor, foreground, and Lacey Rice cooked and presented six courses in the Iron Chef competition.
Menus
Chef Lacey Rice’s mixed spring greens and radicchio salad with mango-blood orange vinaigrette and spicy
prawns.
TARA PRYOR
Oregon Coast Culinary
Institute
Chef Tara
Pryor’s Kalbi
short ribs
and coconut
mango rice.
Appetizer
Tempura-fried Spam musubi
garnished with Hawaiian slaw
Sweet entree
Kalbi short ribs and coconut
mango rice
Savory entree
Lualua macaroni
Chef Lacey
Rice’s Black Lava
sea salt roasted
pork loin with
cranberry chipotle barbecue
sauce and soyginger slaw.
$10 each at noon
Salad: Caprese Salad
Entrée: Raspberry glazed
lamb ribs with roasting hash
D e s s e r t : Jeff’s play on
crème brulee
DINNER — MARCH 1
$20 each with a complimentary glass of wine at 6
p.m.
A p p e t i z e r : Mascarpone
filled date wrapped with
prosciutto
Salad: Classic Caprese
E n t r é e : Braised lamb
shank with stew of root veg-
etables and asparagus en
papillote
D e s s e r t : Jeff’s take on
crème brulee
SUNDAY BRUNCH —
MARCH 3
$15 each with a complimentary mimosa. Children 5
and under are free and children 6-12 are $8 each. Times
are from 10:30 a.m.-2:30
p.m.
Breakfast Biscuit Sandwiches
Waffle station with fresh
strawberries, whipped cream
and house made syrup
Cheddar cheese grits
Scrambled eggs
Vegetarian entree
Passion fruit barbeque tofu
skewer with coconut rice
Chef’s choice
Coconut shrimp with a
pineapple chutney and served
with Hawaiian slaw
Dessert
Pineapple upside down cake
with coconut rum ice cream and
caramel sauce, macadamia nut
and Hawaiian pink salt brittle
Chef’s Table this Friday, Sunday
LUNCH — MARCH 1
Chef Tara Pryor laughs with
the crowd during the event.
Bacon, candied and plain
House made sausage
Assorted pastries
Fresh fruit platter
Cream of tomato soup
Grilled cheese panini’s
Your choice of havarti, cheddar, or Swiss.
Outdoors
Find out where the
best fishing can be
found on the South
Coast.
PLU#71429
Good Thru 3-26-13
5 OFF
$
ANY
PURCHASE
OF $50 OR
MORE.
Excludes alcoholic beverages. Not valid with any other offer. One coupon per visit per person.
Valid at Coos Bay Grocery Outlet only. Cannot be used toward purchase of gift cards.
See GO! Saturday
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Cuisine
A pear crisp
to make anytime
BY SARA MOULTON
The Associated Press
Sometimes, even on a
weeknight, you really crave a
little dessert. But making
dessert takes time, and you
already are spending time
cooking up the main event,
namely dinner.
That’s where this recipe
comes to the rescue. It’s a
quick, easy and delicious
pear crisp that calls for just
five ingredients — pears, granola, lemon juice, apricot
jam and a pinch of salt.
Pears are just now at the
tail-end of their season. Yes,
I know we can find pears all
year these days. But believe
me, those specimens are
going to be nowhere near as
electrifying as a fullyripened in-season local pear.
The problem is the relative
rareness of such pears. Ralph
Waldo Emerson was onto
something when he wrote,
“There are only 10 minutes in
the life of a pear when it is
perfect to eat.”
In other words, most of
the time, no matter where it
comes from, our pears aren’t
at the peak of perfection.
And for those times, when
pears are unripe and you
don’t have time to let them
ripen, this recipe comes in
mighty handy. Baking an
unripe pear not only makes it
tender, it also crystallizes
and magnifies the fruit’s flavor. Happily, any kind of pear
— and there are many varieties — will work in this
recipe, as will a mix of varieties.
Pears also have a lot to
offer in terms of health.
They’re a good source of
vitamin C and a great source
of fiber.
As for granola, there are a
zillion brands in the cereal
aisle of the supermarket. The
problem is that many of
them are laden with fat and
sugar even as they masquerade under a healthy halo.
That’s why the recommended portion on the back of
most granola boxes is just 1⁄4
cup. Pour yourself a normal,
adult-sized portion and you
might as well be tucking into
a breakfast of waffles and
sausage.
So when you shop for granola, look for a brand that’s
lower in fat, sugar and calories than the competition —
and which also contains lots
of nuts, seeds and dried fruit.
And if you want to bump up
the nutritional value of this
recipe even more, you also
1
could add ⁄4 cup of ground
flaxseed.
With all of that said, I
wouldn’t worry too much
about the amount of granola
in this recipe. Per serving, it’s
about what the granola box
recommends, and mostly
serves to put the crisp on this
pear crisp. Heck, you’d be
much better off serving this
dessert for breakfast than
dogging a big bowl of nothing but granola.
SPEEDY PEAR CRISP
Start to finish: 1 hour (15
minutes active)
Servings: 8
1
⁄2 cup plus 1 tablespoon
apricot preserves or
sweetened fruit spread
4 pears (about 2 pounds),
peeled, cored and thinly
sliced
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Table salt
2 cups purchased granola
Heat the oven to 350
degrees. Lightly coat a shallow 6-cup baking dish with
cooking spray.
In a small saucepan over
medium-low, heat the preserves until melted and easily stirred.
Set the sliced pears in a
large bowl, then drizzle the
preserves over them. Add the
lemon juice and salt, then
toss well. Spread the pears
evenly in the prepared baking
dish.
Sprinkle the granola evenly over the pears, then cover
the dish loosely with foil and
bake 30 minutes. Remove the
foil and bake another 15 minutes, or until the pears are
tender. Serve hot or cold.
Nutrition information per
serving: 210 calories; 25 calories from fat (12 percent of
total calories); 2.5 g fat (0.5 g
saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0
mg cholesterol; 50 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 27 g sugar; 3 g
protein; 55 mg sodium.
OCEAN
OCEAN ROCK
ROCK
FISHING!
FISHING!
The Associated Press
Asian steamed clams or mussels are served with broccoli rabe. Seafood lovers know that this steamed standby is high in protein as well
as big on taste.
Clams deliver big flavor
BY SARA MOULTON
The Associated Press
I’d love to claim that
this wonderful recipe
required hours of arduous
research and testing (not
to mention the expert
application of all of my
hard-won culinary skills)
before I was able to settle
on the exact proportions
of its ideal ingredients. But
I’d be lying. In truth, I had
almost nothing to do with
it. The clams did it.
Certain ingredients —
including clams, mussels,
rack of lamb, skirt steak
and dark chocolate —
make meals delicious with
very little effort on your
part. Really, you’d have to
be an idiot to screw them
up. Clams and mussels are
especially generous, delivering a one-two punch of
taste thrills: the succulent
bivalves themselves and
the deeply flavorful juices
that stream out of them
when they’re cooked.
My favorite way to mess
with clams is to steam
them, as in this recipe. You
toss all the ingredients into
a pot, pile on the clams, put
on the lid, crank up the
heat, and presto! Ten minutes later the dish is done.
The only problem is that
the clam liquor at the bottom of the pot is so tasty
that I’m forced to sop it up
with slice after slice of
bread.
That’s why I decided to
bulk up this dish with broccoli rabe, a healthy and
savory vegetable that
absorbs some of the clam
liquor as it cooks (though
the clam liquor that
remains still cries out for at
least a slice or two of toasted country-style bread).
As a way of blunting the
vegetable’s slightly bitter
edge, your first step with
broccoli rabe is to blanch
it. Cut off the tough ends
of the stems, then boil it all
in a large pot of salted
water for two minutes.
Next, drain it and transfer
it to a bowl of ice water to
stop the cooking and set
the color. Finally, chop it
crosswise into pieces
about 1⁄2-inch thick. It’s
just much easier to eat that
way. The garlic, chili
sauce, ginger and sesame
oil in the broth are complements strong enough to
stand up to the robustness
of the broccoli rabe.
After insisting above
that there’s no way to
screw up cooking with
clams, I’ve got to emphasize one crucial step, a step
to ensure that the little
guys turn out tender. You
need to remove each clam
from the pot as it opens
Starts March 1st!
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Lord Bennett’s
541-888-9021
Appetizer
berry chipotle barbeque sauce.
Nori wrapped fresh Hawaiian Ahi
Poke sushi rolls with sweet wasabi
Shoyu sauce.
Chef’s Choice
Monchong (Hawaiian snapper)
with Hawaiian salsa
Sweet
Mixed spring greens and raddichio
with prawns in a mango bloodorange vinegarette.
“In the Charleston Boat Basin”
Savory
FROM ROSEBURG
STORE HOURS
MON. - FRI. 10 A.M. - 6 P.M.
SATURDAY 10 A.M. - 5 P.M.
CLOSED SUNDAY
Hwy. 42 E. Coquille • 541-396-3742 • Prices good Feb. 27– Mar. 5, 2013
Fuji
APPLES
Red Bell
PEPPERS
Roasted pork loin rubbed with
black sea salt and served with cran-
Vegetarian
Pineapple taro root curry over rice
Dessert
Taro-guava sweetbread pudding
with coconut rum raisin sauce
LOCAL
Ownership • Products • Economy
89¢
LB.
59
¢
EA.
Oregon Frozen Sliced $ .49
LB.
STRAWBERRIES
2
Yellow
ONIONS
59¢
LB.
“A cooperative is a member owned and
member controlled business that operates
for the mutual benefit of all members.”
Your neighbors help supply our:
Grass Fed Meats • Farm Fresh Eggs
Seasonal Produce • Albacore Tuna
Fresh Artisan Breads • Fruit Preserves • Wine
Open to all — Easy to join
Shop local, eat healthy!
Red
GRAPES
2
$ .29
LB.
Red Leaf
LETTUCE
99¢
EA.
Russet
$ .39
POTATOES
2
⁄2 teaspoon sesame oil
3 cups blanched and
coarsely chopped
broccoli rabe
8 thick slices countrystyle bread, toasted
In a large saucepan, heat
the oil over medium high.
Add the ginger, scallions
and garlic and saute for 1
minute. Add the chili
sauce, white wine, chicken
broth and clams. Cover
tightly and cook until the
clams start to open. As
they open, transfer the
clams to a bowl. It will take
7 to 10 minutes for all the
clams to open. Discard any
clams that do not open.
Keep the saucepan over
medium heat. Return the
clams and any liquid in the
bowl to the pan. Add the
broccoli rabe, then cook
just until heated through.
Add the sesame oil and stir
well. Divide the clams and
broccoli rabe, along with
the cooking liquid,
between four shallow soup
bowls. Serve each bowl
with a few slices of toasted
bread and a soup spoon.
Nutrition information
per serving: 450 calories;
100 calories from fat (22
percent of total calories); 12
g fat (0.5 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 45 mg cholesterol; 52 g carbohydrate; 4 g
fiber; 8 g sugar; 29 g protein; 500 mg sodium.
ASIAN STEAMED CLAMS
OR MUSSELS WITH
BROCCOLI RABE
Start to finish: 30 minutes
Servings: 4
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon grated or
finely chopped fresh
ginger
1
⁄2 cup finely chopped
scallions (white and
green parts)
3 large cloves garlic,
minced
1 teaspoon Chinese chili
sauce (or your favorite
hot sauce)
1
⁄2 cup dry white wine
1
⁄2 cup low-sodium
chicken broth
3 dozen littleneck clams
or 2 pounds mussels,
scrubbed well
Seaside wins state
high school crown
Seaside High School beat
20 other teams from around
the state to win the Oregon
ProStart High School Culinary Championships held at
the Portland Expo Center.
Seaside earned a trip to the
National ProStart Student
Invitational in Baltimore this
spring.
Seaside’s winning menu
included an appetizer of
double chicken consommé,
an entrée of seared Harris
Ranch beef tenderloins with
balsamic seared vegetables
and whipped potatoes and
hollandaise, finishing with a
dessert of “campfire”
S’mores.
Rounding out the top five
teams were South Salem,
Tualatin, Bend and McMinnville.
YUM!
YCheckUoutM
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our
NEW Lunch Specials!
8
00
Only $ 00
For a Limited Time!
COOS HEAD FOOD CO-OP
You Own it! s i n c e 1 9 7 1 !
O P E N D A I LY
THIS WEEK’S PIZZA SPECIAL:
10 LB. BAG
1
up. The first ones will be
good to go after four or five
minutes. The last clam
might stay clammed up
until five or six minutes
later, by which time the
first clams — if you’d left
them in — would be horribly tough.
That’s it. Quick, easy,
nutritious, delicious and
satisfying. Try it and see if
you don’t end up happier
than a clam.
Large Pepperoni $14
We still have
Delicious Strawberry
Freezer Jam $3.49 LB
1960 SHERMAN, HWY. 101 S., DOWNTOWN NORTH BEND
541-756-7264
541-808-0644
1001 N. Bayshore Dr., Coos Bay, OR
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Tuesday, February 26,2013 • The World • C3 Y
Get a tax
break with
your used
clothing
If you itemize your tax
return, you are in a perfect
position to pick up some
extra dough.
You do know that you are
allowed to deduct the fair
market
EVERYDAY
value of
CHEAPSKATE i t e m s
y o u
donate to
qualified
charitab l e
o rga n i za t i o n s,
right?
And you
probably
Mary
don't do
a very
Hunt
good job
of that
because how on earth are
you supposed to know the
fair market value of those
shoes or that bag of clothes?
Not to mention that computer, lamp or other household appliance.
Most people stuff a
bunch of clothes into bags,
drop them off at a collection
center and claim a $100
deduction. But those
clothes could easily have
been worth $1,500 or more
if you only knew how to
value them. And the values
add up quickly.
Books, even magazines,
can be donated to libraries
or churches and properly
valued. The law does not
allow the charity to set the
value of an item. You, the
donor and taxpayer, must
do that. But how much
should you claim?
If you overstate the value
you risk an audit, penalties
and interest. If you underestimate, you will pay more
taxes than you should.
Here are some examples
of what donated items are
worth, assuming “Good”
condition:
Women’s dress: $12
Men’s suit: $23
Boy’s jeans: $4
Luggage set: $20
Stove: $30
See what I mean? It can
really add up fast.
In his booklet, “Money
for Your Used Clothing: Tax
Year 2012,” Certified Public
Accountant William R.
Lewis comes to the rescue of
uncertain taxpayers. The
booklet lists values for more
than 700 items of clothing
and household goods commonly donated to charity.
The values are obtained
from annual surveys of consignment and thrift stores
that Lewis and his staff perform in all areas of the U.S.,
conforming to IRS requirements for donated items.
Lewis produces a new
and updated version of this
booklet every single year to
reflect true values for the
current tax year. And Lewis
guarantees his work. If the
IRS disallows the deduction, he will personally pay
any interest and penalties.
By using “Money for Your
Used Clothing,” Lewis estimates clients (thousands of
them are in our own
Everyday Cheapskate family) have saved more than $15
million in taxes that would
have otherwise lined the
pockets of Uncle Sam.
That’s a pile of allowable
deductions.
“Money for Your Used
Clothing” addresses recent
tax law changes and guidelines for tax year 2012. It
retails for $25, but because I
believe this is such a valuable tool, I’ve negotiated a
special price of just $20
(plus $2.53 for U.S. Postal
Service media mail shipping, which may take up to
two weeks for delivery) for
my Everyday Cheapskate
readers.
To order, call 800-5503502; visit the bookstore at
www.DebtProofLiving.com
, and click “other books”; or
mail your $22.53 check to
Everyday Cheapskate, Dept.
Money Book, PO Box 2099,
Cypress, CA 90630. To
receive your booklet faster,
call our office at 800-5503502 and ask for priority
shipping rates.
Mary Hunt is the founder of
www.DebtProofLiving.com, a
personal finance member website. You can email her at
[email protected]
m, or write to Everyday
Cheapskate, P.O. Box 2099,
Cypress, CA 90630. To find out
more about Mary Hunt and read
her past columns, please visit
the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.
K
DILBERT
FRANK AND ERNEST
THE BORN LOSER
ZITS
CLASSIC PEANUTS
THE FAMILY CIRCUS
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
ROSE IS ROSE
LUANN
GRIZZWELLS
MODERATELY CONFUSED
KIT ’N’ CARLYLE
HERMAN
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K C4• The World •Tuesday, February 26, 2013
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Classifieds
Theworldlink.com/classifieds
All Merchandise
$0-$500: FREE
$501-$1000:
$5.00
$1001-$1500:
$7.00
6 lines/3 Weeks
Garage/Bazaar
Sales
6 lines/1 week
$12.00
Includes
Garage Sale
Map online
Pet
6 lines/2 Weeks:
$12.00
with photo:
$17.00
Value Ads
Call for more information
541-267-6278
Automobile
6 lines/2 weeks
$15.00
with photo:
$20.00
Enhance your ads with borders,
bolding, centering and artwork.
Real Estate
Jobs Wanted
or Personals
6 lines/1 week:
$15.00
6 lines/1 week:
$35.00
6 lines/2 weeks:
$45.00
6 lines/3 weeks:
$55.00
6 lines/4 weeks:
$59.95
Lost Pet or item
6 lines, 1st day
FREE, $1/day
thereafter
All specials are category specific. $5.00 photo upcharge on all ads. There are no refunds on specials.
These value ads will appear in The World, Bandon Western World, Umpqua Post, The World Link, Online & Smart Mobile.
Employment 204 Banking
200
BANKING JOBS!
Local CPA firm seeks
accounting professional
for busy office.
Requirements include payroll and
payroll processing using
QuickBooks accounting software,
multi-line phone and excellent
customer service skills are a must.
Income tax experience preferred.
Candidate shall be naturally
accustomed to multi-tasking and be
detail oriented while possessing
superior organizational skills.
Salary DOE.
Send resume to:
The World
# 5539
P.O. Box 1840
Coos Bay, Or. 97420
This is a FREE service!
Controller
The World is seeking an
experienced, hands-on Controller to
lead our financial department and
join our leadership team. Reporting
to the Publisher, this resultsoriented position provides
pro-active financial analysis and
evaluation, advice to senior
managers in performing their
responsibilities and directs the
small local accounting staff to
accomplish specific initiatives.
The focus of this position is
financial planning, analysis and
consultation, including maintaining
internal accounting controls;
ensuring accurate financial
statements; providing the
leadership team with financial
information and analysis to make
informed decisions and accurately
assess the ongoing impact of
strategies; and protecting the
assets of the company.
The successful candidate will have
solid accounting (GL, budgeting,
financial statement prep, AR/AP)
experience, prior management
experience, analytical and
organization skills, solid computer
application skills, and demonstrated
ability to effectively lead in a
complex business environment.
The successful candidate will have
demonstrated innovative
leadership, communication and
staff development skills. Prior
accounting management
experience and a bachelor’s degree
or higher in accounting is required.
CPA preferred. Prior experience in
the newspaper industry is a plus.
We offer competitive pay and
benefits. This is an excellent
opportunity for a proven financial
professional to bring his/her skills,
ideas and knowledge to an
established organization.
As part of Lee Enterprises, we offer
a strong package of pay and
benefits, including medical, dental,
vision and 401(k). See our Web site
at www.theworldlink.com. Learn
about our parent company at
www.lee.net.
Please apply online at
www.lee.net/careers. Submit
cover letter, resume and salary
requirements.
We are an equal opportunity
and drug-free workplace.
Pre-employment drug screen and
criminal background check
required.
Call Today Sunday, or any day!!
Use Job Code 13!
1-888-491-9029
Thewo-www2.theworldlink.com/t
opads/job/top_jobs/
No Resume Needed!
Call the automated phone
profiling system or use our
convenient Online form today
so our professionals can get
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Choose from one of the
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207 Drivers
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OCAN
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Place your ad
here and give
your business
the boost it
needs. Call
541-269-1222
Ext. 293
for details
Southern Coos Hospital
in Bandon has an opening for a
Part-time
RN in Med/Surg
from 7pm to 7am. For more info
go to www.southerncoos.org
or call 541-347-4515 for
application. EOE & Tobacco-Free.
213 General
Bandon Concrete &
Development
has an opening for a
Full Time
Heavy Truck & Equipment
Mechanic
RESPONSIBILITIES:
Heavy duty diesel engine, manual
transmission, electronic engine
controls, general electrical and
hydraulic systems troubleshooting
and repair. Responsible for the
maintenance of a fleet of dump
trucks, trailers, redi mix trucks,
construction equipment and other
light vehicles. Must have the ability
to interpret a variety of instructions
furnished in written, oral, diagram,
or schedule form and the ability
to define problems,
collect data, establish facts, and
draw valid conclusions.
Successful candidate must also be
agreeable to work on construction
projects or drive truck as needed to
help complete company projects.
QUALIFICATIONS:
Three to five year’s experience of
Journeyman level heavy duty truck
and equipment repair experience.
General welding skills. Have
essential computer skills and be
able to complete basic paperwork.
Clean DMV preferred, Class-A CDL
required. Additional endorsements
may be required within the first 90
days of employment.
PLEASE DIRECT INQUIRIES TO:
Gary Moser 503-932-0320
Applications available at:
www.oldcastlecareers.com
. Follow instructions .EOE
www.theworldlink.com
News Reporter
The South Coast’s daily newspaper
needs a reporter to cover local
government, health care and other
local news. You’ll break news on
our web and mobile platforms
while pursuing insightful,
high-impact enterprise. Bachelor’s
degree required. Photo and social
media skills are pluses.
See our Web site at
www.theworldlink.com.
Learn about our parent company at
www.lee.net.
http://www.lee.net/careers.
Then email your resume, work
samples and a list of references to
Editor Clark Walworth:
[email protected]
SMALL
BUSINESS
OWNERS:
Find your niche
here! Tell them
what your
business has to
offer on the
Bulletin Board.
Affordable
advertising
customized just
for you! Call
541-269-1222
Ext. 293
to get started
today.
SALES ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE
Do you like meeting new people
and learning about them?
Do you like finding solutions?
If so, you might be cut out for an
exciting and well-paid career in
advertising sales.
The World is seeking another
member for our great team of
sales pros. You’ll spend your
days visiting local businesses.
You’ll help them build their
prosperity with effective
advertising in our multiple print
and online products.
If you are a go-getter with
enthusiasm to spare and a
passion for winning, let’s talk.
Sales experience is not
necessary, but communication
skills are a must.
Must be able to perform in a
deadline-driven environment,
working independently as well as
in a team. Must have reliable
transportation, a clean driving
record and proof of insurance.
We are creating a “World Class
Workplace,” and we need
someone who wants to be a part
of something special.
We offer a base salary, a
generous commission plan
and a strong benefits including
medical, dental, 401(k), paid
vacation and more.
Apply on our Website at
http://www.lee.net/careers
Equal Opportunity Employer/Drug
229 Adult Foster Care
ADULT FOSTER HOME VACANCY
Private room, Pleasant environment,
nutritious meals & walking deck. Experience care providers. Reasonable
rates. Excellent references.
541-269-9067.
Business
300
301 Business for Sale
Estab. Minuteman Press
Business Service Franchise
For Sale. Owner Retiring. Repeat
Accounts. Financing Available
No Exp Nec. 1-800-796-3234
302 Business Service
DIVORCE $155. Complete preparation. Includes children, custody, support, property and bills division. No
court appearances. Divorced in 1-5
weeks
possible.
503-772-5295.
www.paralegalalternatives.com
[email protected]
OCAN
304 Financing
$$EASY QUALIFYING real estate
equity loans. Credit no problem.
Oregon Land Mortgage.
541-267-2776. ML-4645.
306 Jobs Wanted
Windy Maid Housecleaning
Tired of cleaning? I’ll do it for you!
Private home, vacation rentals,
commercial buildings. Call Wendy
at 541-435-4045
Care Giving
225
Notices
400
227 Elderly Care
CAREPROVIDER
position available. 3-5 days
weekly. Harmony Estates,
Bandon 541-347-7709
HARMONY HOMECARE
“Quality Caregivers provide
Assisted living in your home”.
541-260-1788
¢
99
*
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211 Health Care
Lower Umpqua
Hospital
215 Sales
We are an equal opportunity,
drug-free employer offering
a strong package of pay
and benefits.
CREATE YOUR
PROFILE NOW
BY PHONE OR WEB FREE!
Front Desk
Supervisor
in Reedsport is seeking a
Controller
BS in Accounting or Finance
required. Looking for strong
computer skills and teamwork
attitude. Health care experience
preferred but not required.
Apply online at
www.lowerumquahospital.com.
www.theworldlink.com
UTSMART
YOUR
COMPETITION
Full Time
Needed for local pediatric office.
At least two years of college, Four
years preferred. Will train right
person. Please send resume to
Dee Robinson at 1925 Thompson
Rd. Coos Bay, Or. 97420
[email protected]
Simply create your profile by
phone or online and, for the
next 90-days, our professionals
will match your profile to
employers who are
hiring right now!
or
202 Admin./Mgmt.
213 General
Medical Assistant
LOWER UMPQUA
HOSPITAL
has openings for the following
positions:
Med-Surg/ICU
Full-time
night shift, position available.
Current Oregon RN License,
CPR, and ACLS required. Must be
able to function independently
in a small, rural hospital setting. A
positive team attitude is essential.
Criminal background check and
drug screen required. Two years of
experience preferred.
Med-Surg/ICU/ER
Full-time
night shift, position available.
Current Oregon RN License, CPR,
and ACLS required. Must be able to
function independently in a small,
rural hospital setting. A positive
team attitude is essential. Criminal
background check and drug screen
required. Two years of
experience preferred. To
apply go to
www.lowerumpquahosptial.com
Bandon Dunes Golf Resort is
seeking a Hotel Front Desk
Supervisor to provide exceptional
guest service through leadership,
communication and follow-up with
employees and guests. Must
possess a friendly, positive,
up-beat and hospitable attitude
at all times. Minimum 2
years supervisory
experience, preferably in the
hospitality industry. Strong
computer and communication
skills required. Must be able to
work flexible hours, including
weekends.Please apply at:
bandondunesgolf.com
Coordinator P/T: Locate and screen
host families, provide support and activities for exchange students. Make
friends
worldwide!
www.aspectfoundation.org
OCAN
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an advertising proof is requested in writing and
clearly marked for corrections. If the error is not
corrected by the Publisher, its liability, if any, shall
not exceed the space occupied by the error.
Further, the Publisher will reschedule and run the
omitted advertisement at advertiser’s cost. All
claims for adjustment must be made within seven
(7) days of date of publication. In no case shall the
Publisher be liable for any general, special or
consequential damages.
ADVERTISING POLICY
The Publisher, Southwestern Oregon Publishing Co., shall
not be liable for any error in published advertising unless
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Offer expires
3-31-13
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8-27-12
20226118
201 Accounting
No Resume? No Problem!
Monster Match assigns a
professional to hand-match
each job seeker with each
employer!
211 Health Care
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Tuesday, February 26,2013 • The World • C5 Y
403 Found
Holidays
475
Found Specials
For Items or Pets
without/or with photo:
6 lines, Free for one week
May rerun if necessary.
Lost Specials
Choose to add a photo in this
special for only $5.00 more
1st Day Free
6 lines,
Each additional Day
$1.00
No Free reruns on same ad.
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, The Link,
Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
541-267-6278
406 Public Notices
HIGH SPEED INTERNET
ACCESS
Now available in CB. No phone
lines req’d. Not a satellite service.
Month to Month Service as low
as $20/mo.Installation fee required.
Call for details.
DC Wireless ISP, Inc.
www.dcwisp.net 541-435-7796
REWARD OF $700 CASH
LEADING TO RETURN OF
MISSING BELL, NO QUESTIONS
ASKED! 2-FOOT CAST IRON BELL
WAS TAKEN FROM NORTH
BEND METHODIST CHURCH
PROPERTY. THEY ARE HOPING
FOR THE RETURN OF THE
CHURCH BELL. PLEASE CONTACT: 541-269-0103 MARCI OR
541-217-0689 PASTOR OR
NORTH BEND POLICE DEPT.
Birthdays! Anniversaries! Birth
Announcement or any milestone
your family will be celebrating.
Let everyone know! We offer
Beautiful, full color ads. 2x3
announcement with photo for
$30.00 or 3x5 announcement
with photo for $50.00.
Contact Valerie at
The World.
[email protected]
or 541-269-1222 ext. 269
501 Commercial
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise “any preference, limitations or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin, or
an intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing
custody of children under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby informed
that all dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD
toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone number for the
hearing
impaired
is
1-800-927-9275.
407 Personals
Personals Special
6 lines, 1 week
$15.00
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, The Link,
Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
502 Condominiums
MEXICO TIMESHARES
FOR SALE:
Diamond Resorts
formally Playa Del Sol. Beach
front Studio Condo, sleeps 4 with
kitchenette. Make offer.
Mayan Resorts
541-267-6278
Services
425
426 Cake Decorating
Jobs Wanted
Special
6 lines, 1 week
$15.00
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, The Link,
Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
541-267-6278
2 Bedroom beach front condo,
sleeps 10. Make offer. Both
bought in Los Cabos, Mexico.
Please call 541-404-8814
504 Homes for Sale
Open house. Cozy one bdm. bungalow, all remodeled. New kitchen
cabnets, carpets, new vinyl floors,
paint, utility room. Washer/Dryer,
Stove, Refrigerator included. Great
starter
home.
$79,000.
Call
541-267-7777 or 541-290-4987. 1765
Southwest Blvd.
506 Manufactured
1971 2bdrm. 1 bth. in family park.
New carpet and paint on inside. Being sold as is for $8,000 OBO.
Owner will carry. 541-271-3707 or
541-556-7618
BRIDGE
The best improvement in bridge in
the last 20 years is the employment of
“useless” cards to send suit-preference signals.
Without this style of defense, West
would have to guess what to do in this
deal. With suit preference, it is easy.
How should the play and defense
go in four spades after West leads the
diamond king?
South has four losers: three hearts
and one diamond. (West cannot have
the ace and king of hearts, because
his opening lead would have been the
heart ace, not the diamond king.) But
South has 10 potential tricks: five
spades, two diamonds and three
clubs. His best play is to take the first
trick and immediately to lead back his
diamond jack. To defeat the contract,
West must win with his queen and shift
to a heart. But how will he know that is
right instead of a club switch?
At trick one, East plays his diamond two, discouraging. But on the
second round, he can play the seven
or four. Wanting a heart
shift, he drops the
seven, the higher card
asking for the higherranking of the other two
side suits. Now West
knows exactly what to
do.
If you have only low
trumps, you can also
use those to send suitpreference signals. In
this deal, if South immediately draws trumps,
East can play eight-sixthree-two, always the
highest calling for a
heart.
The snag with these
signals is that you and
your partner have to
watch the cards very
carefully. But if you do,
you will defeat more
contracts.
604 Homes Unfurnished
Choose any of these specials and
add a photo for $5.00 extra.
Remodeled 12x56 1972 Mobile in
family park. 2bdrm. 1bth w/ office
or
din.
2
storage
units.
Range/Fridge, Washer and Dryer
included. Owner will carry. $13,500
OBO.
541-271-3707
or
541-556-7618.
Rentals
600
601 Apartments
Real Estate
500
601 Apartments
RENTALS &
REAL ESTATE SPECIALS
Reedsport: 1973 Brookwood manufactured home. Nice 2bd/ 2bth. Large
living/dining room & kitchen. Wood
floors in dining rm & kitchen. Electric
& Pellet stove. Asking $29,000. Call
541-2714098 or 541-271-3748
541-267-6278
Lost African Grey named Stormy
near 894 Laurel Ave in Reedsport.
Please call Jack or Sally if you have
any information.
541-271-3768
601 Apartments
477 Birthdays
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western World,
Umpqua Post, The Link,
Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
404 Lost
506 Manufactured
K
!!Sunny, Spacious!! Super nice one
bdrm in Eastside (Coos Bay). Covered
parking. Great storage and more! No
smoking/ No pets $535+ dep. W/S/G
included. Call 541-269-6562 now.
One bdr. CB 1277 N. 6th St.Laundry
on site, $495mo. One bdr. NB 1189
Virginia no steps, Close to shopping
and schools., $485mo. $400 Dep. No
pets/
smoking.
W/G
paid
541-267-0125 or 541-297-6752.
TUESDAY, FEB. 26, 2013
A number of restrictions that
have hampered your progress in
the past are likely to be gradually lessened or, in some cases,
even totally removed in the year
ahead. This will bring success
within your grasp.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
— You’re likely to function far
more effectively when you can
operate independently. Sadly,
you could be more of a hindrance in situations where teamwork is required.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
— Usually, you don’t blab things
that should be kept to yourself,
but today you might not be able
to help telling on someone whom
you really dislike. Try not to take
the low road.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
— There are days when socializing can be a negative experience, and it could be one of
those times. If you find this happening to you, make a quick exit.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
— Your peers could find your
motives suspicious, so if you
think this to be true, make certain
everything you do is above
reproach. If you try anything
funny, you’ll be caught.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
— Even if you feel like sounding
off to someone who really
deserves it, it would be best that
you don’t. Hold your tongue and
count to 10 or even 20, if that’s
what it takes to subdue your
anger.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — If
you find yourself involved in a
financial
transaction
that
requires a lot of paperwork, don’t
get lazy and take things for granted. Read the fine print, down to
the very last comma.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
— Friends will tolerate a bit of
restlessness on your part, but
not to the point of changing
group plans. Be thoughtful about
your behavior.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) —
When conversing with others,
speak well of friends who aren’t
present, or say nothing at all. Any
comments you make will be
repeated and even distorted to
those being spoken about.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
One Bedroom
109 South 9th Street
The Ghlynn Apartments
By The Coos Bay Library
Very Large and Spacious. Quiet
and Clean, conveniently located.
Hardwood floors, coin operated
laundry. No pets, No smoking.
$495 mth, $400 dep.
541-297-4834
One bedroom, one bath Apartment.
W/S/G pd. Near Barview Market.
$525 Mo. first last and $400 deposit. 541-290-4011
Quiet One Bdr. Apt. Near Coos Bay
Post Office. Ground floor- no steps
shower, large laundry room, W/D
included, covered single car carport. Parking at front door. In the
alley between 4th and 5th St. $525
per mon. with $500 dep. Call
541-294-7740 or e-mail for pictures
[email protected]
Your daily
classifieds are
ON-LINE AT
www.theworldlink.com
— To expedite certain tasks or
assignments, you might be
tempted to take a few shortcuts.
Unfortunately, this might only
cause more work for you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) — It’ll reflect poorly on
your image if you try to take credit for something that you had only
a small part in producing. Don’t
let your ego put you in an embarrassing position.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) — Don’t overreact if another’s point of view is diametrically
opposed to yours. Remember,
everyone is entitled to express
his or her opinion. Show them
some respect.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) — When left to your own
devices, you’re pretty good at figuring things out. Complications
could enter the picture, however,
with comments by an unsolicited
adviser.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 27, 2013
Several old but good relationships might be revived and revitalized in the year ahead. These
wonderful and trustworthy
friends will once again play constructive roles in your affairs, with
everyone benefiting.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
— There are always those times
when we turn out to be the victor
with something in which we are
vulnerable. If you happen to take
a beating in the early rounds
today, keep this in mind.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
— Be as flexible as possible
when trying to iron out the snags
in an agreement. When you allow
everything to be on the table during negotiations, the problems
will dissolve.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
— Stay out of office politics as
much as possible. Chances are
nothing will be resolved, but the
brouhaha it stirs up could unsettle you and affect your job performance.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
— Unless you match your activity with the clock, not everything
you want to accomplish will get
done. Don’t spend too much time
on unanticipated interruptions.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
— Don’t fight for what you want if
you know that doing so will have
detrimental side effects. What’s
good for you might not be equally rewarding for the others
involved.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) —
Rentals / Real Estate 1
1 week - 6 lines,
$35.00
Rentals / Real Estate 2
2 week - 6 lines,
$45.00
MYRTLE POINT, Very clean 2 bed, 1
ba. home. No pets. No smoking. Must
keep lawn mowed & trimmed. Good
rental references a must. $650/mo +
$750 dep. Avail. 10/23. 541-404-5075.
Rentals / Real Estate 3
3 week - 6 lines,
$55.00
Rentals / Real Estate 4
4 week - 6 lines,
$59.95
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, Wednesday
Weekly, Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
541-267-6278
604 Homes Unfurnished
For rent 1 bdrm. 1bath. home small
yard. off street parking. Sewer/ garbage pd. includes W/D. Section 8 ok.
Call 541-888-8125.
Even though Lady Luck is willing
to help you out, you might not
notice her contribution until late
in the game. Make some room
for her to squeeze into the picture.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
— When it comes to your financial affairs, be both careful and
prudent by thinking first and acting second. If you reverse this
order, you might not be able to
clean up your mistakes.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) —
In negotiating a matter of importance, don’t be too hasty and
accept what is first offered. If you
aren’t getting exactly what you
want, you should be able to
improve your position.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
— Something that you work really hard on might not turn out as
well as you expected.
Conversely, that to which you
devote little effort could go over
like gangbusters.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) — Try to be tolerant and
forgiving in involvements with
both your family and friends.
When you overlook their shortcomings, they, in turn, will overlook yours.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) — Although it might not be
easy, a critical objective can be
achieved. When Lady Luck sees
that you are doing everything you
can, she will lend a helping hand.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) — You’ll have good luck in fulfilling your expectations and
hopes, but not necessarily in the
way you expected. Unforeseen
developments will cause you to
scrap your original plans.
THURSDAY, FEBR.28, 2013
The aspects indicate that
greater stabilization in your
financial affairs will be taking
place in the year ahead.
Chances are if it hasn’t already
started, you’ll soon be entering a
growth pattern that will prove
very interesting.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
— Even though any rewards you
reap will be due more to the
efforts of others than your own,
your prospects look exceptionally good. Later, you’ll find a way to
balance the account.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
— Do your best to keep all of
your involvements in good, proper balance. Don’t attempt to take
on more than you can manage,
but by the same token, don’t idle
Coquille - Clean cozy 2 bedroom
plus small hobby room, 2 bath cottage on corner lot. No Smoking Allowed - Smoke free rental. No pets
allowed. Good rental references.
$650 month plus $750 security deposit. Available for move in date of
March 1. Call 541-404-5075 now to
apply and view.
Myrtle Point, 3 bedroom house with
large fenced yard shown by appointment. Application, rental history and
reference required. $750 mo w/ $500
security
deposit.
No
smoking
541-824-0355. Leave mesa age.
Very Clean 2 Bdrm. 1 bth. Large
yard, garage. New carpet and
drapes Garbage paid. No smoking.
$695 mon. plus $400 dep. 1936
Johnson N/B. 541-756-7758
your time away, either.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
— When working on something
you deem to be a labor of love,
positive results are inevitable.
Without question, the secret to
your success is enjoying what
you are doing.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
— Seek out activities devoid of
competition that bring you
together with friends whose
company you enjoy. You need to
relax, not vie with rivals.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
— This could a particularly good
time to invite friends over to your
place for a little tete-a-tete. Most
of the time, these impromptu gettogethers turn out great.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) —
You’re likely to be exceptionally
competent with projects that are
more mental than physical in
nature. You won’t find a better
day to rest your muscle and give
your brain a workout.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
— Material increases are indicated if you operate along traditional lines. However, the picture
could suddenly change if out of
the blue, you decide to take a
risk on something.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) —
Although you have excellent
leadership qualities, they will
remain dormant unless there is
something specific that you
decide to do. Whatever your aim,
it will require tact and grace.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
— You could find yourself
involved in something that affects
others more than you. Rather
than get deeply drawn in, keep a
safe and respectful distance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23Dec. 21) — You have a wonderful
faculty of being able to enjoy
yourself regardless of the hand
that is dealt you. You’ll capitalize
on this gift in two separate situations.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) — Even though you might
not be aware of it, you are apt to
be the center of attention in at
least one gathering. It’ll be your
convivial conduct that enhances
these conditions.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) — One of your best assets is
being able to make friends with
people from all walks of life. This
wonderful quality will be in good
working order — use it to your
advantage.
Make a bundle
{
Earn $20 to $50 a day
delivering The World
As an independent contract carrier, you’ll work an assigned
service area for a few hours Monday through Thursday midday and early mornings on Saturday. With direct deposit
you’ll be paid every 2 weeks, and your only out of pocket
expense is for your transportation costs.
If you enjoy making customers happy and the pride in
accomplishing tasks with efficiency, please contact
Susana Norton for details. We are building a list for future
openings in all delivery areas for The World newspaper.
We have current opportunities in Coos Bay and North Bend.
Susana Norton 541-269-1222 ext. 255 or
[email protected]
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K C6• The World •Tuesday, February 26, 2013
Y
604 Homes Unfurnished
710 Miscellaneous
WOOF YES YOUR PET IS FAMILY
Near Charleston, 2 bedroom 1 bath
mobile home with large tip out living
room, garage and laundry, fully fenced
yard. $683 rent includes W/S/G $450
dep. Pet possible with fee. Available
3/1. 801-915-2693.
Attention hunters, Bravo super grade
wall tent. Factory new. Snow slide
floor, stove. All bells and whistles.
Must sell. 541-921-7952
606 Manufactured
Gallon on light grey indoor paint $5,
15 package of new plastic fishing
worms $1 ea. 4x6 foot new vinyl $3.
LA Angles xl sports jacket $29. 6 pictures $2-$5 ea. Army field jacket
Large $5. 541-888-2012
COQUILLE: Immaculate 3 bd. 2
bath home in rural setting close to
town. Includes refrig, stove, dishwasher. Nice deck off back and
separate
small
shop/storage.
Room to park RV or boat. No
Smoking allowed. No pets allowed.
Good rental references. $800
month/$1000
sec
dep.
Call
541-404-5075.
609 Rooms for Rent
ROOM FOR RENT:
Beautiful view of bay, just 1.5
miles on East Bay Rd. $400mo.
Will need to pass background
check. Call for more information.
541-404-8814
610 2-4-6 Plexes
Coquille: 2 BDRM Cottage in
quite park like setting close to
shopping.
Carpet,
Blinds,
Stove/Fridge. W/G paid. $475 mo.
$250 Deposit. Sorry, no pets.
541-396-4398
2 bed 11/2 bath w/garage, No smoking, no pets. W/S/G pd. $600 rent
$600 deposit. 1076 Anderson Coos
Bay. Credit references required.
541-294-0775.
Bay view, NB 2 bedroom in upscale
4-plex. Energy efficient, low utilities,
immaculate, large 2 car garage w/
auto opener, luxurious, carpet/ appliances, W/D hookups, no smoking.
W/S/G paid. $850/mo + deposit.
541-217-8107 or 541-217-8072.
CIRCLE Y SADDLE with pad $200,
Double H riding boots $75 or OBO.
541404-6565
Golf Balls by the dozen $3. Large red
boat buoy $35. Redwood double deck
bird house $60. Fishing net floats
$10.ea. Call 541-888-3120
Home care walker with compartment
under sit. $45. Hamster cage, brand
new, still in box $15. - 541404-6565
Jazzy Jet 7 Power wheel chair. low
hours. $650. OBO. Metal office desk
for free. 360-749-1484
802 Cats
915 Used Cars
PUBLISHED: The World - February
19, 26, March 05, and 12, 2013
(ID-20226016)
Kohl’s Cat House
Adoptions on site.
541-294-3876
803 Dogs
Two beams for sale. One 4x8x28 1/2
Ft.and one 4x8x9 1/2 Ft. Call
541-756-5808 for more information.
Two easy lift boat loaders $100 ea.
Shot gun shell loader, 12 & 20 gauge
$265. 5 1/2 horsepower Briggs& Straton motor new, $95. 541-759-3336
805 Horses/Equine
HORSESHOEING
For Sale: 2008 Chevy Cobolt 4 door
sedan. 42,000 miles. Sunroof, on call.
Automatic, all power. $8302.00. Firm.
541-888-5992
916 Used Pick-Ups
TEJUN FOWLER
541-297-5295
[email protected]
REEDSPORT
Large Townhouse style
duplex
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, 1 car
garage, W/D hookups, dishwasher,
pellet stove, patio plus fenced yard.
Available now, 700/mo., 1st/ last +
$150 deposit. No pets/smoking.
Tenant responsible for until.
Credit check required.
Call 541-271-3743
612 Townhouse/Condo
2 bed. Townhouse $400 W/S/G
pd. Laundry fac.
Move in Special $600!
77287 Hwy 101, Gardiner
Grand Mgmt 269-5561
BAYFRONT TOWNHOMES
Wooded setting, fireplace, decks,
view of bay and bridge.
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
Tamarac 541-759-4380
Other Stuff
700
701 Furniture
2 WINE-colored soft like leather
La-Z-Boy recliners, wide. 1 swivel, 1
rocker. $130 ea. 541-347-9160.
Antique Dresser with matching mirror. $150. For more information call
541-404-6565
Large buffet $500. Antique desk
$250, Bedroom set with heavy queen
$800, computer desk & chair $50,
Washer & Dryer $250, Fir stands $20,
OBO - 541-888-9781.
Lazy Boy apartment size Hide a Bed.
Excellent
condition.
$95.
Call
541-329-0087
MERCHANDISE
SPECIALS
3 Weeks
Choose any of these specials and
add a photo for $5.00 extra.
Merchandise 1
6 lines, Total Merchandise sold
between $1.00 up to $500.
FREE
Merchandise 2
6 lines, Total Merchandise sold
between $501. up to $1000.
$5.00
Pet Cremation
541-267-3131
Recreation/
Sports 725
★Your Place or Mine★
★Short or Long Term★
★Excellent References★
★541-297-6039★
★See us on Facebook★
729 Exercise Equipment
734 Misc. Goods
Market Place
750
754 Garage Sales
COOS BAY:
Beta Sigma Phi
Blossom Gulch School
Saturday March 2
9am to 3pm.
Garage / Bazaar
Specials
6 lines, 1 week
$12.00
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, The Link,
Online/Online Map
& Smart Mobile.
If scheduled before the deadline
has passed. All prices will be the
same regardless of deadlines. All
specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
541-267-6278
PICC-A-DILLY Flea Market: Fairgrounds, Eugene. THIS SUNDAY,
March 3, 10 - 4. 541-683-5589.
PORT ORFORD:
Huge Estate Sale
Contractor grade tools, ladders
wallpaper, painting equipment, fully
equip work van and custom travel
van (low miles) 2006 Toyota
Avalon, furniture, antiques, music
CD , DVD, household items.
Everything must go.
March 1, 2, & 3. 8-3
521 Madrona Ave.
Automobiles
900
901 ATVs
1987 Yamaha Banshee 350
New rings, new stage 2 reeds,
new stater, new head gaskets,
good tires. Strong runner.
Will sacrifice for $2700.
541-404-8667
Auto Specials
Choose to add a photo in this
special for $5.00 more
6 lines, 2 weeks
$15.00
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, Wednesday
Weekly, Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
541-267-6278
903 Boats
1987 “Lund” 14’ Aluminum Boat
No leaks, carpeted, 2006 9.9HP
motor, EZ-loader trailer. $3500 obo.
Call 541-888-3698.
Pets/Animals
800
2006 Jeep Rubicon. 5 new tires,
new wench and bumper. 56,000
miles.
$16,900
OBO.
541-269-5175
909 Misc. Auto
HONDA WORLD
$7,990
‘00 Ford Mustang
21K Miles, Alloys, Spoiler, CD, PW.
#B3250/108447
801 Birds/Fish
Found Specials
For Items or Pets
without/or with photo:
6 lines, Free for one week
May rerun if necessary.
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western World,
Umpqua Post, The Link,
Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
$12,990
‘01 Ford F-250 HD 4x4
Ext Cab, One Owner, Low Miles, XLT.
#B3256/D03599
$6,990
‘00 Honda Prelude
Auto, Low Miles, Moonroof.
#B3243B/217442
$10,990
704 Musical Instruments
GUITAR SALE. Ibanez electric $125;
nice acoustic w/case $125. Free lesson w/ Steve Montana. 541-332-8048.
707 Tools
Sachs Dolmatr Chain Saw.
24 in. bar. Includes 2 chains and
electric chain sharpener. Runs
Excellent $275.00 541-217-4915
Tools! Shop Smith Drill Press
$40.Craftsman 12 Band Saw $50.
Call 541-888-4620
709 Wanted to Buy
BUYING JUNK AUTOs
No title needed, will pick up,
up to 100 miles from Coos Bay.
Will pay up to $200 per automobile.
541-260-9447
Trade Wanted: 20 Cords of Hardwood
or Fir firewood split for clean 1988
Ford f-250 2 wheel dr. auto, runs
great. Tires 80%, 2014 tags, new exhaust. CB. 541-982-088.
Wanted to buy a cement mixer.
Please call Marvin at 541-808-4265
WANTED: PING PONG table. Please
call 541-808-0497 or 541-290-4541
04 GMC Envoy SLT
4x4, Moonroof, Leather.
#B3267/2210251
Living Aquascapes specializes in
construction, setup, and maintenance
of all types of Freshwater or Saltwater
Aquariums, Ponds, and Fountains.
call Nick at (541)404-9931
Lost Specials
$8,990
07 Chevy SWB 1500 4x2
Air, 43K Miles, Sharp.
#B3270/156092
Choose to add a photo in this
special for only $5.00 more
1st Day Free
6 lines,
Each additional Day
$1.00
No Free reruns on same ad.
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, The Link,
Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
541-267-6278
PET SPECIALS
$14,990
‘03 Dodge 4x4
Quad Cab, Auto, SLT, 31K Miles.
#B3269/212451
$8,990
04 Buick Le Sabre
Auto, 1 Owner, 6 Cyl,
#B3271/122089
Choose to ad a photo in this
special for only $5.00 more
Pet / Animal
6 lines, 2 weeks
$12.00
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, Wednesday
Weekly, Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
541-267-6278
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF WILBUR
LEWIS; SHARLET D. TALBOT, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS CLAIMING
SUCCESSOR IN PROBATE CASE
12PB0052 ; CARLA LEWIS; LYLE
LEWIS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; STATE OF OREGON; OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES; AND
THE REAL PROPERTY LOCATED
AT 1808 COTTONWOOD AVENUE,
COOS BAY, OREGON 97420,
Defendants.
TO THE DEFENDANTS: UNKNOWN
HEIRS OF WILBUR LEWIS; LYLE
LEWIS; AND THE REAL PROPERTY
LOCATED AT 1808 COTTONWOOD
AVENUE, COOS BAY, OREGON
97420:
In the name of the State of Oregon,
you are hereby required to appear and
answer the complaint filed against you
in the above-entitled Court and cause
on or before the expiration of 30 days
from the date of the first publication of
this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is February 19,
2013. If you fail timely to appear and
answer, plaintiff will apply to the
above-entitled court for the relief
prayed for in its complaint. This is a
judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust
in which the plaintiff requests that the
plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your
interest in the following described real
property:
LOT 16, BLOCK 10, MINGUS PARK
HEIGHTS
AMENDED,
COOS
COUNTY, OREGON.
NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS:
READ THESE PAPERS
CAREFULLY!
A lawsuit has been started against
you in the above-entitled court by
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., plaintiff.
Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was
filed with the above-entitled Court.
You must “appear” in this case or the
other side will win automatically. To
“appear” you must file with the court a
legal document called a “motion” or
“answer.”
The “motion” or “answer”
(or “reply”) must be given to the court
clerk or administrator within 30 days
of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and
have proof of service on the plaintiff’s
attorney or, if the plaintiff does not
have an attorney, proof of service on
the plaintiff.
If you have any questions, you should
see an attorney immediately. If you
need help in finding an attorney, you
may contact the Oregon State Bar’s
Lawyer Referral Service online at
www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling
(503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in
Oregon at (800) 452-7636.
This summons is issued pursuant to
ORCP 7.
ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.C.
Merchandise 3
$7.00
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its
successors in interest
and/or assigns,
Plaintiff,
v.
Commonly known as: 1808 Cottonwood Avenue, Coos Bay, Oregon
97420.
906 4X4
755 Market Basket
Country (Flea) market. Greenacres
Grange. 9-4 Fri/Sat. Off Hwy 42, between Coos Bay & Coquille.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE
STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR
THE COUNTY OF COOS
Case No. 12CV0701
SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION
Huffy mountain bike 10 speed and
helmet $85, Pro Form Tread Mill
space Saver $60 and Pro Form Reflex
Elliptical $80. Call 541-888-4620
6 lines, Total Merchandise sold
between $1001. up to $1500.
541-267-6278
Legals
100
Carol’s Pet Sitting
541-267-6278
All specials will appear in
The World, Bandon Western
World, Umpqua Post, Wednesday
Weekly, Online & Smart Mobile.
All specials are category specific.
There are no refunds on specials.
Starts October 1, 2012
2004 FORD F150 - In excellent
condtion, bright red, 79823 miles. No
dents or scratches. ONE OWNER
$11500. Call Jim 541-756-4476
808 Pet Care
Wilson Golf Clubs.
3 through wedge, oversized faces.
Also 1-3, 5-7 woods, Bag and Cart
$75.00 541-217-4915
FOR RENT: New duplex,
3 bedroom, 2 bath. Small pet
negotiable. Wood floors, fenced
yard, W/D included. Central NB.
$1000/mo, 541-297-1328.
1999 Dodge Neon. 4dr, Auto transmission, 104k miles. Power locks &
windows. Cd w/ mp3 aux. Runs great,
looks good. Outer paint coat is fading
on spots. $3800 obo. Bandon.
541-404-0879
Lost: Female Silver Min Pin. Last seen
4th and Golden, Coos Bay Saturday
evening. Don’t have a collar. Please
call 541-404-1694
BOXES
Suitable for moving, storage & shipping, good shape, sm. (18x12x10”) to
big (25x25 x16”). $1. to $3. ea. depending on size & qty. No wardrobe
boxes 541-756-4337
Shopsmith, Mark 5. Many attachments
included. Excellent condition. $375.
Call for more information at
541-271-3599
511 SW 10th Ave., Ste. 400
Portland, OR 97205
P: (503) 459-0140 F: (503) 977-7963
$15,990
09 Toyota Camry Le
4dr, Auto, 31K Miles, Well Equipped.
#B3275/016111
1350 Ocean Blvd., Coos Bay
HondaWorld.com
541-888-5588 • 1-800-634-1054
By ___________________________
Stephanie Schilling, OSB #104942
[email protected]
Attorneys for Plaintiff
SMALL
BUSINESS
OWNERS:
Find your niche
here! Tell them
what your
business has to
offer on the
Bulletin Board.
Affordable
advertising
customized just
for you! Call
541-269-1222
Ext. 293
to get started
today.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
STATE OF OREGON
FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS
Case No. 12CV0954
PUBLISHED SUMMONS
ANDREW R. ELLIS,
Plaintiff,
v.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF
SILVER DIXIE ELLIS,
ALSO ALL OTHER PERSONS OR
PARTIES UNKNOWN CLAIMING
ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT
HEREIN,
Defendants.
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF SILVER DIXIE ELLIS, ALSO ALL OTHER
PERSONS OR PARTIES UNKNOWN
CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN,
OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT
HEREIN.
IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF
OREGON: You are hereby required
to appear and answer the complaint
filed against you in the above entitled
court and cause within thirty (30) days
from the date of service of this summons upon you; and, if you fail so to
appear for want thereof, plaintiff will
apply to the court for the relief demanded in the complaint.
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT
READ THESE PAPERS
CAREFULLY!
You must “appear” in this case or the
other side will win automatically. To
“appear” you must file with the court a
legal paper called a “motion” or
“answer.” The “motion” or “answer”
(or “reply”) must be given to the court
clerk or administrator within 30 days
of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and
have proof of service on the plaintiff’s
attorney or, if the plaintiff does not
have an attorney, proof of service on
the plaintiff.
If you have any questions, you should
see an attorney immediately. If you
need help in finding an attorney, you
may contact the Oregon State Bar’s
Lawyer Referral Service online at
www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling
(503)684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in
Oregon at (800) 452-7636.
The object of plaintiff’s complaint in
the above entitled matter is a suit for
quiet title with respect to real property
described as: All of the Southeast
One-Quarter (SE¼) of the Northeast
One-Quarter (NE¼) of the Southwest
One-Quarter (SW¼) of the Southwest
One-Quarter (SW¼) of the Northeast
One-Quarter (NE¼) of Section
Thirty-One
(31),
Township
Twenty-Eight (28) South, Range Fourteen (14) West, Willamette Meridian,
in the County of Coos, State of Oregon.
RESERVING THEREFROM a strip of
land Fifteen feet wide along the
Southern boundary line thereof for ingress and egress purposes.
Plaintiff’s demand for relief as against
defendants is for a decree declaring
plaintiff to be the owner in fee simple
of the real property described above
and entitled to possession thereof,
free of any estate, title, claim, lien, or
interest of any of the defendants, or
those claiming title under any of the
defendants, and quieting title in the
premises in plaintiff.
This summons is published by order
of the Honorable Richard L. Barron,
Circuit
Court
Judge
of
the
above-entitled court made and entered on the 25th day of January,
2013, directing publication of this
summons once each week for four
consecutive weeks in The World, a
newspaper of general circulation in
Coos County, Oregon.
WHITTY, McDANIEL, BODKIN &
COMBS, LLP
By__/s/________________________
Andrew E. Combs, OSB #042612
PO Box 1120
Coos Bay, OR 97420
(541)267-2156
Of Attorneys for Plaintiff
[email protected]
Date of First Publication: February 5,
2013
PUBLISHED: The World - February
05,
12,
19
and
26,
2013
(ID-20225334)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
STATE OF OREGON
FOR THE COUNTY OF COOS
Case No. 12PB0298
In the Matter of the Estate of:
James Nathaniel Williams
Deceased.
NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers
attached, to the undersigned personal
representative at PO Box 547, North
Bend, Oregon, 97459, within four
months after the date of first publications of this notice, or the claims may
be barred.
All persons whose rights may be af-
K
fected by the proceedings may obtain
additional information from the records
of the Court, the personal representative, or the lawyer for the personal
representative, Patrick M. Terry.
Dated and first published on February
12, 2013.
____________________________
Susan Green
Personal Representative
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Susan Green
PO Box 803
Coos Bay, OR 97459
Telephone (541) 297-3505
LAWYER FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Patrick M. Terry, OSB#025730
PO Box 547
North Bend, OR 97459
Telephone (541) 756-2056
Fax (541) 756-2092
PUBLISHED: February 12, 19, and
26, 2013 (ID-20225968)
SALE OF TIMBER
COQUILLE INDIAN RESERVATION
- COQUILLE FOREST
RASLER CREEK NO. 3 & 4
LOGGING UNITS
The Bureau of Indian Affairs and Coquille Indian Tribe are offering timber
for purchase from the Rasler Creek
No. 3 & 4 Logging Units located in
Section 24, T.30S, R.11W, and W.M.
Coos County, Oregon. SEALED BIDS
must be submitted in duplicate on
forms provided and titled “Proposal for
Timber, Rasler Creek No. 3 & 4 Logging Units”. Address bids to the Coquille Indian Tribe, ATTN. Bureau
of Indian Affairs - Timber Sale Bid
Official, 3050 Tremont St., North
Bend, Oregon 97459. Mailed sealed
bids must be posted so that they will
be received by 10:00 a.m. local time
on March 28th, 2013. Sealed Bids
may be submitted in person at the Coquille Tribes Hazel Room in the
Mill/Casino Hotel (2nd Floor) at 3201
Tremont St., North Bend, OR. 97459
until 10:00 a.m., local time on March
28th, 2013. Opening of sealed bids
will be at 10:00 a.m. followed immediately by oral bidding. Bidders must
have submitted a sealed bid to participate in oral bidding. This sale contains
approximately 3,756,000 board feet of
standing timber. There is an estimated
3,686,000 board feet of Douglas fir,
54,000 of other conifers, and 16,000
board feet of Red Alder and other
hardwoods. The above stated volumes are estimates only and are not
guaranteed. Each bidder must state
the price per thousand board feet,
Scribner Log Scale, which will be paid
for timber cut and scaled from this
sale. No bid per thousand board feet
of less than $335.68 for Douglas fir
will be considered. No bidding will be
permitted on Western Hemlock, White
fir, Cedars, and Red Alder. Western
Hemlock will be paid for at the rate of
$221.31, White fir will be paid for at
the rate of $221.31 per thousand
board feet, Port Orford cedar at the
rate of $371.31 per thousand board
feet, Western Red cedar at the rate of
$571.31 per thousand board feet.
Red Alder and other hardwoods will be
paid for at the predetermined cash
value of $5,940.96. Special Culls and
Peeler Culls for all species will be paid
for at a rate of $50.00 per thousand
board feet, gross scale. Wood Logs
(Utility Culls) removed for all species
will be paid for at a rate of $2.00 per
Ton. All sawtimber from this sale is
subject to log export and substitution
restrictions. A bid deposit in the form
of certified check cashiers check,
bank draft drawn payable to the Coquille Indian Tribe, in the amount of
$65,000.00 must accompany each
sealed bid. The deposit of the high
bidder will be retained pending acceptance or rejection of the bids. All other
deposits will be returned following the
bid opening. The deposit of the high
bidder will be applied as part of the
purchase price against the timber cut
on this sale, or retained as liquidated
damages if the bidder fails to execute
the contract and furnish a satisfactory
performance bond of $125,000.00
within thirty (30) days of acceptance
of his bid. An acceptable performance
bond will be in the form of a cashier’s
check, bank draft, cash, or irrevocable
letter of credit. The advance payment
will be applied as part of the purchase
price against timber cut on this sale,
including the predetermined cash payment of $5,940.96 for Red Alder and
other hardwoods. The right to waive
technical defects and to reject any or
all bids is reserved. In the event of a
rejected high bid, the approving officer
may authorize acceptance of another
bidder who, at bid opening, makes
written request that their bid and bid
deposit be held pending a bid acceptance. A Prospectus and sample timber sale contracts are available on request. Complete information concerning the timber, condition of sale, and
submission of bids may be obtained
from Jason Robison, Forest Manager,
Coquille Indian Tribe, 3050 Tremont
St., North Bend, OR. 97459, Phone 541-756-0904 or Ed Vaughn, Forester, Coquille Indian Tribe, Cell
Phone: 541-643-0746.
All products produced from this
timber sale is 100% Forest Stewardship Certified
PUBLISHED: The World - February
26, 28, March 05, 07, 12, 14 and 19,
2013 (ID-20226553)
S POR T S
Every Day
Local School Sports,
Photos & Scores
Recreational Sports
Scoreboard
National Stories
Subscribe today!
Call 541-269-9999
or 800-437-6397.
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