CAS 100A Course Syllabus Effective Speech

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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
CAS 100A Section 008
Syllabus
Effective Speech
Instructor: Sandra Weiss Knepp MA
Office Phone: 949 – 5300 x 6087
Private Cell Phone: 814 - 934 -1336(emergency only!!)
[email protected]
Email: [email protected] (primary)
Class Site: 129 Eiche
Office Hours: 30 minutes before and after class as scheduled
Staff Assistant: Jennifer Puhatch 949-5509 [email protected]
Textbook:
Hamilton, Cheryl. Essentials of Public Speaking. 4th edition.
Course Objectives: This course is an introduction to Speech Communication: formal
speaking, group discussion, analysis and evaluation of messages. This introductory
course in public speaking assumes you have no previous experience on your part. By
the conclusion of this course you will have confidently and successfully given several
presentations. You will know how to conquer fear.
Take this opportunity to empower yourself to speak on topics about which you care.
Knowing how to analyze an audience and to understand the process of communication
enables you to mold your beliefs to your audience. Effective organization of your ideas
will communicate them clearly. Being able to analyze, understand and evaluate
messages will make you a powerful listener. You may even enjoy taking risks as you
share your beliefs, values, and ideas with others.
I am looking forward to learning from you as you give your presentations. Every student
begins with a clean slate and the potential for an “A” grade. It is my responsibility to
enable you to acquire the tools for success. It is your responsibility to take advantage of
this opportunity to develop a lifelong skill that empowers you to succeed in the real
world, the ability to communicate effectively. The emphasis is on practical experiences,
and therefore, lecturing by the instructor is kept to a minimum.
Syllabus Index:
Topic
Page #
Course Objectives
1
Student Responsibilities Overview
2
Attendance/Make-Up/Late Policy
2
Assignments and Grading
3
Speech Assignments
4
Course Calendar
5
Classroom Etiquette
7
Clarification of Grades for Speeches
9
Presentation Evaluation Criteria
10
Guidelines - Criteria for Success
12
Format Of An Effective Public Presentation
14
Sample Speech to Inform
15
Sample Speech to Persuade
17
Presentation Outline
19
Symposium with a Forum
20
Campus Statement On Academic Integrity
21
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Student Responsibilities Overview:
Assignments:
• You will research and present individual speeches and a group presentation. This
syllabus includes detailed objectives for each assignment. There will be five
speaking assignments: introductory speech, informative speech, persuasive speech,
and a final speech as well as one impromptu speech. Students must speak at their
assigned time or receive a zero for the speech. The only exceptions will be in cases
of true emergencies OR UNIVERSITY EXCUSED ABSENCES.
• All assignments must be word-processed and use the 12-point Arial font and have
one-inch margins all around the printed information. Two WORD PROCESSED
FORMAL outlines of the informative, persuasive, and symposium speeches are due
as detailed later in this syllabus.
• In addition to the above, students will be expected to complete assignments and inclass exercises as assigned.
Preparation: The majority of this class is participatory. You will spend time either
interacting with or evaluating others. You are responsible for coming to class prepared
to discuss information you download from ANGEL PRIOR TO CLASS as well as to
participate in any class activities. Further, ALL assignments must be turned in on time.
Submit all assigned work in-class at the start of class. Late assignments will not be
accepted and may result in failure for the semester. In an acceptable emergency
situation, material may be submitted to my Staff Assistant no later than 1:30 PM one
day after the due date of the assignment. A one-half grade level penalty shall be
assessed on the material.
Attendance: Class attendance is mandatory: Since participation plays a critically
important role in this class, both as a speaker and an audience member, for each
absence over two, your final grade will be penalized and reduced. You may also earn a
bonus based on your attendance. Perfect attendance at every scheduled class session
earns you a five-percent bonus. Each absence reduces your potential bonus by twopercent from your total points earned according to the following list. If you attend the
number of sessions listed, you receive the following bonus: 30 + 5%, 29 + 3%, 28 + 1
%, 27 = 0 %. Missing more than four sessions results in the following penalties: 26 –
2%, 25 – 4%, 24 – 6%, 23 – 4%, 22 – 6%, 21 – 8%, 20 – 10%, 19 – 12%, 18 – 14%, 17
– 16%, 16 – 18%, 14 – 20%, 13 – 22%, 12 – 24%, 11 – 26%, 10 – 28%, 9 – 30%, 8 –
32%, 7 – 34%, 6 – 36%, 5 – 38%, 4 – 40%, 3 – 42%, 2 – 44%, and 1 – 46%.
You cannot make up missed presentations unless the University excuses the absence.
If so, you must reschedule with me and you must provide the audience.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Assignments and Grading:
Graded individual and group activities earn numerical points on a maximum total of a
1000-point scale, which is detailed below. To receive any points, all assignments must
be completed by their due date. Due to the complex schedule of activities in this
course, no later material can be accepted. Final letter grades are determined using the
Penn State +/- grading distribution.
*** It is necessary that students are prepared to present the day before a group
presentation in case of emergency situations with other students. ***
Assignment Weights
Speech of Self or Dyadic
Introduction
Speech to Inform
Presentations begin with
Group A Session # 14
Formal Outline
Possible Points
50
Due In-class Week:
2, 3
100
50
100
A-14, B-15, C-17, D-18
A-14, B-15, C-17, D-18
A-14, B-15, C-17, D-18
100
50
100
B-20, C-21, D-22, A-23
B-20, C-21, D-22, A-23
B-20, C-21, D-22, A-23
100
50
100
100
100
C-25, D-26, A-27, B-28
C-25, D-26, A-27, B-28
C-25, D-26, A-27, B-28
C-25, D-26, A-27, B-28
All session #29
Speaking Outline
Presentation
Speech to Persuade
Presentations begin with
Group B Session # 20
Formal outline
Speaking outline
Presentation
Symposium(Group Discussion)
Presentations begin with
Group C Session # 25
Formal Outline
Speaking Outline
Individual Presentation
Group Presentation
Bonus Impromptu
Presentation
(+40 Bonus-discretion of
instructor)
Total
1000
Grading Scale:
A = 940 and above
A- = 900 – 939
B+ = 870 – 899
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
B
BC
D
F
=
=
=
=
=
Fall 2009
840 – 869
800 – 839
700 – 769
600 – 699
599 and below
Mandatory Requirements:
1.
2.
Submit all Assignments on time. None accepted late without severe penalty!
Present all speeches. Meet the full criterion for each presentation. Not being
present for a presentation results in failure for the course.
3.
Meet all presentation time limits. There is a thirty second (:30) grace period
before or after the time limit. Violation results in a one-third (1/3) grade reduction
on the presentation.
4.
Media must be used for each main point in prepared speeches.
5.
Active participation in all course class sessions and online requirements. Attend
all class meetings on time, prepared to participate, with a positive attitude.
Engage consistently in online discourse with professional and respectful tone.
6.
Meet all Penn State Altoona attendance and course requirements.
7.
Missing any element may be cause for failure.
8.
Meet all criteria for grading to succeed in the course
9.
Have textbook and required materials for each class as listed in this syllabus or
required verbally by instructor during class.
10.
Abide by all course policies (including the academic honesty policy).
Attention:
The following schedule is subject to change. Any changes made by me in class take
precedence over this schedule. It is your responsibility to keep abreast of all changes
and to come to class prepared.
Speech Assignments:
Impromptu: Introduce yourself to the group. What information should we know about
you that makes you a unique and special person?
1-½ minutes.
Informative: Research, organize, outline and present a speech to inform on an
approved topic. Five to seven (5 – 7) minutes.
Persuasive: Research, organize, outline and present a speech to inform on an
approved controversial topic. Five to seven (5 – 7) minutes.
Symposium: With your group of members, select a theme on which each member will
present a brief outlined informative speech of four (4) to five (5) minutes.
Be prepared to respond to audience questions and participation following
the presentations.
Total time: Forty (40) minutes.
Impromptu: Bonus Presentation. Select one (1) quotation from a group of three (3)
chosen at random. You will have five (5) minutes to prepare for an
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
informative or persuasive presentation. You must speak for two (2)
minutes on the quotation. Because you can only raise your average, and
not lower it, participation is mandatory. If your grade is less than your
average, it will not count! If it is higher than your average, it will be
included in the determination of your final grade.
I accept Formal Outlines only on the date they are due as indicated in the schedule.
They are due the week before your scheduled presentations as listed in the syllabus.
No late submissions will be accepted. In an acceptable emergency situation, material
may be submitted no later than 1:30 PM the day after the scheduled submission date,
to the staff assistant. Late work receives a one-half grade level penalty.
You shall submit two (2) word-processed outlines: one (1) Formal Outline for me and
one (1) Speaking Outline (see syllabus) for you to keep. Use the Speaking Outline for
rehearsal and presenting. You must use media to support each Main Point in
Speeches two (2), three (3), and four (4). (See the criteria for media.) Prepare
bibliographies for speeches two (2), three (3), and four (4) in the MLA format that
identifies five (5) pieces of research from sources other than the Internet. No more than
two sources may be of the same type of source. Note: All submitted materials must
use the 12-point Arial font, be double-spaced and have a one (1) inch margin on all
sides.
Attendance is mandatory when you must speak. Missing a presentation date will result
in automatic failure. Only valid, verifiable emergencies give you the opportunity to make
up a presentation. No opportunity exists to make up for missing a symposium
presentation. No scheduled date as a speaker or outline submission date may be
individually traded or changed. Time is limited in this course and active participation in
all presentations is required.
Course Calendar:
Chapters are to be read prior to coming to class the first day of the week they are
assigned.
WEEK
1
2
3
DATE
AUG 24
DAY
M-1
TOPIC
Administrivia, Conquering Fear, Speech 1
Impromptu introductions begin
Do: Personal Report of Comm.
Apprehension –
academic.cengage.com/communication/Ha
milton/essentialsofpublicspeaking4e
Impromptu Introduction concludes.
Discussion of listening.
Assign Speech Groups, Models of
Communication, Audience Analysis
AUG 26
W-2
AUG 31
M-3
SEPT 2
W-4
Purposes of Public Speeches, Topic
Selection, Methods of Presentation
SEPT 7
M-5
NO CLASSES – LABOR DAY
5
ASSIGNMENT
Essentials of Public Speaking
(EoPS) –
Complete PRCA-24
(EoPS) -- Read Ch. 1, 2, 3.
(EoPS) -- Read Ch. 4, 5.
Bring trial PPT to test in
campus system.
(EoPS) -- Read Ch. 12 and 13.
Speech to Inform topic
submission by email at 8PM
for my approval
Receive approval reply via
email
CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
SEPT 9
W-6
SEPT
14
M-7
SEPT
16
W-8
SEPT
21
M-9
SEPT
23
W-10
SEPT
28
SEPT
30
M-11
Library Day
Research on speech topics
Developing a Speech to Inform, Using The
Four “P’s” Supporting Your Speech,
Research
Organizing Your Speech, Outline Forms,
Introducing and Concluding Your Speech
Organization Schema(s) Visual Media,
Delivery, Body Language, Listening,
Audience Participation
Review preliminary Informative outlines in
class
Preparation of a Persuasive Speech
Outlining Persuasive Speeches using the
Monroe Motivated Sequence as illustrated
in the Syllabus
TBA - related to stress management
W-14
Evaluation Criteria
In class review of preliminary persuasive
outlines
Selecting a Symposium Presentation Topic
discussion
Class meeting time to review topic options.
Discuss the sub-topics.
Informative Speech
A - B, C, D -
M-15
Informative Speech
W-16
### Out of class assignment ###
M-17
Informative Speech
C - D, A, B -
OCT 21
W-18
Informative Speech
D - A, B, C -
OCT 26
M-19
OCT 28
W-20
The role of the Moderator, Organization,
Preparation and overview of the
Presentation of a Symposium
Rehearsal in class
Persuasive Speech
B - C, D, A -
NOV
2
M-21
Persuasive Speech
C - D, A, B -
NOV
4
NOV
W-22
Persuasive Speech
D - A, B, C -
M-23
Persuasive Speech
A - B, C, D -
OCT
5
OCT
7
OCT
12
OCT
14
OCT 19
W-12
Fall 2009
M-13
6
B - C, D, A -
(EoPS) -- Read Ch. 6, 7, 8.
(EoPS) -- Read Ch. 9, 10, 11.
Prepare preliminary
Informative outline to bring to
next class
(EoPS) -- Read Ch. 12, 13, 14
Speech to Persuade Topic for
approval by email
Meet as team to discuss.
Overall Symposium topic and
individual sub-topics due by
email for approval.
Group A’s outlines due in
class
Group B’s outlines due in
class
Group C’s outlines due in
class
Group D’s outlines due in
class
Group B’s Persuasive
outlines due in class
(EoPS) -- Read Appendix C -Team Presentations
Group C’s Persuasive
outlines due in class
Group B Formal Outlines due
in class at the start of
Session # 20
Group D’s Persuasive
outlines due in class
Symposium Topics due for
approval.
Group A’s Persuasive
outlines due in class
Group C’s Symposium
CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
13
14
15
16
9
NOV
11
NOV
16
NOV
18
NOV 23
NOV 25
NOV 30
Fall 2009
outlines due in class
W-24
#### Out of class assignment ####
M-25
Symposium C - D, A, B -
W-26
Symposium D - A, B, C -
M
W
M-27
THANKSGIVING BREAK
THANKSGIVING BREAK
Symposium A - B, C, D -
DEC
2
W-28
Symposium B - C, D, A
DEC
7
M-29
DEC
9
W-30
BONUS: Impromptu Presentations!
Mandatory participation required! You can
only increase your grade! Non-participation
results in a Failure (Zero) counting toward
your final mark.
Course Evaluation; Emergency Make-Up
Day (if needed) Learn your Final Grades
today!
Group D’s Symposium
outlines due in class
Group A’s Symposium
outlines due in class
Group B’s Symposium
outlines due in class
Complete PSU course
evaluations. Assign and
explain narrative evaluation.
Narrative evaluation due.
Discuss student evaluations
of class.
Classroom Etiquette:
If a student's behavior is disruptive to the classroom learning environment, he or she will
be asked to leave the classroom. Such action will be counted as an unexcused
absence. If a student is asked to leave the room again, a meeting will be scheduled with
the Dean of Instruction. The following are examples of disruptive behavior:
• Talking while the instructor is talking.
• Excessive tardiness (three late arrivals equal one absence).
• Leaving class early without prior notification (talk to the instructor before class).
Three "early exits" equal one absence.
• Entering or exiting the classroom during student speeches.
• Any behavior that is disrespectful to fellow students or the instructor.
• Answering phones in class (beepers, phones, watch alarms, MP3 players, etc.
should be off during class)*.
• Failure to cooperate.
• Distracting behavior (playing with body piercings, inappropriate attire, excessive
talking, nudity, etc.).
*If your phone does ring, turn it off immediately. Do NOT answer it! Repeated incidents
of electronic device disruptions may result in any of the following measures: confiscation
of the offending item, dismissal from the class, and/or a pop quiz for the entire class. If
you must have your phone on for emergency or work reasons, talk with me about this
outside of class.
Students are responsible for dropping courses they no longer wish to be enrolled in. Do
not assume the instructor will drop you if you simply stop attending class. If you do drop
a course, provide written verification of having executed the drop.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Academic Dishonesty Policy: Anyone caught passing off someone else’s work,
words, or ideas as his or her own can be failed. Additionally, students working together
on assignments, quizzes, or examinations when they are expected to work
independently (this includes work done on on-line) are also violating academic honesty
policies. (See the Penn State Altoona Academic Integrity/Dishonesty Violation
Reporting Flowchart at the end of this syllabus for more information.)
Academic Accommodation: Be advised to notify both your instructor and the Disability
Services office if you have a documented disability. Only when you present a certifying
accommodation form from the Disability Services office, may your instructor then
provide classroom accommodations. The Disability Services office is located in the
Health & Wellness Center, Sheetz Family Building.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Clarification of Grades for Speeches:
A:
Superior preparation, outline, media, and presentation. All elements
4.0
motivate and relate to your audience. Very dynamic and energized presentation. Cohesive,
comprehensive, clear presentation of information. Involvement obvious by the speaker. Body
language and oral presentation skills enhanced the speech. Superior documentation. Ideas very
well organized to fall within time limits.
A-:
Excellent preparation, outline and presentation. Most elements stimulate a
3.67
positive audience attention, interest and response. Media good. Clear presentation of information.
Strong interest communicated to the audience by the speaker. Excellent use of gestures that
enhanced the speech. Excellent audience analysis. Speech within time limits.
B+:
Well done preparation, outline and presentation. Many elements create a
3.33
positive response from your audience. Ideas clearly organized. Media appropriate for situation,
topic and audience. Speaker interest in the topic communicated to the audience fairly well. Very
good use of gestures to improve understanding of the message. Audience analysis very good.
Within time limits.
B:
Very Good preparation, outline, media, and presentation. Generally,
3.0
elements created a positive response from your audience. Some speaker interest in the topic
communicated. Very good organization. Most ideas communicated to the audience with clarity.
Very good use of gestures to improve understanding of the message. Within time limits.
B-:
Good preparation, outline, media, and presentation. Some elements
2.67
generated a positive audience response, others did not. Fair audience analysis. Good use of
gestures to improve understanding of the message. Satisfactory communication of speaker
interest in topic and audience. Met the time limits.
C+:
Fair preparation, outline, media, and presentation. Elements created a
2.33
moderate audience response. Fair level of enthusiasm communicated. Fair audience analysis.
Some good use of gestures to improve understanding of the message. Met the time limits.
C:
Satisfactory preparation, outline, media, and presentation. Some
2.0
elements generated a moderate audience response. Adequate level of speaker enthusiasm
communicated. Fair use of gestures to improve understanding. Adequate audience analysis. Met
the time limits.
D
Minimal level of preparation, outline, media, and presentation. A few
1.0
elements may have related to the audience. Minimally cohesive. Needed more clarity. Limited
use of gestures. Speaker appeared to minimally care about the topic. More information, energy
and enthusiasm needed to motivate audience interest. Met the time limits.
F
0.0
Unsatisfactory level of preparation, outline, media, and presentation.
Very negative speaker attitude toward the audience. Lack of interest in the topic and the audience
or their reactions to confusing, disorganized information. Weak audience analysis. Lacked
knowledge of topic. Lacked effective use of gestures. Documentation missing or needed
improvement. Failure to meet the time limit or outside the grace period. Absent for an outline
submission, a presentation, or an evaluation. Work not submitted on time. Plagiarism results in
failure for the course. Failure to meet mandatory requirements.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Presentation Evaluation Criteria
Presentation
Voice Quality
This criterion concerns the timbre of your voice. It considers whether your
pitch is too high or low; the tone is soft or rough and those factors that
create an oral impression of you as a speaker.
Volume
This criterion concerns the level of intensity or psychological loudness of
your voice in relation to the size of the audience, purpose, occasion and
setting.
Vocal Variety
This criterion focuses on whether you speak in a monotone or use a range
of “musical” notes when you speak. Do you emphasize the important ideas
you communicate in a manner that improves listener attentiveness and
understanding?
Rate
This criterion determines if you speak at a speed that is appropriate to the
energy and information you wish to communicate to your audience. The
time the audience needs to understand your message influences the speed
at which you speak. Pauses also communicate information.
Articulation
The focus is on correct placement of the physical parts used to create
specific phonemes (sounds) in well-spoken standard American English.
Pronunciation
The focus is on whether you correctly say words using standard American
English syllabication and stress.
Gestures
This criterion targets your use of movement appropriate to the message
you wish to communicate to your audience. Using your hands, arms and
body positions appropriately to enhance the message you wish to
communicate.
Facial
Expression
This concerns the manner is which you express the emotional content of
your message to your audience with your eyes, eyebrows, forehead and
lips.
Posture
The focus here is to determine if your body position is appropriate to assist
in communicating your message to the audience or if it distracts from your
message.
Appearance
The focus is on the appropriateness of your physical dress and
presentation of self to your audience, the occasion and the purpose of your
speech.
Audience
contact
This targets the way in which you pay attention to your audience during
your presentation. It is sometimes called eye contact. It concerns itself with
the level of inclusiveness you communicate to your audience based on the
degree of area or individual visual contact you make with the audience.
Feedback
This targets the degree to which you answered the audience question,
“WIIFM?” or “What’s in it for me?” It also includes how you respond to
audience questions and evaluative comments.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Organization
Outline
The focus is on the appropriate selection of the type of outline you select
based on your topic, purpose, the occasion and your audience. It also
targets the logical sequence of your ideas and information. You must
submit one (1) full sentence, correctly word processed written Formal
Outline for speech two (2), three (3) and four (4). You must submit one (1)
Speaking Outline for speech two (2), three (3) and four (4).
Content
This targets the accuracy and appropriateness of your supportive
information and the relevance it has to provide your audience with new
information or a new interpretation on the topic.
Media
You must use Visual Aids for each main point in speech two (2), three
(3) and four (4). The focus is on the degree of communicative
understanding they provide to your audience, their usefulness, the quality
of their creation and their appropriateness. Obtain my written consent
before the date of your outline submission and presentation if any
questions exist in the matter of acceptable, appropriate media use. You
may bring anything into class that will help communicate your verbal
message, except for the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
You may not bring anything into class that poses a threat to persons.
You may not bring anything into class that poses a threat to property.
You may not combine safe items to produce dangerous ones.
You may not present any displays of nudity or of explicit violence.
You may not bring in any controlled substances.
Large animals are, in general, discouraged.
Bibliography
The number and quality of reference items that support your main ideas
are the focus here. Follow MLA guidelines for bibliographies. You
must have a minimum of five (5) sources, other than the internet.
Include a summary of no less than 50 words for each interview. Each
source less than five (5) results in a penalty of a one (1) letter grade
deduction taken from the grade you earn on the speech.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Descriptive Guidelines of the Criteria for Success
GOOD SPEAKING
POOR SPEAKING
COMPOSITION – Materials
COMPOSITION – Materials
1. The subject matter is pertinent to the 1. The subject matter is not pertinent, probably
occasion and the listener.
because the speaker is not thinking of others, or
not adequately diagnosing the occasion/audience.
2. The content of the speech is interesting. 2. The subject of the discourse is poorly chosen in
relation to the listener’s interests.
3. The speech has abundant concrete 3. The discourse lacks materials that catch and
examples and materials that create word hold attention.
pictures and definite situations.
4. Media use enhances the message.
4. Media is inappropriate or poorly used /
prepared.
5. The materials are varied.
5. The materials lack variety.
6. The speech offers adequate support or 6. There is inadequate substance--lack of support
proof of its lines of thought.
(proof).
7. The amount of material is adapted to the 7. There is too much (or too little) material for the
time limits.
time allowed.
8. The language is precise and clear.
8. The language is inexact and fuzzy.
9. The ideas are worthwhile to the listener. 9. The ideas seem unimportant to the listener.
10. Feedback indicates that the ideas are 10. Feedback indicates that the ideas are not
adapted to the audience.
adapted to the audience.
Organization of Materials
Organization of Materials
1. The opening remarks are attentiongetting and pertinent.
2. The central idea and purpose are
presented clearly.
3. The development of the ideas is logical,
coherent, and easy to follow.
4. The conclusion is clear and packs
punch.
5. Feedback indicates that the organization
is adapted to the listener.
GOOD SPEAKING
DELIVERY
1. The opening is too abstract (too general and
perhaps irrelevant).
2. The central idea and purpose are vague and
indefinite.
3. The development is haphazard, incoherent, and
difficult to follow.
4. The conclusion is too general and lacks punch.
Audible Expression
Audible Expression
1. The speaker talks clearly and distinctly.
2. The speaker adjusts his or her loudness
to the communication situation.
3. The speaker maintains a good rate-neither too fast or too slow.
4. The Speaker’s voice is lively and
dynamic and projects enthusiasm.
5. The speaker modulates his/her voice for
variety and for emphasis of important
ideas.
1. The speaker’s words are indistinct and fuzzy.
2. Loudness is inadequate--too little or too much.
5. Feedback indicates that the organization lacks
adaptation to the listener.
POOR SPEAKING
DELIVERY
3. Rate is inadequate--too fast or too slow.
4. The voice is “lifeless,” monotonous--shows
insufficient zest.
5. Voice allows inadequate variety; a lack of
stress on key ideas.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Visible Expression
Visible Expression
1. The speaker makes a good approach
and creates a good impression before he
or she starts to speak.
2. The appearance of the speaker reveals
alertness.
3. The posture of the speaker reveals
alertness.
4. The speaker maintains eye contact (to
“get over” to his or her audience and to
detect feedback.
5. The speaker’s facial expression gives
evidence of friendliness and eagerness to
communicate.
6. The speaker is lively, dynamic, and
enthusiastic.
7. The speaker uses body activity to
compliment
other
means
of
communication.
1. Initial impression is poor.
2. The appearance is poor--not pleasing or
appropriate.
3. The posture lacks tone.
4. Eye contact with the audience is poor (looking
away, looking up, looking down).
5. The facial expression is poor; it lacks warmth
and fails to help in communication.
6. Bearing and manner reveal little life.
7. Movement is meaningless or random--or
absent.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
APPENDIX A
1. Outline Format
2. Sample Outlines
3. Symposium and Forum Format
4. Academic Integrity
THE FORMAT OF AN EFFECTIVE PUBLIC PRESENTATION
I. Introduction:
A. Attention getting remarks: The remarks, directly related to your subject, that you have
specifically designed to get the attention of the audience.
B. Purpose: A statement of your intent (to demonstrate..., to report..., to pay tribute...)
C. Central idea: The simplest single sentence that summarized the entire content of the speech,
in 25 words or less.
D. Preview of Main Points:
1. Main Point: The first main idea by which you hope to develop your thesis.
2. Main Point: The second main idea by which you hope to develop your thesis.
3. Main Point: The third main idea by which you hope to develop your thesis.
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: The connecting statement that will lead you and
your audience into the BODY of your speech and main point!
II. BODY:
A. Main Point: Copy main point 1 from above.
1. Sub-point: develops main point 1
2. Sub-point: develops main point 1
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: The connecting statement that will lead you and
your audience into main point 2
B. Main Point: Copy main point 2 from above.
1. Sub-point: develops main point 2
2. Sub-point: develops main point 2
3. Sub-point: develops main point 2
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: The connecting statement that will lead you and
your audience into main point 3.
C. Main Point: Copy main point 3 from above.
1. Sub-point: develops main point 3
a. develops sub-point 1
b. develops sub-point 1
2. Sub-point: develops main point 3
a. develops sub-point 2
b. develops sub-point 2
3. Sub-point: develops main point 3
a. develops sub-point 3
b. develops sub-point 3
14
Use the following guidelines to
develop the minor sub-points “a” and
“b” only if you need this level of detail
in your outline.
C. Main Point
1. Sub-Point
a. Minor sub-point
1)
2)
b.
2. Sub-Point
CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
TRANSITION STATEMENT: The connecting statement that will lead you and your audience into
the CONCLUSION.
III.CONCLUSION:
A. Summary: restatement of the central idea and main points.
B. Graceful Ending: remarks designed to give your audience closure and to leave a good final
impression with them.
IV. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Follow MLA guidelines. You must have five (5) appropriately alphabetized sources,
(author’s last name, first name; name of the article, journal or newspaper, or book; and
publication date. A (50) fifty word summary of interviews must be included).
SAMPLE SPEECHES
SPEECH TO INFORM: DEMONSTRATION SPEECH
“How to Start to Play Tennis”
by Jon Brown
I.
INTRODUCTION:
A.
Attention getting remarks: Lifelong learning! Lifelong fitness! Lifelong sports! What
major sport fits the bill? Tennis! Young or old, you too can learn to enjoy the challenge of
a dynamic exercise experience playing tennis. How can you begin to play tennis?
B.
Purpose: I am going to demonstrate how to begin to play the lifelong sport of tennis.
C.
Central Idea: Knowing how to play tennis gives you a lifetime sport experience.
D.
Preview of Main Points:
1.
2.
3.
Main Point: Use the racquet that best fits your game.
Main Point: Practice the basic tennis strokes.
Main Point: Apply the most effective strategy when you play.
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: After you master these three steps, you are ready
to play the lifelong game of tennis.
II.
BODY
A.
Main Point: Use the racquet that best fits your game.
1.
2.
Sub-point:
Using an oversized racquet fits the slower player.
a.
It has a larger “sweet spot” to contact the ball.
b.
It is easier to control where you hit the ball.
c.
Extra handle length enables you to reach the ball more easily.
Sub-point:
Proper stringing influences your control
a.
Tight stringing increases power and decreases control.
b.
Less-tight stringing increases the time the ball is in contact with the
racquet and therefore increases control.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: Using the best tools makes it easier for you to
begin to use the basic strokes of tennis.
B.
Main Point: Practice the basic tennis strokes.
1.
2.
3.
Sub-point: Hold the racquet properly for the serve.
a.
Shake hands with your racquet.
b.
Hold it so that it forms a 20 degree angle.
c.
Stand perpendicular to the service line.
d.
Toss the ball up and in front of you.
d.
Swing the racquet across your back and shoulders
e.
Hit across the ball at the highest point of contact that is comfortable for
you.
Sub-point: Grip the racquet correctly for your forehand stroke.
a.
Shake hands with the racquet and shift your thumb around the grip.
b.
Strike the ball just before it begins to bounce for a second time.
c.
Turn you body so that the racquet is away from the net
d.
Prepare by bringing your arm back early.
f.
Swing the racquet from below the ball to a position above your shoulder.
Sub-point: Master the one-handed backhand stroke.
a.
Hold the racquet so that your thumb is along the back surface of the
handle away from the net.
b.
Strike the ball just before it begins to bounce for a second time.
c.
Turn you body so that the racquet is away from the net
d.
Prepare by bringing your arm back early.
e.
Swing the racquet from below the ball to a position above your
shoulder.
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: Now that you know a few of the basic
you are ready to apply some strategy to your game.
C.
strokes,
Main Point: Apply the most effective strategy when you play.
1.
2.
3.
Sub-point: Change the location of your serve in the service box.
a.
Shift the location of your serve to the outside to open up the court.
b.
Move your serve to the inside to avoid one pattern of service.
Sub-point: Hit the ball so that it moves your opponent around the court.
a.
You will tire your opponent more easily.
b.
Shift from the strength of your opponent to their weakness
c.
Keep away from a single pattern of play.
Sub-point: Use different strokes to change the pace of play.
a.
Overspin strokes increase the pace of play.
b.
Slice strokes change the speed of the ball on the court.
d.
Overhead lobs slow down the pace and allow you to recover from a
disadvantageous position on the court.
d.
Drop shots move your opponent in and out from the net position.
TRANSITION STATEMENT: Now you know the basics of playing the lifelong sport of tennis. Let
us review.
III.
Conclusion:
A.
Summary:
1.
2.
Central Idea: Knowing how to play tennis gives you a lifetime sport experience.
Main Points:
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
a.
b.
c.
B.
IV.
Fall 2009
Main Point: Use the racquet that best fits your game.
Main Point: Practice the basic tennis strokes.
Main Point: Apply the most effective strategy when you play.
Graceful Ending: You now know the basics of the game. Begin to put them into practice.
Start to play this dynamic, lifelong game of tennis now! Enjoy it for many years to come.
BIBLIOGRAPHY: (as indicated in the format of an effective public presentation)
Speech to Persuade
“Desperate People and the Population Explosion”
I. INTRODUCTION:
A. Attention: What happens when our planet no longer produces enough food to support the
people living on it? What do we do? How do we behave? How must we as members of a
society filled with abundance behave? What actions can prevent this from happening?
B. Purpose: I am going to persuade you to support programs that limit population growth.
C. Central Idea: Everyone should work to control the population explosion.
D. Preview of Main Points:
1. Main Point: Need: People suffer from excessive population growth.
2. Main Point: Satisfaction: Three major actions can reduce excess population growth
on our planet.
3. Main Point: Visualization: Imagine a world with its population under control.
4. Main Point: Action: Actively support population control programs.
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: After you recognize the impact of excess
population on our planet, you will agree that everyone should work to control the population
explosion.
II. BODY
A. Main Point: Need: People suffer from excessive population growth.
1. Sub-Point: Many countries cannot support their growing populations.
a. Starvation conditions exist in Ethiopia.
b. Overcrowded conditions create civil wars.
2. Sub-Point: Uninformed women bear excessive numbers of children.
a. Overcrowded cities influence the spread of disease.
b. Children develop many terminal illnesses.
3. Sub-Point: Desperate people threaten the peace of the world.
a. Individuals who are pushed to the limit will take any action to survive.
b. Illegal immigrants arrive in the U.S. A. daily.
c. Criminal organizations swindle those seeking an opportunity to get to America
so as to help their families survive.
1) Minor Sub-Point: Chinese boat people
2) Minor Sub-Point: Cuban boat people
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: What strategies enable people to limit the
population growth rate in their society?
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
B. Main Point: Satisfaction: Three major actions can reduce excess population growth.
1. Sub-point: Limit the number of children in a family.
a. China limits families to one child.
b. Prevent excess population growth with birth control.
2. Sub-point: Educate people about human rights.
a. Develop worldwide educational birth control clinics.
b. Encourage cultures to recognize women as people and not property.
c. Increase the worldwide availability of parenting classes.
3. Sub-Point: Help developing countries grow economically.
a. Finance educational opportunities that foster economic growth.
b. Support small business loan programs using the Indian Model as a guide.
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: Imagine a world where each individual provides a
good standard of living for their family.
C. Main Point: Visualization: Imagine a world with its population under control.
1. Sub-Point: Limited family size produces fewer demands on each family.
a. This produces an improved quality of life for each family member.
b. It frees both parents to contribute to the financial success of the family.
c. Children have a greater chance of survival into adulthood.
2. Sub-Point: Economic growth improves markets for American goods.
a. Food exports rise for American farmer.
b. Manufacturers increase the numbers of customers they serve.
c. The growth of illegal immigration to America reduces significantly.
3. Sub-Point: Educated populations contribute to the quality of life.
a. Greater freedom for women results from fewer children.
b. Knowledge about birth control empowers women to become a positive force in
the growth of society.
c. Education reduces the use of forced child labor.
TRANSITION STATEMENT AND SIGNPOST: Knowing effective strategies does no good until
we use and support them.
D. Main Point: Action: Actively support population control programs.
1. Sub-Point: Support population control programs of the United Nations.
a. Information about birth control disseminated by radio in India.
b. Free distribution of condoms in developing countries where this does not
violate cultural and religious beliefs.
2. Sub-Point: Encourage the growth of education and status for women.
a. Parenting classes in Venezuela.
b. Funding for small businesses led by women in India.
c. Educated women have fewer pregnancies.
TRANSITION STATEMENT: Confronting the problem of the population explosion directly
provides time for the Earth to recover from its impact.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
III.CONCLUSION:
A. SUMMARY:
1. CENTRAL IDEA: Everyone should work to control the population explosion.
2. MAIN POINTS:
A. Main Point: Need: People suffer from excessive population growth.
B. Main Point: Satisfaction: Three major actions can reduce excess
population growth on our planet.
C. Main Point: Visualization: Imagine a world with its population under control.
D. Main Point: Action: Actively support population control programs.
B. GRACEFUL ENDING: Visualize a world filled with people it can support with food, clothing
and shelter. Imagine a world where educated, empowered people contribute to the
benefit of all. Let us work to control world population together.
IV. BIBLIOGRAPHY: (as indicated in the format of an effective public presentation)
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Presentation Outline
Any format using single words, short phrases, simple diagrams or combinations of these
may be used to create a Presentation Outline from which to speak. Mind Maps work
well too. The idea is to use the minimal amount of notes so that you speak to your
audience without reading to them from a manuscript. You may use brief notes on 3X5
note cards, 8 1/2X11 paper with print in a large font size and one or two complete
quotations. You will not be permitted to use your Formal Outline for your presentation.
Sample Presentation Outline
Planet overcrowding
Suffering caused
Solutions
Limit # children
Education
Economic growth
Control Overpopulation
Visualize future
Actions to do
OR
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Diagram
option
CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Attention:
Need:
Satisfaction:
Visualization:
Action:
Fall 2009
Food – Excessive Population - Challenge
Excessive Population Growth
Major options for population control
Balanced population and production
Support population control programs
Word or
Phrase Option
Symposium with a Forum
Each group needs to select a topic. They must determine the level of audience interest,
attitudes and knowledge. Decide if your group wishes to inform or persuade the audience.
Divide the topic into subtopics for presentation. Select one (1) member to act as the group
Moderator.
Each speaker will prepare an individual Formal Outline and a Speaking Outline appropriate for
their speech that meets all the requirements of each extemporaneous speech presentation
prepared this term. Use an appropriate organizational pattern to fit your informative or
persuasive presentation. Include all the elements required in previous presentations. Note the
organizational patterns discussed in the text.
Numerous responsibilities of the Moderator for each group need careful preparation to assist the
group in achieving a successful presentation. The Moderator needs to introduce the group topic
and the speakers to the audience. S/he asks questions that lead to open discussion among the
group members following all the speech presentations. S/he receives questions from the
audience and directs them to members of the group for their responses. S/he receives
comments and contributions from the audience on the topic presented. S/he monitors the time
to ensure that the group presentation keeps within the established time limits.
The Moderator needs to prepare an outline of the overall topic and presentation using the
organization of a speech to inform. The form of this outline differs from other outlines in this
syllabus therefore moderators need to confer with the instructor to learn the proper form to use.
First, the Moderator introduces the group topic, the speakers and their individual subtopics, and
then presents a transitional statement leading to the topic of the first speaker. The Moderator
introduces each speaker in turn with a transitional statement leading to the topic of each
speaker until all speakers conclude their presentations. At this time the Moderator stimulates
discussion by asking questions prepared in advance that s/he included in their outline. S/he
then calls on group members to respond to the questions so that the speakers may provide a
variety of answers. Following this part of the discussion, the Moderator asks if audience
members wish to ask questions or make contributions to the discussion.
In conclusion, the Moderator summarizes the presentation including the contributions of the
members of the group and the audience. S/he closes with a graceful ending to conclude the
presentation. The Moderator need not provide a bibliography as part of the outline s/he
prepares.
The speakers must prepare full outlines and bibliographies for their presentations. Submission
of all group and Moderator outlines must take place during the class session before the group
presentation. Submitting work late may result in failure for the term. No time exists for any group
member to make up part of a symposium presentation. Missing a presentation may result in
failure for the term.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
The audience will make contributions and ask questions of the speakers following the
presentation of the group. The quality of speaker comments and responses will contribute to
both individual and group marks.
CAMPUS STATEMENT ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
“Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly activity free from fraud and deception and is an educational
objective of this institution. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism,
fabrication of information or citations, facilitating acts of academic dishonesty by others, unauthorized
prior possession of examinations, submitting work of another person or work previously used without
informing the instructor, or tampering with the academic work of other students.” (Policies and Rules for
Students, Section 49-20.)
CONSEQUENCES OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
The penalty for academic dishonesty in less serious cases consists of a failing grade for the work or test
where this misconduct occurred. This decision is made by the instructor and could result in a failing grade
for the course. In more serious cases of academic dishonesty, the penalties are more severe (including
automatic failure for the course, probation, suspension or expulsion from the University), and formal due
process procedures are available for the students and faculty involved. Section 49-20 of the Policies and
Rules for Students provides the details on these procedures.
Plagiarizing a speech and cheating on the test are serious cases of academic dishonesty and will result in
course failure and disciplinary proceedings.
Plagiarizing a speech or a presentation or cheating on a test are serious cases of academic dishonesty
and will result in course failure and disciplinary proceedings.
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CAS 100 A Syllabus – SWKnepp
Fall 2009
Penn State Altoona Academic Integrity/Dishonesty Violation Reporting Flowchart
Faculty member suspects an
academic integrity/dishonesty
violation has occurred in
his/her class
Faculty member
meets with student to
address his/her
concerns about
alleged behavior
Faculty member contacts
Registrar to assign DF
which prevents student
from dropping class
Student accepts responsibility
and parties agree on
resolution
Student accepts responsibility and
parties agree on resolution (up to grade
of “ F” for the course)...faculty member
contacts Registrar with resolution
Student contests responsibility
and faculty member chooses to
pursue
Faculty member contacts appropriate Division
Head and Associate Director of Academic
Affairs for consultation and schedules a
meeting between student, Division Head and
him/herself
Resolution is that evidence is insufficient to
show violation occurred...no further action
warranted
Judicial Affairs receives
written complaint from faculty
member or accused student
and schedules Disciplinary
Conference
Disciplinary Conference held with accused
student and student reviews options for
proceeding
Student continues to contest allegations and
faculty member or student elects to refer incident
to Judicial Affairs for resolution w/consultation
by Associate Director of Academic Affairs
Student continues to contest
allegations and requests a
hearing to present evidence
supporting his/her side of
incident
Student accepts
responsibility and
sanction is
assigned along
with
recommendation
of course grade of
“ F” to faculty
member if
appropriate
If Judicial Affairs
officer believes
potential
sanction may
involve
separation, a
University
Hearing Board is
convened
Faculty member
determines no
violation
occurred
If Judicial Affairs officer
believes potential sanction is
less than separation, an
Administrative Hearing is
convened
If student is found responsible
and the assigned sanction is
Deferred Suspension or
above, appeal to CEO/Dean is
available and his/her decision
is final
22
If student is not found
responsible or is found
responsible and
assigned less than
separation, case is
closed and there is no
appeal
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