FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

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FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
DEAN
VICE-DEANS:
EDUCATION - basic studies:
EDUCATION - specialized studies:
SCIENCE AND RESEARCH:
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS:
DEVELOPMENT:
Prof. Ing. Petr Zuna, CSc.
Doc. Ing. Josef Adamec, CSc.
Doc. Ing. Jan Vojtek, CSc.
Doc. Ing. Jiří Hemerka, CSc.
Doc. Ing. Milan Hofreiter, CSc.
Doc. Ing. Luboš Janko, CSc.
Address:
Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 311 9813, 2435 1111 Fax: (+420 2) 311 1261 E-mail: [email protected]
http://www.fsid.cvut.cz
Contact persons:
Ing. Petr Holmer, CSc, International Relations Office, director
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2889 Fax: (+420 2) 2431 0292 E-mail: [email protected]
Doc.Ing.Eva Vesela, CSc, Study Department
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2764 E-mail: [email protected]
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
201 Department of Technical Mathematics
Head: Prof. RNDr. Karel Kozel, DrSc.
Address: Karlovo nám. 13, 121 35 Praha 2
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 7365, Fax: (+420 2) 2492 06 97, E-mail: [email protected]
202 Department of Applied Physics
Head: Prof. RNDr. Bruno Sopko, DrSc.
Address: Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2427, Fax: (+420 2) 311 3657, E-mail: [email protected]
203 Department of Physical Education
Head: PhDr. Jaroslav Schmid, CSc.
Address: Karlovo nám. 13, 121 35 Praha 2
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 7650, 2435 765, Fax: (+420 2) 29 03 02, E-mail: [email protected]
204 Department of Languages
Head: PhDr. Hana Kybicová, CSc.
Address: Horská 4, 128 03 Praha 2
Phone: (+420 2) 2491 5319, Fax: (+420 2) 311 2768, E-mail: [email protected]
205 Department of Mechanics
Head: Prof. Ing. Svatava Konvičková, CSc.
Address: Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2511, Fax: (+420 2) 2431 0292, E-mail: [email protected]
207 Department of Fluid Dynamics and Power Engineering
Head: Prof. Ing. Václav Petr, DrSc.
Address: Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2539, Fax: (+420 2) 2435 3705, E-mail: [email protected]
208 Department of Production Machines and Mechanisms
Head: Prof. Ing. Jaroslav Talácko, CSc.
49
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Address: Horská 4, 128 03 Praha 2
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 3540, Fax: (+420 2) 2491 3540, E-mail: [email protected]
210 Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering
Head: Prof. Ing. Pavel Zítek, DrSc.
Address: Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2564, 311 641, Fax: (+420 2) 2431 0292, E-mail: [email protected]
216 Department of Environmental Engineering
Head: Doc. Ing. Richard Nový, CSc.
Address: Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2478, 2435 248,Fax: (+420 2) 2435 5606, E-mail: [email protected]
218 Department of Process Engineering
Head: Prof. Ing. František Rieger, DrSc.
Address: Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2548, Fax: (+420 2) 2431 0292, E-mail: [email protected]
220 Department of Automotive and Aerospace Engineering
Head: Prof. Ing. Jan Macek, DrSc.
Address: Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2503, 2435 2502, Fax: (+420 2) 2435 2500, E-mail: [email protected]
223 Department of Manufacturing Technology
Head: Doc.Ing.Jan Suchánek, CSc.
Address: Technická 4, 166 07 Praha 6
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 2612, 311 9818, Fax: (+420 2) 2431 0292, E-mail:Jan.Suchá[email protected]
232 Department of Materials Engineering
Head: Prof. Ing. Josef Steidl, CSc.
Address: Karlovo nám. 13, 121 35 Praha 2
Phone: (+420 2) 2435 7427, 2435 7498, Fax: (+420 2) 2491 1406, E-mail: [email protected]
238 Department of Management and Economics
Head: Prof. Ing. František Freiberg, CSc.
Address: Horská 3, 128 03 Praha 2
Phone: (+420 2) 29 76 12, 2491 5319 /287, Fax: (+420 2) 29 76 12, E-mail:
[email protected]
50
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
STUDY PROGRAMMES
The Faculty offers 6 Bachelor Degree Programmes, 13 Master Degree Programmes and 14
Doctoral Degree (Ph.D.) programmes in the Czech language:
Bachelor Degree Programmes (Department):
Transportation and Handling Technology (220)
Information and Automation Technology (210)
Environmental, Thermal Power and Process Engineering (207, 216, 218)
Manufacturing Engineering and Management (223, 238)
Production Engineering (208)
Applied Mechanics (205)
Doctoral Degree Programmes:
Master Degree Programmes
(Department):
Materials Engineering
Machines and Equipment for Transportation
Production Machines and Equipment
Thermal Power Engineering
Process Engineering
Manufacturing Technology
Environmental Engineering
Biomechanics
Fine Mechanics and Optics
Technical Cybernetics
Mechanics of Solids, Deformable Bodies
and Continua
Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics
Mathematical and Physical Engineering
Enterprise Management and Economics
Environmental Engineering (216)
Thermal and Nuclear Power Engineering
(207)
Process Engineering (208)
Handling and Manipulation Engineering
(220)
Aerospace Engineering (220)
Materials Engineering (232)
Production Engineering (223)
Machine Tools Equipment (208)
Enterprise Management and Economics
(238)
Engineering Mechanics and Mechatronics
(205, 207)
Mathematical Modelling in Engineering
(201)
Instrumentation and Control Engineering
(210)
Biomedical and Rehabilitation Engineering
(205, 210)
51
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
NOTE
No bachelor programme and only one master degree program is completely available in
English language. The program is Process Engineering.
Doctoral Degree Courses
Courses necessary for each specialization must be agreed with the respective supervisor at the
beginning of the study.
Course
Dpt.
Partial Differential Equations
Numerical methods in Aerodynamics
Computational Mechanics of the Heat and Mass Transfer
Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations
Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations,
Fundamentals of Finite Elements Method
Numerical Methods in Algebra
Kinematical Geometry
Differential Geometry
Differential Geometry
Robotics and Geometry
Diffusion in Solids
Experimental Methods of Plasma Physics
Physical Measurement Methods in Engineering
Physical Properties of Surfaces
Lasers and Their Applications
Surfaces and Coatings
Radiation Damages of Materials
Fundamentals of Semiconductor Technology
General English for Ph.D. Students
Specialized English for Ph.D. Students
Mechanics of Multibody Systems I. and II.
Controlled Mechanical Systems
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Advanced Thermodynamics
Continuum Thermodynamics
Gas Dynamics
Heat and Mass Transfer
Steam Boilers and Heat Exchangers
Safety of Nuclear Power Plants
Modern Power Systems
Models in Control and Monitoring Systems
Principles of Engineering Measurements
Application of Artificial Intelligence in Engineering
Basic Methods of Measurement
Selected Problems in Automatic Control
Dependability of Technical Systems
Advanced Topics in Momentum and Heat Transfer
Mixing in Heterogeneous Systems
Engineering Rheology
Process Modelling and Identification
Numerical Methods in Momentum and Heat Transfer
Heat and Mass Transport
Turbulence in Single and Two-Phase Flows
52
Lecturer
201
201
201
201
201
Neustupa
Kozel
Vogel
Burda
Burda
201
201
201
201
201
202
202
202
202
202
202
202
202
204
204
205
205
207
207
207
207
207
207
207
207
210
210
210
210
210
210
218
218
218
218
218
218
218
Neumannová
Kargerová
Kargerová
Kargerová
Kargerová
Sopko
Novák
Frank
Černý
Hamal
Novák
Sopko
Sopko
Jirků
Jirků
Stejskal
Valášek
Ježek
Nožička
Maršík
Nožička
Nožička
Jirouš
Klik
Petr
Zítek
Kuneš
Bíla
Uhlíř
Šulc
Mykiska
Rieger
Rieger
Šesták
Žitný
Šesták
Šesták
Žitný
Roušar
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Mathematical Modelling of Thermodynamics of Internal
Combustion Engines
Passive Safety of Vehicles
Aerodynamics
Vortex Tubes, their Generation and Losses
Metalworking Processes
CAD/CAM/CAE In Metalworking Processes
Theory of Corrosion and Surface Coating
Metal Forming Theory
Experimental Methods in Machining
Functional Coatings and their Applications
Surface Integrity
Surface Coating Design
Machining and Finishing Difficult to Machine Materials
Optimisation of Forming Technologies
Optimisation of Cutting Conditions
Industrial Logistic
Manufacturing Methods Improvement
Process Planning Systems
Theory of Manufacturing Process and Systems Modelling
Theory of Machining (Cutting
Selected Forming Technologies
Quality Control
Physical Metallurgy
Mechanics of Materials
Processing of Non-metallic Materials and Composites
Kořínek
Physics of Non-metallic Materials in Solid State
Kořínek
Experimental Methods in Materials Science
Microeconomic Theory
Managerial Information Systems
Information Management
Macroeconomic Theory
Financial Management
Management and Cost Accounting
220
220
220
220
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
223
232
232
232
Macek
Kovanda
Brož
Jerie
Čermák
Čermák
Kvasnička
Čermák
Mádl
Kvasnička
Kvasnička
Kvasnička
Kvasnička
Šanovec
Mádl
Preclík
Preclík
Preclík
Preclík
Mádl
Šanovec
Chmelík
Macek, Zuna
Janovec, Cejp
Steidl,
232
Steidl,
232
238
238
238
238
238
238
Macek, Steidl
Macík
Molnár
Molnár
Pačesová
Freiberg
Zralý
NOTE
The above doctoral-degree courses are available for Ph.D. students exclusively.
LIST OF COURSES
MASTER-DEGREE STUDY PROGRAMMES
The following list of master degree courses are subject to change.
Please check the current offer of courses on the homepage of the Faculty of Mechanical
Engineering:
http://www.fsid.cvut.cz
Item EDUCATION/PROSPECTUS.
53
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
SEMESTER COURSE
HOURS
COURSE No
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
201 1056
201 6007
201 1021
237 2021
218 2019
213 2018
233 3018
204 6120
201 1057
201 6008
202 1024
202 6003
213 1019
201 2027
232 2029
234 3018
213 3011
213 1005
231 1101
201 1066
201 2033
232 1039
202 1022
202 1022
213 3018
234 1045
209 3001
201 1049
231 1102
211 1001
212 1023
233 1067
231 1102
213 3019
209 3271
211 1002
213 1010
212 1015
231 1107
214 1015
213 1026
213 2025
238 1054
218 1075
237 1047
214 1016
237 2080
Mathematics I.
Mathematics I. - Seminar
Constructive Geometry
Computer Use Fundamentals I
Chemistry
Technical Drawing
Fundamentals of Technology I.
Czech Language
Mathematics II.
Mathematics II. - Seminar
Physics I.
Physics I. - Seminar
Design I.
Computer Graphics
Materials Science I.
Fundamentals of Technology II.
CAD I. – Computers in Design
History of Technology
Mechanics I.
Mathematics III.
Algorithmization
Materials Science II.
Physics II.
Physics II. – Seminar
Design II.
Technology II.
Introduction into Philosophy
Numerical Mathematics
Mechanics II.
Strength of Materials I.
Thermodynamics
Technology I.
Mechanics II.
Design III.
Humanity - Information Sources
Strength of Materials II.
Machine Elements and Mechanisms I.
Fluid Mechanics
Mechanics III
Electrical Engineering I.
Machine Elements and Mechanisms II.
Project I
Economics of the Enterprise
Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer
Automatic Control
Electrical Engineering II.
Measurement in Engineering
4+4
0+2
3+2
1+1
2+1
1+2
1+1
0+2
4+2
0+2
4+2
0+2
1+2
1+1
2+1
1+1
1+2
2+0
2+2
3+2
2+2
2+2
2+1
0+2
0+2
2+2
0+2
2+2
2+2
4+3
3+2
3+2
2+2
0+2
1+1
2+2
4+2
3+2
2+3
3+2
3+0
0+4
2+2
3+1
3+2
2+3
2+2
Selected Courses of 7-10 Semester
- must be agreed at the beginning of each semester
7
7
7
7
8
Applied Physical Chemistry
Hydromechanical Unit Operations
Design of Process Equipment
Algorithms for Engineering Informatics
Partial Differential Equations
54
218 1028
218 1037
218 1024
237 1014
201 1045
3+2
4+2
4+3
2+2
2+2
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
8
8
8
8
8
8
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Heat Transfer Operations
218 1017
Mass Transfer Operations
218 1039
Polymer Processing
218 1091
Database and Knowledge Systems
237 1068
Dynamic System Modeling
237 1026
Instrumentation Technology in Automatic Control
237 1072
Computer Network Services
237 2015
Water Waste Treatment and Gaseous Emission Reduction218 1089
Numerical Analysis and Design of Process Equipment
218 1040
Experimental Methods
218 1068
Chemical and Bio Reactor Design
218 1077
CA Chemical Engineering Process and Management
218 1012
Process Control
218 1076
Introduction to Modelling and Simulation for
Environmental Engineering
216 6007
Object Oriented Programming
237 1042
PLC in Industrial Control
237 1060
Theory of Automatic Control
237 1127
Stochastic Processes FOR engineers
237 1070
Processing Lines
218 1100
Plant Design
218 1013
Industrial Chemistry
218 1014
Capita Selecta of Modelling and Simulation for
Environmental Engineering
216 6008
Computer Aided Control Design
237 1070
Theory and Methodology of Machining (Cutting)
234 1012
Manufacturing Systems Design
234 1021
Manufacturing Methods Improvement
234 2019
Theory and Methodology of Metal Forming
233 1005
Theory and Methodology of Casting
233 1008
55
4+2
4+2
2+2
2+2
2+2
2+2
1+2
3+1
3+2
2+2
3+2
2+2
2+2
1+3
2+2
2+2
2+2
1+1
3+2
2+1
2+1
1+3
2+2
3+2
2+2
2+1
3+2
2+2
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
SYLLABI OF COURSES
of the first 6 semesters of Master-degree program
Code:2011021
Lecturer:
Department:
Kargerová
201.3
CONSTRUCTIVE GEOMETRY
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
6
Weekly load: 3+2
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
1
Course description:
Projection methods (axonometry, obligue projection, linear perspective),
planar kinematical geometry (trajectory, envelope, cyclic motion), helix,
surfaces ( sf. of revolution, helicoidal sf., developable sf., envelope sf.).
Contents:
1. Monge projection
2. Obligue projection
3. Orthogonal axonometry
4. Linear perspective
5. Kinematical geometry
6. Kinematical geometry
7. Surfaces of revolution
8. Surfaces of revolution
9. Helix
10. Helicoidal surfaces
11. Developable surfaces
12. Developable surfaces
13. Envelope surfaces
14. Envelope surfaces
Recommended literature:
1. Kargerova,M.: Geometry and Computer Graphics. CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1998
Key words:
Projection, kinematical geometry, motion, curve, surface, screw motion, development
56
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2011049
Lecturer:
Department:
Kolman
201.2
NUMERICAL MATHEMATICS
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
4
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
4
Course description:
An overview of typical mathematical problems faced by engineers that can not be solved
explicitly. Numerical approaches to their approximate solutions
Contents:
Matrices; System of linear equations – direct methods; Gauss elimination for tri-diagonal
1.
systems; Principle of iterative methods; norms and spectral radius.
2. Simple and Jacobi iterative method; Gauss-Seidel method; convergence conditions.
Systems of nonlinear equations; Problems of existence and uniqueness of the solution;
3.
Iterative methods – Newton method; Analogy of 1D problem.
Principle of interpolation; Interpolation by algebraic polynomials; Existence and uniqueness
4. of the polynomial; Interpolation by spline functions; Advantages of this interpolation;
Practical applications.
Least squares approximation – principle of approximation by an algebraic polynomial;
5.
Derivation of the system of normal equations;
Numerical solution of the Cauchy problem for the 1st order equation and for a system in
6-8. normal form; Cauchy problem for the nth order equation; Principle of one-step methods of
Euler & Runge-Kutta; Convergence; Practical application;
The problems of the solution of the boundary value problems for an 2nd order ordinary
differential equation, comparison with the Cauchy problem; Existence and uniqueness;
9Dirichlet problem; Principle of the mesh methods (finite difference methods), convergence;
10.
Existence and uniqueness of the solution of the associated system of linear equations;
Shooting method;
Numerical solution of the linear partial differential 2nd order equations in 2D –mesh
methods; Classes of equations; Formulation of elementary problems for the equations of
11- the mathematical physics (Laplace and Poisson equation; Heat transfer equation, Wave
13. equation); Difference substitutions of the first and second derivative order of the
approximation; Principle of the mesh method for the solution of individual types of
problems; Convergence and stability;
Recommended literature:
Mathews, J. H.: Numerical Methods for Mathematics, Science and Engineering, Prentice
1.
Hall International, 2nd edition,1992
Gerald, C.F., Wheatley, P.O.: Applied Numerical Analysis, Addison Wesley, 6th edition,
2.
1999
Key words:
Numerical methods; system of equations; differential equations
57
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2011056
Lecturer:
Department:
Neustupa,
Kračmar
201.1
MATHEMATICS I
Weekly load: 4+4
Study profile:
all branches
Assessment: a,ex
Credits:
8
Semester:
1
Course description: Introduction to linear algebra, calculus of functions of one
variable, indefinite and definite integrals. Simple applications in physics and
geometry.
Contents:
1. Linear algebra: Vector spaces.
2. Matrices and determinants.
3. Systems of linear algebraic equations.
4. Linear transformations of Euclidean spaces. Eigenvalues, eigevectors of square matrices.
5. Differential calculus: Sequences of real numbers and their limits.
6. Function of one real variable - limits, continuity, derivatives.
7. Higher order derivatives.
8. Application of derivatives, behaviour of a function.
9. Taylor’s polynomials, MacLaurin’s polynomials.
10. Non-linear equation for one unknown.
Indefinite integrals: Antiderivative, indefinite integral, basic methods of integration:
11.
integration by parts, method of substitution.
12. Integration of rational and simple irrational functions, integration of trigonometric functions.
13. Separable differential equations.
14. Definite integral: Definition, basic properties and methods of calculation, applications.
Recommended literature:
1. Neustupa, J.: Mathematics I, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1996
2. Finney, R. L., Thomas, G.B.: Calculus, Addison-Wesley, New York, Ontario, Sydney, 1994
Key words:
Linear algebra, differential calculus, integral calculus (indefinite and definite integral)
Code:201 1057
Lecturer:
Kračmar,
MATHEMATICS II
Study profile:
58
all branches
Weekly load: 4+2
Assessment: a, ex
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Department:
Neustupa
201.1
Credits:
6
Semester:
2
Course description:
Introduction to the calculus of functions of more variables, double and volume integrals,
line and surface integrals, theory of a field. Applications in physics and in geometry.
Contents:
1. Differential calculus of functions of more variables: limit, continuity, partial derivative.
2. Higher order partial derivatives.
3. Maxima and minima.
4. Implicit functions.
Double integral: definition, basic properties, method of calculation (Fubini theorem.
5.
transformation to polar and other coordinates), applications.
Volume integral: definition, basic properties, methods of calculation (Fubini theorem,
6.
transformation to cylindrical, spherical and other coordinates), applications.
7. Line integral of a scalar function: definition, basic properties, calculation, applications.
Line integral of a vector function: definition, basic properties, independence on the path,
8.
calculation.
9. Green theorem, applications.
10. Surface integral of a scalar function: definition, basic properties, calculation, applications.
11. Surface integral of a vector function: definition, basic properties, calculation, applications.
12. Operators div and curl, Gauss theorem and Stokes theorem.
13. Potential vector field.
14. Solenoidal vector field.
Recommended literature:
1. J. Neustupa, J., Kračmar, S.: Mathematics II, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1998
R. L. Finney,R.L, Thomas, G.B.: Calculus, Addison-Wesley, New York, Ontario, Sydney,
2.
1994
Key words:
Multi-variable calculus, double and triple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, theory of a
field
59
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2011066
Lecturer:
Department:
Burda
201.2
MATHEMATICS III
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
5
Weekly load: 3+2
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
3
Course description:
Theory of ordinary differential equations. First and second order differential equations.
Systems of differential equations in normal form. Initial value problem. Linear and
nonlinear systems. Autonomous systems and their dynamic properties. Infinite series.
Power series. Taylor expansion. Applications.
Contents:
Ordinary differential equations of first order. Basic concepts. Maximal solution. Existence
1.
and uniqueness of maximal solution of the initial value problem.
Separable differential equations. Homogeneous differential equations of first order. Exact
2.
equation. Linear differential equation of first order. Bernoulli equation.
Systems of differential equations in normal form. Fundamental set of solutions of
3.
homogeneous linear systems. The Wronskian.
4. Linear differential equations of 2-nd order. Method of undetermined coefficients.
5. Autonomous systems. Dynamic interpretation in the phase space.
6. Homogeneous linear autonomous systems. The Euler method for the general solution.
Phase diagram of the homogeneous linear autonomous system in the plane. Various types
7.
of equilibrium points. Nonhomogeneous linear autonomous systems.
8. Nonlinear autonomous systems. Properties of phase trajectories. First integral.
9. Infinite series of numbers. Tests of convergence for the series with positive terms.
10. Series with arbitrary real terms. Absolute and conditional convergence. The Leibnitz test.
11. Power series. Structure of the domain of convergence and determination of the domain.
12. Operations on power series (multiplication, differentiation, and integration of power series).
13. The expansion of a function into the Taylor/MacLaurin series.
Application of power series to the solution of the initial value problem for the linear
14.
differential equation of 2-nd order with variable coefficients.
Recommended literature:
Burda, P.: Mathematics III, Ordinary Differential Equations and Infinite Series, CTU
1.
Publishing House, Prague, 1998.
Key words:
ordinary differential equations, initial value problem, autonomous systems, infinite series, power
series.
60
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2012027
Lecturer:
Department:
Kargerová
201-3
COMPUTER GRAPHICS
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
2
Weekly load: 1+1
Assessment: ca
Semester:
2
Course description:
Modelling of curves, surfaces, solids. Algorithms and means of computer graphics
(visibility, shading, colour models). Design of models using software DesignCad-3D and
Maple.
Contents:
1. Modelling of solids (wire frame, CSG model, B- representation)
2. Modelling of curves (Ferguson cubics, Bezier curves)
3. Composite curves, Coons B-spline
4. Modelling of surfaces (Coons and Bezier patches)
5. Computer rendering (algorithms of visibility)
6. Light definition, Colour definition, models RGB, CMY,HLS
7. Shading, ray-tracing
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Recommended literature:
1. Kargerova, M.: Geometry and Computer Graphics, CYU Publishing House, prague, 1998
Key words:
Modelling, curves, surfaces, colour model, shading, light
61
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2012033
Lecturer:
Department:
ALGORITHMIZATION AND PROGRAMMING
Kolman
Study profile:
all branches
201.2
Credits:
4
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: ca
Semester:
3
Course description:
Pat I: An introduction to elementary programming, learning the basic principles, building
the capacity to write gradually more and more complex programs (still very basic but
writing them oneself and from scratch). Part II: Learning specific algorithms tackling
simple problems from numerical mathematics as applied in engineering problems.
Contents:
Example of elementary program, program structure, programming process;
1. Algorithm statements;
Building blocks of C language;
Statements, assignment, priorities of operations;
2. Mathematical functions, standard libraries;
Flow control: Conditional statement, Switch, Goto;
Cycles: For, While, Do-while;
3.
Break; Continue;
Formatted and unformatted intput/output;
4.
Input/output from data files;
Functions - call by value, call by reference;
5.
Recursive functions;
Pointers;
6. Array as a parameter of function; function as a parameter of function;
Data types typedef, enumeration, structure;
7. Dynamic memory allocation: one-dimensional arrays, multi-dimensional arrays;
8. Sorting: direct selection, bubblesort, shakesort, quicksort;
9. Numerical integration: trapezoidal method, Simpson’s method;
10. Equation f(x)=0: bisection method, iterative method, Newton’s method;
System of linear algebraic equations: Finite methods:
11.
Gaussian elimination, Gaussian elimination for tridiagonal system;
System of linear algebraic equations: Iterative methods:
12.
Jacobi's method, Gauss-Seidel method;
13. Cauchy problem for one ordinary differential equation
Recommended literature:
1. Barclay,K.A.: ANSI C Problem Solving and Programming, Prentice Hall 1990;
2. www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial
Key words:
Algorithms, programming, C language, numerical mathematics
62
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2021022
Lecturer:
Department:
Veselá
202
PHYSICS II
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
7
Weekly load: 4+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
3
Course description:
Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves.
Light, wave optics, geometrical optics. Quantum properties of electromagnetic waves.
Interaction of radiation with matter. Photoelectric effect. Wave-particle mature of matter.
Quantum-mechanical description of particle's motion. Hydrogen atom and periodic
system of elements. Spectra, x-rays, ;laser. Band theory of solids, semiconductors.
Nucleus, radioactivity, sources of nuclear energy. Laboratories - measurements of 6
experiments related to the lectures.
Contents:
1. Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction, self-inductance, mutual inductance.
2. Maxwell's equations, displacement current.
3. Electromagnetic waves, interaction of radiation with matter. Light.
4. Geometrical optics.
5. Wave optics, interference. Special theory of relativity.
6. Particle nature of radiation. Photoelectric effect. Black-body radiation, the Compton effect.
7. Wave-particle nature of matter. De Broglie waves. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle.
8. Models of hydrogen atom, quantum numbers, electron spin.
9. Introduction into quantum mechanics - Schrodinger equation.
10. Particle in a box. Harmonic oscillator. Periodic system of elements.
11. Spectra, x-rays, laser. Molecular bonds.
12. Band theory of solids, semiconductors.
Radioactivity, activity, disintegration law, half-life, sources of nuclear energy,
13.
measurements.
14. Fundamental elementary particles, classification. Cosmology.
Recommended literature:
Young, H.D., Freedman, R.A.: Sears and Zemansky' University Physics, 10th edition,
1.
Addison-Wesley, 2000
Key words:
Electromagnetic induction, inductance, Maxwell's laws, electromagnetic waves, optics, particle
nature of radiation, wave nature of particles, models of hydrogen atom, quantum numbers,
exclusion principle, uncertainty principle, periodic system of elements, Schrodinger equation,
spectra, molecular bonds, band theory of solids, nuclear physics, half-life, activity,
elementary particles, cosmology.
63
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2021022
Lecturer:
Department:
Veselá
202
PHYSICS I
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
3
Weekly load: 2+1
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
2
Course description:
Kinematics and dynamics of a particle motion. Principle of conservation of energy.
System of particles, centre of mass. Rigid body. Continuum, elastic properties of bodies.
Oscillations, waves. Fluid mechanics. Temperature and heat transfer. Kinetic theory of
gases. Thermodynamics. Electric field, current, conductivity, resistance. Conductors,
semiconductors, insulators. Magnetic field. Magnetic materials. Electromagnetic field.
Laboratories - accuracy of measurements, systematic and random errors, uncertainty of
direct and indirect measurements, regression, measurements of 11 various experiments
related to the lectures.
Contents:
1. Physical quantities - vectors and scalars. Kinematics of a particle motion in one dimension.
Motion in two or three dimensions, circular motion. Newton's laws of motion. Galileian
2.
transformation.
Motion equations, applications. Dynamics of a circular motion. Work and energy. Principle of
conservation of energy. Momentum, impulse, collisions. Centre of mass. Rigid body.
3.
Rotational and translational motions, the torque. Conservation of momentum and angular
momentum.
Gravitation, Newton's law of universal gravitations. Potential and intensity of a gravitational
4.
filed, satellites. Fluid mechanics, surface tension.
Continuity equation, Bernoulli's equation. Viscosity. Temperature, heat, calorimetry.
5.
Internal energy, first law of thermodynamics.
Thermodynamic processes. The Carnot cycle. Equipartition of energy theorem. The second
6.
law of thermodynamics, entropy, probability, information.
Elasticity, stress, strain, elastic moduli. SHM, the physical pendulum, the simple pendulum,
7.
damped oscillations, forced oscillations, resonance.
8. Mechanical waves, types, mathematical description, sound, beats, the Doppler effect.
9. Electric charge, electric filed, intensity. Electric flux, Gauss's law, electric potential.
10. Capacitors, capacitance, energy of electric field, Gauss' law in dielectrics.
11. Electric current, resistivity, resistance, electromotive force.
12. Direct-current circuits, Kirchhoff's rules, power and energy in electric circuits.
13. Magnetic field, the Hall effect, magnetic materials.
14. Mass spectrometer, cyclotron. Sources of magnetic filed, Ampere's law.
Recommended literature:
Young, H.D., Freedman, R.A.: Sears and Zemansky' University Physics, 10th edition,
1.
Addison-Wesley, 2000
2. Vesela E., Physics I, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 2003
Key words:
physics, accuracy, theory of errors, kinematics, dynamics, motion equations, harmonic motion,
centre of mass, deformation, continuum, hydrodynamics, kinetic theory of matter,
thermodynamics, mechanical waves, electric field, electric current, circuits, magnetic field,
magnetic materials
Code:2093001
INTRODUCTION INTO PHILOSOPHY
64
Weekly load: 1+1
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Lecturer:
Department:
Zamarovský
238.3
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
2
Assessment: a
Semester:
1
Course description:
Brief overview of main persons and ideas of ancient philosophy. The basic aim is to point
out close relation of ancient philosophical ideas with our present day problems.
Contents:
1. What is philosophy, the mythological background.
2. Presocratic philosophers, the Milesians and concept of arche, reductionism and science.
3. Pythagoras and the Pythagoreans, metempsychosis, soul, mathematics, medicine etc.
4. Heraclitus and his view on nature. Temporality and Eastern philosophy.
5. The Eleatic school, problem with negative concepts and vacuum, Zeno`s paradoxes.
6. The way to materialism (Empedocles, Anaxagoras).
7. Atomism, Democritus and Leucippus. Ancient and modern concepts of atom, cosmology.
8. Concept of ananke, absolute determinism, Laplace demon and modern science.
9. The Sophists, subjectivism and relativism. Sophists and post-modern philosophy.
10. Socrates and his method. Socratic schools. Megarians and paradox of the liar.
11. Plato and Platonism. Idealism, the allegory of the cave and it`s consequences. Atlantis.
12. Aristotle, his live and teaching. Logic, methodology of science, Aristotelian physics.
13. Philosophy of the Hellenistic period. Epicurus and atomism. Stoicism, scepticism.
14. Science in Alexandria, Archimedes, Euclides and geometry.
Recommended literature:
1. Zamarovský, P.: The Roots of Western Philosophy, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 2000.
2. http://www.ditext.com/encyc/frame.html
Key words:
philosophy, science, history, interdisciplinarity
Code:2093271
HUMANITY - INFORMATION SOURCES
65
Weekly load: 1+1
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Lecturer:
Department:
Tichá
12138
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
2
Assessment: a
Semester:
4
Course description:
Information literacy presents the ability to recognise the information need, to locate,
evaluate, and use effectively the needed information. The course concentrates on
searching printed and electronic information sources for engineers, online searching
strategy, library services, the internet information sources and also on references,
citation and copyright principles.
Contents:
1. Introduction to information literacy.
2. Library catalogues 1. CTU libraries.
3. Library catalogues 2. State Technical Library.
4. Electronic information sources available in CTU network 1. Dialog.
5. Electronic information sources available in CTU network 2. Web of Science.
6. Electronic information sources available in CTU network 3. ProQuest, PCI.
7. Electronic information sources available in CTU network 4. Electronic journals.
8. Document delivery services.
9. Searching the Internet versus searching databases.
10. Special engineering documents 1. Technical standards.
11. Special engineering documents 2. Patents. Industrial Property.
12. References and citations.
13. Revision lesson.
14. Final report results. Evaluation and assessment.
Recommended literature:
Information Literacy Course. Handouts and Presentations. [online]. CTU in Prague. [cit.
1.
22.5.2003]. Available on WWW: <http://knihovny.cvut.cz/courses/handouts.html.en>
TILT: Texas Information Literacy Tutorial [online]. The University of Texas System Digital
2. Library © 1998-2002 [cit. 22.5.2003]. Available on WWW:
<http://tilt.lib.utsystem.edu/>
Key words:
electronic information sources, information literacy, library services, bibliographic references
writing styles
66
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2111001
Lecturer:
Department:
Sochor
205.1
STRENGTH OF MATERIALS I
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
8
Weekly load: 4+3
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
4
Course description:
This course is to provide the ability to comprehend and analyze basic types of
loading of simple machine members in order to determine their stress states
and deformations. This provides tools for dimensioning the members and/or
determining their allowable loading. This subject also provides the prerequisite
for other advanced and special courses concerning the theory of elasticity and
plasticity. Seminars are devoted to practical design and computation of simple
machine elements.
Contents:
1. Tension and compression.
2. Trusses both statically determinate and indeterminate
3. 2D- and 3D-stress state (principal stresses and planes and maximum shearing stress).
4. Strain energy for multiaxial stress state.
5. Theories of failure.
6. Torsion of circular bars.
7. Centroids, second moments of area, and products of inertia of plane areas.
Bending of beams (shearing force, bending moment, normal and shearing stresses in
8.
beams).
9. Deflection of beams.
10. Statically indeterminate beams.
Combined loading (unsymmetrical bending; bars with axial loads; bending and torsion;
11.
torsion and tension; bending and shear).
12. Design for fatigue strength (cyclic loading; S-N diagram; Smith’s and High’s fatigue diagrams)
13. Safety factors for fatigue strength; stresses due to combined loading.
14. Thin-walled rotational membranes.
Recommended literature:
1. Sochor, M.: Strength of Materials I, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1998
Nash, W.A.: Strength of Materials, Schaum’s outline series, 2nd edition, McGraw-Hill,
2.
INC, 1998
Key words:
2D and 3D stress state; strain energy; loading in tension, compression, bending and torsion;
fatigue strength; thin-walled rotational membranes
67
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2111002
Lecturer:
Department:
Sochor
205.1
STRENGTH OF MATERIALS II
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
5
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
5
Course description:
This course is to provide an advanced analysis of machine members. It also
provides the prerequisite for other special courses concerning the theory of
elasticity and plasticity.
.
Contents:
1. Bending of curved rods.
2. Bending of frameworks.
3. Thick cylinders
4. Compound thick cylinders
5. Circular plates
6. More general types of CP loading
7. Buckling of columns
8. Combined stress: buckling & bending
9. 3-D stress state
10. Geometrical theory of strains
11. Torsion of bars having non-circular profiles.
12. Torsion of thin-walled profiles
13. Plastic limit analysis of structures
14. Plastic behaviour of thick cylinders under inner overpressure
Recommended literature:
1. Sochor, M.: Strength of Materials II, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 2002
2. Heam, E.J.: Mechanics of Materials II, Textbook of University of Warwik, UK, 1998
Key words:
Curved rods and frames, thick cylinders, circular plates, buckling of columns, 3-D stress state,
torsion of non-circular profiles, Plastic limit analysis of structures
68
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2121015
Lecturer:
Department:
FLUID MECHANICS
Adamec,Ježek Study profile:
all branches
207.1
Credits:
7
Weekly load: 3+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
5
Course description:
The first course in Fluid Mechanics designed to provide the fundamental tools necessary
to analyse a fluid systems and predict its behaviour.
Contents:
Introduction, basic properties, quantities and units, Fluid statics, development
1.
of the hydrostatic law
2. Forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy
Ideal fluid in motion: basic laws – continuity equation, Bernoulli equation, linear
3.
momentum equation, discharge from vessels, one-dimensional pipe flow
4. Frictional and local losses
5. Principles of pressure, velocity and discharge measurement
6. Unsteady one-dimensional flow
7. Relative flows
8. Force action on fluid jet
9. Laminar flows
10. Turbulent flows
11. Flow past bodies, boundary layer, drag and lift, wing theory
12. Dimensional analysis and model theory
13. Potential flow theory
14. Navier-Stokes equation
Recommended literature:
1. White, F. M.: Fluid Mechanics, 3rd ed., New York, 1994
2. Munson,B.,Young,D.,Okiishi,T.:Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, 2nd ed., New York,1994
Douglas, J., Mathews, R.: Solving Problems in Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 1 and 2, Longman,
3.
Malaysia, 1998
Key words:
Hydrostatics, continuity energy and momentum equations, pipe flow, flow past bodies, model
theory, potential flow
69
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2121023
Lecturer:
Department:
Jílek
207.1
THERMODYNAMICS
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
5
Weekly load: 3+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
4
Course description:
The course deal with a basic engineering approach to classical thermodynamics, heat
transfer and compressible flow through nozzles and diffusers. Basic concepts and
principles are introduced, and they are applied mostly to systems behaving as ideal
gases or typical vapours. Basic notions associated with ideal mixtures are studied with an
emphasis on psychometrics. Heat transfer covers fundamentals of conduction, convection
and radiation. Heat exchangers are treated as an engineering application.
Exercises and labs are devoted to practical problems and experimental technique.
Contents:
1. Basic thermodynamical concepts.
2. Basic laws of thermodynamics.
3. Mathematical relations of thermodynamics. Ideal gas application.
4. Processes in Ideal gases. Mixtures of ideal gases
5. A general approach to irreversible processes in ideal gases. Mixing.
6. Real gases. Phase change processes.
7. Reversible and irreversible processes in vapours. Throttling.
8. Psychometrics
Heat transfer by conduction. The Fourier-Kirchhoff equation. One-dimensional stationary
9.
cases.
10. Heat transfer by convection. Overall heat transfer.
11. Heat exchangers. Heat transfer by radiation.
12. Equations of one-dimensional compressible flow. Speed of sound.
13. Nozzles and diffusers.
14. Cycles in engineering application.
Recommended literature:
1. Jílek, M.: Thermomechanics, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 2002.
2. Jílek: Exercises and Labs in Thermomechanics, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 2002
Key words:
Energy, energy transformation, engineering cycles, laws of thermodynamics, mixtures,
psychometrics, heat transfer, conduction, convection, radiation, heat exchangers,
compressible flow, nozzles, diffusers.
70
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2131010
Lecturer:
Department:
MACHINE ELEMENTS AND MECHANISMS I
Jančík
12108
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
7
Weekly load: 4+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
5
Course description:
Joints, joining elements (screwed, clamped, splined, welded, soldered, adhesive joints,
feathers, pins, tenons, cotters, keys). Mechanical transmissions (gear, belt, chain and
friction drives). Seminars are devoted to practical individual design projects of motion
screw, preloaded connecting bolts, pressed, splined and key joints between shafts and
hubs, non-detachable welded and riveted joints, belt and chain drives. Sketching of
machine elements and simple assembly units is also indispensable seminar work.
Contents:
1. Basic principles of supporting systems design in theory and practice.
2. Bolt and screw joints. Geometry, mechanics and design of thread pairs.
3. Bolt and screw connections – theory and design of preloaded joints.
4. Design of preloaded bolts and screws at variable external load. Motion screws and nuts.
5. Removable joints of shafts and hubs – clamped, pressed, keyed, splined.
6. Joints with clevis pins, pins, shrunk-on rings. Design of welded joints.
7. Butt and fillet welds – practical design calculations. Bonded and riveted joints.
8. Mechanical transmissions – kinematic and dynamic behaviour, calculating models.
9. Design of belt and chain drives, transmissions with friction wheels.
10. Geared transmissions – types, basic law of gearing, theory of involute gearing.
11. Spur gear drives – dimensional and strength calculations, design, measuring, production.
12. Helical gear drives – virtual gear theory, rules of calculating methods.
13. Bevel gear drives – virtual and bivirtual gears theory, rules of calculating methods.
14. Hypoid gear drives. Worm gear drives – dimensional and strength calculations.
Recommended literature:
Jančík, L.: Machine Elements and Mechanisms I, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 2002.
1.
Jančík, L.: Machine Elements and Mechanisms – Tasks (study texts), CTU, Praha, 2002
Shigley, J.E., Mischke, C.R.: Mechanical Engineering Design, McGraw-Hill, New York,
2.
1989
Key words:
supporting systems, mechanical joints, material joints, joining elements, mechanical
transmissions, dimensioning, loading capacity, durability, reliability.
71
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2131019
Lecturer:
Department:
Křivý
208.1
DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS I
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
3
Weekly load: 1+2
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
2
Course description:
Acquirement of the fundamental knowledge of representation and dimensioning
of
machine elements founded in the acquaintance with the function of a part in the technical
system and the function of form elements of the part. Analysis of the assembly of simple
mounting units.
Contents:
Standardization of technical documentation. Technical drawings. General rules of technical
1.
representation. Gears, splines representation and dimensioning.
Principal rules of dimensioning. Title block. Gradation of quantities. Choice of series of
2.
preferred numbers
Use of series of preferred numbers. Surface quality - formation of surface, terminology,
3.
surface parameters.
Amplitude parameters (Ry, Rz, Ra, Rq), spacing parameters (Sm, S), hybrid parameters
4.
(tp, Abbot curve). Shaft and hub joints.
5. Accuracy of dimensions. Terminology. ISO system of limits and fits.
Shaft basis and hole basis systems of fits. Interchangeable system (clearance fit,
6.
interference fit, transition fit).Analysis of a mounting unit.
7. Relationship between tolerance and surface roughness. General tolerances.
8. Dimensional loops. Terms and definitions. Linear dimensional loops.
9. Geometrical tolerances - terms and definitions.
10. Fundamental principle of tolerances. Form, attitude, and position tolerances.
Run out tolerances. Dependent and independent tolerances. Minimum and maximum
11.
material principle.
12. Projecting tolerance zone. General geometrical tolerances. Tolerance of angles.
13. Cone joints and fits. Tolerancing of cones. Analysis of tolerancing ways.
14. Tolerancing of threads.
Recommended literature:
Křivý, J., Pospíchal, J.: Fundamentals of Design I. Technical Drawings. Representation
1
and Dimensioning, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1999
Křivý, J.: Fundamentals of Design II. Rules of Interchange ability. Representation and
2
Dimensioning of Machine Elements, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1999
3 STANDARD SELECTION
Key words:
Interchangeability, representation, dimensioning, tolerances, roughness surface, preferred
numbers
72
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2131026
Lecturer:
Department:
MACHINE ELEMENTS AND MECHANISMS II
Jančík
208.1
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
3
Weekly load: 3+0
Assessment: ex
Semester:
6
Course description:
Axles and shafts, sliding and rolling bearings, shaft connections with couplings and
clutches, elements of crank mechanisms, pipelines and fittings.
Contents:
1. Axles and shafts – preliminary design, strength and deformation evaluation.
2. Vibration of shafts. Sliding bearings – bases of tribology, lubricants, and materials.
3. Radial sliding bearings operating at hydrodynamic or hydrostatic lubrication.
4. Design, loading capacity, durability of sliding bearings. Rolling bearings - standardisation.
5. Kinematics, dynamics, loading capacity, durability of rolling bearings. Shaft supporting.
6. Shaft coupling and clutches – kinematics, dynamics, characteristics, design, reliability.
7. Mechanically controlled shaft clutches – design, loading capacity, compensating behaviour.
8. Special shaft clutches – safety, starting, overrunning clutches.
9. Main parts of crank mechanisms, kinematics of crank mechanism, indicator diagrams.
10. External, internal and inertial forces loading crank mechanisms.
11. Loading, preliminary strength calculation and design of main parts of crank mechanisms.
12. Flow of substance through pipeline - operating parameters, diameters of pipelines.
13. Pipes and fittings – materials, loading capacity, couplings, compensators.
14. Survey of force calculations of closing cocks, valves and gate valves.
Recommended literature:
1. Jančík, L.: Machine Elements and Mechanisms II (study texts), CTU, Prague, 2003.
Shigley, J.E., Mischke, C.R.: Mechanical Engineering Design, McGraw Hill, New York,
2.
1989.
Key words:
axles, shafts, sliding bearings, rolling bearings, shaft couplings, shaft clutches, parts of crank
mechanisms, pipelines, fittings, dimensioning, loading capacity, durability, reliability.
73
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2132018
Lecturer:
Department:
Křivý
208.1
TECHNICAL DRAWING
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
2
Weekly load: 1+2
Assessment: ca
Semester:
1
Course description:
Acquirement of the fundamental knowledge of representation and dimensioning of
machine elements founded in the acquaintance with the function of a part in the technical
system and the function of form elements of the part.
Representation and dimensioning of machine elements (sketches and drawings according to models). Screw joints.
Contents:
1. Standardization of technical documentation.
Technical drawings (types, scales, layout of drawing sheets, type of lines, folding of
2.
drawings).
General rules of technical representation. Orthographic projection. Views, sectional views,
3.
number of views. Local, partial, cross-sections. Sketches.
Principal rules of dimensioning. Dimension, projection, leader lines. Indicating of
4.
dimensional values. Systems of dimensioning.
5. Dimensioning of basic geometrical features. Indication of dimensional accuracy.
6. Indication of semi-products - bar profiles. Title block.
Representation and dimensioning of machine elements. Representation and dimensioning
7.
of threads, bolts, nuts
Inscription of limit deviations of angular dimensions. Indication of surface roughness,
8.
surface treatment.
9. Dimensioning of symmetrical subjects. Indication of geometrical tolerances.
10. Indication of form and position accuracy.
11. Screw joints and locking elements.
12. Drawings of parts and assemblies. Proposal drawings.
13. Technical report. Bibliographic data.
14. Registration of credits.
Recommended literature:
Křivý, J., Pospíchal, J.: Fundamentals of Design I. Technical Drawings. Representation
1
and Dimensioning, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1999
Křivý, J.: Fundamentals of Design II. Rules of Interchangeability. Representation and
2
Dimensioning of Machine Elements, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1999
3 STANDARD SELECTION
Key words:
technical documentation, representation, dimensioning, drawings, sketches, title block, thread,
joints, locking
74
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2132025
Lecturer:
Department:
Jančík
208.1
PROJECT I
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
4
Weekly load: 0+4
Assessment: ca
Semester:
6
Course description:
Elaboration of semester main global project of mechanical drive of conveyor composed of
electric motor, elastic shaft coupling (respectively V-belt drive), two-stage gearbox
provided with minimally two pairs of helical mating gears (respectively one pair of bevel
mating gears and one pair of helical mating gears) and compensating double-row toothed
shaft coupling (respectively roller chain drive). Second, alternative arrangement of
projected mechanical drive is provided instead of two-stage gearbox and additional
mechanical drives by means of one single-stage warm gearbox.
All the individual projected mechanical drives are composed of conception design, in
detail solved design calculations, assembly drawing, subassembly drawings, detail
drawings and material, technological and economical analyses in form of partial reports.
Contents:
Recommended literature:
1. Jančík, L.: Design Project I (study texts), CTU Publishing House, Prague 2003.
Jančík, L.: Machine Elements and Mechanisms – Tasks, CTU Publishing House, Prague
2.
2002
Key words:
work on an individual design project
75
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2133011
Lecturer:
Department:
Pospíchal
208.1
CAD I
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
2
Weekly load: 1+2
Assessment: a
Semester:
2
Course description:
Basic concepts of 2d and 3d design in Mechanical Desktop and Inventor
Contents:
1. Computer Aided Design – introduction – software, hardware
2. 2d drawing – line, polyline, circle, arc, point, ellipse, coordinates systems
3. 2d drawing – layers, templates, snap mode, ortho mode, tracking
4. 2d drawing – modification, filters
5. 2d drawing – dimensioning, tolerancing
6. 2d drawing – assembly drawing – dBases of standards parts
7. 3d design – basic, Booleans operators
8. 3d design – parametric sketches
9. 3d design – constraining sketches
10. 3d design – creating sketched features
11. 3d design – creating work features
12. 3d design – creating placed features
13. 3d design – creating drawing views
14. Test
Recommended literature:
Bečka, J.: CAD, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 2003
Autodesk: Mechanical Desktop - Tutorials
1.
Autodesk: Inventor - Tutorials
Key words:
CAD, 3d design, computer design
76
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2133018
Lecturer:
Department:
Křivý
208.1
DESIGN II
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
2
Weekly load: 0+2
Assessment: a
Semester:
3
Course description:
Acquirement of the fundamental knowledge concerning the synthetical activity in the
period of design processes of a subject especially within analysis of the function and the
geometrical accuracy. Utilization of a computer add (Autocad, Pro Engineer).
Contents:
Assignment of a mounting unit. General requirements for the arrangement of working
1.
documentation.
Explanation of the technical, economical aspects of the valve project in point of view of
2.
design and technology.
Choice of elements according to pressure, temperature and physical properties of the
3.
floating substance.
4. Working on the proposal drawing.
5.
6.
7. Test of the proposal drawing.
8. Working on the working drawings of not standard parts..
9.
10. Working on the assembly drawing and item list.
11.
Technical report including choice of elements, calculations of fits, dimensional loops and
12.
presentation of literature sources.
13. Handing over of the project, checking and correction.
14. Credit registration.
Recommended literature:
Křivý, J., Pospíchal, J.: Fundamentals of Design I. Technical Drawings. Representation
1
and Dimensioning, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1999
Křivý, J.: Fundamentals of Design II. Rules of Interchangeability. Representation and
2
Dimensioning of Machine Elements, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1999
3 STANDARD SELECTION
4. Catalogues of valve and piping products.
Key words:
Valve, piping, pressure, temperature, floating substance, motion thread, drawing, analysis
77
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2133019
Lecturer:
Department:
Křivý
208.1
DESIGN III
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
2
Weekly load: 0+2
Assessment: a
Semester:
4
Course description:
Acquisition of common knowledge of a technical object design processes using standard
components and modulus. Reconstruction of a mounting unit.
Acquirement of the fundamental knowledge concerning the synthetical activity in the
period of design processes of an object especially within analysis of the function,
geometrical accuracy and manufacturing technology. Utilization of a computer add
(AutoCAD, Pro Engineer).
Contents:
General principles of a new technical product design. Instructions for the completion of the
1. task, literature, time-table, design procedure of a given technical object,welding,
documentation, weld indication. Assignment of a work piece specified for drilling jig design
Explanation of the technical, economical aspects of the drilling jig project in point of view of
2.
design and manufacturing technology.
Free-hand sketch of 3 variants – each minimal in two associated views [sectional
3. views] - at least one solution for a multiple jig [used for more work pieces clamped
simultaneously], evaluation and choice of solution.
4.
5. Proposal drawing of the chosen solution.
6. dtto
7. dtto
8. dtto
9. Test of the proposal drawing
Drawings of not standard parts [working drawings], assembly drawing, item list,
10.
technical report, list of used literature.
11. dtto
12. dtto
13. Handing over of the project, corrections.
14. ASSESSMENT – CREDIT REGISTRATION.
Recommended literature:
Křivý, J., Pospíchal, J.: Fundamentals of Design I. Technical Drawings. Representation
1
and Dimensioning, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1999
Křivý, J.: Fundamentals of Design II. Rules of Interchange ability. Representation and
2
Dimensioning of Machine Elements, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1999
3 STANDARD SELECTION
4. Catalogues of mechanical and hydraulic jig elements.
Key words:
drilling, jig, technology, design, workpiece, interchangeability
78
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2141015
Lecturer:
Department:
Chyský
210.1
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING I
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
4
Weekly load: 3+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
5
Course description:
Introduction into theory of electric circuits, analysis special types of electric circuits as DC
and AC. Transient states in circuits with accumulators of energy. Using SymbolicComplex method and Fourier transformation for analysis AC circuits supplied with
harmonic signal. Introduction into electronics. Principle and typical parameters of basic
semiconductor components. Application in electronic circuits. Analogue and digital
circuits. Principle of analogue and digital signal processing.
Contents:
Components of electrical circuits – resistors, capacitors, inductors, source of voltage and
1.
current. Ideal, real, equivalent diagrams
Analysis methods of electrical circuits – Nodal voltages, loop currents, Thevenins & Nortons
2.
theorem, principle of superposition.
3. General methods for analysis of circuits with non DC supplying. Transient states.
4. Symbolic-complex method and Fourier transformation for analyse of AC circuits.
Three phase system. Electrical power in DC, AC (one and three phase) circuits.
5.
Measurement of electrical power.
6. Electronics. Diodes, rectifiers. Zener’s diode, voltage stabiliser
7. Thyristor, triac, controlled rectifier, chopper
8. Transistors unipolar, bipolar, linearization of transistor models.
9. Transistor as amplifier.
10. Operational amplifier, inverter, integrator, digital to analogue converter
11. Base of digital signals. Transistor as switch. Logical circuits. Converters of signal levels.
12. Digital TTL and CMOS integrated circuits. Applications
13. Microcomputer, basic structure, properties.
14. Power electronics
Recommended literature:
Rizzoni, G.: Principles and Applications of Electrical Engineering, McGraw-Hill, 2000,
1.
ISBN 0-07-117727-2
Key words:
Circuit analysis, symbolic-complex method, electrical power, semiconductors, diode, transistor
79
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2141016
Lecturer:
Department:
Chyský
210.1
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING II
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
5
Weekly load: 2+3
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
6
Course description:
Fundamentals of electrical machines. Electromagnets. Transformers. Induction motors.
Synchronous machines. Stepper machines. DC motors and generators. Universal motors.
Electrical instruments. Distribution system of electrical energy.
Contents:
1. Magnetic materials and magnetic circuits
2. DC and AC electromagnets, calculation of force and torque on electromagnet
Transformer, principle, theory. Equivalent diagram. Phasor diagrams. No-load and short
3.
circuit transformer.
Transformer under load. Loses and efficiency. Special types of transformers – measuring
4.
transformer (I, V), welding transformer. Design of instruments transformer
Three phases transformers, magnetic circuit, connection delta, star, delta-star, Clock angle.
5.
Parallel work of transformers
6. Fundamentals of induction machines. Rotating magnetic field. Synchronous speed.
Theory asynchronous machines. Motor and generator. Equivalent diagram. Loses in AM and
7.
their division. Slip.
Kloss formula, torque diagram, Construction of AM, types of armature. 1 phase and 3 phase
8.
motor
9. Running up AM, speed control, braking. Frequency converter.
10. Synchronous machine. Motor generator. Stepper motor.
Fundamentals of DC machines. Principle. Basic equation describing behaviour of DC
11.
machine. Equivalent diagram.
DC machine with separate, parallel and serial excitation. Torque characteristics.
12.
Applications.
13. Speed control of DC machines. Ward Leonard group. Universal motors.
Distribution of electrical energy. Low voltage instruments. Fuses, breakers, contactors,
14.
switches.
Recommended literature:
1. Roadstrum, W.H., Wolaver, D.H.: i, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1994, ISBN 0-471-51043-2
Key words:
Electrical machines, induction motor and generator, DC machine, synchronous machine, speed
control, electrical instruments.
80
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2181075
Lecturer:
Institute:
MOMENTUM, HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER
Šesták
218
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
4
Weekly load: 3+1
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
6
Course description:
Based on analogies, existing between flow of real fluids, heat and mass transfer,
the course deals with formulation and use of laws and interrelationships valid for all the
three transport phenomena in general. Resulting scientific knowledge is applicable while
designing, sizing or rating mechanical and process engineering components or systems in
which flow of Newtonian as well as non-Newtonian fluids, heat and mass transfer in
single or multicomponent media takes place. The course is preceded with an introduction
into the fundamentals of tensor calculus in Cartesian coordinates.
Contents:
1. Fundamental concepts of momentum, heat and mass transfer. Newton´s, Fourier´s and
Fick´s law. Balance of a general physical quantity in a moving continuum
2. Mass and momentum balances in flowing homogeneous fluids, Cauchy´s equation. Mass
conservation equation, momentum and angular momentum balances. Constitutive
equations of fluids.
3. Navier – Stokes equations of motion, exact and approximate solutions in the creeping and
laminar flow regimes. Rheological constitutive equations and flow of non-Newtonian fluids
4. Momentum transfer in turbulent flow. Velocity distributions for turbulent flows in simple
geometries.
5. Differential and macroscopic mechanical energy balances.
6. Residence time distribution (RTD) in continuous flow systems. Basic distribution functions
with applications
7. Balances in thermodynamic systems. Internal energy balance, heat transfer mechanisms,
Fourier – Kirchhoff´s energy balance.
8. Conductive heat transfer. Steady and unsteady temperature distributions in solids.
9. Convective heat transfer. Forced and natural convection with flow in ducts and around
objects immersed in a flowing fluid. Convective heat transfer correlations
10. Heat transfer with phase changes. Boiling, condensation, melting and solidification.
11. Radiation heat transfer. Radiation between black and non-black bodies. Radiant energy
transport in gases. Combined convection and radiation.
12. Mass transfer fundamentals. Concentrations, constitutive equations of molecular mass
transfer, Fick´s laws.
13. Mass transfer by molecular diffusion. Diffusion through a stagnant gas film. Equimolar
counter diffusion. Diffusion in solids, diffusion with chemical reactions and unsteady
molecular diffusion.
14. Convective mass transfer. Analogy between heat and mass transfer. Simultaneous heat
and mass transfer.
Recommended literature:
1. Bird, R.B.,Stewart, W.E.,Lightfoot, E.N.: Transport phenomena, 2nd Ed.,Wiley, N.Y. 2002
2. Welty, J.R.,Wicks, C.E.,Wilson, R.E.: i, 4th Ed.,Wiley, N.Y., 2000
Key words:
transport phenomena, momentum heat and mass transfer, Newtonian and non-Newtonian
fluids, transport properties, mechanical and process engineering equipment design.
81
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:218 2019
Lecturer:
Žitný
Department:
218
CHEMISTRY
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
3
Weekly load: 2+1
Assessment: ca
Semester:
1
Course description:
General chemistry from the point of view of mechanical and process engineering. Physical
chemistry forms 2/3 of the course (structure and properties of matter, thermodynamics,
phase equilibrium, chemical reactions, reaction engineering), the remaining 1/3 is
devoted to organic chemistry (hydrocarbons, polymers) and biochemistry. Laboratory
practice is oriented upon the material properties measurement.
Contents:
1. Classification of games and mathematical models.
2. Scope and classification of chemistry
3. Matter, properties, units. Structure of matter (periodical table, notation) and bonding.
4. Mass balancing, stochiometry of chemical reactions.
5. State variables p,v,T, state equations (ideal gas, Van der Waals, Redlich Kwong).
6. Heat and energies, internal and total energy, enthalpy in phase and chemical changes.
First and second law of thermodynamics, entropy, Gibbs energy. Examples of industrial
7.
processes energy balancing (feasibility of chemical reactions)
8. Phase equilibrium in one-component systems – phase diagrams.
9. Equilibrium in multicomponent systems (Raoult’s law, Henry’s law, phase diagrams).
Chemical reactions classification. Rate of chemical reactions (reaction mechanisms, reaction
10.
order, Arrhenius equation, catalysis). Equilibrium of chemical reactions.
Reaction engineering, batch and continuous reactors, residence time distribution,
11.
conversion in segregated and maximum mixedness flows.
12. Organic chemistry (hydrocarbons, polymers, properties of plasts)
13. Biochemistry (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides).
14.B
Bio-reactions, bio and food engineering.
Recommended literature:
1. Žitný, R., Krýsa, J.: Chemistry, Introductory Course. CTU Publishing House, Prague 1998
2. http://www.fsid.cvut.cz/cz/u218/pedagog/predmety/1rocnik/chemaj/bookchem.htm
Key words:
physical chemistry, phase equilibrium, reaction engineering, organic chemistry, bio-chemistry
82
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2311101
Lecturer:
Department:
Šika
205.2
MECHANICS I
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
4
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
3
Course description:
Mechanics I deals with the basic concepts of statics and kinematics. There are described
the methods of solution of equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies and their systems with
and without friction. There are introduced the methods of description of position and
motion of particles and rigid bodies.
Contents:
Introduction. Modelling. Force. Constraints of particle. Free-body diagram. Equilibrium of
1.
particle.
2. Moment of the force. Couple of forces. Constraints of rigid body in plane.
Constraints of rigid body in space. Free-body diagram. Equivalent system of forces.
3.
Equilibrium of rigid body.
4. Statically determinate and indeterminate cases. Structural theory of system of bodies.
5. Analytical solution of statical equilibrium of system of bodies.
6. Centre of mass. Internal forces.
7. Mechanical work. Trusses.
8. Friction. Self-locking cases.
9. Constraints with friction. Statical solution of systems of bodies with friction.
10. Kinematics of particles.
11. Description of a particle position in vector and matrix formulation.
12. Description of a particle motion in vector and matrix formulation.
13. Kinematics of simultaneous motions. Matrix formulation.
14. Concluding examples.
Recommended literature:
1. Beer, F.P., Johnston, E.R.: Vector mechanics for engineers, McGraw-Hill Boston, 1998
2. http://mech.fsik.cvut.cz
Key words:
Mechanics, statics, kinematics, particle, rigid body, force, friction, constraint, moment, velocity,
acceleration, matrix
83
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2311102
Lecturer:
Department:
205.2
MECHANICS II
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
4
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
4
Course description:
Mechanics II deals with the basic concepts of kinematics and dynamics. There are
described the methods of solution of kinematics of system of bodies. There are
introduced the principles for solution of dynamics of rigid bodies. There are described the
methods of solution of dynamics of system of bodies in plane. There are described the
basic concepts of vibration of mechanical systems.
Contents:
1. Translational and rotational motion.
2. General planar motion.
3. Spherical and general spatial motion.
4. Analytical solution of kinematics of system of rigid bodies.
5. Vector method. Elements of theory of gearing.
6. Kinematical solution of system with constant ratio.
7. Dynamics of system of particles.
8. Dynamics of rigid body. Moments of inertia.
9. Balancing of rotating rigid body. Newton-Euler equations.
10. Dynamic solution of system of rigid bodies in plane.
11. Vibration of mechanical system with 1 DOF.
12. Forced vibration. Accelerometer, vibrometer. Critical revolutions.
13. Vibration of mechanical system with 2 DOFs.
14. Concluding examples.
Recommended literature:
1. Beer, F.P., Johnston, E.R.: Vector mechanics for engineers, McGraw-Hill Boston., 1998
2. http://mech.fsik.cvut.cz
Key words:
Mechanics, kinematics, dynamics, vector method, moment of inertia, linear momentum,
moment of linear momentum, Newton-Euler equations, vibration, natural frequency.
84
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2311103
Lecturer:
Department:
1205
MECHANICS III
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
5
Weekly load: 2+3
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
5
Course description:
Mechanics III deals with the basic concepts of analytical mechanics. There are introduced
the methods of synthesis of mechanical systems. The further special cases of mechanical
systems are analysed such as cables, cams, gyroscopes. Further cases of mechanical
vibrations are analysed such as bending, torsion, vibration absorption.
Contents:
1. Principle of virtual work.
2. Application of principle of virtual work.
3. Equilibrium position and its stability.
4. Analytical solution of kinematics by matrix method.
5. Graphical methods in statics and kinematics.
6. Cables.
7. Cams.
8. Synthesis of mechanical systems.
9. Lagrange equations of second kind.
10. Gyroscopes.
11. Elementary theory of impacts.
12. Bending and torsional vibrations.
13. Vibration of mechanical system with more DOFs.
14. Concluding examples.
Recommended literature:
1. Beer, F.P., Johnston, E.R.: Vector mechanics for engineers, McGraw-Hill Boston, 1998
2. http://mech.fsik.cvut.cz
Key words:
Mechanics, statics, kinematics, dynamics, principle of virtual work, Lagrange equation of second
kind, cables, cams, gyroscopes, synthesis, impact, bending vibration, torsion vibration.
85
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2321039
Lecturer:
Department:
Steidl
232
MATERIALS SCIENCE II
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
4
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
3
Course description:
Theory of heat treatment of steels. Heat treatment, thermodynamic and thermo-chemical
treatment. Structural steels and alloys. Corrosion and stainless materials. Creep,
relaxation and heat-resisting materials. Wear and wear-resisting materials. Tool steels
and materials. Cast iron. Non-ferrous metals and alloys. Polymers, composites, ceramics
and their modification. Laboratories.
Contents:
1. Fundamentals of metallurgy of iron alloys.
2. Phase transformations in iron alloys.
3. Time–temperature-transformation diagrams (isothermal and anisothermal).
4. Heat treatment of iron alloys.
5. Thermo–chemical and thermo-mechanical treatment of alloys.
6. Carbon and low-alloyed structural steels.
7. High-alloyed structural steels (stainless, creep-resisting, etc.).
8. Steels and other materials for tools.
9. Cast steels and cast irons.
10. Selected nonferrous alloys and their treatment.
11. Powder metallurgy and its application.
12. Plastics and their processing.
13. Technical ceramics and its processing.
14. Composite materials (survey of technologies and properties).
Recommended literature:
1. Callister, W.D.: Materials Science and Engineering, 3rd ed.,John Wiley&Sons, Inc.,1994.
Macek, K.- Zuna, P.: Materials Science, I.st.ed.CTU, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1996
2.
(in Czech)
Key words:
iron alloys, phase transformations, heat treatment, steels, cast steels, cast irons,
nonferrous alloys, plastics, ceramics, composite materials.
86
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2322029
Lecturer:
Department:
Steidl
232
MATERIALS SCIENCE I
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
3
Weekly load: 2+1
Assessment: ca
Semester:
2
Course
description:
Review of engineering materials with respect to standards. Internal structure of
materials. Deformation and fracture behaviour during different load conditions.
Dehardening processes in metals. Mechanical and technological properties and their
testing. Thermodynamic background of metallic systems. Technical ferrous alloys: steels,
cast irons. Influence of chemical composition and metallurgical processes on steel grade.
Contents:
1. Introduction (history, future development, economical and ecological aspects, importance
of the subject).
2. Crystal lattice and its imperfections.
3. Stress and strain.
4. Failure and fracture, fracture mechanics.
5. Mechanical properties and their testing.
6. Technological properties and macroscopic defects.
7. Physical and chemical properties.
8. Basic thermodynamical concepts and laws.
9. Transport of heat and mass.
10. Phases and phase transformations.
11. Binary equilibrium diagrams of metallic and ceramic systems.
12. Selected ternary equilibrium diagrams.
13. Iron-carbon alloys (stable and metastable systems of Fe-C).
14. Influence of further elements on properties of iron alloys.
Recommended literature:
1. Callister, W.D.: Materials Science and Engineering, 3rd ed.,John Wiley&Sons, Inc.,1994.
Macek, K.- Zuna, P.: Materials Science, I.st.ed.CTU, CTU Publishing House, Prague, 1996
2.
(in Czech)
Key words:
crystal lattice, stress, strain, fracture, properties, thermodynamical concepts, equilibrium
diagrams, iron-carbon alloys.
87
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2331067
Lecturer:
Department:
Král
223.1
TECHNOLOGY I
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
5
Weekly load: 3+2
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
3
Course description:
The initial stages of production are decisive for the properties of the final product. The
course describes the methods of production of castings, forgings, stamped parts, and
fabrication of plastics. Surface coating methods are also included. The lectures deal with
the basic theory of the processes, case studies and testing methods are the subject of
seminars and labs.
Contents:
1. Manufacturing of semiproducts, economic aspects.
2. Casting, properties and structure of materials for casting, solidification.
3. Risers, gating systems design, sand casting methods.
4. Permanent mould casting, design of castings, foundry equipment.
5. Introduction to the theory of metal forming.
6. Bulk metal forming methods. Heating for forging. Powder forging.
7. Hammers and presses, energy, force, velocity. Design of forgings.
8. Sheet metal forming methods. Formability criteria. Calculation of forces.
9. Metal forming dies, selection of equipment, feeding devices.
10. Fabrication of plastics, compression moulding, injection moulding, thermoforming.
11. Welding methods and weldability, fusion welding and pressure welding.
12. Structural changes in welds, HAZ, shielding, physical welding methods.
13. Design for welding, brazing and soldering.
14. Surface coating methods.
Recommended literature:
DeGarmo, P., Black, T., Kohser, R.: Materials and Processes in Manufacturing, Macmillan
1.
Publishing Company, NJ, 1988
Král, M., Bednář, B., Čermák, J.: Engineering Technology, CTU Publishing House, Prague,
2.
2003
Key words:
sand casting, die casting, forging, sheet metal, welding, plastics, surface coating
88
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2333018
Lecturer:
Department:
Král
223.1
FUNDAMENTALS OF TECHNOLOGY I
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
1
Weekly load: 1+1
Assessment: a
Semester:
1
Course description:
The students of mechanical engineering should be familiar with the basic methods of
production of machine parts. The course deals with the basic methods of the
manufacturing of semiproducts during the lectures. The students receive a brief practical
training in the laboratories and workshops.
Contents:
1. The branches of technology, introduction to properties of metallic materials.
2. The production of casting in sand moulds.
3. Patterns for castings, design, materials and production - laboratory.
4. Permanent mould casting.
5. Preparing a sand mould - workshop practise.
6. Metal forming, basic methods of rolling and forging.
7. hammers and presses - workshop instruction.
8. Sheet metal forming, methods and equipment.
9. Sheet metal forming dies and machine tools - workshop instruction.
10. Welding, types of welds, properties of welded parts, welding methods.
11. Welding equipment in the workshop and laboratories.
12. Introduction to surface coating methods.
13. Manual arc welding - workshop practice.
14. Final test.
Recommended literature:
1. Rao, P.N.: Manufacturing Technology, MCGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1992
Král, M., Bednář, B., Čermák, J.: Engineering Technology, CTU Publishing House, Prague,
2.
1998
Key words:
manufacturing, casting, welding, forging, sheet metal
89
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2341045
Lecturer:
Department:
Mádl
223.2
TECHNOLOGY II
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
4
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: a, ex
Semester:
4
Course description:
Theoretical fundamentals of cutting processes. Cutting tools. Cutting fluids. Economic of
machining. The shapes produces, common tolerances and surface finish obtained in the
following processes: Broaching, thread machining, machining of gears, superfinishing,
honing, lapping. Fixed and flexible automation, NC and CNC machining, Non-conventional
material removal processes.
Contents:
1. Introduction.
2. Theoretical fundamentals of machining.
3. Tool materials.
4. Machinability.
5. Cutting fluids.
6. Vibrations in machining.
7. Economics of machining.
8. Broaching.
9. Thread machining.
10. Machining of gears.
11. Superfinishing Honing, Lapping.
12. Fixed automation.
13. Flexible automation, NC machining.
14. Non-conventional machining
Recommended literature:
Mádl, J.: Mechanical Technology, Material-Removal processes, CTU Publishing House,
1.
Prague, 1996.
Degarmo, E.P., Black, J.T., Kohsedr, R.A.: Material and Processes in Manufacturing.
2.
Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, 1997
Kalpakjian, S.: Manufacturing and Technology, Production engineering, Addison-Wesley
3.
Publishing Company, USA, 1989
Key words:
Machining, material removal processes, cutting processes, non-conventional processes, CNC
machining.
90
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2343018
Lecturer:
Department:
MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY FUNDAMENTALS
Weekly load: 1+1
II
Kvasnička
223.2
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
1
Assessment: a
Semester:
2
Course description:
Introduction to machining. International standardization and terminology for units, their
definition and symbols used in machining. Nomenclature and definitions of cutting tools.
Six basic machining operations. The shapes produces, common tolerances and surface
finish obtained. Important calculation methods for determination of process variables.
Labs complete metrology and workshop skills.
Contents:
1. Material removal processes basic information.
2. Nomenclature of surfaces, motions, geometry and kinematics quantities .
The cut and its dimensions, forces and torques, energy and power according to ISO and SI
3.
standards.
4. Nomenclature of cutting tools. Reference systems.
5. Cutting tools definitions and materials.
6. Determination of the geometrical position of the cutting edge.
7. Basic terminology, symbols and units in machining.
Turning (process schematics, tools, geometry produce, tolerances and surface finish
8.
obtained).
9. Drilling.
10. Shaping and planing.
11. Milling.
12. Sawing.
13. Grinding.
14. Calculation method for estimation of main process conditions and time.
Recommended literature:
Boothroyd, G., Knight, Winston, A.: Fundamentals of Machining and Machine Tolls. 2nd
1.
ed. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York and Barel. 1989. ISBN 0-8247-7852-9
Key words:
Machining, international terminology, cutting tools, basic machining processes
91
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2371047
Lecturer:
Department:
Klán
210.3
AUTOMATIC CONTROL
Study profile:
all branches
Credits:
5
Weekly load: 3+2
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
6
Course description:
Automatic controllers are important part of many industrial processes. The goal of this
course is to introduce students into basic knowledge of automatic control theory and
practice like transfer functions, open versus closed loop control, design of controllers and
frequency based analysis of control systems. The course also concentrates on logic
control and control via programmable logic controllers. Some seminaries are arranged in
laboratories where practical skills and control engineering methods are trained. Students
begin to work with MATLAB software as a common platform of control engineers.
Contents:
1. Essential Principles of Automatic Control, Signals and Systems.
2. Digital Logic Control.
3. Combinatorial Logic Circuits and Controllers.
4. Programmable Logic Controllers, Sequential Logic Circuits.
5. Continuous Linear Systems, Laplace Transform.
6. Transfer Functions, Mathematical Models, Poles and Zeros.
7. Transient and Steady State Response Analysis.
8. Detailed Analysis of Selected Processes.
9. Open Loop and Closed Loop Control.
10. Design of Proportional, Integral and Derivative Controllers (PID).
11. Advanced PID Controllers.
12. Discrete-time based PID Controllers.
13. Frequency-Response Analysis.
14. Modelling Control Systems via MATLAB.
Recommended literature:
1. Ogata, K.: Modern Control Engineering (4th Edition), Prentice Hall, 2001.
2. Dunning, G.: Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers (2nd Edition). Delmar
Learning, 2001.
3. Dorf, R.C., Bishop R.H.: Modern Control Systems (8th Edition). Addison-Wesley, 1998.
Key words:
Automatic Control, Linear Dynamic Systems, PID Controllers, PLC systems, Transient and
Frequency Analysis, Design of Control Processes.
Code:237 2021
COMPUTER USE FUNDAMENTALS I
92
Weekly load: 1+1
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Lecturer:
Department:
Klán
210.3
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
3
Assessment: ca
Semester:
1
Course description:
The goal is to introduce students into problem how to create technical or professional
documents on computers or Web and how to realize technical computations with using
computers. The students get practical skills via creating own essay in a text editor,
realizing technical computations in a spreadsheet and creating own technical-based
WWW page.
Contents:
1. Basic work with text editors.
2. Working with editor of mathematical formulas and their introduction into documents.
3. Making final version of the technical essay.
4. Introduction to technical and scientific computations via computers.
5. Solving some technical problems via spreadsheets.
6. Making final version of the technical-based project with graphs and computations.
7. Introduction into WWW, key information WWW resources.
8. Searching of technical information in electronic documents.
9. Introduction to publishing on WWW.
10. Basic tags in creating WWW pages.
11. Advanced tags in creating WWW pages.
12. Creating of basic WWW documents.
13. Making final version of the WWW page.
14. Checking tasks and assessment.
Recommended literature:
1. Acklen, L.: Teach yourself Microsoft Office 2000, Sams, 1999.
2. Boumphrey, L. and the others: Beginning XHTML, Wrox 2000.
Key words:
professional documents, technical computations, creating and publishing of WWW pages, using
computers.
Code:237 2080
Lecturer:
Volf
ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
Study profile:
93
all branches
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: ca
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Department:
210.1
Credits:
4
Semester:
6
Course description:
Static and dynamic properties of measurement instruments. Organisation of
measurement chain. Measurement errors, they sources and correction. Summary of
principles, sensors and transducers to measurement of physical status values
(temperature, position, distance, force, pressure, speed, acceleration, torque, flow,
warm, humidity, level elevation, liquid and gas analysis, visual, tactile and proximity
sensors). Scanning and processing measuring data. Remote measurement, signal types
for data transfer, automation measurement and information systems, processing of
measuring values by computer. Calibration and verification of measurement instruments.
Contents:
Measurement system, Static characteristics of transducers. Accuracy and sensitivity of
1.
transducers and instruments. Uncertainty of measurements.
Dynamic properties of sensors and transducers. Time constant of transducer and its
2. determination and using. Possibilities transducer errors decreasing. Information transducers
properties.
Electronic processing circles, discresation analog signals, digital signal filtration, signal
3.
modulation.
Temperature transducers - resistive, semiconductive, thermoelectric, pyroelectric,
4.
piezoelectric and liquid sensors.
5. Measurement of thermal power and heat, humidity measurement.
6. Pressure transducers - inductive, resistive, capacitive and piezoresistive sensors
7. Level elevation measurement.
Position and distance transducers - absolute, incremental and impulse sensors, inductive,
8.
resistive, capacitive sensors. Proximity transducers.
9. Force and torque measurement - inductive, resistive, capacitive and piezoresistive sensors.
10. Tactile transducers and visual transducers - CCD, PSD elements.
Flow measurement - electrical anemometers (resistive), mechanical (float, propeller),
11.
Prandtl’s tube.
12. Liquid and gas analysis measurement - viscosity, density.
Turn speed, speed and acceleration measurement - mechanical, impulse, inductive,
13.
resistive, capacitive and semicoductive sensors.
14. Industry measurement systems.
Recommended literature:
Sedláček, M., Haasz, V.: Electrical Measurements and Instrumentation, CTU Publishing
1.
House, Prague, 2000
2.
Sirohi, R., S., Radha Krishna, H., C.: Mechanical Measurements. New Delhi, Wiley
Eastern Ltd., 1991
Ott, Soren: Measurements of Temperatures, Radiation and Heat Transfer in Natural Gas
Flames: Final report JIVE project. Roskilde, Riso nat. Lab., 1993
4
5
Webster, J.,G.: i. Boca Raton, CRC Press 2000
Doebelin, E., O.: Measurement System: Application and Design. New York, McGraw-Hill,
1990
Key words:
Technical measurement, sensors, transducers.
94
FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Code:2381054
Lecturer:
Department:
Kavan
238.1
ECONOMICS OF THE ENTERPRISE
Study profile:
Credits:
all branches
4
Weekly load: 2+2
Assessment: a,ex
Semester:
6
Course description:
The programme consists of: Management of Change and Economics, Forecasting and
Operations Strategy, Design of Work Systems, Total Quality Management and Inventory
Control, Material Requirements Planning and Just-In-Time Systems, Logistics and
Practical exercises. The study programme has a strong international orientation. The
teaching goal is to prepare students for dealing with real-world settings and
implementing the most effective up-to-date practices. We aspire to lead in research, and
in developing modern concepts and tools.
Contents:
1. Engineering Economy for Engineering Managers.
2. Cost-Profit-Volume or Break-Even Analysis.
3. Market-Related Factors.
4. Overview of Forecasting Methods, Demonstration Problems.
5. Decision Making.
6. Japanese Influence on Operations Management.
7. Facility Location and Job Design.
8. Planning for Operations and Capacity.
9. Inventory Management and Purchasing.
10. Material Requirements Planning.
11. Just-in-Time Manufacturing Excellence. The Kanban System.
12. Total Quality Management.
13. Project Management, Network Techniques.
14. Optimal strategy control.
Recommended literature:
1. Kavan, M.: Management Study Guide, ČVUT, Praha, 1999.
2. Gönen, T.: Engineering Economy for Engineering Managers, Wiley, Sacramento, 1990.
3. Dilworth, J.B.: Operations Management, Mc Graw-Hill, 1992.
95
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