Sample Syllabus - Michael McKinney`s History 17

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SADDLEBACK COMMUNITY COLLEGE
History 17 - Internet
Survey of American History Since 1876
Fall 2008: Internet Format (September 15th - December 19th)
Instructor: Michael McKinney
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://socccd.blackboard.com
Username/Password: Your Saddleback email username and password
________________________________________________________________________
READ EVERY WORD OF THE SYLLABUS SO YOU UNDERSTAND THE COURSE
Course Description: This course is a survey of American History from the Pre-Columbian
epoch through present-day. This course will examine the social, political, and economic
variables that have influenced major events in American History. History 17 meets transfer
requirements for UC and CSU, and satisfies the Saddleback College AA graduation
requirements in American History.
Course Requirements: This course requires that you have a broadband Internet connection,
access to basic Office applications (including MS Powerpoint), email, and the ability to play
and listen to MP3 files, either on your computer or on an iPod (or similar device). Without
any of above mentioned, it will be impossible for you to complete this course. But
remember, you have many sources for computers: friends, family, internet café’s, libraries,
and work. Additionally, this course will require that you set aside time for downloads of
files, some of which may take hours (depending on your connection). A certain level of
computer ability is a pre-requisite for this course.
Course Structure: History 17 is an Internet course. There are no traditional class meetings.
The entire course will be taught via the Internet from September 15th to December 19th. The
course will be broken down into 16 separate topic segments. As there are <16 weeks in the
course, there may be several segments per week. It is important, therefore, that you keep
track of the schedule in the syllabus starting on page 6.
The expectations for each segment are very simple. Use the assigned textbook and
historical documents (which are available on Blackboard) as supporting material. Then,
open up the lecture Powerpoint and the accompanying audio file on Blackboard for that
segment. You will then listen to the lecture, while you follow along with the Powerpoint.
Each segment will have assignments due on the Segment date (see grading detail). Each
segment will be a chronological “period” in U.S. History, starting from the after the Civil
War (1865) and finishing with the end of the cold war. Review the tables starting on Page 6
of this syllabus for details on the segments (timelines and assignments).
There will be several weekly obligations on your part to successfully complete this course:
Weekly Reading: The historical documents are available on blackboard. The textbook is
available in the bookstore. Each segment contains textbook and historical document
references for each segment. The tables starting on page 6 explain the reading details for
each segment. . The textbook and historical documents are intended as a supplement and
resource for the lectures. If you need details, or would like a different perspective from the
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lecture, consult the textbook. The historical documents, meanwhile, offer a primary source
view of an historical segment. They are important for a thorough understanding and
appreciation of US History.
Weekly Lectures: Every segment in this syllabus will have: 1) A PowerPoint Lecture 2) An
MP3 Audio File of me giving the lecture. Both are available on Blackboard under
COURSE DOCUMENTS in the Lectures Folder. You are expected to listen to the lecture
while you follow along with the PowerPoint. Each lecture is between 1 and 2 hours long.
Each MP3 file is at least 30MB, so plan the downloads with this fact in mind (ie, it may take
an hour depending on your connection). You should right click on the file and save it
locally to your computer, and then listen to it. For every segment’s due date (located in the
tables starting on page 6), you will turn in a synopsis of the main points of the lecture
(emailed to [email protected]). See the grading section for details.
Online Discussion Boards On Blackboard, there is a COMMUNICATION section, within
which you will find a Discussion Board. On the discussion board, I have placed a different
discussion group for every week of the course. Every week, you will need to enter the
correct discussion board, and comment about your impressions of the material for that week
in a constructive way. You may ask questions, leave comments about your view of the
material, disclose additional research you’ve done, respond to other students, give your
opinion or insight, etc. For every discussion board, you must also answer your choice of 1
of the questions that appear in the segment tables of the Syllabus for each segment. I will
go through the discussion boards to look for the quality of your work in deciding your
grade. Make certain detailed and quality posts are submitted. If the posts do not reflect a
deep analysis of the material, are curt, show the author did not spend time on the material, or
are otherwise of low quality, then the grade will reflect that effort.
Additionally, there are other course obligations that are not weekly, but are still important to
your overall grade:



There will be an independent research project that you will complete. It will be on a
topic of your choice (suitable material in the timeframe of this course). Details of
the assignment can be found in the “Administration” folder of Blackboard. It is due
July 18th.
There will be a final, distributed Dec. 1st and due Dec. 19th (open book/note)
Students may choose to do an additional presentation 3% added to the final grade,
depending on quality. Topics must be turned in for approval prior to Segment 8.
Course Goals: History 17 seeks to broaden a student's understanding of American History,
as well as the techniques historians use to draw their conclusions. Additionally:
1) To critically understand how the past affects the present, and to recognize the
relevance of history to our lives. To appreciate the phrase, "to fully understand who
you are and where you're going, you must first look to where you've been".
2) Students will develop and enhance their critical thinking skills.
3) Students will learn to develop the "Historical Method" as an approach to thinking
about History
4) Students will improve their writing and presentation skills
5) Students will learn to use various research techniques, and improve their methods
6) Students will enhance their knowledge of American History
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a. Civil War and Reconstruction on American politics, racial relations, and
society.
b. Movement west, and the impact on American Indian populations
c. The Rise of Industrialization, and the goliaths of American industry:
Vanderbilt, Stanford, Rockefeller, Carnegie, JP Morgan
d. The effects of industrialization, and the resulting social and political reaction
e. Foreign expansionism under Theodore Roosevelt
f. World War I
g. The Roaring 20s, the resulting depression, and Roosevelt’s New Deal
h. WWII – The War against the Axis
i. The Cold War
j. The Civil Rights Movement, and the Counterculture Movement
Course Expectations:
1) All assignments are mandatory, and lapses will adversely impact a student's grade
2) Students are expected to turn in quality assignments
3) Students are expected to work hard and do their personal best.
4) If there is any class-related matter which requires my assistance (questions, subject
matter help, etc.), you are expected to email me immediately. Send an email to
[email protected] I will respond ASAP. It is important that you
indicate “Question” or “Inquiry” in the subject line so I know to respond. If you
place a question in with your assignments, I may misfile your email into my
assignments folder and accidentally miss your question.
Grading Details
Online Discussion of Material (30% of Final Grade): Every week, you will need
to enter the correct weekly discussion board on Blackboard, and comment about
your impressions of the material for that week in a constructive way. You may ask
questions, leave comments about your view of the material, disclose additional
research you’ve done, respond to other students, give your opinion or insight, etc.
Additionally, you will be required to answer at least 1 of the questions posed in the
table for that segment. I will go through the discussion boards, and I will ultimately
grade the quality of your submissions. The intention is to make this as interactive as
we can, so leave your comments throughout the week. Make certain that detailed
and quality posts are submitted. If the posts do not reflect a deep analysis of the
material, are curt, show the author did not spend time on the material, or are
otherwise of low quality, then the grade will reflect that effort.
Research Project (25% of Final Grade) : Students will assemble a PowerPoint
presentation based on independent research they do on a relevant historical topic of
their choice (pending approval by Michael McKinney). Instructions are available in
the “Administration” folder of Blackboard. This presentation will comprise 25% of
your final grade. It should be emailed to [email protected] on or before
the due date on Dec. 19th. I will look for quality, research, analysis, detail, level of
comprehension, and on time submission for grading. Assignment details can be
found in the administration folder of Blackboard. Read the assignment in detail for
specifics.
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Lecture Synopsis (30% of Final Grade): Every segment has a PowerPoint Lecture
and an accompanying MP3 Audio File of me giving the lecture. Both are available
on Blackboard in the “Lecture” Folder. For each segment, you will provide a
synopsis of the points that I made in that lecture. This can be done with summary
bullet points or paragraphs. You will email your synopsis by the segment due dates
(in the tables) to [email protected] Each synopsis is due no later than
midnight on the segment due date. At the end of this course, I will select 7 random
segments and grade them. If there is no submission for one of the weeks chosen, this
will negatively impact the grade. I will look for quality, detail, level of
comprehension, and on-time submission. Do Not only review the PowerPoint. You
must listen to the lecture along with the PowerPoint. If a synopsis does not contain
references to the audio portion of the lecture, no grade higher than a C will be given
for this grading component. This component comprises 25% of your final course
grade.
Final (15% of Final Grade): There will be a 1 question open book final at the end
of this course. The final will be in the Administration folder of Blackboard on Dec
1st. It is due Dec. 19th. The completed final must be emailed to me at
[email protected] before the due date. Complete instructions can be
found on the final exam. The final exam will comprise 15% of your course grade.
Extra Credit: See me about an extra credit assignment, if you want to add 3% to
your final grade (to qualify you for a higher final grade, if you’re on the borderline).
It will be a second class presentation (submitted only to me). Topics must be turned
in for approval prior to Segment 8.
Grading Breakdown
Component
Detailed Synopsis of the Lecture
Weekly Discussion Board Participation
Independent Research Assignment
Final Exam
Optional Extra Credit Class Presentation
Percentage
30%
30%
25%
15%
Add 1, 2 or 3%
Students are strongly encouraged to do their personal best. The instructor does not use a
curve to grade course work. The Course Grade will be based on the following scales:
Grade
Percentages
A
90-100%
B
80-89%
C
70-79%
D
60-69%
F
<60%
Class Policies
1) Plagiarism (literary theft) on papers or presentations, and other forms of dishonest
student behavior will not be tolerated. Not only will the offender receive an "F" for
this course, but they will also be turned over to the Dean of Student Services for
further disciplinary action.
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2) A student with a verified disability may be entitled to appropriate academic
accommodations. Please contact your instructor and/or the Disabled Students
Program Services Office for further information
3) If you decide at any point to drop this course, it will be your responsibility to submit
the necessary paperwork to records and admissions. Failure to do so will result in a
grade of 'F' on your permanent record for this course.
4) Papers are expected to be turned in on the assigned due date. Late papers will be
accepted, but will have 1 Full Letter Grade taken off for every week the paper is late.
5) Please send any correspondence to my email address [email protected]
I will generally respond within 24 hours.
Every week is broken out into a table. Each table describes the assignment for that week.
The table is broken out into 1) Textbook 2) General Points and Topics 3) Historical
Documents 4) Class Discussion Topics
Textbook: Please obtain a copy of the following textbook for weekly text assignments:
American Destiny –Narrative of a Nation (Single Volume Edition…Volumes 1
and 2 Combined) John A. Garraty• Mark C. Carnes; Longman – Publishers ISBN
= 0-321-31636-3. It’s about a 1000 pages.
The weekly textbook assignment is described in the first row of each table. Reading this
prior to the lecture will enhance your understanding of that lecture and help you with the
material for that week.
General Points and Topics: These are the general points and topics which will be discussed
during the lecture for this week. If you do not find a particular topic in the textbook, or in
the historical documents, you will be expected to do independent research and learn about
them. You should begin the lecture with a good general understanding of each topic.
Historical Documents: Every week, there will be primary source historical documents
assigned as reading. These documents will be available on the class website (details above),
or may be obtained from the instructor. You are also expected to have read them prior to
the lecture. It will also form the basis of the lecture for that week.
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Lecture Topics and Reading Schedule
For each week's readings, reflect on the social, political, and economic context in which
major historical events and trends occurred.
**DUE DATE IN GRAY BOX (Multiple Segments per Week)**
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 1: Sept 15th
ORIENTATION AND LECTURE ON HISTORY
METHODOLOGY: Nothing is due on this date
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 2: Sept. 22nd
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
Recap of the Civil War and the Reconstruction Era
Chapter 15 – War to Save the Union (1861-1865)
Chapter 16 – Reconstruction and the South (1865-1876)
• Fort Sumter • Invasion of North (1 + 2)
• Union Victories in The West • Gettysburg Address
• Emancipation Proclamation • Blockade at Sea
• Costly Mop Up
• Richmond or The Rebels?
• Lincoln's 1864 Election • Appomattox Courthouse
• Copperheads and Habeas Corpus • Lincoln's Plan -10%
and Wade-Davis • Andrew Johnson's Plan • Radical
Republican Plan • Treatment of Freed Slaves • Politics
of Reconstruction • Grant Administration • 1876
Election and 1877 Compromise • Racial Segregation
• Emancipation Proclamation • Gettysburg Address
• Civil War Diaries (Union, Rebel) • Lincoln
Inaugurations • Articles of Impeachment • Example
"Black Codes" • Johnson's Response • 14th + 15th
Amendment • Sherman's Order #15 • Sharecropper
Contract • Joint Committee on Reconstruction
1) If Lincoln had lived to finish his second term, would
post-war reconstruction have been handled differently?
2) Did the South really need to be "punished" or "taught a
lesson"? Why did the Radical Republicans believe it did?
3) What was Sherman’s Order #15?
4) How did some Southern State governments try to
circumvent the 14th and 15th Amendment? Why?
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 3: Sept. 29th
Text:
General Points and Topics
How the West was Lost: Migration west, and interaction
with American Indians (1876-1890)
Chapter 17 – In the Wake of War
• Migration West: Railroads, Homesteads, Gold, Cattle
• Indian Wars and Reservations
• Indian Policy in the Federal Government
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Historical Documents:
• Dawes Act (1877) • Homestead Act • Fort Laramie
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
Treaty with Sioux
1) Was violent conflict with the Indians avoidable? Was
there another path that both sides could have taken?
2) What factors led to the U.S. continually breaking
treaties with the Indians?
3) How was the Dawes Act of 1887 a well-intentioned, but
poorly constructed plan to help the Indians? How did it
have the opposite effect of what it was intending.
4) What was the Dawes Act?
____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 4: Oct. 6th
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
America’s Second Industrialization (1876-1895)
Chapter 18 – An Industrial Giant
Chapter 19 – American Society in the Industrial Age
• Industrial Growth
• Competition and Monopoly
• Socialist Reformers
• Government Reform
• Unions and Labor
• Rise of Immigration
• Sherman Act • Chinese Immigrant Letter • Chinese
Exclusion Act (1882) • Carnegie - Gospel of Wealth
1) What were the advantages and drawbacks of industrial
growth in the late 19th Century?
2) What were the advantages of immigration at this time?
3) Was the public reaction to "monopolists" reasonable and
legitimate or overblown?
4) What did Carnegie say in his classic “Gospel of Wealth”?
_______________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 5: Oct. 13th
Solving Society’s Ills – The Start of Government Intervention:
**2 SEGEMENTS DUE THIS WEEK** The Progressives and T. Roosevelt (1890-1905)
Text:
Chapter 20 – Intellectual and Cultural Trends
Chapter 21 – Politics: Local, State, and National
Chapter 22 – The Age of Reform
General Points and Topics • Progressive Mind • Muckrakers • Suffrage+ 19th amendment
• Reform: Social, Political, Labor, Business, Environment
• Intellectual and Cultural Trends of the Time
Historical Documents:
• Susan B Anthony Speech • Attack on the Meatpackers
1) What was “The Jungle”?
Segment Questions:
2) How did Newspapers impact Progressivism?
Answer at least 1 for the
3) Was progressivism just the “chic”, or “trendy” thing to do at
discussion board. But
the time? Many of these problems existed for 100 years, yet
remember: the discussion
suddenly people started doing something. Why?
board must contain more
than just this. It must also 4) Did progressives melodramatize in order to push their
agendas or sell more newspapers?
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
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_______________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 6: Oct 13th
Foreign Expansionism + T. Roosevelt (1890-1914)
**2 SEGEMENTS DUE THIS WEEK**
Text:
Chapter 23 – From Isolation to Empire
General Points and Topics • American Empire: Latin America, Asia • Square Deal
• Gunboat Diplomacy • Spanish American War • Yellow
Journalism • Socialist Reformers • New Immigration
Historical Documents:
• Roosevelt Corollary • Platt Amendment
• Roosevelt Letter • Expansion of White Race
• Newspaper Articles on "Spanish Treachery"
1) What were the reasons for America's expansionism?
Segment Questions:
2) What was the Platt Amendment?
Answer at least 1 for the
3) Why were more regions (Puerto Rico, Philippines) not
discussion board. But
brought into the Union as States?
remember: the discussion
4) What were the results and consequences of expansionism
board must contain more
than just this. It must also in Latin America, The Pacific, The Caribbean, and Asia?
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 7: Oct 20th
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
World War I and its Aftermath (1914-1920)
Chapter 24 – Woodrow Wilson and the Great War
• Wilsonian Idealism
• Isolationism
• Lusitania + Zimmerman • Modern Warfare
• Versailles + Reparations • Dough Boys
• The Home Front: Industry, Propaganda, Sedition
• Seeds of WWII
• Fourteen Points
• Versailles Treaty
1) Did America have any real interest in entering WWI?
2) What was the impact of not joining the League of Nations?
3) What impact did Wilson's Idealism and Fourteen Points have
on the post-war world? Was Wilson's approach naïve?
4) How did the Versailles Treaty plant the seeds of WWII?
5) Name a provision in the Versailles Treaty?
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 8: Oct. 27th
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Boom-Time: The Roaring 20s (1920-1929)
Chapter 25 – Postwar Society and Culture: Change + Ad.
Chapter 26 – The New Era: 1921-1933 (Start to pp. 856)
• Ford and Production • Harding + Coolidge Prosperity
• Legislating Morality - 18th amend. • Innovations
• Playtime (Dance, Jazz, Ballgames) and the counterreaction
None this week
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Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
1) Did Americans live beyond their means in the 1920s?
2) How did the 1920s permanently change the social
landscape in America?
3) What caused America's swing back toward Isolationism?
4) How did innovations in the 1920s help the economy?
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 9: Nov 3rd Boom to Bust: The Depression (1929-1933)
**2 SEGMENTS DUE THIS WEEK**
Text:
Chapter 26 – The New Era: 1921-1933 (pp. 856 - 869)
General Points and Topics • 1929 Crash • Buying on Margin • 1920s banking laws
• Hoover + Depression • Communists, Anarchists • SmootHawley Tariff + intervention • Breadlines and Hoovervilles.
Historical Documents:
• Herbert Hoover’s “Rugged Individualism” Speech
1) Was it fair to criticize Herbert Hoover for the Depression?
Segment Questions:
2) What point was Hoover making in Rugged Individualism?
Answer at least 1 for the
3) America had undergone depressions before (some worse
discussion board. But
than 1929). Why, this time, did Americans look to
remember: the discussion
government to solve their problems?
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 10: Nov 3rd
Roosevelt’s New Deal (1932-Present Day)
**2 SEGMENTS DUE THIS WEEK**
Text:
Chapter 27 – The New Deal 1933-1941
General Points and Topics • Ford and Production • Harding + Coolidge Prosperity
• Hoover’s Approach versus FDR • FDR + The New Deal
• Packing the Court • The New Deal and the Supreme Court
Historical Documents:
• Herbert Hoover's “Crisis to Free Men” - 1936 campaign
• Roosevelt’s “New Deal” Speech
1) Compare and contrast the Hoover approach with the
Segment Questions:
Roosevelt approach toward solving the depression.
Answer at least 1 for the
2) What other options could Roosevelt have followed?
discussion board. But
3) Why did the courts strike down much of the New Deal as
remember: the discussion
Unconstitutional?
board must contain more
than just this. It must also 4) Is Social Security a government pyramid scheme,
benefiting government at the expense of payers? Will you
include your thoughts of
ever see a Social Security Check when you retire?
this segment’s material.
5) Did Roosevelt go too far trying to influence the Judiciary?
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_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 11: Nov 10th
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
World War II – The onset + The Fight in Europe (1941-1945)
Chapter 28 – War and Peace
• Lend-Lease • Germany First Policy • Day of Infamy
• Production • Allied Strategy – Europe • Four Freedoms
• Manhattan Project • War and Social Change at Home
• Four Freedoms Speech • Einstein Letter to FDR
1) What led to America's enormous productivity in WWII?
2) How did the war affect racial relations and politics at home?
3) Should the U.S. have pursued a “Europe First” strategy?
4) Should the U.S. have conducted a Strategic Bombing
Campaign in Europe? Was that campaign a success or failure?
5) What was the point of the Four Freedom’s Speech?
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 12: Nov 17th
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
World War II – The Fight in the Pacific (1941-1945)
(Review Again) Chapter 28 – War and Peace
• Internment of Americans • Allied Strategy - Japan
• The decision to use the A-Bomb • “Japs and Krauts”- Home
Propaganda • Island Hopping • Difficult Pacific Fighting
• Executive Order 9066 • Why Should we fight?
1) Why did Roosevelt pursue a policy of internment? Why
didn’t the courts intercede on the grounds of the Constitution?
2) Should the U.S. have dropped the Atomic Bomb
3) What was Executive Order 9066?
3) How did the war affect racial relations + politics at home?
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 13: Nov 24th
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
World War II – Setting up a New World Order (1945-1949)
Chapter 29 – The American Century (pp942 – 954)
• Bretton Woods System • Marshall Plan • The United
Nations (UN) • Rebuilding Germany and De-Nazification
• MacArthur + Japan’s Constitution • homefront • USSR
• Japanese Constitution • Bretton Woods Agreements
1) What was the purpose of the Bretton Woods System?
2) Why did tensions rise between the US and USSR?
3) Can you tell from the Japanese Constitution that it was
written by Americans? How so?
4) Why were the Nuremburg trials central to the
Denazification effort?
5) Why did Roosevelt and Truman essentially give Eastern
Europe to the Soviet Union immediately following the war?
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_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 14: Dec 1st
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
The Cold War: Outset through Vietnam: (1945-1970)
Chapter 29 – The American Century (pp954-end)
Chapter 30 – From Camelot to Watergate (start – pp1006)
• Soviet and US Tensions • HUAC + McCarthyism • MAD
• Marshall Plan and Versailles • Massive Retaliation versus
Flexible Response • Mao Tse Tung • Duck and Cover
• Soviet-US Military Clashes (Proxy, Nukes, Conventional)
• Korea • Vietnam • Africa, Latin America, Middle East
• NSC-68
1) Why was the Doctrine of massive retaliation flawed? How
was Flexible Response also flawed?
2) What was the theory behind MAD? Was it effective?
3) What factors led the National Security Council to make the
conclusions that it did in NSC-68?
4) Who was responsible for the Cold War?
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 15: Dec 8th
Text:
General Points and Topics
Historical Documents:
Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
The Cold War: Détente to the end of the USSR: (1970-1989)
Chapter 30 – From Camelot to Watergate (pp1006- end)
Chapter 32 – The Nation Transformed
• Détente and easing tension • ABM Treaty • SALT • OPEC
• Cold War Strategies and Perceptions • Mao + Triangulation
• Detente • Reagan, Defense + the Evil Empire • Carter
None this Week
1) What was the U.S. attempting to accomplish through
“triangulation”
2) Since SALT led to only trivial cuts in warheads, was the
treaty just theater with no substance? What was the point?
3) Was the Communist threat as big as it was made out to be?
4) Did the Cold War ultimately enhance or detract from US
national security?
5) Did the U.S. make a mistake with Détente? Did either of
the Superpowers have any choice?
_____________________________________________________________
SEGMENT 16: Dec 15th The Civil Rights Movment (1950-1966)
* Final Exam Distributed The Counter-Culture Movement (1960-1973)
Text:
Chapter 31 – Society in Flux
General Points and Topics • Brown versus Board of Education • Medgar Evers
• MLK • Sit-Ins • Bus Boycott • NAACP • SCLC
• Selma and Montgomery, Alabama • Malcolm X
• Counterculture (Music, Drugs, Peace) • Watergate
Historical Documents:
• MLKs “I have a Dream Speech” • Jim Crow Law
• Brown v. Board of Education Decision • Malcolm X speech
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Segment Questions:
Answer at least 1 for the
discussion board. But
remember: the discussion
board must contain more
than just this. It must also
include your thoughts of
this segment’s material.
1) How did MLKs approach differ from Malcolm X’s early in
the Civil Rights era? Who’s approach got more results?
2) What role did the media play in bringing about civil rights
changes in the 1950s and 60s?
3) Did the Vietnam protests make any difference, or just a lot
of noise?
4) Cars kill 40,000 Americans each year. The flu kills 14,000
each year. Staph infections kill 100,000 a year. Each of these
innocent deaths can be dramatically reduced with more
funding, technology, and public attention. Yet nobody seems
to care. Why don’t Americans protest for safer cars, better
vaccines, and cleaner hospitals? Why only wars? What’s the
role of the media?
_____________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________
ASSIGNMENTS DUE: Dec. 19th FINAL EXAM, AND RESEARCH PROJECT DUE
FINAL EXAM AND RESEARCH PROJECT ARE DUE NO LATER THAN
MIDNIGHT. EMAIL BOTH ITEMS TO [email protected] IF THEFILE
IS TOO LARGE, BREAK THE SLIDES UP INTO SEVERAL FILES AND SEND
THEM TO ME IN SEPARATE EMAILS, TITLING THEM APPROPRIATELY
(Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, etc.)
_____________________________________________________________
CONGRATULATIONS!!! YOU HAVE SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED
MICHAEL MCKINNEY’S HISTORY 17 COURSE
12
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