Journal Article Review

advertisement

Your Name Here 1

TED 207 -- Introduction to Teaching Technology Education

Journal Article Review

(Signature Artifact)

Directions

Read one educational journal article and report on it. Your report must summarize the work and its findings plus give your critical reaction in one typed page.

1.

Use the APA reference for the article as the title of the paper. Place the single spaced title at the top of the page.

2.

3.

4.

5.

DONOT

include a title page.

Use your name as the running head.

Omit the Reference page (the reference is the title).

You may single space the content page if you need more room on the page. Do not exceed one page of content, with 1” margins and 12 point Times New Roman font.

6.

Choose a journal or magazine from the appropriate list below.

List of Appropriate Journals

MKE

1. The Forum

2. Techniques

3. Education and Training

4. Journal of Career and Technical Education

5. Journal of Education for Business

6. Delta Pi Epsilon Journal

7. Business Education Forum

TED

1. The Technology Teacher

2. Technology and Children

3. T.I.E.S.

4. Tech Directions

5. Journal of Technology Education

6. Journal of Industrial Teacher Education

7. Journal of Technology and Design Education

Your Name Here 2

TED 207 Journal Article Critique Assessment Rubric

Levels:

1 2

Criteria:

Conception

Introduction and conclusion do not focus clearly on the main point. Overall structure is difficult to follow. Ideas are not ordered effectively. The work does not accomplish its purpose.

Introduction and conclusion simply state the main idea.

Overall structure is slightly inconsistent. Some ideas are ordered, but the work accomplishes its purpose.

3

Introduction and conclusion focus clearly on the main point.

Overall structure is easy to follow. Ideas are ordered effectively. The work accomplishes its purpose.

Score

Purpose of the article

How the text works

Fails to identify and discuss the central claim and thesis. Does not understand what the author is trying to say.

Central claim and thesis are identified, but not discussed.

Does not fully understand what the author is trying to say.

Student identifies and discusses the central claim and thesis. Demonstrates an understanding of what the author is trying to say.

Fails to identify and discuss how the text is developed and argued. Does not demonstrate an understanding of how evidence (facts and examples) is used and interpreted.

Identifies, but does not discuss how the text is developed and argued. Does not demonstrate a complete understanding of how the evidence (facts and examples) is used and interpreted.

Student identifies and discusses how the text is developed and argued.

Demonstrates clear understanding of how evidence

(facts and examples) is used and interpreted.

Making judgments about the context

Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of an argument

Strategy

Identifies the intended audience, but does not report which concepts are defined and used. Does not determine how the concept is used to organize and interpret data.

Reports which concepts are defined and used, but does not identify the intended audience.

Determines how the concept is used to organize, but does not interpret the data.

Student identifies the intended audience; which concepts are defined and used. Determines how the concept is used to organize and interpret the data.

Identifies sources and genre of the evidence presented.

Does not identify strengths and weaknesses of an argument or discuss how the argument could be better or differently supported. Determines whether the conclusion is warranted by the evidence presented, but does not offer an opposing argument.

Identifies strengths and weaknesses of an argument, but does not discuss how the argument could be better or differently supported. Offers an opposing argument, but does not determine whether the conclusion is warranted by the evidence presented.

Student identifies strengths and weaknesses of an argument.

Discusses how the argument could be better or differently supported. Determines whether the conclusion is warranted by the evidence presented. Offers an opposing argument.

No supporting materials are present. Ideas are not developed. Ideas are repetitive; major ideas do not receive enough attention. Paragraphs are scattered, undeveloped, disorganized, and confusing.

Supporting materials are present, but ideas are not welldeveloped. Some repetition of ideas occurs; major ideas receive less than adequate attention. Paragraphs show signs of unification, development, organization, and coherence.

Supporting material is persuasive. Ideas are welldeveloped. Unnecessary repetition of ideas is avoided; major ideas receive enough attention. Paragraphs are unified, developed, organized, and coherent.

Style

Student's words are limited and cliché. The same words are repeated often throughout writing. Language is confusing or vague.

Student's words are, for the most part, original and free of clichés. Some language is either vague or excessively flowery.

Student word choice is appropriate for the audience.

Transitions are used and sentences are varied.

Interesting language is used including strong verbs and vivid nouns. Wordiness is avoided.

Grammar and

Mechanics

APA Editorial Style

Student shows frequent errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

Student shows occasional grammatical errors. Spelling has been proofread.

Student's work is nearly errorfree. Reflects thorough proofreading for grammar and spelling.

Most margins, paragraphs, and spacing are incorrect. No headings are present.

Capitalization, italics, and abbreviation errors are frequent.

Margins, paragraphs, and spacing are correct in most places. Headings are present.

Most capitalizations, italics, and abbreviations are correct.

Margins, paragraphs, and spacing follow APA guidelines.

Headings carefully outline the hierarchy of ideas presented.

Capitalization, italics, and abbreviations are correct.

Your Name Here 3

Download