Your Journey to UMKC

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Your Journey to UMKC – Speech One
Learning Outcomes:
 Explore and analyze your own and others’ values through the use of multiple strategies that engage different sources and
perspectives in written and oral discourse.
 Identify and analyze how cultural context and assumptions play a role in the analysis and production of discourse.
 Understand basic rhetorical concepts (audience, purpose, genre, convention, logos, ethos, pathos, logical fallacies, structure,
etc.) and apply such concepts to the interpretation, analysis, and production of written and oral discourse.
 Develop an introductory understanding of critical discourse analysis and critical language awareness.
 Use written and oral discourse to develop and present meaningful and interesting ideas that show your voice, a willingness to
take intellectual risks, and an attempt to enter an academic conversation.
 Create academic discourse through a basic process that includes editing, proofreading, and revising multiple drafts.
 Interpret your own and others’ work and reflect on your development as a producer of discourse.
 Construct basic research strategies, use appropriate research resources, learn to identify scholarly sources, and evaluate and
cite those information sources.
 Develop an introductory understanding of citation and an ability to appropriately cite sources using a consistent professional style
(MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.).
 Identify and address personal impediments to discourse production, including speech anxiety and writer’s block.
Audience: General academic
Length: 4-6 minutes. Your speech should thoroughly develop ideas based on the assignment and questions for consideration. Additionally, your
speech should satisfactorily meet all requirements listed in the rubric.
Prompt: For this speech, you are asked to tell the class about your journey to UMKC. Some questions you might consider include:
 Did you consider other schools or attend other schools before UMKC?
 Why did you choose UMKC?
 Did you consider paths other than a four-year college?
 What is your major? Or, if you are undeclared, what are you considering?
 Why did you choose this major? Does it lead to a specific career path? Does it reflect a lifelong goal?
 What is your family’s history in regards to college – are you a first generation college student? Did your family expect you to go to college?
Why or why not?
Other Requirements / Considerations:
 You cannot read your speech. You must deliver your speech extemporaneously using a Speaking Outline.
 You must submit your speaking outline along with your speech.
 You must offer oral citations, if sources are used.
 The week before your speech is due, you must submit a Preparation Outline (full-sentence outline) that follows the format in Chapter 9 of
THINK (page 150). Your speech should have logical organization of points (see the structure of the speech below). If you use sources, the
outline should include MLA in-text citations and a list of references.
 You will be graded on organization, outlining, delivery, and use of language. More specific grading criteria are outlined in the rubric,
available through BlackBoard and in the syllabus.
Structure of the Speech:
Introduction
I) Attention-getter [a shocking fact, quote, rhetorical question, example or brief anecdote]
II) Establish relevance of your topic to the audience [why should the audience care about your topic]
III) State your thesis [A statement about why you came to UMKC.]
IV) Preview your specific main points [Two-three specific points that support your thesis, and preview how the speech will develop]
Body
I) Main point one [A general point that supports your thesis. This should match what you previewed in the Introduction.]
a. Sub point [Specific evidence that demonstrates your main point, such as examples, statistics, narratives, or analogies.]
b. Sub point [Specific evidence that demonstrates your main point, such as examples, statistics, narratives, or analogies.]
[Transition: Review Main Point One and Preview Main Point Two]
II) Main point two [A general point that supports your thesis. This should match what you previewed in the Introduction.]
a. Sub point [Specific evidence that demonstrates your main point, such as examples, statistics, narratives, or analogies.]
b. Sub point [Specific evidence that demonstrates your main point, such as examples, statistics, narratives, or analogies.]
[Transition: Review Main Point Two and Preview Main Point Three]
III) Main point three (if necessary) [A general point that supports your thesis. This should match what you previewed in the Introduction.]
a. Sub point [Specific evidence that demonstrates your main point, such as examples, statistics, narratives, or analogies.]
b. Sub point [Specific evidence that demonstrates your main point, such as examples, statistics, narratives, or analogies.]
Conclusion
I) Transition into the conclusion [A signpost that indicates the speech is ending.]
II) Restate thesis [A restatement of the thesis you presented in the Introduction.]
III) Summarize your main points [Creatively restate the main points you presented in the speech.]
IV) End with impact [Be sure that you do not end the speech abruptly. You could end with a quote, challenge to the audience, or finish a story
that you began in the Introduction.]
Stage 1 (Due Week 2 on Tuesday by 11:59p): Preparation Outline 25 points
 See above for expectations regarding Preparation Outline.
 Load Outline directly to BlackBoard under Week 2 > Assignment Upload – Preparation Outline Speech One
Stage 2 (Due Week 3 on Thursday by 11:59p): Speech 50 points
 Post your speech to BlackBoard. See BlackBoard for specific technical requirements.
 Post a copy of your Speaking Outline to BlackBoard under Week 3 > Speaking Outline for Speech #1
Stage 3 (Due Week 3 by Saturday at 11:59p): Peer Response 25 points
Respond to three of your peers’ speeches via Discussion Board on BlackBoard. If possible, try not to respond to speeches that already received three
responses.
In your response, you should address the following questions:
1. Introduction
a. Is the attention-getter effective?
b. Does the speaker have a clear thesis?
c.
Is there a clear preview of the main points?
2. Body
a. Are the main points clearly stated?
b. Do the main points provide support for the thesis?
c. Are the main points expanded with effective subpoints that include examples, narratives, analogies, and/or statistics?
d. If sources are used, are they cited effectively?
e. Does the speaker use internal summaries and previews in their transitions?
3. Conclusion
a. Is there a transition that indicates the speech is ending?
b. Is there a detailed summary of the main points?
c. Does the speech end with impact?
4. Delivery and Style
a. Is the speaker's vocal quality effective?
b. Does the speaker use language in a manner that is vivid and engaging?
c. Is the speech enhanced by gestures and/or movement?
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