Fruits and Vegetables - University of Georgia

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Fruits and Vegetables
Lesson 8: Summer Squashes, Winter Squashes and Pumpkins
Getting Started
1. Review lesson plan before each session.
2. Copy handouts:
a. Staying Healthy & Fit with Squashes and Pumpkins
b. Choose 5 A Day the Color Way with Squashes and Pumpkins
c. Table tents (at least one of each for each table; copy on card stock paper)
d. Recipes (4)
3. Gather supplies needed for lesson and activities
Supplies Needed
1. Handouts.
2. Squash characters – Peter Pumpkin, Stevie Squash and Zack Zucchini.
3. Food Guide Pyramid Poster (optional)
4. NOAH News headline.
5. Ingredients for recipe demonstration (choose from one of the recipes in this packet)
6. Plates, forks or spoons and napkins or other supplies needed to taste recipe.
7. Fresh summer or winter squash and pumpkins, depending on season, to display during
lesson. Use canned or frozen items if fresh not available.
Beginning the Lesson
1. Introduce yourself and the organization you represent.
2. Summarize the lesson by reading the objectives.
3. Let the group know the lesson will be informal and they can ask questions any time.
Objectives – The participants will:
1. Understand the nutrition benefits of squash and pumpkin.
2. Identify the different varieties of squash.
3. Learn new ways to prepare and eat squash and pumpkin.
4. Learn how to select and store squash and pumpkin.
5. Understand the protective effects of squash and pumpkin against heart disease and
cancer.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Script
Introduction
(Display fresh summer squash or fresh winter squash or pumpkins – depending on season in
which lesson is offered – to refer to during lesson. Can use as prizes for participants who answer
questions, etc.)
Note to speaker: You can focus lesson more on the squash that is in season around the time
lesson is offered (summer squashes in late spring/summer, winter squashes and pumpkins in
fall/winter).
Let’s take a look at our headline (display handout/overhead/ with headline). What may be the
secret to staying healthy and fit as we age? Eating 5 to 9 servings of colorful fruits and
vegetables every day – 5 A Day the Color Way, our age-defying formula for health that
may help:
1. Fight cancer.
2. Fight heart disease.
3. Fight effects of aging (on eyesight, memory, immune function and painful
inflammation).
Remember, if there is one thing certain about diet, it is that you can reduce your risk of cancer,
heart disease and other conditions associated with aging if you eat at least 5 servings of colorful
fruits and vegetables daily, as part of an overall diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol.
So, how are all of you going to help yourself fight cancer, heart disease and other diseases of
aging? Say it with me – 5 A Day the Color Way, eating 5 to 9 servings of colorful fruits and
vegetables every day to stay healthy and fit (hold up handout/show overhead).
Let’s review. What is the rainbow of colors for staying healthy and fit?
Blue-purple – like blueberries, blackberries, raisins and eggplant
Yellow-orange – like oranges, grapefruit, peaches, summer squash and winter squash
Red – like strawberries, cherries, tomatoes and red cabbage
White – like bananas, onions, garlic and cauliflower
Green – like grapes, kiwi, broccoli, spinach and zucchini
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Just like the different colors of Lifesavers Candy represent different flavors, different colors of
fruits and vegetables represent different flavors and different disease-fighting nutrients that help
you stay healthy and fit. That is why we need 5 A Day the Color Way!
Today, we are going to talk about vegetables that come in summer and winter varieties. They
also come in different colors – from yellow to orange to green. The summer varieties are tender,
while the winter varieties come with a tough skin. Can anyone name these vegetables? Wait for
answers, prompt if necessary. Right on, we are going to talk about the many types of summer
squash and winter squash. We will also talk about why they are so good for us. First, though let
me introduce you to my squashy friends before we talk about different squashes. Meet Peter
Pumpkin, Stevie Squash and Zack Zucchini. (Display characters as you introduce them; ask
participants if they eat these, how often they eat these and if any are favorites.)
(Bring in examples of these varieties of squash in season – winter or summer; use pictures in
cookbooks or food encyclopedias, especially for the less familiar winter squashes.)
As you can see, summer squash like yellow squash (or crookneck and straightneck squash),
zucchini and pattypan squash are tender vegetables. You can even eat them raw if you like.
Pumpkins and winter squashes have a hard outer shell and tough flesh. Our friend Peter
Pumpkin is actually in the gourd family of squashes. There are many types of winter squashes.
Can any of you help name these? Yes, butternut, spaghetti and acorn squash are popular winter
squashes. Have you also heard of hubbard, banana, delicata, and turban squashes? You may
have seen these colorful squashes in grocery stores in fall or winter. Some of you may have used
them as fall decorations.
Nutrition Benefits (Refer to handout titled Why Fruits and Vegetables are So Good for You.)
Yellow squash (crookneck and straightneck), pattypan squash and zucchini are summer
favorites. How many of you grow these or have grown these in the past? How many of you
have neighbors who grow these and share their crop with you (maybe sneaking large zucchini on
your doorstep in the middle of the night!). These summer squashes are a good source of vitamin
C. Remember vitamin C helps you fight infections and heal wounds. Also, diets rich in vitamin
C may help reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease and cataracts. Summer squash is low in
calories – about 20 calories in a ½ cup serving.
Summer squashes contain compounds that give them their green and yellow colors. These are
called lutein (lou-teen) and zeaxanthin (ze-uh-zan-theen). They are carotenoids, like betacarotene. These two seem to help protect your eyes from a condition called macular
degeneration. This is a leading cause of blindness in older adults. Eat summer squashes or other
yellow-green fruits and vegetables every day to help protect your eyes (examples include
spinach, greens, corn, kiwi, okra, and broccoli).
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Winter squashes and pumpkins are all rich in vitamin A (from carotenoids like alpha- and betacarotene). You can tell they are a good source of vitamin A from their rich yellow-orange
colors. Remember vitamin A is needed for healthy eyes, lungs and skin and to help fight
infections. Also, diets rich in vitamin A from fruits and vegetables may help reduce your risk of
heart disease and cancer. Winter squashes and pumpkins are also a good source of vitamin C
and fiber.
(Include this part about pumpkins if you are focusing on winter squash and/or if it is fall.) You
may want to use pumpkins for more than jack-o-lanterns. You might say pumpkins are one of
the foods that helped our country’s early settlers survive. Native Americans were growing
pumpkins long before any settlers arrive in America. Pumpkins became a staple for the Pilgrims
when they settled in Massachusetts in the 1600s. It is thought the early settlers wrote a folk song
about pumpkins. It goes like this:
If flesh meat be wanting to fill up our dish,
We have carrots and pumpkins and turnips and fish . . . .
We have pumpkin at morning and pumpkin at noon
If it were not for pumpkins, we would be undone.
(As appears in The Color Code, p. 93, by Joseph, Nadeau and Underwood, 2002)
Shopping, Storage, and Preparation
Let’s talk about how to buy and store fresh summer squash, winter squash and pumpkins.
Summer squash (yellow crookneck or straightneck, pattypan and zucchini) should be firm,
glossy, and should not have any brown spots or cracks on their skins. Do not buy squash that are
shriveled. Store summer squash in the produce drawer of your refrigerator. Use them within 3
to 5 days after you buy them.
Look for smaller summer squash if you want a tender vegetable. Use larger squash in casseroles
or in bread, like zucchini bread. Tender summer squash can be cooked in a variety of ways.
They can be grilled, sautéed, used in stir-fry, oven roasted or stewed. Summer squashes can be
eaten raw. Try them with your favorite lowfat dip or add them to a green salad.
Winter squash and pumpkin should be firm, heavy for their size, with no cracks or bruises.
Avoid any with soft spots. Winter squash and pumpkins will keep for several months if they are
ripe and the stem is attached. Store them in a cool, dry place, like on an open shelf or
countertop. Do not store them in the refrigerator.
Winter squashes and pumpkins are often baked. You can cut them in half and bake in the oven
or cook in a microwave. You can even bake them whole in the oven if you poke holes in the
skin. Scoop out the cooked flesh and season with a little butter, salt and spices like cinnamon or
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
nutmeg. You can also use the cooked flesh in recipes. Winter squash can also be peeled and cut
into chunks and baked, boiled, steamed or pan-fried. You can eat the seeds of winter squash and
pumpkin. Remove the seeds from the flesh. Rinse to remove strings. Place on an oiled baking
sheet. Sprinkle with garlic powder, a pinch of salt and any other seasonings you desire. Roast in
a hot oven (about 400F oven) until seeds are toasted but not burned.
Don’t forget about canned and frozen squash and pumpkin! They are good for you too and can
save a lot of preparation time! Packages of frozen, sliced summer squash are great for casseroles
and soups. Frozen, mashed winter squash makes a great side dish or recipe ingredient. Canned
pumpkin is good to use in many recipes, including pumpkin pie. Canned pumpkin keeps most of
its vitamin A and is an excellent way to increase your daily servings of vegetables.
Let’s talk about some delicious ways that we can prepare summer squash, winter squash, and
pumpkin.
(Refer participants to the handout “Easy ways to Enjoy Squash and Pumpkin”)
1. Make a summer squash vegetable medley. Slice one yellow squash, one zucchini and
one onion. Cook in a medium saucepan with ½ to 1 of cup water, 1 tablespoon butter, and
your favorite seasoning. Try garlic powder, fresh or dried herbs, pepper or salt-free
seasoning blends.
2. Pan-fry summer squash for a quick side dish. Slice one summer squash, one zucchini and
one onion. Cook in skillet over medium-high heat in 1 to 2 tablespoons canola oil until
crisp-tender. Add seasonings as you like.
3. Try raw slices of yellow squash, pattypan squash or zucchini with your favorite Ranchstyle dressing or dip. Also add raw squash slices to green salads.
4. Add grated zucchini or yellow squash to quick bread or muffin recipes for moist, sweet
bread.
5. Roast summer squash for quick, flavorful side dish. Toss thick slices or chunks of
summer squash with olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder and fresh or dried herbs.
Spread on baking sheet (line with foil for easier cleaning). Place in hot oven (450F) and
roast until edges of squash start to brown, about 15 minutes. Stir halfway through
cooking.
6. Microwave winter squash for quick side dish. Cut a butternut or other winter squash in
half. Scoop out seeds and strings. Place halves face down in a microwave-safe baking
dish. Cook on high for 3 minutes. Remove, turn face up and season with cinnamon,
sugar and butter. Return to microwave and cook on high until tender, about 7 to 10
minutes.
7. Keep canned pumpkin on hand for quick side dishes (mashed pumpkin), pumpkin bread
or pumpkin pie.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Activity
Okay, let’s review before we try a tasty squash recipe.
1. How many servings of fruits and vegetables do you need to eat daily? At least 5 a day.
2. What can eating colorful summer or winter squashes or pumpkins do for you? Help you
stay healthy and fit – reduce risk of heart disease and cancers and help protect eyes.
Now, let’s try our tasty squash dish.
References
Eat Your Colors. The Produce for Better Health Foundation. 2 May 2003
<http://www.5aday.com>.
Joseph, J.A., Nadeau, D.A. & Underwood, A. (2002) The Color Code. Hyperion: New York.
Produce A – Z. AboutProduce.Com. 2 May 2003 <www.aboutproduce.com>.
Pumpkins and More - Pumpkin Facts. University of Illinois Extenstion. 9 Jan 2002
<www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/pumpkins/facts.html>.
Selecting, Storing, and Serving Ohio Squash and Pumpkin: Fact Sheet. Ohio State University
Extension. 9 Jan 2002 <www.ohioline.osu.edu>.
Vegetables. Puritan’s Pride. 9 Jan 2002 <www.puritan.com/healthnotes/Food/Vegetables.htm>.
Why are fruits and vegetables so good for you? Dole 5 a Day Kids. 9 Jan 2002
<www.dole5aday.com/Kids/Facts/K_CalvinsQandA.html>
The Food Stamp Program provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help
buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact your local food stamp office,
food bank, or senior center.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Primary authors: Jacy Wade, MS & Marilyn O. Wright, MS, RD, LD
[email protected]
Primary reviewers: Joan G. Fischer, PhD, RD, LD & Mary Ann Johnson, PhD
Graphic artist: Wendy Gout
This material, including artwork, was developed with support from the Department of Foods and
Nutrition at The University of Georgia, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and the
USDA Food Stamp Nutrition Education Program. Permission is granted to reproduce, translate,
abstract, review or quote these materials in whole or in part for educational purposes only (not
for profit beyond the cost of reproduction) provided that the author(s) and The University of
Georgia receive acknowledgement as shown in this example notice: Reprinted with permission
from The University of Georgia, Department of Foods and Nutrition, Athens, GA. Authors, Title,
Date.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Staying Healthy & Fit with Squashes and Pumpkins
 Summer squashes (yellow squash, pattypan squash and zucchini) are
good sources of vitamin C. Winter squashes (acorn, butternut,
spaghetti, hubbard and turban) and pumpkins are also good sources of
vitamin C.
 Choose 1 to 2 servings of vitamin C-foods every day to have
healthy gums, help fight infections and heal wounds, and reduce
your risk of heart disease, cancer and cataracts.
 Winter squashes and pumpkins are rich in vitamin A.
 Choose 1 to 2 servings of vitamin A-rich foods every day to
have healthy eyes, lungs and skin, to fight infections, and reduce
your risk of heart disease and cancer.
 Yellow squash and zucchini contain lutein and zeaxanthin, which
give them their yellow and green colors.
 Eat fruits and vegetables that supply lutein and zeaxanthin every
day to help protect your eyes from macular degeneration (a
condition that leads to blindness).
 Summer squashes and winter squashes are a good source of fiber.
 Eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables for the fiber and
other nutrients you need to stay healthy and fit.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Choose 5 A Day the Color Way with Squashes and
Pumpkins
 Make a summer squash medley. Slice one yellow squash, zucchini
and onion. Cook in medium saucepan with ½ cup water, 1tablespoon butter or oil, and your favorite seasonings.
 Pan-fry summer squash for a quick side dish. Slice one yellow
squash, zucchini and onion. Cook in skillet over medium-high heat in
1 to 2 tablespoons oil until crisp-tender, and then season.
 Try raw slices of yellow squash, pattypan squash or zucchini with
your favorite dip or salad dressing. Add raw squash slices to green
salads or pasta salads.
 Add grated zucchini or yellow squash (about 1 cup) to quick bread or
muffin recipes for moist, sweet bread.
 Roast summer squash for a quick flavorful side dish. Toss cut squash
with oil and seasonings. Spread on baking sheet. Place in 450F
oven and roast until edges start to brown, about 15 minutes. Stir once
halfway through cooking.
 Microwave winter squash or pumpkins for a quick side dish. Cut
squash in half, scoop out seeds and place in microwave-safe baking
dish. Cook on high for 3 minutes. Season with cinnamon, sugar and
butter. Microwave on high until tender, about 7 to 10 minutes.
 Keep canned pumpkin on hand for quick side dishes, bread or pie.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Pumpkin Pie Smoothie
1 can (15 oz) pumpkin puree
1 can evaporated milk
1 cup (8 oz) lowfat vanilla
yogurt
¼ cup brown sugar
¼ tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp nutmeg, optional
1 tsp vanilla extract
1. Chill canned pumpkin and evaporated milk in refrigerator for 1 – 2
hours before making smoothies.
2. Pour pumpkin puree, evaporated milk, spices and vanilla extract
into a blender container and blend until smooth.
3. Pour into glasses and enjoy. Top with 2 tablespoons whipped
topping, if desired. Makes 4 servings. Refrigerate any leftovers.
Nutrition Facts per serving
Total calories
Total fat
Total carbohydrate
Serving size: ¼ recipe (about
1 ½ cups)
98
1g
16 g
Adapted from VeryBestBaking.com at www.verybestbaking.com/recipe_template.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Squash Casserole
Vegetable cooking spray
1 Tbsp canola oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 pound yellow squash, sliced
1 cup shredded carrots
1 (6 oz) package stuffing mix
1 cup (8 oz) reduced-fat sour cream
1 large egg
1 cup reduced-salt chicken broth
1. Preheat oven to 375F. Spray a 2-quart casserole dish with
vegetable cooking spray, set aside.
2. Heat oil in skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until
softened, about 5 minutes. Set aside.
3. Combine squash and remaining ingredients in large bowl. Stir in
cooked onion, mixing well.
4. Pour mixture into casserole dish. Bake until mixture is bubbly and
lightly browned on top, about 30 – 40 minutes. Makes 8 servings.
Nutrition Facts per serving
Total calories
Total fat
Total carbohydrate
Serving size: about 1 cup
163
6g
23 g
Adapted from Southern-Style Diabetic Cooking by Marti Chitwood, RD, CDE.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Light & Easy Pumpkin Pie
1 unbaked graham cracker pie shell (9 inch)
2 large eggs
1 can (30 oz) pumpkin pie mix
2/3 cup evaporated milk (reduced-fat or fat free)
1. Preheat oven to 425F.
2. Beat eggs lightly in large mixing bowl. Stir in pumpkin pie mix
and evaporated milk. Stir until well blended and smooth. Pour
into pie shell.
3. Bake in oven for 15 minutes then reduce heat to 350F and
continue baking until knife inserted in center of pie comes out
clean, about 50 – 60 minutes.
4. Remove from oven and cool on rack for 2 hours before serving.
Refrigerate any leftovers. Makes 8 servings.
Nutrition Facts per serving
Total calories
Total fat
Total carbohydrate
Serving size: 1/8 pie
105
3g
18 g
Adapted from VeryBestBaking.com at www.verybestbaking.com/recipes/.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
Zucchini & Corn Soup
2 Tbsp canola oil
1 medium onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
4 medium zucchini, sliced
1 medium green pepper, chopped
6 cups reduced-salt broth
2 cans (15 oz) yellow corn
1 tsp ground cumin
1. Sauté onion in oil in large saucepan over medium-high heat until
onion starts to soften, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and cook 1
minute.
2. Add zucchini and green pepper to onion mixture and cook over
medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
3. Add remaining ingredients to saucepan. Bring to simmer, reduce
heat to low and cover. Cook over low heat until heated through
and vegetable are tender, but not mushy, about 30 minutes. Serve
hot with cornbread and a green salad. Makes 8 main dish
servings.
Nutrition facts per serving
Total calories
Total fat
Total carbohydrate
Serving size: about 1 cup
147
4g
23 g
Recipe adapted from Puritan’s Pride, www.puritan.com.
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA
UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
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