Carcharhinidae

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Carcharhinidae

Requiem sharks

Carcharhinidae characteristics

5 gill slits

2 dorsal fins

No fin spines

Caudal fin w/ strong ventral lobe

Mouth behind eyes

Round eyes w/ nictitating eyelids

Long arched mouth w/ bladelike teeth

Short labial furrows

Mostly unpatterned

Mostly medium to large

100-300 cm

Some smaller

~100

Active strong swimmers

More nocturnal

Ram ventilators & buccal breathers

Behavior

Some solitary

Some socialize in small groups

Some social schooling spp.

Clear hierarchical dominance b/t spp.

Oceanic whitetip

(Carcharhinus longimanus)

dominate silky sharks

Silky sharks

(Carcharhinus falciformis)

dominate grey reef sharks

(Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos)

Taxonomy

Order Carcharhiniformes

Family carcharhinidae

 12 genera (8 monotypic)

~50 spp. (31 are in genus

Carcharhinus

)

Examples include

Tiger shark

(Galeocerdo cuvier)

Bull shark (

Carcharhinus leucas

)

Blacktip reef (

Carcharhinus melanopterus)

Sharpnose sharks (

Rhizopriondon

spp.)

Lemon Shark (

Negaprion brevirostris

)

Distribution

Temperate and tropical seas

Majority tropical continental shelves & offshore

Some coral reefs

Some deep water

Benthopelagic

Pelagic-Blue Shark (

Prionace glauca)

, Oceanic Whitetip (

Carcharhinus

longimanus

), Silky Shark (

Carcharhinus falciformis

)

All over the world

Feeding

Wide variety

Teleosts

Crustaceans

Mollusks

Elasmobranchs

Seabirds

Reptiles

Marine mammals

Reproduction

Most placental viviparous

Galeocerdo cuvier

is ovoviviparous

Biennial or triennial reproductive cycle

Status

Important in commercial, subsistence and sports fisheries

used for

Food

Liver oil

Fins-especially blue shark

Skin

Ecotourism

Have bitten people

Caught as bycatch

Red list mixed from data deficient; threatened to endangered; many near threatened

Literature cited

Compagno, L.M. Dando, and S. Fowler. 2005. Sharks of the world. Princeton University

Press, Princeton, NJ. Pp288-322

Whitney NM, Crow GL. 2007. Reproductive biology of the tiger shark (

Galeocerdo cuvier

) in Hawaii. Marine Biology

. 151 (1).pp63-70

Yokota K, Kiyota M, Minami H.2006.Shark catch in a pelagic longline fishery:

Comparison of circle and tuna hooks. Fisheriess Research. 81.pp 337-341.

Clarke SC, McAllister MK, Milner-Gulland EJ, et al.2006.Global estimates of shark catches using trade records from commercial markets .Ecology Letter 9.pp 1115-1126

Campana SE, Marks L, Joyce W, et al. Effects of recreational and commercial fishing on blue sharks (Prionace glauca) with inferences on the North Atlantic population . CANADIAN JOURNAL OF FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES 63. pp 670-682

IUNC 2006. 2006 IUCN red list of threatned species. At http:// www.iuncnredlist.org

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