Chapter One Questions

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Chapter One Questions

2010

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Epidemiology is broadly defined as the study of factors that influence the health of populations. The application of epidemiologic findings in populations to decisions in the

care of individual patients is: a.

b.

c.

d.

Generally inappropriate

Known as clinical epidemiology

Limited to chronic disease epidemiology

Limited to infectious disease epidemiology e.

Subject to the ecologic fallacy.

The BEINGS model is a useful paradigm for: a.

Allocating public health resources b.

c.

d.

e.

Asserting the impact of herd immunity

Determining the role of social policy on public health

Establishing the importance of social contacts

Evaluating etiologic factors in disease.

The BEINGS model provides a list of factors in disease causality. Which of the following factors are explicitly included in the list? a.

Behavioral, ecologic, idiopathic, nutritional, genetic, and social factors. b.

Behavioral, environmental, immunologic, nutritional, genetic, and selective factors. c.

d.

Behavioral, environmental, immunologic, nutritional, genetic, and social factors.

Biologic, environmental, immunologic, nutritional, genetic, and synergistic factors. e.

Biologic, environmental, innate, nutritional, genetic, and synergistic factors

For an infectious disease to occur, there must be interaction between: a.

b.

c.

d.

Behavioral factors and genetic factors

The agent and the vector

The host and the agent

The vector and the environment e.

The vector and the host

Widely publicized fatalities associated with an “emerging” disease (e.g. hantavirus pulmonary syndrome) may be an example of: a.

Active surveillance b.

c.

Case finding

Iatrogenesis d.

e.

The first responder effect

The iceberg phenomenon

Which one of the following activities is beyond the scope of activities undertaken by

epidemiologists? a.

b.

c.

d.

Analyzing cost-effectiveness

Establishing modes of disease transmission

Preventing disease

Providing data for genetic counseling

1

Julie A. Fox

Chapter One Questions

2010

7.

8.

9.

e.

Rationing health care resources

Herd immunity refers to: a.

b.

c.

d.

Genetic resistance to species-specific disease

Immunity naturally acquired in a population

The high levels of antibody present in a population after an epidemic

The prevention of disease transmission to susceptible individuals through acquired immunity in others.

e.

The vaccination of domestic animals to prevent disease transmission to humans.

Attempts to eradicate a disease through wide-spread immunization programs may be associated with potential adverse effects. Which of the following adverse effects is

correlated with the efficacy of the vaccine? a.

b.

The emergence of resistant strains

The loss of the natural booster effect

c.

d.

The occurrence of allergic reactions

The occurrence of infection in younger age groups e.

The occurrence of neurologic complication.

Which of the following phenomena resulted from attempts to solve a public health

problem?

a.

Antigenic drift in the influenza virus

b.

c.

Desertification in sub-Saharan Africa

Reactivation of latent tuberculosis in individuals with HIV infection d.

e.

Spread of Legionella pneumophila through air-conditioning systems

Transmission of hepatitis C via blood transfusions.

10.

Evaluation of which of the following potentially preventable causes of disease is mostly likely to raise ethical concerns? a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

Dietary intake

Genetic susceptibility

Immunization status

Smoking history

Social support networks.

2

Julie A. Fox

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