The Giver Argument Essay Outline

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The Giver
Standard RL8.7: Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or
drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by
the director or actors.
Assignment Overview:
Write a 5 paragraph essay that argues which version of The Giver presents a more
powerful or relevant warning about the future.
The claim must answer the following question:
Consider the book and film versions of The Giver: Which of the two formats explores a
warning about the future in a more relevant or powerful way?
Parts of the Assignment:
 Evidence chart: Watch the film version and gather evidence that compares
major themes or plot events against equivalent elements from the text version (4
days).
 Outline: Organize claim, reasons with supporting evidence, and conclusion into
an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion (1 day).
 Type Argument Essay: Draft and revise argument essay based on outline.
Sequence:
1. Evidence chart and film viewing: January 5-8 (4 days).
2. Outline: January 9 (1 day/ weekend as homework if needed)
3. Draft Argument Essay: January 12-14, & 15 (3 days/ homework as needed)
_______________________________________________________________
Reminders
Signal Phrases (in lieu of citations):
Because this essay addresses only two works, the required citations for evidence will
be a signal phrase. When a piece of evidence is put forth, it must be made abundantly
clear whether it came from the book or the film.
Formatting:
This essay must be typed using MLA formatting. Basic elements include:
 Heading
 Running header with page number
 Centered title (no bold, underline, font size change, etc)
 Times New Roman font
 Size 12, double-spaced text
For visual examples, refer to pages 35-38 in the student agenda.
This packet includes:
 Rubric
 Outline
 Evidence chart
DUE: January 15, at the end of class
Argument Writing Rubric Grade 8
Standards: Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence (CCSS.W.1, Common Core State Standards for ELA, p. 42); Produce clear and coherent writing in which
the development, organization and style are appropriate to task purpose, and audience (CCSS.W.4, Common Core State Standards for ELA, p. 43).
Argument
Advanced
6
90-100

Claim is clearly stated and
distinguished from alternate or
opposing claims

Claim is purposefully focused and
consistent

Complex claim is well-developed
Claim, reasons, and evidence are
organized into paragraphs:

Skillful and varied use of
transitions

Logical progression of ideas from
beginning to end

Purposeful introduction and
conclusion

Strong connections among ideas
Proficient
5
70-89

Claim is clearly stated and
distinguished from alternate or
opposing claims

Claim is focused and consistent
Basic
4
60-69

Claim is sometimes clear, focused
or consistent
Below Basic
3
50-59

Claim is unclear, unfocused ,
inconsistent or missing
Claim, reasons, and evidence are
organized into paragraphs:

Appropriate use of transitions with
some variety

Adequate progression of ideas from
beginning to end

Evident introduction and conclusion

Adequate connections among ideas
Claim, reasons, and evidence are
inconsistently organized into
paragraphs:

Some use of transitions

Inadequate progression of ideas
from beginning to end

Ineffective introduction and
conclusion

Weak connections among ideas
Claim, reasons, and evidence are
inconsistently organized into
paragraphs:

Little or no use of transitions

Confusing progression of ideas

Missing introduction and/or
conclusion

No connections among ideas
Supporting
Reasons:
The claim is
developed and
supported with
logical reasoning

Provides comprehensive support for
the claim through the use of three
distinct and powerful reasons
The reasons demonstrate a
thorough understanding of the
topic or text and its message for the
audience

Provides adequate support for the
claim through the use of three clear
reasons
The reasons demonstrate an
adequate understanding of the topic
or text and its message for the
audience


Evidence and
Elaboration:

Presents 3 pieces of well-chosen
evidence (details from the
book/movie) for most reasons
Skillfully integrates evidence with
correct signal phrases
Skillfully analyzes and draws strong
conclusions from evidence with
elaboration
Skillfully contrasts the choices
made in each text

Presents 2 pieces of well-chosen
evidence (details from the
book/movie) for each reason
Integrates evidence from sources
with generally correct signal phrases
Analyzes and draws logical
conclusions from evidence
Adequately contrasts the choices
made in each text

Provides inadequate support for
the claim—there may be less than
three reasons or the reasons may
be too similar to separate
The reasons demonstrate an
inadequate understanding of the
topic or text and its message for
the audience
Uses some irrelevant, repetitive,
or inadequate evidence (details
from the book/movie)
Some attempt to correctly use
signal phrases
Inconsistently analyzes evidence
Conclusions drawn are sometimes
not logical
Inadequately contrasts the choices
made in each text
Uses precise, academic language
Use of topic-specific vocabulary is
clearly appropriate for the audience
and purpose
Establishes and consistently
maintains a formal/appropriate
style

Uses a mix of precise with more
general language
Use of topic-specific vocabulary is
generally appropriate for the
audience and purpose
Establishes and generally maintains
a formal/appropriate style


Uses simplistic language
Inconsistent use of topic-specific
vocabulary
Lacks a consistent
formal/appropriate style



Minimal errors/patterns of error in
usage, sentence structure,
punctuation, capitalization,
spelling, and format
Skillful use of sentence structure
enhances meaning
Minimal errors/patterns of error in usage,
sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, spelling, and format
Ideas/Purpose:
The argument is
focused and
clearly states the
claim(s).
Organization:
The writing has a
clear and
effective
organizational
structure
creating unity
and
completeness.
The reasons are
developed and
supported with
relevant evidence,
and the evidence
is elaborated to
prove its
relevance.
Language and
Vocabulary:
The writing uses
precise and topicspecific language
and maintains a
formal/appropria
te style.
Conventions:
The writing
demonstrates a
command of
conventions and
assigned format.





















Frequent errors/patterns of error in
usage, sentence structure,
punctuation, capitalization, spelling,
and format






Provides little or no support for the
claim—too few reasons given or
the reasons given may not prove
the claim
The reasons demonstrate little
understanding of the topic or text
and its message for the audience
Frequently uses irrelevant,
repetitive, or inadequate evidence
(details from the book/movie)
Does not consistently use signal
phrases to introduce evidence
Fails to analyze evidence
Conclusions drawn are not logical
or are missing
Little attempt to contrast the
choices made in each text
Uses limited or vague language
Lacks topic-specific vocabulary
Lack of formal/appropriate style
shows little sense of audience and
purposes
Severe errors/patterns of error in
usage, sentence structure,
punctuation, capitalization, spelling,
and format interfere with
understanding
Total:________ / 36
Name:___________________Period:________
The Giver Argument Essay Outline
Paragraph 1: Introduction
 Start with a hook
 Answer the question in the format of a claim: Consider the book and film
versions of The Giver: which of the two formats presented the more powerful or
relevant warning about the future?
Idea for Hook:______________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Write your claim:____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Paragraph 2: First Body Paragraph
Reason: Supports claim/shows why claim is valid. Your own words and ideas, not cited.
Evidence: Include signal phrase.
Minimum of 2.
Elaboration: Explain why this choice is more powerful/
relevant in your own words. Compare to other format. Not
cited.
Paragraph 3: Second Body Paragraph
Reason: Supports claim/ shows why claim is valid. Your own words and ideas, not cited.
Evidence: Include signal phrase.
Minimum of 2.
Elaboration: Explain why this choice is more powerful/
relevant in your own words. Compare to other format. Not
cited.
Paragraph 4: Third Body Paragraph
Reason: Supports claim/ shows why claim is valid. Your own words & ideas, not cited.
Evidence: Include signal phrase.
Minimum of 2.
Elaboration: Explain why this choice is more powerful/
relevant in your own words. Compare to other format. Not
cited.
Paragraph 5: Conclusion
 Reiterate claim without repeating
 Show how this topic applies to the audience (warrant)
 Leave the audience with finals thoughts, call to action, or image that circles
back to your hook
Reiterate Claim:____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Why does this apply to the audience?:_______________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Final thoughts, call to action, image that circles back to claim:_______________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Reminders for Drafting the Argument Essay
Introduction:
 Hook must be well-developed and grab the reader’s attention.
 Claim must answer the question completely, and make sense to the reader if he
or she did not know what the question was.
Body paragraphs:
 Topic sentence must include a transition and reason that your claim is correct.
 Cite evidence by using a signal phrase to show if it’s from the book or film.
 Use your own words to explain how evidence proves your reasoning as sound.
 Conclusion/transition sentence must be included and must help guide the
reader into the next paragraph.
Conclusion paragraph:
 Claim must be restated in a new way
 Show how this topic applies to the audience (warrant)
 Leave the audience with finals thoughts, call to action, or image that circles
back to your hook
Name __________________________________ Period _____
The Giver Book and Movie Comparison
The book
Detail
Exposition
The Community
Ceremony of
Twelve/graduation
Technology
Surveillance
The movie
Chief Elder
Asher
Fiona
Jonas
Gabe
Rosemary
Jonas’s family
The Giver
Content of the
memories
The pill/the
injections
Love
The escape
Climax
Resolution
Use the space below to record any direct quotations from the movie compelling enough to use as evidence:
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