TABLE OF CONTENTS - Psy.fau.edu

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HANDBOOK FOR
UNDERGRADUATE
PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS
2010 – 2011
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
CHARLES E. SCHMIDT COLLEGE OF SCIENCE
www.psy.fau.edu
FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY AT BOCA RATON
777 Glades Road, P.O. Box 3091
Boca Raton, Florida 33431-0991
561-297-3360
FAX: 561-297-2160
FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY AT DAVIE
3200 College Avenue
Davie, Florida 33314
954-236-1120
FAX: 954-236-1107
JOHN D. MACARTHUR CAMPUS
FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY AT JUPITER
5353 Parkside Drive
Jupiter, FL 33458
561-799-8500
Rev. 07/10
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface
About Psychology
Introduction to the Department of Psychology
Department Personnel
Faculty and Areas of Specialization (Ph.D. Degree)
Secretarial & Support Staff
Fundamental Information
Academic Advising
Financial Aid
Student Registration Procedures
How to Register
Other Enrollment Issues
Enrollment Restrictions—Course Load
Deadline for Declaring a Major
Repeating Courses: University Forgiveness Policy
Freshman Warning and Academic Probation, Suspension, & Dismissal
Reinstatement and Readmission
Late Withdrawal From a Course
Transient Coursework
Course Equivalencies
Graduation Procedure
University’s Right to Award a Degree
Statement of Academic Policies
Department of Psychology
Class Attendance
Make-up Examinations
Incomplete Work
Pass-fail Option
Posting of Grades
Directed Independent Study
Misconduct
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science
Personal Communication Devices
Disabilities
Honor Code
Academic Grievances
Academic Petitions
Undergraduate Psychology Programs
General Information
Undergraduate Psychology Course Prerequisites
Degree Requirements for the B.A. in Psychology
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General Psychology Requirements
Laboratory in Psychology Options
Psychology Elective Requirements
Cognate Area Requirements
Biological Sciences
Mathematical Sciences
Degree Requirements for the B.S. in Psychobiology
Core Requirements
Concentration Area Requirements
Ethology/Comparative Psychology
Behavioral Neuroscience
Departmental Honors Program
Minor in Psychology
Degree Requirements for the University
Intellectual Foundations Program—Core Curriculum
Transfer Students: Transfer of Credits to FAU
Students Entering With an AA Degree
Students Transferring From a Four-Year Institution
Transfer Credits and the Psychology Major
Psychology Content Areas Associated with Psychology Electives
and Laboratory Courses
General Education and Gordon Rule Deficiencies for Transfer Students
Gordon Rule Requirements
Math and the Psychology Major (B.A. Program)
PSY 3234 Experimental Design and Statistical Inference
PSY 3502 App. Of Fractals to Psychology (Formerly PSY4930)
MAC Prefixed Mathematics Courses
Non-MAC Prefixed Mathematics Courses
STA 3163L Intermediate Statistics Laboratory
How to Choose Electives
I Need Help!! Resources for Academic Support/Assistance
Career Planning: Therapeutic Helping Professions
Comparison of Popular Therapeutic Helping Professions in the United
States of America
Career Planning: Graduate Degrees
Preparing for Graduate Study in Psychology and Related Fields
Academic Preparation
Research and Field Experience
Letters of Recommendation
Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
Schedule for Career Planning and Applying to Graduate School
Resources About Graduate Study/Careers in Psychology
Web Sites
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Books and Other Published Materials
Research Facilities
Psychology Student Organizations (Psychology Club/U-PSYCH listserv)
Notes
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PREFACE
The Psychology Student Handbook is intended to serve as a guide to
undergraduate students majoring in Psychology or Psychobiology at Florida
Atlantic University. To aid the student in selecting courses, we have summarized the
current university, college, and departmental requirements, as they apply to the
different classifications of students that attend FAU (transfers with an AA degree,
transfers without an AA degree, 4-year students, etc). Graduation requirements may
vary for these different classifications of students, and may also vary depending
upon the student's year of matriculation. Students should pay careful attention to
the information that is provided in the University Catalog regarding requirements
for both the department major and other graduation requirements to determine
which requirements apply to their specific circumstances. While every attempt has
been made to ensure that the information contained in this Handbook is accurate
and up-to-date, the student should keep in mind that the "final authority" is the
University catalog. The student should consult the edition of the catalog that was in
force during the term that the student was originally admitted or reinstated to
degree-seeking status.
Ultimately, each student is charged with the responsibility of knowing about all
of the graduation requirements for the baccalaureate degree and ensuring that they
have all been satisfied appropriately. If a student has any questions about
graduation requirements, requirements for the major, or anything else described in
this handbook, the student should make contact with one or more of the following:

The Undergraduate Coordinator for the Department of Psychology, Dr.
Jennifer P. Peluso, at (561) 297-3369 or [email protected]

The Department of Psychology office staff at (561) 297-3360

The Student Services Office in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science (see
http://advisortrac.science.fau.edu/AdvisorTrac/default.html)
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Boca Raton: (561) 297-3700
o Davie: (954) 236-1103

Academic Advising and Services in Jupiter at (561) 799-8697 or (561) 799-8698.
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ABOUT PSYCHOLOGY
Psychology is a behavioral science involving the study of the mind, brain, and
behavior of people and animals. Psychologists basically ask the question, "Why do
living organisms do the things they do?" They are primarily concerned with the
interaction between mental processes and behavior, and the variables that influence
these. The American Psychological Association, one professional organization of
psychologists, lists 50 individual subdivisions of psychology. The goal within these
different subfields of specialization is to advance or to apply the scientific
understanding of the mind and behavior. Therefore, psychologists in all these areas
need to know how to use the scientific method. Beyond this reliance on the scientific
method, however, psychology is a multi-faceted field.
Some people have a very limited view of the field of psychology. They think
psychologists are primarily involved with the treatment of mental disorders. Indeed,
many psychologists work in the therapeutic helping professions (e.g., Clinical
Psychology, counseling, therapy) with people having various degrees of difficulty in
dealing with their world. However, other specialties in psychology are far removed
from counseling. Experimental psychologists attempt to understand the
fundamental causes of behavior in humans and animals and are usually found in
academic or research positions. They are trained within specific domains within the
field of psychology (e.g., Cognitive Psychology, Evolutionary Psychology,
Developmental Psychology, etc.). Industrial and Organizational psychologists try
to apply psychological principles in industrial organizations, primarily in selecting
and placing employees, training personnel, and generally relieving problems
associated with any organization of people. Educational and school psychologists
apply psychological principles to improve the teaching-learning process. Social
psychologists study how individuals influence each other. Psychometric
psychologists develop various types of instruments to measure different aspects of
behavior and psychological functioning, including (but not limited to) IQ tests and
personality tests. Developmental psychologists study the development of living
organisms from the moment of conception until death. Cognitive psychologists
study how humans and nonhumans mentally process, store, and use information.
Psychobiologists and neuroscientists study the relationships among the brain,
physiology, and behavior, while neuropsychologists may apply what is known
about these relationships to patients in a clinical setting.
Because there are so many facets to psychology (including many more subfields
than the ones mentioned above), there are many decisions you will need to make
concerning your course of study here at Florida Atlantic University. Therefore, the
following information has been provided to assist you in planning your degree
program. This document is to be used only as a guide. The University Catalog is
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the final authority on what you need to do in order to graduate from Florida
Atlantic University.
* Modified from "A GUIDE FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS AND WOULD-BE MAJORS,"
Department of Psychology, Southwest Texas State University.
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INTRODUCTION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
The Department of Psychology at Florida Atlantic University resides within the
Charles E. Schmidt College of Science. The Psychology faculty are located on the
Boca Raton Campus and the satellite campuses in Davie and Jupiter. They have long
been recognized for the high quality of the department’s academic programs and for
their accomplishments teaching, research, and scholarship. The faculty is committed
to excellence in teaching, as well as to the concept of individualized training of
research skills.
The department provides an intellectually challenging and supportive environment
in which students can develop their potential for careers in all areas of psychology.
Students can choose one of two majors in the Department of Psychology. They can
major in Psychology and earn, at the completion of their university training, the B.A.
in Psychology. Or, they can choose to major in Psychobiology; upon completion of
this program they are awarded the B.S in Psychobiology. The department also
offers graduate study leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees in Psychology (cognitive, developmental, social/personality, evolutionary,
and psychobiology).
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DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL
Florida Atlantic University
Department of Psychology, Bldg. 12, BS 101
777 Glades Road
Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991
(561) 297-3360
FAX (561) 297-2160
http://psy.fau.edu
Faculty and Areas of Specialization (Ph.D. Degree)
Elan B. Barenholtz, Ph.D. (Rutgers University)
Visual perception; visual recognition; statistical learning
David F. Bjorklund, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Cognitive development; individual differences in cognition; evolutionary
developmental psychology.
Steven L. Bressler, Ph.D. (University of California--Berkeley)
Cognitive neuroscience; investigation of cognitive processing through
analysis of the large-scale dynamics of activity in the cerebral cortex.
Marissa Greif, Ph.D. (Yale University)
Cognitive development; tool use and action planning in infancy and early
childhood; problem solving in infancy and early childhood; categorization;
eye-tracking methods for infants and children.
Howard S. Hock, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins University)
Perception; cooperative interactions in the formation of visual motion
patterns; perceptual stability; adaptation.
Erika Hoff, (University of Michigan) (Davie Campus)
Language development; the role of input in language acquisition, relations
between phonological and lexical development, socioeconomic status and
language development, bilingual development.
Katherine M. Hughes, Ph.D. (Florida Atlantic University) (Jupiter Campus)
Behavioral neuroscience; psychopharmacology, drug addiction and
treatment.
James J. Jakubow, Ph.D. (City University of New York) (Visiting Instructor)
Behavioral psychology; Pavlovian and operant conditioning, behavioral
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pharmacology, mathematical modeling of behavior, applied behavior
analysis, parenting, companion animal psychology
Ingrid B. Johanson, Ph.D. (CUNY)
Developmental psychobiology; ontogeny of learning, memory and sensory
function.
Nancy Aaron Jones, Ph.D. (University of Maryland) (Jupiter Campus)
Infant and child development; psychopathology, psychophysiology, and
social/personality development; physiological and social precursors to the
development of depressive disorders.
J. A. Scott Kelso, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin)
Self-organization of brain and behavior; cognitive, neural and social
coordination dynamics; structural and functional neuroimaging.
Alan W. Kersten, Ph.D. (Georgia Tech)
Event memory, aging, language development, categorization.
Edward W. Large, Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
Dynamics of human perception, action, cognition and the design of
autonomous agents utilizing dynamical principles.
Phillip S. Lasiter, Ph.D. (Arizona State University)
Neuroanatomical and developmental bases of gustation.
Brett Laursen, Ph.D., (University of Minnesota) (Davie Campus)
Developmental; close relationships; adolescent adaptation; social
development; interpersonal conflict.
David J. Lewkowicz, Ph.D. (City University of New York)
Perceptual and cognitive development in human infants and children;
intersensory integration, sequence learning.
Larry Liebovitch, Ph.D. (Harvard University)
Fractal and nonlinear analysis of molecular, cellular, physiological, and
psychological systems.
Thomas C. Monson, Ph.D. (University of Minnesota)
Personality and social psychology; trait research; attribution.
Andrzej Nowak, Ph.D. (University of Warsaw)
Dynamical models of social processes, computer simulation of social and
cognitive processes, cognitive psychology.
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Jennifer P. Peluso, Ph.D. (Emory University)
Cognitive psychology; individual differences in cognition, emotion and
memory; individual differences in cognition and personality related to
student success
David G. Perry, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin)
Social development; sex typing; aggression; moral development.
Gary W. Perry, Ph.D. (University of Manchester)
Molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating neural development, growth,
and regeneration.
Monica Rosselli, Ph.D. (University of Mexico) (Davie Campus)
Neuropsychology; neuropsychological deficits in drug abusers, education
variables in neuropsychological assessment, neuropsychology of SpanishEnglish bilinguals
Michael Sagristano, Ph.D. (New York University) (Visiting Instructor)
Social cognition, attitudes, decision making, financial psychology
Todd K. Shackelford, Ph.D. (University of Texas, Austin) (Davie Campus)
Evolutionary psychology; human sperm competition, conflict between men
and women, sexual coercion, spousal and familial violence and homicide.
Robert W. Stackman, Jr., Ph.D. (Rutgers)
Behavioral neuroscience; neurobiological substrates of spatial and
nonspatial memory
Leslie Terry, Ph.D. (Duke University) (Davie Campus)
Developmental psychobiology; animal models and human analysis of drug
abuse; developmental neuropsychology; developmental
psychopharmacology.
John C. Touhey, Ph.D. (University of Nevada)
Culture and personality; intimate relationships; risk-taking behavior.
Betty Tuller, Ph.D. (University of Connecticut)
Pattern dynamics of speech production and speech perception, phonological
learning, the neural basis of skill learning, cognition in diabetes and
Alzheimer’s disease.
Robin R. Vallacher, Ph.D. (Michigan State University)
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Social psychology; dynamical models of social processes, social judgment,
goal-directed action, self-concept, social influence.
Robert P. Vertes, Ph.D. (Rockefeller University)
Functional organization of the brainstem and its control of forebrain
function; neurophysiology of sleep.
Charles W. White, Ph.D. (Stanford University) (Davie Campus)
Human visual perception and sensory processes.
David L. Wolgin, Ph.D., Chair (Rutgers University)
Behavioral Neuroscience; behavioral and neural mechanisms of drug
tolerance and sensitization.
DEPARTMENT SECRETARIAL & SUPPORT STAFF
Boca Raton Campus
BS 101, (561) 297-3360
FAX (561) 297-2160
Susan McDonough, Senior Secretary
Sherika Hanna-Emery, Budget Coordinator
Helen Munchow, Secretary
Pedro Villoldo, Coordinator of Research Program/Services
Davie Campus
ES 268, (954) 236-1120
FAX (954) 236-1099
Veronica Lindsay Weiss, Senior Secretary
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FUNDAMENTAL INFORMATION
ACADEMIC ADVISING
ALL undergraduate academic advising for BA Psychology and BS Psychobiology
students will be handled by the staff of the Student Services Office for the Charles E.
Schmidt College of Science. This advising will address the requirements for the
major as well as for the other general graduation requirements that must be
completed. Student Services staff for the College are located on the Boca Raton
campus in the Science and Engineering Building (SE) in room 234 and on the Davie
campus. Advising on the MacArthur campus in Jupiter is conducted by Academic
Advising and Services at (561) 799-8697 or (561) 799-8698. The advisors in these
offices help students plan and monitor their academic progress toward completing
the requirements for their degree programs as well as for general graduation
requirements. They also assist students with registration holds, changes of major(s),
transfer student orientation and credits, and many other transcript and registration
issues.
Students can arrange for an advising appointment with the Student Services Office
staff for the College of Science by logging into the AdvisorTrac system online at
http://advisortrac.science.fau.edu/AdvisorTrac/default.html. Students needing
further assistance can contact the office by telephone at 561-297-3700.
Psychology department faculty (on all campuses) are available to students for
guidance in career choices, graduate training, research opportunities, information
about specific sub-disciplines within the field, etc. Undergraduate students are
strongly encouraged to seek out a faculty mentor to complement the comprehensive
academic planning that is offered via the College of Science's Student Services
Office. Most faculty conduct advising by appointment only.
The website for the Department of Psychology is found at http://psy.fau.edu; it
contains news items as well as a copy of this handbook and information about the
graduate programs in psychology.
FINANCIAL AID
All students interested in financial aid of any type should apply through the Office
of Financial Aid (SSB 227, 297-3530). This includes applications for scholarships,
loans, and college work-study. Minority students are especially encouraged to
inquire regarding special scholarships for which they might be eligible.
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At the end of each Spring term, the Psychology Department awards the Susan B.
Dewar Memorial Scholarship to an outstanding undergraduate student who is
planning to continue the study of psychology at the graduate level. Students at the
Davie Campus are eligible for the Elisa M. Pollock Memorial Awards for
outstanding psychology students.
STUDENT REGISTRATION PROCEDURES
How to Register. Prior to consulting with an advisor, the student should carefully
study the Schedule of Courses to determine what courses are scheduled for a given
term on each campus and at what times. Students can obtain information about
prerequisites, co-requisites, and/or other registration controls for a specific course
by clicking on the 5-digit CRN for that course in the semester schedule. It is a good
idea to review this information for a course before attempting to register for it. The
current schedule is continuously updated online and is available via the MyFAU
system (you must login using your FAU netID at http://myfau.fau.edu), or by
going to the direct link at http://oasis2.fau.edu/ia-bin/ahomepg.htm. The student
should also review the Psychology Student Handbook and the University Catalog
for degree requirements and course descriptions prior to attending an advising
appointment.
New students must register during the regular registration period indicated in the
Academic Calendar published by the Registrar’s Office. Continuing students can
take advantage of advance (or pre-) registration to enroll in courses, or, alternatively,
can register during the regular registration period. It is to the student's advantage to
register, if at all possible, during pre-registration because some classes may be
closed by regular registration. Consult the current university catalog for dates of
pre- and regular registration for the upcoming term, or view the current academic
calendar online at http://www.fau.edu/registrar/acadcal.php.
Once a new student has had an initial advising session (with Student Services staff)
and received some guidance in course selection, the student can register online via
the MyFAU system (http://myfau.fau.edu). In certain situations, students may need
to complete their registration in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science Student
Services Office (S&E 234). Students may also register in person at the Davie, Jupiter
and Port St. Lucie campuses.
Continuing students can register in person at the Registrar’s Office or online.
Although continuing students are not required to meet with their academic advisors
in order to register, it is highly recommended that students periodically meet with
their academic advisors to discuss their programs of study and to monitor progress
toward graduation. Such meetings can take place at any time during the academic
year.
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Other Enrollment Issues. There are times when a student attempting to register
online for a particular psychology course cannot enroll in it because of a failure of
the system to recognize a prerequisite course. This can happen when a prerequisite
has been taken at another institution with a different course number than that used
at FAU or other Florida state institutions. When this happens, the student needs to
come in to the Psychology Department office in BS 101 with his/her FAU Z# and a
complete copy of the current unofficial transcript from the MyFAU system showing
courses taken at all institutions of higher education. The transcripts are needed by
the office staff to verify that the prerequisites have been completed. Most other
registration errors can be handled this way, too. (Please note that the Psychology
Department staff cannot assist students with registration problems for nonpsychology courses. In general, students must contact the staff of the department
responsible for the course for which they are having registration problems in order
to get those problems resolved.)
During the first week of classes, there is an add/drop period during which the
student may make changes to their semester course schedule. The deadline by
which schedule changes can be made is listed in the current academic calendar
published by the Registrar’s Office at http://www.fau.edu/registrar/acadcal.php.
Drops and/or withdrawals after this deadline are possible, but courses may be fee
liable, and students may need to file petition paperwork with the Dean’s Office in
order to drop or withdraw late from a course.
In order to register for Directed Independent Study (PSY 4906, see page 10 in this
handbook), students must meet with the faculty member who will be supervising
the project and obtain permission. The faculty member will do so either by
electronically providing this permission in the registration system for the student, or
by signing a copy of the Registration - Drop/Add Request form. The signed form
needs to be brought to the department office so that the staff can issue electronic
permission on behalf of the faculty member.
ENROLLMENT RESTRICTIONS—COURSE LOAD
To be considered full-time, a student must be registered for 12 credits in any
semester, up to a maximum of 20 credits. During the summer semester, the
maximum load is 9 credits each for short terms A and B, and 18 credits for the fullterm C. The total of C term enrollment plus twice the A (or B) term enrollment
cannot exceed 18 credits. If a student wishes to enroll in more than 20 hours during
the Fall or Spring semester, or more than 18 credit hours in the Summer, he or she
must obtain permission from the staff in the Student Services Office for the Charles
E. Schmidt College of Science (S&E 234, 561-297-3700).
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DEADLINE FOR DECLARING A MAJOR
Students cannot officially declare a major unless they are in good academic
standing and have maintained a satisfactory academic record with an average of “C”
or better on all work attempted (2.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale). Students who have not
chosen a major must declare a major during the semester in which they reach 72
credit hours. If they reach 72 credit hours without having declared a major, students
will be prohibited from registering for any more courses until the major is declared.
Students may declare a major in Psychology by completing an Application for
Undergraduate Change of College/Change of Major form (available online via the
Registrar’s Office at http://www.fau.edu/registrar/forms.php#student). This form
requires the signature of the Undergraduate Coodinator for the Psychology
Department if students are changing to the BA Psychology and/or BS
Psychobiology degree program(s).
REPEATING COURSES: UNIVERSITY FORGIVENESS POLICY
Students may repeat any course completed at Florida Atlantic University
provided that the course is still listed in the current catalog of offered coursework.
Ordinarily, each attempt at a course is included in the calculation of a student’s
grade (all attempts at the same course are averaged together). However, through the
University Forgiveness Policy, FAU offers students the opportunity to eliminate
from the calculation of the GPA the influence of the grade earned in the first attempt
of a course and to merely replace it with the grade earned on a subsequent attempt
in the same course. This is an ideal opportunity to improve the GPA for someone
who needs to “recover” from earning a failing or unsatisfactory grade in a course.
There are caveats to the University Forgiveness Policy, however. For example, in
order to apply the Forgiveness Policy to a course, the student must have completed
both the original attempt and the subsequent attempt at that course at FAU. If the
first attempt was completed at a different institution, the University Forgiveness
Policy cannot be applied toward that course. Another constraint on the Forgiveness
Policy is that it can only be used up to two times during a student’s study at FAU.
A student must request to use the Forgiveness Policy (it is not applied
automatically) for each course for which the student desires to use the policy. The
student will need to complete the Forgiveness Policy Request form at the Office of
the Registrar and submit it prior to or during registration for the term in which the
course is to be repeated. Repeated courses may be subject to full tuition and/or
additional fees. Additional information about this policy can be found in the
current University Catalog in the section entitled “Academic Policies and
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Regulations,” which is available in hard copy and as a downloadable PDF document
at
http://www.fau.edu/academic/registrar/univcatalog/welcome.htm.
FRESHMAN WARNING AND ACADEMIC PROBATION, SUSPENSION, &
DISMISSAL
When a student’s GPA falls below 2.0 in a given semester, academic year, or in
cumulative, a student will be notified of the need to improve their academic
performance. Depending on how low the GPA has fallen, and for how many
semesters, the student may be issued a “warning” in writing. This may take the form
of a “Freshman Warning” or a notice of Academic Probation. If the poor
performance continues such that the GPA for the next term of attempted
coursework is again below 2.0 and the cumulative GPA falls below 2.0, the student
may be suspended and/or dismissed from the university. More information
regarding Freshman Warning, Academic Probation, Academic Suspension, and
Academic Dismissal can be found in the university catalog in the section on
“Academic Policies and Regulations” at
http://www.fau.edu/academic/registrar/univcatalog/welcome.htm.
It is possible to have one’s academic status reinstated or to be readmitted to the
university after a period of suspension or dismissal by submitting a petition to the
student’s college. If a student was a declared Psychology major at the time of
suspension/dismissal, he or she will need to complete a College of Science Petition
Form. This form can be obtained from the web site for the Student Services Office for
the College of Science at http://weblog.science.fau.edu/student_services/. The
student will also need to write a personal statement explaining what led to the
suspension/dismissal and how/why he or she will be more successful upon return
to the university. Copies of supporting documentation (if any) should be enclosed
with the personal statement. Before the petition packet can be submitted to the
Student Services Office of the College of Science (in Science & Engineering room 234,
tel. 297-3700), the student must obtain a letter of support for the petition from the
Department of Psychology. The support letter must accompany a student’s petition.
To obtain a letter of support from the Department of Psychology, the petitioning
student will need to complete a departmental request form for a letter
(Undergraduate Student Petition Form (Psychology), found on the department’s
web site). Then, the student should arrange to meet with Dr. Jennifer Peluso, the
Undergraduate Coordinator for the department, to discuss the situation. Copies of
the completed College Petition Form and the personal statement with
documentation should be turned in to the department at that time. In the case that
departmental support for the petition is granted, a letter of support will be provided
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to the student within 48 business hours of the meeting and receipt of a student’s
materials. Letters of support, however, are not automatic. Every case will be
evaluated individually and letters will be provided at the discretion of the
department. Letters will not be provided on a walk-in basis.
REINSTATEMENT AND READMISSION
Any student who has not been actively enrolled in coursework at FAU for three
or more consecutive terms (including Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters) will be
removed from the Registrar’s roll of current students. At that point, if the student
wishes to reenroll at the university, (s)he will need to reapply to the university
(including the submission of an application and associated fees, providing current
necessary documents, and the like). If the student was in Good Standing when last
enrolled, readmission will suffice to allow the student to register for courses.
However, if the student was on Academic Warning, Probation, Suspension, or
Dismissal, the student will need to submit a petition to be reinstated at FAU (see
above).
Once the student is reinstated or readmitted to the university, he or she should
check to see what the current graduation requirements and academic policies are.
Whatever baccalaureate degree requirements are in place at the time the student’s
status at the university is restored will be applied to that student regardless of the
previous degree requirements that were in place at the time of the student’s original
admission to FAU and/or declaration of major. Students are responsible for being
aware of the graduation requirements that apply to them.
LATE WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE
A late withdrawal from a course is defined as withdrawing from a course after
the deadline for a mid-term withdrawal (published in the current official Academic
Calendar of the University, see http://www.fau.edu/registrar/acadcal.php). To do
so, a student must complete the following steps (see additional information and
forms online at http://weblog.science.fau.edu/student_services/ ). Psychology and
Psychobiology majors are enrolled in the College of Science, so their petitions will be
submitted to the Student Services Office for the Charles E. Schmidt College of
Science.
FIRST: Obtain and complete an Academic Petition and complete a Post Mid-Term
Withdrawal/Drop Request Form for EACH class.
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SECOND: Write a 1-page letter explaining your reasons for requesting the
withdrawal, and attach any supporting documentation.
THIRD: Ask the instructor of each course to complete a Withdrawal/Drop Request
Form. The instructor’s name, office address, phone number, and email must be on
the form.
FOURTH: Each instructor must write a letter (on department letterhead) to the
Academic Petitions Committee expressing their opinion on your petition to drop the
class.
FIFTH: Bring your letter, a Post Mid-Term Withdrawal request form for EACH class
you are attempting to drop, instructor letter(s), the completed Academic Petition
form (one form), and your documentation to SE 234
SIXTH: Once the College of Science committee representative has signed, you must
then secure the signature of the Dean of Student Affairs representative
SEVENTH: Turn in all completed, signed forms with documentation to the
Registrar’s office.
EIGHTH: Continue attending class until you receive a decision from the Petitions
Committee; completing these forms does not constitute a withdrawal from class,
unless approved by the Academic Petitions Committee. After the committee usually
meets, usually every two weeks; you will be notified of the decision.
TRANSIENT COURSEWORK
Undergraduate psychology students who want to take courses at another
institution (while continuing their program of study here at FAU) must receive prior
permission from the College of Science before those courses can be applied as
transfer credit into their degree programs. To do so, students should first meet with
an academic advisor in the Student Services Office for the College of Science to
determine the appropriateness of the course(s) they want to take at another
institution. Once the advisor OKs the courses, students must complete a Transient
Student Form either in paper form or electronic form (available at
http://www.facts.org/cgi-bin/eaglec ). The Transient Student Form will be
evaluated by the staff in the Student Services Office for the College of Science;
students will receive correspondence from that office regarding the approval of the
transient coursework.
Transient coursework cannot be counted as credit hours completed at FAU, only
as transfer credit. Students must be in academic good standing during the semester they
15
wish to complete transient coursework. Submission of the Transient Student Form may
be necessary for a student to maintain eligibility for financial aid.
Transient coursework in the final semester is generally prohibited. Students may
petition to be granted a waiver from this rule. Such petitions should explain and
document the exceptional or extenuating circumstances that make the transient
coursework necessary in that term. Any and all petitions must be submitted to the
Student Services Office for the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science (see above).
COURSE EQUIVALENCIES
If a student wishes to request a substitution for a psychology course offered here
at FAU, he or she needs to complete a request form for the substitution and submit a
syllabus along with that form to the Undergraduate Coordinator for the Department
of Psychology (Dr. Jennifer Peluso). If the request is for substituting a non-FAU
course (one taken at another institution), the student should submit the
Undergraduate Course Equivalent/Substitution Petition Form. If the request is for
substituting another FAU course, the student should submit the Undergraduate
Student Petition Form (Psychology). Each of these forms can be found on the
department’s web site at http://psy.fau.edu .
GRADUATION PROCEDURE
Prior to registering for the expected last term, the student should make an
appointment with his/her advisor to see if all departmental requirements for
graduation will have been completed by the end of that term. Once registration has
been completed, and before the deadline to apply for graduation (consult the
Academic Calendar at http://www.fau.edu/registrar/acadcal.php), the student
and his/her advisor will complete a Graduation Audit Form. The student must also
complete an Application for the Degree form. Students failing to file for graduation
before the appropriate deadline for a particular semester can have their graduation
delayed by one semester. The filing procedure must be repeated if the student does
not graduate in the term expected.
New students should keep a copy of the University Catalog that was in effect at
the time of their admission. The catalog is, in essence, a contract between the student
and the University as to what the student must do to earn the Baccalaureate. This
means that any changes in degree requirements that occur after a student has been
admitted will not apply to that student. If the student discontinues enrollment for
more than 1 year, however, the student must reactivate his or her enrollment. The
catalog in force at the time a student is reactivated or reinstated will be in force in
this situation and any new requirements that have been established since the date
of a student’s original matriculation will then apply.
16
UNIVERSITY’S RIGHT TO AWARD A DEGREE
Florida Atlantic University helps students meet their academic goals by monitoring
academic progress toward their degree.
If an undergraduate student has completed his or her respective degree
requirements, the Academic Dean of the student's program confirms this, and the
student is eligible to be awarded the degree, the University reserves the right to
award the degree. Once the degree is awarded, the student must be readmitted to
Florida Atlantic University in order to enroll in any courses.
Students pursuing double majors or dual degrees must formally notify their
academic dean of their intent. Undergraduate students pursuing dual degrees in
different disciplines must obtain formal approval of their academic dean, following
established University procedures for such approvals.
Should the University invoke its prerogative to award a degree once a student has
completed all stated degree requirements, the student may appeal this decision. If
the student can demonstrate that continued enrollment is necessary to achieve his or
her academic goals, the appeal may be granted. Reasons such as, but not limited to,
desire to continue financial aid, participate in student activities, and access student
services do not constitute legitimate reasons for appeal.
Any undergraduate student, who wishes to appeal for continued enrollment,
thereby postponing graduation, must submit a written request to the student's
academic dean no later than ten class days after being notified that the University is
invoking its right to award the degree. This appeal will be reviewed by a committee
composed of the student's primary academic dean, the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies or Graduate Studies, and the University Registrar. The committee must find
evidence to support the student's claim of a legitimate academic need in order to
grant permission to continue taking courses.
17
STATEMENT OF ACADEMIC POLICIES
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
Each instructor in the Department enjoys the privileges and responsibilities of
academic freedom and therefore has considerable autonomy in determining the
procedures and policies for any given class. The guidelines below, however, express
the common expectations of the psychology faculty. Please consult your instructor
and/or current syllabus for specific course(s) for any additional information or
clarification.
Class Attendance. Regular class attendance expresses interest and seriousness
of purpose. It is in the student's best interests to attend class regularly. Some faculty
may require regular attendance.
Make-Up Examinations. Policies regarding the giving of make-up exams
vary from instructor to instructor. Generally, you should keep in mind that make-up
exams represent an imposition on other students and the instructor. Make-up exams
require the instructor's approval and are generally allowed only if there is
compelling evidence that the student had good reason to miss the examination. No
student should assume that a makeup privilege is automatically available. Requests
for a makeup test should be made prior to the date of the examination whenever
possible.
Incomplete Work. The Department strongly encourages students to complete
required exams and assignments for a course on time. Professors will award a grade
of Incomplete only in exceptional circumstances. Many of the faculty adopt the
policy that an Incomplete will not be given to a student whose completed work in a
course is of unsatisfactory (D or lower) quality. Students desiring a grade of
Incomplete must discuss their situations with their instructors as soon as possible
during the semester.
In the rare case that an instructor grants an Incomplete to a student, the
instructor will state the specific circumstances under which the outstanding
coursework must be completed (including the time frame and list of assignments)
on an official university form (the Removal of Incomplete Grade Form). The student
will be asked to sign this statement acknowledging the terms and time frame under
which the grade of Incomplete will be removed. Incompletes MUST be completed
no later than one year after the close of the semester for which the “I” was entered,
or the grade will be automatically changed to “F.” IT IS ULTIMATELY THE
STUDENT’S OWN RESPONSIBILITY TO COMPLETE ANY OUTSTANDING
COURSEWORK AND SUBMIT IT TO THE INSTRUCTOR WITHIN THE
18
REQUIRED DEADLINE(S) ACCORDING TO THE COURSE SYLLABUS AND
THE AGREEMENT(S) DOCUMENTED ON THE REMOVAL OF INCOMPLETE
GRADE FORM.
Pass-Fail Option. The student may opt, with approval, to receive a grade of
Pass (P) or Fail (F) in certain designated courses. The decision to take a course P/F
or for a grade must be made prior to the end of the Add/Drop period. The
maximum credit available to any student on a pass-fail option is 1 course per term,
up to a total of 12 credits. Students on probation may not opt for the pass/fail
option. The pass/fail option is not available to a student for a course in his/her
major. Students may not elect the pass/fail option for courses they are using to
satisfy the Gordon Rule writing or math requirements.
Posting of Grades. In the interest of protecting students' privacy, faculty are
forbidden by federal law to post grades or to release information about grades to
individuals other than the students. Do not call the psychology office to obtain
your grade over the phone; the secretaries and faculty cannot give out grades over
the phone. If you have provided a 4 digit "pin number" to the instructor, he/she MAY
post your grades by pin number. Posted grades are usually located on the bulletin
board around the corner from the Psychology office. You may also look up your
semester grades in the MyFAU system online (http://myfau.fau.edu).
Directed Independent Study. In a Directed Independent Study (PSY 4906), or
DIS, students are offered the opportunity to become involved in ongoing research
projects of the faculty. Such work in the laboratory can earn from 1-3 credits,
depending upon the amount of time that the student is willing to commit each week.
Alternatively, or in addition, a DIS may involve library research and reading on
some topic of special interest to the student and faculty member. Directed
Independent Study is strongly recommended for students interested in going on to
graduate school. It provides valuable experience in the day-to-day conduct of
scientific research and/or academic psychology. Students are generally expected to
commit three hours per week to the DIS project for each credit hour they register for
in a DIS (i.e., a 3 credit hour DIS requires at least 9 hours of work each week).
A Directed Independent Study is not a substitute for a course already offered
and cannot be used to fill core area requirements for the degree. However, a 3-credit
DIS that the instructor certifies in writing to constitute a laboratory experience
may be used to meet the Laboratory in Psychology core requirement (the DIS
supervisor will sign a memo to the student’s academic advisor that will be placed in
the student’s advising records). One 3-credit DIS may also be completed as a
psychology elective toward the major (a non-lab DIS is acceptable for this purpose).
Any additional credits earned via DIS can count toward the 120 credits required for
the baccalaureate degree.
19
A list of available research opportunities can be found a the department
website
at
http://psy.fau.edu/undergraduate_programs/#Undergraduate_Resources.
Students interested in pursuing a DIS should contact the faculty member with
whom they wish to work. Approval from this faculty member must be obtained
before enrolling for a DIS. DIS credit is graded on a Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory
(S/U) basis.
Note: Students should be aware that the Self-Service web registration system
handles enrollment in PSY 4906 DIS with a default assignment of one credit hour for
the course. If a student wishes to enroll in more than one credit hour in a semester,
the student must go back to the registration page in the Self-Service system and
change the credit hours from one credit hour to the desired number of credit hours.
Misconduct. The Department of Psychology considers scientific misconduct,
including such activities as inventing or intentionally misrepresenting data, as
interfering with its educational mission, and subject to the same penalties and
procedures as other Honor Code violations and academic irregularities.
CHARLES E. SCHMIDT COLLEGE OF SCIENCE
Personal Communication Devices. The FAU student handbook includes the
following statement in the section on policies and procedures: “In order to enhance
and maintain a productive atmosphere for education, personal communication
devices such as pagers, beepers, and cellular telephones are to be disabled in class
session” (p. 174). Devices may remain on so long as they are in silent/vibration
mode, but students are not to use them during class meetings. In extenuating
circumstances, a student may leave the classroom to answer/respond to a page or
call, but permission from the instructor should be obtained ahead of time.
Adherence to this policy is expected. If a class meeting is disrupted by a student’s
personal communication device, that individual will be asked to leave the
classroom. Please see your course syllabi for additional policies regarding this issue.
Disabilities. Students who believe that they possess disabilities (of any type)
for which accommodation is required must inform the instructor at the close of the
first week of class meetings. They must indicate the nature of their disability and the
sort of reasonable accommodation requested. This information will be kept
confidential, however, students will be referred to the Office for Students with
Disabilities to receive authorized academic accommodations from the University
(official documentation is necessary to complete this process). All disability-related
information will remain confidential and will not be released to anyone without the
20
student’s written permission. Obviously, if a situation or disability arises during the
course of the session for which accommodations become necessary, a student should
contact course instructors immediately. All matters will be kept strictly confidential.
Honor Code. Every student enrolled in courses at FAU is expected to have
read and understood the Honor Code of Florida Atlantic University and abide by it.
Students should consult Florida Administrative Code 6C5-4.001 Honor Code,
Academic Irregularities, and Students’ Academic Grievances for more information
on the definitions of these occurrences and the outline of appropriate procedures to
follow in the event that any of these should occur. This is reprinted in the Student
Handbook for the University as well as in the Academic Policies and Regulations
section of the University Catalog at
http://www.fau.edu/academic/registrar/univcatalog/welcome.htm.
The most up-to-date revisions of the Florida laws in effect at any given time, and the
appropriate statute or rule can be consulted at
http://fac.dos.state.fl.us/faconline/chapter06.pdf.
If, at any time, you have any questions about the Honor Code, what
constitutes an academic irregularity, or about something that might be a violation of
the Honor Code related to a course, you should contact your instructor. You may do
this in any way that is most comfortable for you (e.g., email, telephone, in person).
Such correspondence will be kept confidential.
Academic Grievances. Students with a grievance against an instructor
regarding academic matters should follow the Academic Grievance Procedure given
in the FAU Rules under "Academic Irregularities". Briefly, the steps are as follows:
•
Discuss the grievance with the instructor.
•
If satisfactory resolution is not obtained, the student may request a
conference with the instructor and department chair.
•
A memorandum of action taken at this conference should be sent to
the student in writing by the department chair.
•
The student may appeal the action to a college faculty/student council
through a written request submitted within 10 days of the
departmental conference.
The same procedure applies if an instructor accuses the student of an academic
irregularity, with the instructor initiating the action.
Academic Petitions. Students who find that a particular academic regulation
of the University is causing them undue hardship may appeal to the Academic
Petitions Committee. This committee does not concern itself with grievances against
instructors (follow procedure outlined above). Petition forms, information about the
petitions process, and a listing of relevant resources can be obtained at the Student
21
Services Office for the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science (SE 238) or at the web
site for the Student Services Office at
http://www.science.fau.edu/student_services/forms/CollegePetitions.html
The student should be aware that petitions are not automatically granted, and
that petitions are approved only when the Committee is convinced that a true
hardship will exist if it does not take a positive action. Some of the common
requests:
• Permission to drop/withdraw after the final deadline
• Reinstatement after Suspension/Dismissal
• Waiver of the last 30 upper-division hours in residence policy
• Waiver of the Summer attendance policy for core- curriculum students
• Permission to take a course overload for a semester (over 20 hours
spring/fall; over 18 hours for summer)
• Request to change a grade option in the course after registration
22
UNDERGRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS
GENERAL INFORMATION
In order to graduate, a student must have a 2.0 grade point average in
psychology coursework. This means that if a grade of "D" is earned in a psychology
course, it must be balanced by a grade of B or better in another psychology course,
so that the overall grade point average in psychology is 2.0. At this time, there is no
minimum grade required by the department for coursework toward the
psychology major. The student is not required to repeat psychology courses
(including required courses) in which a grade of D is earned. A number of courses
have specific prerequisites (see page 20).
Students are reminded that the completion of the requirements for the B.A. in
Psychology or the B.S. in Psychobiology does not, in itself, qualify a student for
graduation. A full description of additional baccalaureate requirements can be
found in the Degree Requirements section of the current university catalog. It is the
“final authority” about what requirements, policies, and procedures apply to an
individual student. It is available in hard copy in the university bookstore as well as
in electronic form (downloadable in sections as a PDF document) at
http://www.fau.edu/academic/registrar/univcatalog/welcome.htm.
In compliance with Policy Guideline 05.02.15 as approved by the Chancellor
of the State University System, Florida Board of Governors Office, FAU will provide
students access to information about Academic Learning Compacts for each
baccalaureate degree program. The Academic Learning Compact for each program
identifies (a) content/discipline knowledge and skills, (b) communication skills, and
(c) critical thinking skills students in that program are expected to demonstrate prior
to graduation and the methods by which students will be assessed on these skills.
The Academic Learning Compacts for the B.A. in Psychology and B.S. in
Psychobiology programs are provided on the department website at
http://psy.fau.edu
.
23
UNDERGRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY COURSE PREREQUISITES
ALL psychology courses above the 1000-level require PSY 1012 (General
Psychology) as a prerequisite (unless otherwise noted below). The following
indicate any additional prerequisites beyond PSY1012. Not listed are Special
Topics, Directed Independent Study, and Honors Program courses—these all
require Permission.
Course
Prerequisite(s) in addition to PSY1012
CBH4024: Comparative Animal Behavior
DEP4095: Personality & Social Development
DEP4130: Language Acquisition
DEP4163: Cognitive Development
DEP4797C: Human Development Laboratory
EXP4180: Music Perception and Cognition
BCS1010 (Biological Principles)
DEP3053 (Human Development)
DEP3053 (Human Development)
DEP3053 (Human Development)
DEP3053 (Human Development)
EXP3505 (Cognition), EXP4120 (Auditory Perception),
or permission of instructor
EXP3505 (Cognition) or
PSB3002 (Biolog Bases of Behavior I)
PSY3213 (Research Methods)
EXP3505 (Cognition) May be taken concurrently with
PSY1012
PSY3213 (Research Methods) or PSY3234 (Exp.
Design & Stat. Infer.)
PSB3002 (Biolog Bases of Behavior I)
PSB3002 (Biolog Bases of Behavior I)
PSB3002 (Biolog Bases of Behavior I)
PSB3002 (Biolog Bases of Behavior I)
PSB3002 (Biolog Bases of Behavior I)
EXP4204: Human Perception
EXP4404: Psychology of Learning
EXP4934C: Cognition Laboratory
PCO4734: Interpersonal Processes
PSB4006: Biological Bases of Behavior II
PSB4315: Neuropsychology
PSB4324: Human Psychophysiology
PSB4444: Psychopharmacology
PSB4810: Neurobiology of Learning &
Memory
PSB5615: Biological Vision
PSBL3002: Computer Lab in Psychobiology
PSBL4004: Laboratory in Psychobiology
PSY4302: Personality Testing & Meas.
PSY 4812: Advanced Evolutionary Psychol.
STA3163L: Intermediate Statistics Lab.
SYP4002: Current Issues in Social Psychology
SYP4010: Individuals in Modern Culture
SYP4030: Intra- and Intergroup Processes
SYP4120: Social Cognition
EXP4204 (Human Perception) and
Permission of Instructor
PSB 3002 (Biolog Bases of Behavior I)
Either EXP4404 (Psychology of Learning) or PSB4500
(Developmental Psychobiology) or PSB3002 (Biolog
Bases of Behavior I), plus a “B” average (or permission
of instructor)
PSY3234 (Exp. Design & Stat. Infer.)
PSY 4810 Evolutionary Psychology
PSY3234 (Exp. Design & Stat. Infer.)
SOP3004 (Social Psychology) and either PSY3234 (Exp.
Design & Stat. Infer.) or PSY3213 (Research Methods)
Permission of instructor
SYG1300 (Introduction to Social Psychology) with a
grade of “C” or better (or equivalent with permission
of instructor)
SYG1300 (Introduction to Social Psychology) with a
24
grade of “C” or better (or equivalent with permission
of instructor)
25
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.A. IN PSYCHOLOGY
Courses taken on any FAU campus may be used toward the psychology degree
requirements. Students must satisfy ALL university requirements for a baccalaureate degree
(not just those for the major) in order to graduate.
The B.A. in Psychology is intended for students interested in pursuing
graduate study in psychology (experimental psychology; clinical or counseling
psychology; applied psychology).
All students are required to complete at least 40 hours in college-level
psychology course work. At least 20 of the 40 semester hours must be taken at
Florida Atlantic University, and a minimum of 31 semester hours of the 40 hours
must be upper-division (3000-4000 level). Up to 9 hours of lower-division
psychology course work taken at another institution may be applied to the
psychology major upon approval of the department.
Students are strongly urged to complete the major requirements in as timely a
manner as possible. If the student leaves a required course until the final semester,
and the course is then either not offered or is closed, the student's graduation will be
delayed.
Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 both in the major and overall
in order to graduate. If a student’s GPA falls below 2.0 in the major, or overall, the
student cannot graduate until the GPA meets or exceeds this minimum.
I.
General Psychology Requirements: Nine courses (25 credit hours) are
required of all majors*.
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
DEP 3053 Psychology of Human
Development
3
EXP 3505 Cognition
3
PSB 3002 Biological Bases of Behavior I
3
PSY 1012 General Psychology
3
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
PSY 3213 Research Methods in Psychology 3
PSY 3234 Experimental Design &
Statistical Inference
3
SOP 3004 Social Psychology
3
STA 3163L Intermediate Statistics Lab
1
(see below) Laboratory in Psychology
3
Laboratory in Psychology Options: This requirement may be met by: a) Existing
laboratory courses: DEP 4797C Human Development Lab; EXP 4934C Cognition
Laboratory; PSB 3002L Computer Lab in Psychobiology; PSB 4004L Laboratory in
Psychobiology; SOP 4230C Laboratory in Social Behavior; OR b) Special Topics “Research
in…” laboratory courses – PSY 4930 Research in (Varied Topics); OR c) Upper-division
26
Directed Independent Study laboratory courses (PSY 4906; requires memo from instructor
certifying lab experience); OR d) an Honors Thesis (PSY 4970).
*For transfer students: If an equivalent lower division course has been taken in place
of the above, it may be substituted (with the permission of a psychology advisor)
granted that an upper-division psychology elective/lab in that same content area is
also completed in the major. Lower-division substitutes for required psychology
courses WILL NOT be counted as upper-division courses toward general graduation
requirements.
II.
Psychology Elective Requirements:
A minimum of five additional courses (15 credit hours) are to be selected from the
courses offered within the department. These are listed below along with the credit
hours assigned to each course.
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
CBH 4024 Compar Animal Behavior
3
CLP 4144 Abnormal Psychology
3
DEP 3134 Childhood Bilingualism
3
DEP 4095 Personality and Social Devel
3
DEP 4115 Infant Development
3
DEP 4130 Language Acquisition
3
DEP 4163 Cognitive Development
3
DEP 4305 Psychology of Adolescence
3
DEP 4797C# Human Development Lab
3
EXP 4120 Auditory Perception
3
EXP 4180 Music Perception & Cognitn
3
EXP 4204 Human Perception
3
EXP 4304 Psychology of Motivation
3
EXP 4404 Psychology of Learning
3
EXP 4525 Human Memory
3
EXP 4620 Psychology of Reading
3
EXP 4640 Psychology of Language
3
#
EXP 4934C Cognition Laboratory
3
PCO 4734 Interpersonal Processes
3
PPE 4003 Personality Theories
3
PPE 4700 Experim Studies Personality
3
PSB 3002L# Comptr Lab in Psychobiol
3
PSB 4004L# Laboratory in Psychobiology
3
PSB 4006 Biolog Bases of Behavior II
3
PSB 4240 Neuropsychology
3
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
PSB 4324 Human Psychophysiology
3
PSB 4444 Psychopharmacology
3
PSB 4504 Developmental Psychobiology
3
PSB 4810 Neurobioy of Learning & Memory 3
PSB 4833 Biopsychology of Language
3
PSB 5117 Biological Vision (graduate-level)
3
PSB 5515 Developmental Neurobiology
3
PSY 1930 Univ Scholars Seminar in Psych
3
PSY 2930 Special Topics in Psychology
3
PSY 3502 Fractals in Psychology
3
PSY 4302 Personality Test and Measurement 3
PSY 4604 History and Systems of Psychology 3
PSY 4810 Evolutionary Psychology
3
PSY 4812 Advanced Evolutionary Psychology 3
PSY 4906#‡ Directed Independent Study
1-3
PSY 4930 Special Topics in Psychology
3
PSY 4932‡‡ Honors Seminar
3
‡‡
PSY 4970 Honors Thesis
1-3
SOP 3742 Psychology of Women
3
SOP 4230C# Social Behavior Laboratory
3
SYP 4002 Current Issues in Social Psychology 3
SYP 4010 Individual in Modern Culture
3
SYP 4030 Intra- and Inter- Group Processes 3
SYP 4120 Social Cognition
3
#The
same course cannot be used to satisfy two different requirements for the major at the same
time. A course counted as a Psychology laboratory cannot be counted as a Psychology Elective
simultaneously.
‡Maximum
of 3 credits of DIS may be counted toward Psychology Elective Requirement.
‡‡Enrollment
in Honors Thesis and Honors Seminar is limited to Honors students.
27
III.
Cognate Area Requirements
Before enrolling in the following courses, students should determine whether prerequisites
or co-requisites are required by the controlling department. Substitutions for transferred
coursework may require formal evaluation by the FAU department controlling the
course(s) in question.
Biological Sciences: All students must have six (6) credit hours of Biological Science to be
chosen from the following courses. Other BSC or ZOO courses may be substituted only by
approval from the Psychology Department:
Course Number and Title
BSC 1010 Biological Principles
BSC 1011 Biodiversity
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
BSC 2085
BSC 2086
Anatomy & Physiology 1
Anatomy & Physiology 2
3
3
Mathematical Sciences: All students must have six (6) credit hours of Mathematics
to be chosen from the following courses:
Course Number and Title
MAC 1105 College Algebra
MAC 1114 Trigonometry
MAC 1140 Pre-Calculus Algebra
MAC 1147 Pre-Calculus Algebra & Trig
MAC 2233 Methods of Calculus
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
4-5
3
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
MAC 2241, 2242 Life Sci Calculus 1, 2
3
MAC 2281, 2282 Calc for Engineers 1, 2
4
MAC 2311, 2312, 2313 Calc w/Analytic
Geom 1, 2, 3
4
PSY 3502 Fractals in Psychology
3
Note that all of the MAC courses may be used to satisfy the Gordon Rule
(Computational Skills) if the student earns a grade of “C” or higher. PSY 3234
Experimental Design & Statistical Inference is a required psychology course, but it
also counts as a Gordon Rule (Computational Skills) course. These may also also be
used toward the State of Florida’s CLAS requirement. The PSY 3502 Fractals in
Psychology course is neither a Gordon Rule course, nor a CLAS-eligible course. See
the university catalog for more information.
Laboratories for the cognate courses are NOT required for the major, but
students should check with their academic advisors and the controlling departments
to determine whether laboratories are needed in order to satisfy (other)
departments’ requirements or general graduation requirements.
28
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. IN PSYCHOBIOLOGY
Courses taken on any FAU campus may be used toward the psychobiology degree
requirements. Students must satisfy ALL university requirements for a baccalaureate degree
(not just those for the major) in order to graduate.
The Psychobiology Degree Program is designed to provide the type of
undergraduate preparation necessary for students who are interested in pursuing
graduate degrees in psychobiology and behavioral biology, or in pursuing professional
degrees in medicine or veterinary medicine. The student elects an emphasis in either
Ethology/Comparative Psychology OR Behavioral Neuroscience.
Students are strongly urged to complete the major requirements in as timely a
manner as possible. If the student leaves a required course until the final semester, and
the course is then either not offered or is closed, the student's graduation will be
delayed.
Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 both in the major and overall in
order to graduate. If a student’s GPA falls below 2.0 in the major, or overall, the student
cannot graduate until the GPA meets or exceeds this minimum.
I.
Core Requirements (57 credit hours required)
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
BCH 3033 Biochemistry I
3
BSC 1010 Biological Principles
3
BSC 101L Biological Principles Lab
1
BSC 1011 Biodiversity
3
BSC 1011L Biodiversity Lab
1
CBH 4024 Comparative Animal Behavior
3
CHM 2045 General Chemistry 1
3
CHM 2045L General Chemistry 1 Lab
1
CHM 2046 General Chemistry II
3
CHM 2046L General Chemistry II Lab
1
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I
3
CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II
3
CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry II Lab
2
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
Math through Calculus (MAC 2233, 2241, 2242,
2281, 2282, 2311, 2312, or 2313)
3
PCB 4723
Comparative Animal Physiology 3
PCB 4723L
Compar Animal Physiol Lab
1
PHY 2048, 2049†
General Physics I and II† 8
OR
PHY 2053, 2054†
College Physics I and II† 8
PSB 3002
Biolog. Bases of Behav. I
3
PSY 1012
General Psychology
3
PSY 3213
Res. Meth. in Psychology
3
PSY 3234
Experim. Design and Stat. Inf.
3
STA 3163L
Intermed. Statistics Lab
1
†This degree program does not require that students take Physics lab courses,
however, students who are considering medical school should take the lab
sequences. Also, the Physics department may require labs as co-requisites for
lecture courses.
29
See the next page for additional concentration area requirements.
II.
CONCENTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS: A minimum of 12 credit hours
taken exclusively within one of the following areas of concentration.
a.
Ethology/Comparative Psychology: 12 credit hours must be selected from the following
list
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
EXP 4304 Motivation
3
OCB 4043
Marine Biology
OCB 4043L
Marine Biology Lab
PCB 3063
Genetics
PCB 4043
Principles of Ecology
PCB 4414C
Behavioral Ecology
PCB 4673
Evolution
PSBL 3002
Computer Lab Psychobiol
PSBL 4004
Lab in Psychobiology
Course Number and Title
PSB 4500
ZOO 2203
ZOO 2203L
ZOO 4473
ZOO 4473L
ZOO 4516
ZOO 4516L
ZOO 4690
ZOO 4690L
2
2
4
4
4
3
3
3
Cr. Hrs.
Develop Psychobiology
3
Invertebrate Zoology
3
Invertebrate Zoology Lab
2
Ornithology
2
Ornithology Lab
2
Exp. Techn. Mar. Anim. Beh. 1
Marine Animal Behavior Lab 3
Compar. Vertebrate Morph. 3
Compar. Vertebr Morph Lab 2
b. Behavioral Neuroscience: 12 credit hours must be selected from the following list
Course Number and Title
Cr. Hrs.
EXP 4204 Human Perception
PCB 3063 Genetics
PSBL 3002 Comput Lab in Psychobiology
PSBL 4004 Lab in Psychobiology
PSB 4006 Biological Bases of Behavior II
PSB 4240 Neuropsychology
Course Number and Title
3
4
3
3
3
3
PSB 4324
PSB 4444
PSB 4500
PSB 4810
PSB 4833
PSB 5515
30
Cr. Hrs.
Human Psychophysiology
Psychopharmacology
Developmental Psychobiology
Neurobiol. of Learning & Mem
Biopsychology of Language
Developmental Neurobiology
3
3
3
3
3
3
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS PROGRAM
Qualified students are invited to participate in an Honors Track in the
undergraduate psychology major program. Students may apply for and be admitted to
the Honors Program after completion of 60 credit hours and prior to the completion of
105 hours. Students must have a grade point average of 3.2 overall and in psychology
for all college-level coursework to be admitted to, and be retained in, the program.
Students in the Honors Program are strongly encouraged to enroll for a Directed
Independent Study as soon as they have identified a faculty member with whom to
work. This should be done as early as possible, but no later than the start of the senior
year. In addition, students in the Honors Program are expected to register for and
participate in the Honors Seminar (PSY 4932) for 3 credit hours. Enrolling in the
Honors Thesis (PSY 4970) is optional, normally taken with 1 credit hour one semester
and 2 credit hours the next semester to complete a written Honors Thesis/Project.
MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY
A minor in Psychology is available for students who complete a minimum of 15
credits in psychology, including the following required courses:
Course Number
DEP 3054
EXP 3505
PSB 3002
PSY 1012
SOP 3004
Course Title
Psychology of Human Development
Cognition
Biological Bases of Behavior I
General Psychology
Social Psychology
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
At least three of the above courses must be taken at FAU in order to qualify for the
minor.
31
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE UNIVERSITY
All undergraduate majors must complete the following minimum requirements, in
addition to those indicated above. These requirements are described in detail in the
University Catalog in the section entitled “Degree Requirements.” The most current
version of this section of the catalog may be viewed online and downloaded as a PDF
document at
(http://www.fau.edu/academic/registrar/09-10_catalog/University_Catalog.htm
1.
Earn a minimum of 120 credits in academic courses acceptable toward the degree
(some programs require more than 120 credits.) Attain a minimum 2.0 grade point
average in the courses required for a major program at FAU.
2.
Earn a minimum of 45 of these 120 credits at the upper division as indicated by the
Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS) designations or their equivalents. In
some programs, graduate-level courses may be used to satisfy undergraduate
requirements; however, no undergraduate will be required to take a graduate-level
course as part of a normal degree requirement. At FAU, courses with a number of
3000 or higher are considered to be upper division courses.
3.
Apply no more than 60 credits of nontraditional credit toward the degree earned
through Advanced Placement (AP), College Level Examination Program (CLEP),
Correspondence Courses, International Baccalaureate (IB), or Military Service
Schools, subject to limits for each as stated in the Academic Policies and
Regulations section of this catalog. Credits earned in this manner will be
considered transfer credits.
4.
Earn the last 30 upper-division credits in residence at FAU. In programs requiring
more than 120 credits, at least 25 percent of the total number of credits required for
the degree must be earned in residence at FAU.
5. Earn at least 50 percent of all upper-division courses in the major department from
FAU.
6.
Fulfill the core curriculum or general education requirements as appropriate to the
student’s admission status. For students matriculating Fall, 2009 or later, this
requirement is met via the new Intellectual Foundations Program (IFP).
7.
Summer Credit Requirement: Earn a minimum of 9 credits by attending one or
more summer terms at either FAU or another state of Florida institution. This
requirement applies only to students admitted to FAU as freshmen or as transfer
students with fewer than 60 credits. Credits earned and transferred through the
Advanced International Certificate in Education (AICE) Program, Advanced
Placement (AP) Program, College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Dual
32
Enrollment (DE) Program, or International Baccalaureate (IB) Program may be
applied toward the 9-credit summer requirement, thereby reducing the student’s
summer credit requirement total.
8.
Satisfy the Writing Across Curriculum (Gordon Rule) and Gordon Rule
computation requirements (see explanation elsewhere in this section).
9.
Complete the College Level Academic Skills requirement (CLAS) (see
http://www.fau.edu/testing/newclas.php ).
10. Fulfill major requirements of the Department of Psychology and the Charles E.
Schmidt College of Science. These include maintaining an overall GPA and a GPA
in the major of at least 2.0 (equivalent to a grade of “C”).
11. Fulfill the foreign language graduation requirement.
12. Submit an Application for Degree form.
Students can arrange for an advising appointment with the Student Services Office staff
for the College of Science by logging into the AdvisorTrac system online at
http://advisortrac.science.fau.edu/AdvisorTrac/default.html. Students needing
further assistance can contact the office by telephone at 561-297-3700.
33
INTELLECTUAL FOUNDATIONS PROGRAM—CORE CURRICULUM
The Intellectual Foundations Program (IFP), the University’s Core Curriculum
for four-year degree programs, is required of all students who enter as freshmen or
with fewer than 30 credit hours as of Fall, 2009. It is designed to provide a broad
background in the liberal arts and sciences, and to satisfy legislative requirements for
competency in writing and mathematics (THE GORDON RULE). A description of the
current IFP, and which courses can be used to satisfy the different “foundations” in this
program is provided in the university catalog. Students with questions about the IFP
should schedule an appointment with a College Student Services advisor by logging
into the AdvisorTrac system online at
http://advisortrac.science.fau.edu/AdvisorTrac/default.html. Students needing
further assistance can contact the office by telephone at 561-297-3700.
TRANSFER STUDENTS: TRANSFER OF CREDITS TO FAU
The transfer of credits toward the student's program at FAU is complicated by
the fact that there are different "classes" of transfer students.
Students Entering With An Associates Degree. A student who has earned an
Associates degree from a community college in the state of Florida will have completed
a minimum of 60 credit hours. While credit hours in excess of 60 hours may also be
applicable to the Baccalaureate degree at FAU, at a minimum, 45 of the 120 credits
required for the baccalaureate degree must be in upper level (3000-4000) course work.
At least 30 hours of this upper-division coursework must be completed here at FAU.
Thus, students entering FAU with an AA degree may need to complete a number of
upper level elective courses (not necessarily required for their major) in order to
graduate.
Students Transferring From A Four-Year Institution. Students who enter FAU
with credit hours earned at another four-year institution may be permitted to apply all
of their credits toward the FAU baccalaureate degree program. However, upper
division transfer students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at FAU. The last
30 upper-division credit hours in a baccalaureate degree program must be earned in
residence at FAU.
Transfer Credits and the Psychology Major. Up to 20 credit hours of psychology
coursework taken at another four-year institution may count toward the 40 credits
required in psychology. Up to 9 credit hours of lower-division psychology coursework
taken at another institution may count toward the 40 credit hours required in
psychology. However, the student should keep in mind that 31 of the 40 credits
34
required for the degree program must be in upper level (3000-4000) course work. For
example, if all 20 credits are lower division credits (1000-2000), the student would still
be required to take 31 credits at FAU. Decisions as to which courses transfer to form
part of the FAU degree program will be made by the advisor, in consultation with other
faculty members when necessary. The student may be asked to provide a syllabus or
the name of the text used to assist the advisor in determining whether an outside course
fulfills one of the department's core area requirements. Students who have completed
an upper-division statistics elsewhere with a grade of C or better may be exempted
from the statistics requirement upon approval of the advisor. Courses from 4-year
institutions that are not approved toward the psychology major may nevertheless be
counted toward the 120 semester hours required to graduate.
Students who wish to use psychology coursework taken at another institution as
substitutes for FAU psychology courses need to complete and submit an
Undergraduate Course Equivalent/Substitution Petition Form found on the
department web site. This form must be submitted with syllabi (see the instructions on
the form itself.)
If a lower-division psychology course is accepted as a substitution for an upperdivision required psychology course, the department may, at its discretion, require that
the student complete an upper-division psychology laboratory or psychology elective
course in that same content area as part of the major degree program. The following
table shows which psychology content area is represented by each undergraduate
psychology elective and psychology laboratory course currently offered by the
Department of Psychology.
PSYCHOLOGY CONTENT AREAS ASSOCIATED
ELECTIVE AND LABORATORY COURSES
Course #
CBH 4024
CLP 4144
DEP 3134
DEP 4095
DEP 4115
DEP 4130
DEP 4163
DEP 4305
DEP 4797C
EXP 4120
EXP 4180
EXP 4204
EXP 4304
EXP 4404
EXP 4525
EXP 4620
EXP 4640
Course Title
Comparative Animal Behavior
Abnormal Psychology
Childhood Bilingualism
Personality and Social Development
Infant Development
Language Acquisition
Cognitive Development
Psychology of Adolescence
Human Development Lab
Auditory Perception
Music Perception and Cognition
Human Perception
Psychology of Motivation
Psychology of Learning
Human Memory
Psychology of Reading
Psychology of Language
35
Cr. Hrs.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
WITH
PSYCHOLOGY
Psychology Content Area
Psychobiology
Social
Developmental
Developmental, Social
Developmental
Cognition, Developmental
Cognition, Developmental
Developmental
Developmental
Cognition
Cognition
Cognition
Cognition
Cognition
Cognition
Cognition
Cognition
EXP 4934C
PCO 4734
PPE 4003
PPE 4700
PSB 3002L
PSB 4004L
PSB 4006
PSB 4240
PSB 4324
PSB 4444
PSB 4504
PSB 4810
PSB 4833
PSB 5117
PSB 5515
PSY 1930
PSY 2930
PSY 3502
PSY 4302
PSY 4604
PSY 4810
PSY 4812
PSY 4906
PSY 4930
PSY 4932
PSY 4970
SOP 3742
SOP 4230C
SYP 4002
SYP 4010
SYP 4030
Cognition Laboratory
Interpersonal Processes
Personality Theories
Experimental Studies of Personality
Computer Lab in Psychobiology
Laboratory in Psychobiology
Biological Bases of Behavior II
Neuropsychology
Human Psychophysiology
Psychopharmacology
Developmental Psychobiology
Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
Biopsychology of Language
Biological Vision (graduate-level)
Developmental Neurobiology
Univ Scholars Seminar in Psych
Special Topics in Psychology
Fractals in Psychology
Personality Test and Measurement
History and Systems of Psychology
Evolutionary Psychology
Advanced Evolutionary Psychology
Directed Independent Study
Special Topics in Psychology
Honors Seminar
Honors Thesis
Psychology of Women
Social Behavior Laboratory
Current Issues in Social Psychology
Individual in Modern Culture
Intra- and Inter- Group Processes
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1 to 3
3
3
1 to 3
3
3
3
3
3
Cognition
Social
Social
Social
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
Psychobiology
N/A
N/A
N/A
Social
N/A
N/A
N/A
Various Areas Offered
Various Areas Offered
N/A
Various Areas Offered
Social
Social
Social
Social
Social
Reminder: Lower-division substitutes for required psychology courses WILL NOT be
counted as upper-division courses toward general graduation requirements
There are no restrictions on the number of lower-division courses in
mathematics, biological sciences, or foreign language transfer students may count
toward their baccalaureate degree program in psychology (assuming that they are
deemed to be equivalent to FAU courses that can be counted toward the degree).
As a general rule, students cannot take courses at another institution in their final
semester (the semester of graduation). Petitions to waive this rule must be submitted to
Dr. Ingrid Johanson, Sr. Associate Dean for the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science.
GENERAL EDUCATION AND GORDON RULE DEFICIENCIES FOR TRANSFER
STUDENTS
36
Students entering with an AA degree from a public Florida community college have
automatically fulfilled the university General Education requirements (see below) and
the Gordon Rule requirements (see below). All other transfer students MAY have
general education or Gordon Rule deficiencies. These deficiencies should be identified
on the acceptance letter and/or in initial orientation advising provided by the College
of Science Student Services Office. Students entering FAU with general education
deficiencies must remedy those deficiencies within the first year of enrollment at
FAU.
GORDON RULE REQUIREMENTS
Students entering college or university study for the first time after October 15, 1982,
are required to complete, with grades of C or better, 12 credit hours of Writing (or
24,000 words) and 6 credits hours of Mathematics for admission into the upper division.
Students transferring from out-of-state institutions who think they may have completed
Gordon Rule equivalent courses with grades of C or better must obtain a letter from the
previous institution stating that at least 6,000 words were written in the course (not to
include essay examinations). Such letters should be mailed directly to the Registrar's
Office at FAU. More information about the Gordon Rule can be obtained from the
university catalog.
MATH AND THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR (B.A. PROGRAM)
Many students express confusion about the relationship between the
mathematics courses that can be used to satisfy the math cognate requirement (6 hours)
for the Psychology (B.A.) major and what mathematics courses can be used to satisfy
more general graduation requirements (e.g., CLAS alternatives, Gordon Rule for
computational skill, etc.). The following is provided to help clarify some of the
differences between mathematics courses that a student may consider taking.
Additional information can be obtained from the current University Catalog.
PSY 3234 Experimental Design and Statistical Inference (3 cr.)
 Is as a requirement for the Psychology Major (no minimum grade required)
 FAU courses with STA prefixes cannot be substituted for this course; STA
courses taken elsewhere may serve as substitutes (depending on the course
content; must be evaluated by department)
 Cannot be used toward the satisfaction of the Foundations of Mathematics
and Quantitative Reasoning (IFP program, for students matriculating Fall,
2009 or later)
37



Cannot be used toward the satisfaction of the Mathematics Requirement for
General Education Deficiencies (for students matriculating prior to Fall, 2009)
IF passed with grade of “C” or higher, may be counted as a GORDON RULE
course (computational skills)
Can be used to exempt from CLAS, depending on the grade
PSY 3502 App. Of Fractals to Psychology (3 cr., formerly offered as MAT 1932,
PSY 4930, or PSY 1502)
 May be taken either as a PSY elective course or to partially fulfill the
mathematics cognate requirements for the Psychology Major (it can only be
counted once; it cannot be used as both)
 Cannot be used toward the satisfaction of the Foundations of Mathematics
and Quantitative Reasoning (IFP program, for students matriculating Fall,
2009 or later)
 Cannot be used toward the satisfaction of the Mathematics Requirement for
General Education Deficiencies (for students matriculating prior to Fall, 2009)
 Cannot be counted as a GORDON RULE course (computational skills)
 Cannot be used to exempt from CLAS
MAC Prefixed Mathematics Courses (3, 4, or 5 cr.)
 May be used be used to partially fulfill the mathematics cognate
requirements for the Psychology Major (MAC 1105 or higher)
 IF passed with grade of “C” or higher, may be used be used toward the
satisfaction of the Foundations of Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
(IFP program, for students matriculating Fall, 2009 or later)
 IF passed with grade of “C” or higher, may be used be used toward the
satisfaction of the Mathematics Requirement for General Education
Deficiencies (for students matriculating prior to Fall, 2009)
 IF passed with grade of “C” or higher, may be counted as a GORDON RULE
course (computational skills), depending on the course
 May be used to exempt from CLAS, depending on the course and the grade
Non-MAC Prefixed Mathematics Courses
 Cannot be used to partially fulfill the mathematics cognate requirements for
the Psychology Major
 IF passed with grade of “C” or higher, may be used be used toward the
satisfaction of the Foundations of Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning
(IFP program, for students matriculating Fall, 2009 or later); see list in the
university catalog.
 IF passed with grade of “C” or higher, may be used be used toward the
satisfaction of the Mathematics Requirement for General Education
38


Deficiencies (for students matriculating prior to Fall, 2009); see list in the
university catalog.
IF passed with grade of “C” or higher, may be counted as a GORDON RULE
course (computational skills), depending on the course (see catalog list)
May be used to exempt from CLAS, depending on the course and the grade
STA 3163L Intermediate Statistics Laboratory (1 cr.)
 Is as a requirement for the Psychology Major (no minimum grade required)
 FAU courses with STA prefixes cannot be substituted for this course; STA
courses taken elsewhere may serve as substitutes (depending on the course
content; must be evaluated by department)
 Cannot be used toward the satisfaction of the Foundations of Mathematics
and Quantitative Reasoning (IFP program, for students matriculating Fall,
2009 or later)
 Cannot be used toward the satisfaction of the Mathematics Requirement for
General Education Deficiencies (for students matriculating prior to Fall, 2009)
 Cannot be used toward the satisfaction of the GORDON RULE
(computational skills)
 Cannot be used to exempt from CLAS
Students should see the Degree Requirements section of the University Catalog for
complete information. Students who wish to arrange for an advising appointment with
the Student Services Office staff for the College of Science can do so by logging into the
AdvisorTrac system online at
http://advisortrac.science.fau.edu/AdvisorTrac/default.html. Students needing
further assistance can contact the office by telephone at 561-297-3700.
39
HOW TO CHOOSE ELECTIVES
At the upper division level, much of the student's course work both inside and
outside of Psychology is elective. Many students wonder what they "should" take.
There is no single answer to that question, but there are some general principles that
can guide you.
Take courses that will round our your liberal arts education. Take courses which
are required for a second major that interests you. Even if the requirements for a second
major are not completed, the transcript will show substantial course work in the area.
Take courses that are prerequisites for work you may someday want to do at the
graduate level; equip yourself with the knowledge and skills you might need to have.
For instance, if you already know that you want to go to graduate school, look at the
requirements for the program(s) at several universities that interest you, and use your
electives to meet those requirements.
Take courses that simply seem interesting to you. Remember, your college
courses may be your best (and often last) opportunity to expose yourself to an
unfamiliar area or discipline. The best preparation for an uncertain future is often a
broad liberal arts education.
Take courses that are broadly related to the occupation that you want to pursue.
One way to do this is to look at requirements of majors that are related to the
occupation. Examples of this approach:
OCCUPATION
SALES
Consider courses in
:
organizational and industrial psychology (offered in Business);
marketing; management; communication arts; commercial art;
media; accounting
PSYCHOBIOLOGY
psychobiology area course offerings; biology; chemistry; physics;
statistics; computers. Consider the psychobiology track.
HUMAN SERVICE
personality/social
area
course
offerings;
developmental psychology; learning theory;
sociology; political science; education; theater art
FORENSICS
criminology, criminal justice, psychobiology, personality/social
area course offerings; social and developmental psychology;
social work; sociology; political science; chemistry/biochemistry;
biological sciences; physics; mathematics
40
social
and
social work;
SCIENCE EDITING
English; journalism; statistics; biology; chemistry; physics;
sociology; history; industrial arts
Do not be overly constrained by any of these suggestions. Ask yourself what
purpose electives can serve for you, then find electives that suit your goals.
41
I NEED HELP!!
Resources for Academic Support/Assistance
There are many offices and organizations here at FAU that serve the student
population. Many of them offer advising and counseling services, tutoring, writing
assistance, and other resources to support academic success.
Career Development Center (http://www.fau.edu/cdc/Default.htm)
– Workshops/events
– Career assessment
– Advising
– Co-op/Internship resources
Freshman Advising Services (http://www.fau.edu/freshmanadvising/)
– Freshman advising
– Online advising for anyone
– Academic Survival Tips
– Comprehensive Check Lists for Academic Majors
Office of Multicultural Affairs (http://www.fau.edu/ma/)
– Academic Enhancement Program & tutoring
– ESOL program
– CLAS reviews
– Mentoring
– Counseling for academic and personal challenges
– Book Loan Program
Center for Learning and Student Success (http://www.fau.edu/retention/)
– Learning communities
– Tutoring
– Supplemental Instruction
– Student Success Series
– Academic Success Tips
– Heritage Park Support Center
– University Support Services (links to other tutoring, writing help, career
development, mentoring, academic advising)
Heritage Park Support Center (http://www.fau.edu/retention/TEST.php)
– Tutoring
– Writing
– Advising
– Mentoring
– Counseling
42
Current Student Resources (http://www.fau.edu/current/current.html)
Student Athlete Center for Academic Excellence (http://fausports.cstv.com/schoolbio/fau-acad-center.html)
– Academic advising for athletes
– Tutoring support
– Study hall
– Personal development
Student Counseling Center (http://www.fau.edu/student/counsel/)
– Individual, couple, family, group counseling, and psychiatric services
– Workshops and programs on academic success skills like time management,
stress management, text anxiety
– Other programs on improving relationships, conflict resolution, personal
identity, students who are parents
– Online links to self-help resources and anonymous screenings
University Center for Excellence in Writing (http://www.fau.edu/UCEW/)
– Workshops on writing issues
– Individual conferences with writing consultants
– Resource library
43
CAREER PLANNING: THERAPEUTIC HELPING PROFESSIONS
As a psychology student, perhaps you are interested in eventually pursuing a
career in which you would conduct therapy, counseling, and/or psychological
assistance with clients. There are many different therapeutic helping professions that
would provide you with the opportunity to pursue such a career. In fact, the array of
choices within the therapeutic helping professions can be quite confusing when you
first start investigating all of them. Should you pursue Clinical Psychology? Or Social
Work? Or Counseling? Or Marriage and Family Therapy? How do you know which one
is the right one?
A majority of the professions that involve therapy or work as a counselor involve
graduate training, licensure, and/or other certification(s) beyond the bachelor’s degree.
Not all of these professions, however, include the label “psychologist” or involve
additional training/credentialing in a “psychology” field, per se. To figure out which
therapeutic helping profession is the right one for you to pursue—and what type(s) of
graduate program(s) are the right ones for your aspirations—it would be best for you to
consider the following questions:

What type of client population do you want to work with? That is, do you wish to
work with individuals with specific clinical psychopathologies, with
psychologically disordered individuals in general, or with individuals who are
having psychological/social difficulties but who may not necessarily have
psychological disorders?

Do you want to be able to professionally diagnose specific psychological disorders
as well as conduct therapy?

Do you want to be able to administer publisher-controlled psychological tests and
other assessment instruments (e.g., intellectual functioning, developmental
assessments, learning disabilities, etc.) and professionally interpret the results for
clients?

Do you wish to only work with individuals, or do you wish to have the expertise to
also work with couples and/or families?
The following table provides a comparison between some of the most popular
therapeutic helping professions in the United States.
44
Comparison of Popular Therapeutic Helping Professions in the Unites States of America
Clinical
Psychology
Involves teaching about, research about or treatment of persons with any of the common
mental health disorders. http://www.guidetopsychology.com/cln_cns.htm
Counseling
facilitates personal and interpersonal functioning across the life span with a focus on
individual, group, and community interventions for emotional, behavioral, vocational, and
mental health problems using preventative, development, and remedial approaches, and in
the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of psychotherapy.
http://www.abpp.org/Examiners/ABCoP%20Examination%20Manual%20Final%2009_29
_073.pdf
Counseling
The application of mental health, psychological or human development principles, through
cognitive, affective, behavioral or systemic intervention strategies, that address wellness,
personal growth, or career development, as well as pathology
http://www.alabamacounseling.org/ppmanual.pdf
Marriage
Mental health professionals trained to diagnose and treat mental abd emotional disoders.
& Family
MFT specialize in treating mental disorders in the context of marriage and famiy
Therapy
relationships. http://www.aamft.org/asp-bin/search_nm.asp?q=marriage
+and+family+therapy&Submit=Go&t.
Psychology
School
Counseling
A professional member of an educational team who assists students in their personal, social,
and academic, and career development aspects of education through services such as
individual counseling, small group counseling, and classroom teaching, and provide
leadership in educational reform (advocacy); traditionally known as a guidance counselor,
although this term is deemed inaccurate by most professionals today.
http://www.allwords.com/word-school+counselor.html
School
The specialty of school psychology has been characterized as one that collectively provides
Psychology individual assessment of children who may display cognitive, emotional, social, or behavioral
difficulties; develops and implements primary and secondary intervention programs; consults
with teachers, parents and other relevant professionals; engages in program development and
evaluation; conducts research; and helps prepare and supervise others.
http://www.education.ucsb.edu/jimerson/IISP/Definition.html
Social
Work
The social work profession promotes social change, problem solving in human relationships
and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance well-being. Utilising theories of
human behaviour and social systems, social work intervenes at the points where people
interact with their environments. http://www.ifsw.org/en/p38000208.html
Psychiatrist
yes
no M.D. X X
X
X
Clinical
Psychologist,
Psychologist
Counselor,
Therapist
yes
X
X
yes
no Psy.D X X X X
or
Ph.D
no M.A. X X X X
Counselor,
Therapist
yes
Counselor,
Therapist
Longer-Term
Therapy
Connect Clients
to Community
Resources
Manage
Medications
Research in
Appropriate
Setting
Teach**
Professional Activities
Diagnose Psych'l
Disorders
Brief, ShortTerm Therapy
Families
Couples
Adults
Children
Credential
Required?
Minimum
Degree Needed
General Description
Psychiatry
An individual who has obtained an M.D. degree and also has completed postdoctoral
specialty training in mental and emotional disorders; a psychiatrist may prescribe for the
treatment of psychological disorders. http://www.psychology matters.org/glossary.htm#p
License
Required?*
Graduate
Program
Targeted
Population
Professions
Associated with
the Program
Profession Information
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
no M.A. X X X X
X
X
X
X
American
Counseling
Association
yes ISC M.A. X X X X
X
X
X
X
American
Association
for Marriage
& Family
Therapy
American
School
Counseling
Association
ISC M.A. X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Counselor,
Therapist
ISC M.A. X
X
X
X
X
X
X
M.A. X X X X
X
X
X
X
45
yes
American
Psychiatric
Association
American
Psychological
Association
X
American
Psychological
Association
Counselor,
Therapist
Counselor,
Therapist
Professional
Organization
American
School
Counseling
Association,
American
Psychological
Association
X Association of
Social Work
Boards,
National
Association of
Social
Workers
Comparison cont’d
Psychiatric
Nursing
Life
Coaching
Licensed registered nurse(RN) who has the ability to apply knowledge, skills, and experience
autonomously to complex mental health problems
Advanced
Practice
Registered
NursePsychiatric/Ment
al Health
deal with relatively healthy people who want to improve their lives in specific ways, such as variety, including
changing careers, finding a healthy relationship, taking their business to a new level, losing
"therapist,"
weight or deepening their self-understanding, for example. They deal with stress management
"counselor,"
as well as time management, goal setting and other key areas of change to help their clients "advisor," "life
lead more balanced lives that better reflect clients’ personal values and priorities.
coach," etc.
http://stress.about.com/od/stressmanagementglossary/g/LifeCoach.htm
N/A -- not regulated
ISC -- in some cases
*Dependent upon the specific licensure requirements of the state in which practice is located
**Credentials required are dependent upon the specific requirements of the governing body
controlling the academic setting and level at which teaching takes place
46
yes
yes M.A. X X
N/A N/A N/A X X
X
X
X
Longer-Term
Therapy
Connect Clients
to Community
Resources
Manage Client
Medications
Research in
Appropriate
Setting
Teach**
Professional Activities
Diagnose Psych'l
Disorders
Brief, Short-Term
Therapy
Families
Couples
Individual Adults
Children
License
Required?*
General Description
Professions
Associated with
the Program
Graduate
Program
Targeted
Population
Credential
Required?
Minimum Degree
Needed
Profession Information
X
X
X
X
Professional
Organization(
s)
American
Psychiatric
Nurses
Association,
Society for
Education
and Research
in PsychiatricMental Health
Nursing
International
Coach
Federation,
International
Association of
Coaching, US
Life Coach
Association,
Florida Life
Coach
Association
CAREER PLANNING: GRADUATE DEGREES
Jobs in the field of Psychology almost always require a Master's degree and may
require a doctorate. If you want to work in teaching, research, or
counseling/therapy, you should plan to go to graduate school. However, before you
rush off to graduate school, you should look very carefully at the kinds of jobs for
which a bachelor's degree in psychology prepares you. Among the employment
possibilities indirectly related to undergraduate psychology training are:
•
Drug and alcohol abuse consultant (not professional counseling)
•
Probation officer
•
Psychological technician in certain research and governmental agencies
•
Employment agency counselor
•
Personnel worker
•
Social worker
•
Animal trainer
•
Vocational rehabilitation worker
•
Behavioral modification or psychological technician in a psychiatric
institution
•
House parent in an institution
•
Educational settings
•
Other business contexts
Most large high schools now offer one or two psychology courses (sometimes
as Advanced Placement courses). You can be certified to teach high school
psychology by taking several education courses and completing student teaching in
addition to the psychology major. Students who pursue the psychobiology track
may be certified to teach high school science. If you are interested in becoming a
high school teacher, investigate the requirements early. The additional courses
necessary for teaching certification will either reduce your electives or take an extra
semester of university work.
Psychology is a valuable pre-professional major for several fields. Psychology
majors are working on graduate degrees in MEDICINE, LAW, EDUCATION,
BUSINESS, COMPUTER SCIENCE, as well as in psychology. Students who plan to
major in psychology and hope to go on to medical, dental or veterinary school might
47
consider pursuing the Psychobiology track. These students should also contact the
Pre-Professional Office prior to their first registration at FAU.
If you are interested in working more directly in the field of psychology or in
its related helping professions (e.g., counseling, marriage and family therapy), you
may want to or need to earn a Master's degree. With a master's degree, you could:
•
Teach in a community college or a small college
•
Work with patients in a mental hospital or a private clinic (initially under the
supervision of a PhD or MD; requires state licensure)
•
Be a part of a research team in industry or government (under the
supervision of a PhD)
•
Work in industrial psychology
•
Supervise psychological technicians in schools, hospitals, and government
agencies
•
Work as a school psychologist (may require certification or licensure in the
state in which the practice is located)
If you are interested in teaching at the university level, practicing clinical
psychology, or planning and conducting research, you will want to earn a doctorate
in psychology. Members of the Psychology Department will be pleased to talk with
you about advanced graduate training in psychology or in a related field
If you are NOT interested in working in a psychology-related job, remember
that your bachelor's degree indicates to a potential employer that you are (a) able to
learn (b) willing to learn and (c) responsible. Large companies and state and federal
agencies will train you after you are hired so long as they have been assured that
you are flexible, reasonably intelligent, and responsible. In addition, a degree in
psychology indicates you are interested in people--a valuable trait for jobs involving
SALES, PERSONNEL WORK, or MANAGEMENT.
48
PREPARING FOR GRADUATE STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY AND RELATED
FIELDS
Competition for acceptance into a graduate program in psychology,
especially in clinical psychology, is extremely intense. In fact, it is often more
difficult to get into a good clinical PhD program than it is to get into medical school,
with some schools accepting less than 2% of their applicants! Graduate programs in
other helping professions like mental health counseling, marriage and family
therapy, school counseling, and other fields are also becoming increasingly
competitive, even at the Masters level. College seniors are often surprised that they
are, in the start of their senior year, behind schedule in terms of getting things ready
for the graduate school application process. Start preparing to apply for graduate
study NOW.
You will be judged on a number of criteria when you apply, including
cumulative grade point average (GPA), undergraduate major GPA, scores on the
Graduate Record Examination, general course work, science background, research
experience, letters of recommendation, and clinical experience (for the helping
professions). If you are interested in pursuing a degree in an area of experimental
psychology, you will want a strong background in science, laboratory courses,
statistics, and research. If you are interested in clinical psychology or a counselingrelated field, research is STILL important, but so is some relevant experience in the
mental health field. This experience is extremely useful in helping you decide what
aspect of psychology you find most rewarding and enjoyable.
ACADEMIC PREPARATION
A strong general background in experimental psychology is the best
preparation for graduate study in psychology or counseling. You should also plan
on at least 6 semester hours each of math, physical sciences, and biological sciences,
according to the APA. For the qualified student, the Honors Program provides an
ideal curriculum to prepare for graduate study, though the regular track provides
solid preparation as well. The Psychobiology B.S. program is specially designed for
individuals who wish to pursue graduate study in psychobiology (animal behavior
OR behavioral neuroscience) or neuropsychology. Most graduate schools state that
they require a minimum of 3.0 grade point average; however, the actual GPA of
accepted applicants is often much higher.
RESEARCH AND FIELD EXPERIENCE
49
Research experience can be obtained in our department by volunteering in a
faculty member’s research lab or completing one or more Directed Independent
Study (PSY 4906) with a faculty member whose research area is of interest to you. If
you choose to pursue the Honors Program, you will benefit from the research
experience required to complete the Honors Thesis. Clinical field experience can be
obtained by working for pay or by volunteering your services to local mental health
agencies and hospitals. FAU students have obtained relevant experience by working
at Fair Oaks Hospital, Women in Distress, Kids in Distress, Lakes Hospital and other
agencies. Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) uses volunteers as well.
Students interested in arranging for credit hours for internships or
cooperative educational experiences can do so by contacting the Career
Development Center (a division of Student Affairs): Boca Raton (561) 297-2740;
Davie (954) 236-1213; Jupiter (561) 799-8046. Students may alternate semesters of
study with full-time paid assignments, or they may arrange part-time assignments.
Students may also arrange for internship credit hours (students cannot be paid and
receive credit hours for the same hours). Students can also obtain more information
at the Center’s website at http://www.fau.edu/cdc/Coop/coop.htm .
LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION
Most graduate schools require at least 3 letters of recommendation. Cultivate
your letter writers early. Faculty with whom you have done research (e.g., DIS,
Honors Thesis) are the BEST sources of letters, in that they can evaluate you on a
number of dimensions of interest to graduate schools (e.g., research ability,
maturity, written and oral communications skills, emotional stability, interpersonal
relations, etc.). Supervisors from work, volunteer activities, and social organizations
are also good resources for letters of recommendation as long as they can provide
the appropriate information to support your application to graduate programs.
A good letter of recommendation is one that tells the reader something more
than what is available on your academic transcript. It should be specific and the
writer should be able to comment on his/her personal experience of your work
patterns and your intellectual, social, and emotional characteristics.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION (GRE)
Plan on taking the GRE no later than October of your senior year (the October
preceding the year in which you would like to start graduate school). Prepare for the
exam and study as hard as you can (especially review the math skills required for
the Quantitative portion). Most programs require a minimum of 1000 on the
aptitude exam (combined verbal and quantitative scores); the actual GREs of
50
students they accept may be substantially higher (e.g., University of Minnesota
minimum is 1000, but the median of accepted students was 1301).
Check on the requirements for the programs that you are interested in. Some
require the Advanced Exam in Psychology or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) in
addition to the GRE Aptitude Exam.
You can obtain information about dates/times for GRE administration and
preparation at the web site for FAU’s Testing and Evaluation Center at
http://www.fau.edu/testing/GRE.php
SCHEDULE FOR CAREER PLANNING AND APPLYING TO GRADUATE
SCHOOL:
Junior Year
• Work on basic psychology requirements, including statistics, research
methods and science courses.
• Become acquainted with faculty members and their research areas. Begin
to work with a faculty member no later than 2nd semester junior year.
• Attend departmental colloquia (undergraduates are ALWAYS welcome)
• Explore opportunities to join professional organizations. Get active in the
Psychology Club and Psi Chi.
• Do fieldwork if you are interested in clinical/ counseling.
Summer Between Junior and Senior Years
• Buy study guide for the GRE, MAT, and other tests and begin to study.
• Begin to investigate prospective graduate programs.
• Continue research/field experience.
Senior Year
• Complete all substantive degree requirements, research, and field work by
December so they can be considered with your application. Continue the
work, however, in the spring.
• September: write to schools for applications; register to take the GRE; and
begin to request letters of recommendation.
• Through application materials, find out about any additional
requirements or tests needed by the program of your choice. Make a
careful note of the application deadlines for programs you are interested
in.
• October:
The GRE should be taken at this date (at the latest). It doesn't
hurt to take this test twice, if you have the time and money.
51
• November: Have a letter (statement) of intent written and ask your
faculty advisor to check it for grammar, spelling and content.
• December: Send completed applications to schools well ahead of the
deadlines. Request transcripts to be sent from all of the
colleges you have attended. If you are applying to an
experimental program, and you are interested in working
with a particular faculty member in that program, feel free to
contact that person.
GOOD LUCK!
52
RESOURCES ABOUT GRADUATE STUDY/CAREERS IN PSYCHOLOGY
WEB SITES
American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy: Directory of MFT Training
Programs
http://www.aamft.org/cgi-shl/TWServer.exe/Run:COALIST
American Counseling Association: Choosing a Graduate Program:
http://www.counseling.org/students/graduateprograms/TP/home/CT2.aspx
American Psychological Association
http://www.apa.org/students/student3.html
American Psychological Association: Scientific Problem Solvers—Careers for the 21st
Century
http://www.apa.org/students/brochure/
American School Counselor Association: Careers/Goals
http://www.schoolcounselor.org/content.asp?pl=325&sl=133&contentid=133
American Psychology and Law Society
http://www.ap-ls.org/
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs:
Choosing a Career in Counseling
http://www.cacrep.org/
Florida Department of Education
http://www.fldoe.org/
Marky Lloyd's Careers in Psychology Page
http://www.psywww.com/careers/
PsycLAW: Law and Psychology (maintained by the American Psychological
Association)
http://www.apa.org/psyclaw/
Rider University’s Handout on Graduate Careers and Careers in Psychology
http://www.rider.edu/suler/gradschl.html#APA%20Book
Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Inc.
53
http://www.siop.org
State of Florida’s licensure requirements for Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family
Therapy & Mental Health Counseling:
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/491/soc_lic_req.html
State of Florida’s licensure requirements for Psychology (Florida Board of
Psychology):
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/psychology/psy_lic_req.html
State of Florida’s licensure requirements for School Psychology (Florida Board of
School Psychology):
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/schoolpsych/index.html
BOOKS AND OTHER PUBLISHED MATERIALS
American Psychological Association (1994). Getting in: A step by step plan for gaining
admission to graduate school in psychology. Washington, DC: American
Psychological Association.
American Psychological Association (1983). Graduate study in psychology and
associated fields. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Kardas, E. P. (1999). Psychology resources on the World Wide Web. Pacific Grove, CA:
Books/Cole Publishing Company.
Keith-Spiegel, P., & Wiederman, M. W. (2000). The complete guide to graduate school
admission. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Publishers.
Mayne, T. J., Norcross, J. C., & Sayette, M. A. (2006) Insider's guide to graduate
programs in clinical and counseling psychology: 2006/2007. New York: Guilford
Press.
Sachs, M. L., Burke, K. L., & Gomer, S. (Eds.) (2001). Directory of graduate programs in
applied sport psychology. Morgantown, WV: Fitness Information Technology,
Inc.
Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (1997). Career paths in psychology: Where your degree can take you.
Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Woods, P. J., & Wilkinson, ,C. S. (Eds.) (1987). Is psychology the major for you? Planning
for your undergraduate years. Washington, DC: American Psychological
Association.
54
For further information on planning for graduate study and a career in psychology,
you can search the FAU Main Library’s holdings. A quick Google search will also
reveal a large number of books and other published materials and web sites that will
be useful.
55
RESEARCH FACILITIES
The research laboratories in the Department of Psychology afford students
the opportunity to acquire research skills and to learn about the most modern
apparatus and methodologies for conducting research in psychology. A scientific
computer programmer and an electronics technician are included among the
Department of Psychology's research support personnel.
Modern training in psychology is highly dependent upon computer
technology. The heart of the University's computer system is the Academic
Computing Center, which the Department of Psychology uses for teaching and
research purposes through remote terminals located in its laboratories. The
University's computer system provides access to several public data networks that
communicate with other universities, public and private agencies, and research
centers through the United States and many foreign countries. The Department is
also equipped with various kinds of computers and other high-technology devices
that serve specialized purposes in its teaching and research programs.
Research in social, personality, and cognitive development is conducted
using the facilities of the A.D. Henderson University School and the Karen E.
Slattery Educational Research Center for Child Development (both on FAU’s Boca
Raton campus), area elementary schools, and in cooperation with area hospitals.
Collaborations are also in place with Kids in Distress in Fort Lauderdale.
The Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences is an interdisciplinary
research center. The current interim director is Dr. Janet Blanks, Professor. The
Center has excellent computational and research facilities. It has a staff from various
fields, including physics, engineering, computer science, and psychology, as well as
technical support personnel. A number of active collaborations exist between the
Center and institutions outside the boundaries of FAU.
Studies utilizing animal subjects are conducted at the animal research
facilities, which includes quarantine rooms, surgery, teaching/research labs, and
animal colony rooms. A variety of neuroscience techniques are used in these
research programs and provide the student with excellent exposure to modern
neuroscience and psychobiology.
On the Davie campus, a Science and Education Building houses Psychology
faculty offices, classrooms, and research laboratories. Psychology faculty and
teaching and research facilities are also located at the northern campuses in Jupiter
and Port St. Lucie (the John D. MacArthur and Treasure Coast campuses,
respectively.)
56
The department maintains a list of current research opportunities for
undergraduates on the department web site. A hard copy of this list is available in
the department office, BS 101.
57
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
The Psychology Club is a student organization dedicated to enhancing the
undergraduate experience for students interested in psychology. The club meets
during the Fall and Spring semesters.
Watch for notices of upcoming meetings that are placed around the departmental
offices.
U-PSYCH LISTSERV
The department maintains a listserv populated with the FAU email addresses of
current undergraduate students who are majoring in the BA Psychology or BS
Psychobiology degree programs. The listserve membership is updated once
annually en masse. If you are not included in the listserv, but would like to be, you
can send an email from your FAU email account to [email protected] with
the word “subscribe” in the subject line and the following as the only text in the
body of your email (without the quotation marks): “subscribe upsych-l” This will
add your email address to the listserv and you will then automatically begin
receiving the emails distributed to that listserv from that date forward.
If you wish to unsubscribe from the listserv, you can send an email from your
FAU email account to [email protected] with the word “unsubscribe” in the
subject line and the following as the only text in the body of your email (without the
quotation marks): “unsubscribe upsych-l”
58
NOTES
59
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