section i: overview - Canada Council for the Arts

advertisement
EMPLOYMENT EQUITY
2013 NARRATIVE REPORT
(January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013)
*The terminology used in this report is consistent with that used in the Employment Equity Act.
Table of Contents
SECTION I: OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................................... 3
SECTION II: QUANTITATIVE INFORMATION .................................................................................... 5
SECTION III: QUALITATIVE MEASURES AND RESULTS................................................................. 6
1 - Communications .................................................................................................................... 6
2 - Equity Environment ............................................................................................................... 7
3 – Promotion and Professional Development Opportunities ..................................................... 8
4- Reasonable Accommodation .................................................................................................. 8
5- Recruitment ............................................................................................................................. 8
6- Retention and Termination ..................................................................................................... 9
7- Training and Development ..................................................................................................... 9
SECTION IV: CONSULTATIONS ............................................................................................................ 9
SECTION V: FUTURE STRATEGIES .................................................................................................... 11
Short-term Employment Equity Initiatives for 2014................................................................. 11
Long-term Employment Equity Initiatives ............................................................................... 11
APPENDIX A ............................................................................................................................................. 12
WOMEN ................................................................................................................................... 12
ABORIGINAL PEOPLE .......................................................................................................... 13
MEMBERS OF VISIBLE MINORITIES ................................................................................. 14
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES ........................................................................................... 15
2
SECTION I: OVERVIEW
The Canada Council for the Arts is a federal Crown corporation created by an Act of Parliament
in 1957 “to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the
arts”. The Council reports to Parliament through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and its
accounts are audited by the Auditor General of Canada. The Annual budget allocation from
Parliament is supplemented by endowment income, donations and bequests, and other revenue
(e.g. Art Bank rentals). The Canada Council is governed by an 11-member Board. The Chair,
the members of the Board and the Director and CEO of the Council are appointed by the
Governor in Council for fixed terms. The Council headquarters are located in Ottawa.
The Canada Council provides a broad range of grants and services to professional Canadian
artists and arts organizations in music, dance, theatre, visual arts, media arts, writing and
publishing and integrated arts. It also promotes public awareness of the arts through its
communications, research and arts promotion activities. The Canadian Commission for
UNESCO also operates under the general authority of the Canada Council for the Arts.
The Council relies heavily on the advice and expertise of artists and arts professionals from
across Canada (over 600 serve annually as peer assessors) and work collaboratively with federal,
provincial, territorial and municipal arts and cultural agencies and departments.
All Canada Council programs are accessible to professional artists and arts organizations in
Canada The Canada Council granting programs are accessible to individual artists and arts
organizations from diverse Aboriginal, cultural and regional communities, including people with
disabilities. There are also several designated programs for Aboriginal, culturally diverse
(visible minority) and Deaf and disability arts communities.
The Council’s Equity Office offers policies and programs to ensure that groups that experience
significant barriers to accessing public arts support achieve equitable access to the Council’s
programs and services. The Council’s Aboriginal Arts Office and disciplinary sections provide
designated programs and services to First Nations, Inuit and Metis artists and arts organizations.
Canada Council’s commitment to an equitable, respectful and inclusive professional working
environment allows all employees to maximize their performance and their contributions,
thereby supporting excellence in every aspect of the Canada Council’s operations. The strength
and scope of this commitment is reflected in the diversity of staff, peer assessment committees,
the Council’s Board and the beneficiaries of Council’s grants programs.
3
As equity is one of the five directions in the Canada Council’s strategic and corporate plans, the
Council is committed to enhancing its leadership role in promoting equity as a critical priority in
advancing its ultimate outcome of a vital and diverse Canadian arts sector. It achieves this goal
by promoting and advancing equity and diversity as an integral element of the Canadian arts
ecology, and by ensuring that its own operations support equity at all levels.
4
SECTION II: QUANTITATIVE INFORMATION
Representation of designated groups
The following table demonstrates the overall representation of the Canada Council’s workforce
of the four employment equity designated groups effective December 31, 2013 compared to the
2006 labour market survey:
Employment Equity
Designated Group
CCA
workforce
%
External
availability
%
Women
Aboriginal Peoples
Members of visible minorities
Persons with disabilities
160
10
28
11
68.4
4.3
12.0
5.0
145
9
30
9
61.5
4.1
12.9
4.1
Variance
between CCA
workforce and
external
availability
15
1
-2
2
Employment Equity Occupational Groups
The Canada Council’s workforce is divided into seven (7) Employment Equity Occupational
Groups and takes into account all regular full-time and part-time status employees. The
following is the percentage of representation in our workforce for each of the occupational
groups. This calculation is based on a total number of regular status employees on December 31,
2013 (212 employees):
Employment Equity Occupational Groups
Senior Managers (Executive Management Group)
Middle and Other Managers (CC10 – EX1)
Professionals (CC8 – CC9)
Semi-Professionals and Technicians (CC5 – CC7)
Supervisors (only one (1) position falls in this category)
Administrative and Clerical Personnel (CC5 – CC7)
Clerical Personnel (CC1 – CC4)
Total
% of representation in
our workforce
4
9
42
5
0
16
24
100
Note: The classification used for employment equity reporting differs from those of the Canada
Council. (Details on the equity representation can be found in Appendix A).
5

Term employees represent 12.4% of the Council’s workforce.

In 2013, the Canada Council launched a Self-Identification survey to offer employees an
opportunity to review and re-confirm the data that they had previously provided. Based
on the data collected, four (4) employees who had previously identified as being a
member of one of the four employment equity groups no longer self-identified. Three of
these employees had previously self-identified as being a visible minority and one
identified as having a disability.

The quantitative report demonstrates that there is a recurring gap for women within the
semi-professional occupational group. To address this gap, we will continue to recruit at
a national level when posting vacancies within this occupational group to increase our
pool of qualified candidates meeting the basic requirements of the position.

The results of our workforce analysis demonstrate that the overall representation of
equity groups within the Canada Council’s workforce is above the expected availability
rate for women, Aboriginal Peoples and persons with disabilities. The results also
demonstrated that we are 7% below the availability rate for members of the visible
minority group.
SECTION III: QUALITATIVE MEASURES AND RESULTS
The following information refers to the various measures and results achieved in 2013 in
supporting Employment Equity.
1 - Communications
Measure: In 2013, the Canada Council launched the Self-Identification Survey.
Result: Based on the information provided by staff, four employees who had previously selfidentified as being part of one of the Employment Equity Groups, no longer identified as such.
These changes are reflected in the qualitative and quantitative reports.
Measure: To ensure that our statistics for employment equity reporting are accurate and up to
date.
Result: To maintain this information, as part of the hiring process, our letters of offer include
information specific to employment equity. The person responsible for Employment Equity
meets with new hires their first day with the Council to discuss employment equity and asks
them to complete and submit the Self-Identification form within the first 10 days of employment.
When the form is not returned, the person responsible for Employment Equity contacts the
employee to follow up.
6
Measure: Ensure that our workforce reflects Canadian diversity and reinforces the Canada
Council’s commitment to equity as aligned with the Canada Council’s Strategic Plan and Action
Plan.
Result: The Senior Human Resources Advisor, now responsible for Employment Equity, will be
a member of the Equity Practices and Initiatives Committee (EPIC) and created a subcommittee
comprised of several members of the EPIC. The members of this subcommittee will assess the
results of the 2008-13 Employment Equity Action Plan and develop the 2014-19 Plan based on
the workforce analysis and initiatives outlined in the 2008-13 Plan. The draft of this new Action
Plan will be shared with all EPIC members, the Equity Champion, the union and Staff
Association (non-union) representatives for their feedback and comments. The Action Plan will
then be brought to the Executive Management Group for approval. Once approved, the Action
Plan will be communicated to all staff.
The implementation of the Action Plan will further the strategy to embed diversity principles in
all areas of Canada Council as well as meet, or surpass, Employment Equity standards.
2 - Equity Environment
Measure: The Canada Council’s workforce analysis meets or exceeds the expected availability
rate of the overall representation of equity groups within its workforce.
Result: The Canada Council’s workforce analysis demonstrated that the overall representation of
equity groups within its workforce is above the expected availability rate in the areas of women,
Aboriginal Peoples and persons with disabilities. The results also demonstrated that we are 7%
below the availability rate for the members of visible minority groups. The return of several
employees currently on leave that have self-identified as members of a visible minority group
will increase the level of representation within this employment equity group. This will augment
results to meet or exceed the expected availability rate or the overall representation for this
group.
Measure: The Council maintains an Employment Equity Action Plan.
Result: The person responsible for Employment Equity, in collaboration with the EPIC
committee members, will define the results achieved of the 2008-13 Action Plan and develop the
2014-19 Employment Equity Action Plan using the results of the workforce analysis. The plan
will identify areas to focus our efforts. Consultation will be held with management, unionized
and non-unionized representatives as well as the Executive Management Group. The
implementation of the Action Plan will further the proposed strategy to embed diversity
principles in all areas of Canada Council.
7
3 – Promotion and Professional Development Opportunities
Measure: Offer all staff temporary and permanent professional development opportunities.
Result: In 2013, seven (7) employees were promoted of which six (6) were women. Through a
competitive process, numerous staffing competitions offered professional development
opportunities to all staff. Several employees benefited from temporary assignments that provided
the opportunity to develop new skills and competencies.
4- Reasonable Accommodation
The Canada Council recognizes the importance of integrating human rights into all facets of our
business. Accommodation is an obligation of the Canada Council under the Canadian Human
Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act. By providing accommodation the Canada Council
supports the value of “equity”.
Measure: The Canada Council’s Accommodation Policy fosters and supports a positive work
environment that respects people’s different needs.
Result: In 2013, several employees were accommodated. Accommodations included making
special arrangements for facilities, purchasing technical tools and equipment and temporary
changes of status (from full-time to part-time). All requests were reviewed, assessed and
implemented in a timely and efficient manner. Follow-up with employees has ensured that the
measures undertaken for the accommodation effectively met individual needs.
5- Recruitment
Note: The Canada Council has a staffing and human resources system that is distinct from those
of the Public Service of Canada.
Measure: Human Resources continues to research appropriate venues when advertising our
vacancies at a National level in order to both increase the pool of qualified candidates and target
members of equity groups.
Result: In 2013, the Council advertised two positions at a national level, targeting individuals
who self-identified as Aboriginal Peoples. These positions were for a Coordinator position at the
Aboriginal Arts Office and an Aboriginal Program Officer position at the Theatre Section. There
were several applicants who met the basic requirements and both of these positions were filled
successfully.
When advertising targeted positions such as Aboriginal Program Officers, we advertise on
various Aboriginal web sites and ask Aboriginal Program Officers and the Coordinator of the
Aboriginal Arts Office to communicate with the Aboriginal communities about this opportunity.
Using the Canada Council’s own database of clients, grant recipients (individuals and
8
organizations) and stakeholders, we are able to distribute advertisements to individuals who have
self-identified as being a member of one of the employment equity groups.
Recruitment practices also included the dissemination of job postings to diverse organizations
specializing in the assistance of individuals who have disabilities and vocational challenges to
finding employment.
6- Retention and Termination
Measure: Invite all employees leaving the Canada Council to participate in an exit interview.
Result: When an employee of the Canada Council has resigned or plans to retire, they are asked
to complete an exit interview. The information collected in these interviews assists in
determining and planning training and development opportunities, informs the development of
tools or policies and contributes to reflection on pertinent issues or concerns.
7- Training and Development
Measure: Employees are offered professional and personal development opportunities to
increase their knowledge and expertise as well as to increase awareness of equity principles and
practices.
Result: Several lunchtime events were offered to all staff on diverse artistic practices within
Canada. For example, the Aboriginal Arts Office in collaboration with the Media Arts Section
invited all staff to attend a presentation that was made by an Aboriginal filmmaker, Lisa Jackson.
Staff also had the opportunity to view excerpts of some of her work.
On June 6, 2013, the Council’s standing Equity Practices and Initiatives Committee (EPIC)
hosted a successful all-day event on equity initiatives that was open to all staff. Many of our
employees participated in this day long sharing of progress made on the equity front, including
initiatives, policies, practices, statistics and notable stories. In depth discussions of various
strategies provided staff with a clearer understanding of the Council’s objectives for each
initiative and their role as staff in supporting these initiatives.
The Equity Office developed the Expanding the Arts: Deaf and Disability Arts, Access and
Equality Strategy Guidebook for staff. This is an internal document which will serve as a
resource to all staff on Council’s policies, procedures and programs as well as best practices and
tools for accommodating artists who are Deaf or who have disabilities. Its purpose is to ensure
that staff are comfortable and conversant with accommodation protocols. This supports the goal
of increasing access, support and the participation of artists who are Deaf or who have
disabilities within our programs and throughout all of our activities. The Equity Office will offer
training to staff on how to use this guidebook in 2014.
9
SECTION IV: CONSULTATIONS
The Canada Council's culture is highly consultative. Several cross-Council committees foster
discussions on issues and topics concerning equity. The Director and CEO of the Canada
Council and the Executive Management Group encourage staff to actively participate in
initiatives, voice opinions and take a leadership role within the scope of their responsibilities.
The Equity Practices and Initiatives Committee (EPIC) meets monthly. The members of this
committee are representative of the four designated groups as well as management and the
Human Resources person responsible for Employment Equity. The mandate of this committee is
to measure progress on the equity front by monitoring, tracking, communicating and contributing
to the development of an equity framework – therefore ensuring the integration of “equity” as a
value in all aspects of work at the Canada Council.
Council employees have numerous opportunities to attend, participate in and discuss equity
issues. Every year, usually in June, the Council sets aside a full day to discuss the ongoing
initiatives that have been undertaken on equity.
The Council has two offices that continuously promote equity among artists and arts
organizations:


The Aboriginal Arts Office: Collaborates with the Aboriginal Arts Advisory Committee
and with all sections of the Canada Council to support Aboriginal Peoples artistic
practices in all arts disciplines.
The Equity Office: Advances the guiding principle of equity throughout the Canada
Council in order to positively impact the Canadian arts sector and through it, the general
public.
One of the roles of these offices is to increase equity of access to Canada Council's grants and
services for professional artists and arts organizations. It does this by collaborating with all
divisions of the Council and consulting with arts communities and other stakeholders to develop
policies, programs and strategies. These offices play a leadership role in coordinating the
approach and analysis.
10
SECTION V: FUTURE STRATEGIES
Short-term Employment Equity Initiatives for 2014

Continue to offer in-house training on various topics linked to and broadening
employees’ knowledge and awareness of culture and equity.

Review procedures for requests for accommodation to ensure our employees receive the
most effective and efficient response to their requests.

Research other venues for advertising our vacancies such as educational institutions and
professional associations specializing in assisting individuals who have disabilities and
vocational challenges in finding employment.

Recruitment efforts to minimize or eliminate the gaps within the “Semi-Professionals and
Technicians” and the “Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel” occupational
groups will be an area of focus when recruiting.
Long-term Employment Equity Initiatives

Maintain or increase our internal representation within the four employment equity
groups and address gaps identified in some of the occupational groups.

Human Resources Division will continue to align programs, policies and initiatives with
equity objectives to foster a productive, enabling and ethical work environment that
encourages employee development, and recognizes and rewards excellence at the
Council.

Develop and implement the 2014-19 Action Plan.
11
APPENDIX A
WOMEN
Employment Equity
Occupational Group
Total CCA
workforce
Number of
women in
CCA
workforce
Senior Managers
Middle & Other Managers
Professionals
Semi-Professionals &
Technicians
Supervisors
Administrative and Senior
Clerical Personnel
Clerical Personnel
8
20
105
10
4
12
66
3
50.0 %
60.0 %
62.9 %
30.0 %
% of
External
availability
rate for
women
24.2 %
39.1 %
61.6 %
38.2 %
1
35
1
31
100 %
88.6 %
55
43
Total
234*
160
% of
women in
CCA
workforce
Expected
number of
women
Variance
2
8
65
4
2
4
1
-1
50.4 %
76.9 %
1
27
0
4
78.2 %
69.7 %
38
5
68.4 %
61.5 %
145
15
* Total CCA workforce: The total number of full-time and part-time status employees at its peak in
2013 for reporting purposes.
Totals may not equal the sum of components due to rounding.
Findings:
The Canada Council continues to maintain a strong overall internal representation of women in its
workforce compared to the overall external availability.
The percentage of women in the Canada Council’s workforce at a Senior Managers level is more than
double the percentage of the external availability rate for women.
There is a slight gap in the semi-professional group.
12
ABORIGINAL PEOPLE
Total CCA
workforce
Number of
Aboriginal
People in
CCA
workforce
% of
Aboriginal
People in
CCA
workforce
Senior Managers
Middle & Other Managers
Professionals
Semi-Professionals &
Technicians
Supervisors
Administrative and Senior
Clerical Personnel
Clerical Personnel
8
20
105
10
0
1
6
0
0.0 %
5.0 %
5.7 %
0.0 %
% of
External
availability
rate for
Aboriginal
People
2.4 %
1.9 %
6.3 %
2.3 %
1
35
0
1
0.0 %
2.9 %
55
2
Total
234*
10
Employment Equity
Occupational Group
Expected
number of
Aboriginal
People
Variance
0
0
7
0
0
1
-1
0
2.0 %
1.9 %
0
1
0
0
3.6 %
2.5 %
1
1
4.3 %
4.1 %
9
1
* Total CCA workforce: The total number of full-time and part-time status employees at its peak in
2013 for reporting purposes.
Totals may not equal the sum of components due to rounding.
Findings:
The overall internal representation of Aboriginal Peoples compared to the overall external availability
demonstrates that the Canada Council’s workforce for this designated group exceeds the expected
representation.
A slight gap has been identified in the Professional group.
The Canada Council has seven (7) targeted positions where you are required to be an Aboriginal
Person in order to be considered when we advertise vacancies.
13
MEMBERS OF VISIBLE MINORITY GROUPS
Total CCA
workforce
Number of
visible
minorities
in CCA
workforce
% of
visible
minorities
in CCA
workforce
Senior Managers
Middle & Other Managers
Professionals
Semi-Professionals &
Technicians
Supervisors
Administrative and Senior
Clerical Personnel
Clerical Personnel
8
20
105
10
1
3
17
0
12.5 %
15.0 %
16.2 %
0.0 %
% of
External
availability
rate for
visible
minorities
8.7 %
14.0 %
13.5 %
22.0 %
1
35
0
0
0.0 %
0.0 %
55
7
Total
234*
28
Employment Equity
Occupational Group
Expected
number of
visible
minorities
Variance
1
3
14
2
0
0
3
-2
11.0 %
8.9 %
0
3
0
-3
12.7 %
12.7 %
7
0
12.0 %
12.9 %
30
-2
* Total CCA workforce: The total number of full-time and part-time status employees at its peak in
2013 for reporting purposes.
Totals may not equal the sum of components due to rounding.
Findings:
Members of visible minority groups are well represented within the “Senior Managers”, “Middle and
Other Managers” and “Professionals” occupational groups, however, the Council’s overall
representation of visible minorities in its workforce is slightly lower than the external availability.
Recruitment efforts to minimize or eliminate the gaps within the “Semi-Professionals and
Technicians” and the “Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel” occupational groups will be an
area of focus when recruiting.
14
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
Total
CCA
workforce
Number of
Persons with
disabilities
in CCA
workforce
% of
Persons with
disabilities
in CCA
workforce
Senior, Middle & Other
Managers
Professionals
Semi-Professionals &
Technicians
Supervisors
Administrative and Senior
Clerical Personnel
Clerical Personnel
208
0
0.0%
% of
External
availabilit
y rate for
Persons
with
disabilities
3.2%
105
10
3
1
2.9 %
10.0 %
1
35
0
3
55
Total
234*
Employment Equity
Occupational Group
Expected
number of
Persons
with
disabilities
Variance
1
-1
4.5 %
4.8 %
5
0
-2
1
0.0 %
8.6 %
9.5 %
2.6 %
0
1
0
2
4
7.3 %
4.4 %
2
2
11
4.7 %
4.1 %
9
2
* Total CCA workforce: The total number of full-time and part-time status employees at its peak in
2013 for reporting purposes.
Totals may not equal the sum of components due to rounding.
The Workforce Analysis Report for Persons with disabilities is based on information collected from
the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS). This survey does not breakdown the
managerial occupational groups into two (2) separate groups. The percentage of external availability
rates for Persons with disabilities for the Senior Managers and Middle & Other Managers occupational
groups are combined in the Workforce Analysis Report from the Workplace Equity Information
Management System (WEIMS).
Findings:
The overall internal representation of Persons with disabilities compared to the overall external
availability demonstrates that the Canada Council’s workforce for this designated group exceeds the
expected representation.
Gaps have been identified in the management and professional groups.
15
Download
Related flashcards
Management

42 Cards

Create flashcards