Syllabus - Angelina College

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Angelina College
Science and Mathematics Division
BIOL 1413 Instructional Syllabus
I.
BASIC COURSE INFORMATION
A. Course Description: Fundamental biological concepts relevant to animals, including
systematics, evolution, structure and function, cellular and molecular metabolism,
reproduction, development, diversity, phylogeny, and ecology.
B. Intended Audience: This is a laboratory-based course designed for science majors.
C. Instructor: Andy Ferrell
Office: Rm 357
Office Hours: See schedule on office door
Office Phone: 936-326-4890
e-mail: [email protected]
II.
INTENDED STUDENT OUTCOMES:
A. Core Objectives
1. Critical Thinking Skills - to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and
analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information
2. Communication Skills - to include effective development, interpretation and
expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication
3. Empirical and Quantitative Skills - to include the manipulation and analysis of
numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions
4. Teamwork - to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work
effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal
B.
Learning Outcomes: The student will be able to:
1. Compare and contrast the structures, reproduction, and characteristics of
animals.
2. Describe the characteristics of life and the basic properties of substances
needed for life.
3. Identify the principles of inheritance and solve classical genetic problems.
4. Describe phylogenetic relationships and classification schemes.
5. Identify the major phyla of life with an emphasis on animals, including the
basis for classification, structural and physiological adaptations, evolutionary
history, and ecological significance.
6. Identify the chemical structures, synthesis, and regulation of nucleic acids and
proteins.
7. Identify the substrates, products, and important chemical pathways in
respiration.
8. Describe the unity and diversity of animals and the evidence for evolution
through natural selection.
9. Describe the reasoning processes applied to scientific investigations and
thinking.
10. Describe basic animal physiology and homeostasis as maintained by organ
systems.
11. Describe modern evolutionary synthesis, natural selection, Mendelian
inheritance, micro and macroevolution, and speciation.
12. Describe the structure of cell membranes and the movement of molecules
across a membrane.
III.
ASSESSMENT MEASURES OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
A.
Assessments for Core Objectives
1. Critical thinking – Critical thinking skills will be assessed using embedded test
questions focusing on analysis, synthesis and evaluation of biological
phenomena.
2. Communication – Communication skills will be assessed using lab reports and
embedded test questions focusing on best practices in written, visual, and oral
communication.
3. Empirical and Quantitative Skills – Empirical and quantitative skills will be
introduced and assessed using embedded test questions focusing on calculations
in genetics and population dynamics.
4. Teamwork – Teamwork skills will be assessed using teamwork skills in lab
exercises as well as embedded test questions focusing on best practices.
B.
Learning Outcomes
1. Students will compare and contrast the structures, reproduction, and
characteristics of animals by answering multiple choice questions.
2. Students will describe the characteristics of life and the basic properties of
substances needed for life by answering multiple choice questions.
3. Students will identify the principles of inheritance and solve classical genetic
problems by answering multiple choice questions.
4. Students will describe phylogenetic relationships and classification schemes by
answering multiple choice questions.
5. Students will identify the major phyla of life with an emphasis on animals,
including the basis for classification, structural and physiological adaptations,
evolutionary history, and ecological significance by answering multiple choice
questions.
6. Students will identify the chemical structures, synthesis, and regulation of
nucleic acids and proteins by answering multiple choice questions.
7. Students will identify the substrates, products, and important chemical
pathways in respiration by answering multiple choice questions.
8. Students will describe the unity and diversity of animals and the evidence for
evolution through natural selection by answering multiple choice questions.
9. Students will describe the reasoning processes applied to scientific
investigations and thinking by answering multiple choice questions.
10. Students will describe basic animal physiology and homeostasis as maintained
by organ systems by answering multiple choice questions.
11. Students will describe modern evolutionary synthesis, natural selection,
Mendelian inheritance, micro and macroevolution, and speciation by answering
multiple choice questions.
12. Students will describe the structure of cell membranes and the movement of
molecules across a membrane by answering multiple choice questions.
IV. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES
A. Methodologies common to all sections
This course will be taught using a combination of lectures and laboratory
exercises that complement and supplement lecture material. Audio-visual
materials, models, and dissection of specimens will be employed to enhance
lecture and laboratory presentations.
V. COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND POLICIES
A. Required Textbooks and Equipment
1. Zoology by Hickman, et al, (W. C. Brown/McGraw Hill) Fifteenth Edition.
2. Exploring Zoology: A Laboratory Guide by Smith & Schenk, (Morton Publishing) 1 st ed.
B. Course Policies – (This course conforms to the policies of Angelina College as
stated in the Angelina College Handbook.)
Academic Assistance – If you have a disability (as cited in Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990) that may affect your participation in this class, you should see Karen
Bowser, Room 208 of the Student Center. At a post –secondary institution, you
must self-indentify as a person with a disability; Ms. Bowser will assist you in
with the necessary information to do so.
Attendance Policy – Attendance will be required as per Angelina College Policy.
Records will be turned in to the academic dean at the end of the semester. Do not
assume that non-attendance in class will always in an instructor drop. You must
officially drop a class or risk receiving a failing grade. This is official Angelina
College Policy.
Course Conduct
1. Absolutely no cell phone use is allowed during labs or class.
2. No Food, drinks, or tobacco in class.
3. Courteous and respectful behavior will be expected in class at all times.
VI. COURSE SCHEDULE
Day
Topic
Chapter
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
VII.
Science of Zoology, Origin of Life
Chemistry of Life, Cells
Cellular Metabolism
Medelian Genetics
Molecular Genetics and Gene Regulation
Evolution
EXAM 1
Reproduction and Development
Animal Architecture
Taxonomy and Phylogeny
Protozoans; Sponges and Placozoans
Radiate Animals; Flatworms, Mesozoans, and Ribbon Worms
EXAM 2
Gnathiferans and Lophotrochozoans
Molluscs
Annelids and Allies
Smaller Ecdysozoans
Arthropods: Trilobites, Chelicerates, Myriapodes
EXAM 3
Crustaceans
Hexapods
Echinoderms and Hemichordates
Chordates
Fishes
Early Tetrapods and Amphibians
Reptiles
Birds
Mammals
EXAM 4
FINAL EXAM
1, 2
2, 3
4
5
5
6
7, 8
9
10
11, 12
13, 14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
EVALUATION AND GRADING:
A. Grading Criteria (percents, extra credit, etc.)
Lecture and lab grades will be combined to give one grade for the course. Lab is worth 1/3 of
the total course grade.
Lecture (2/3 of total course grade)
Regular Exams (4 total)
70%
Comprehensive Final Exam 20%
Homework/Quizzes
10%
B. Lecture Exams:
There will be four regular lecture exams that will be given as shown on the class schedule.
The final exam is comprehensive. The grade on the comprehensive portion of the final exam
can replace the single lowest grade on the regular exams. No make-up exams will be given
for any reason. If you miss an exam, the final exam grade will replace the grade of that
missed exam.
The instructor may modify the provisions of the syllabus to meet individual class needs by
informing the class in advance as to the changes being made.
Angelina College
Science and Mathematics Division
BIOL 1413 Lab Instructional Syllabus
I.
BASIC COURSE INFORMATION
A. Course Description: Fundamental biological concepts relevant to animals, including
systematics, evolution, structure and function, cellular and molecular metabolism,
reproduction, development, diversity, phylogeny, and ecology.
B. Intended Audience: This is a laboratory-based course designed for science majors.
C. Instructor: Mr. Andy Ferrell
Office: Rm 357
Office Hours: See schedule on office door
Office Phone: 936-326-4890
e-mail: [email protected]
II.
INTENDED STUDENT OUTCOMES:
B. Core Objectives
5. Critical Thinking Skills - to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and
analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information
6. Communication Skills - to include effective development, interpretation and
expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication
7. Empirical and Quantitative Skills - to include the manipulation and analysis of
numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions
8. Teamwork - to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work
effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal
B.
Learning Outcomes: The student will be able to:
1. Compare and contrast the structures, reproduction, and characteristics of
animals.
2. Describe the characteristics of life and the basic properties of substances
needed for life.
3. Identify the principles of inheritance and solve classical genetic problems.
4. Describe phylogenetic relationships and classification schemes.
5. Identify the major phyla of life with an emphasis on animals, including the
basis for classification, structural and physiological adaptations, evolutionary
history, and ecological significance.
6. Identify the chemical structures, synthesis, and regulation of nucleic acids and
proteins.
7. Identify the substrates, products, and important chemical pathways in
respiration.
8. Describe the unity and diversity of animals and the evidence for evolution
through natural selection.
9. Describe the reasoning processes applied to scientific investigations and
thinking.
10. Describe basic animal physiology and homeostasis as maintained by organ
systems.
11. Describe modern evolutionary synthesis, natural selection, Mendelian
inheritance, micro and macroevolution, and speciation.
12. Describe the structure of cell membranes and the movement of molecules
across a membrane.
III.
ASSESSMENT MEASURES OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
A.
Assessments for Core Objectives
5. Critical thinking – Critical thinking skills will be assessed using embedded test
questions focusing on analysis, synthesis and evaluation of biological
phenomena.
6. Communication – Communication skills will be assessed using lab reports and
embedded test questions focusing on best practices in written, visual, and oral
communication.
7. Empirical and Quantitative Skills – Empirical and quantitative skills will be
introduced and assessed using embedded test questions focusing on calculations
in genetics and population dynamics.
8. Teamwork – Teamwork skills will be assessed using teamwork skill sin lab
exercises as well as embedded test questions focusing on best practices.
B.
Learning Outcomes
1. Students will compare and contrast the structures, reproduction, and
characteristics of animals by answering multiple choice questions.
2. Students will describe the characteristics of life and the basic properties of
substances needed for life by answering multiple choice questions.
3. Students will identify the principles of inheritance and solve classical genetic
problems by answering multiple choice questions.
4. Students will describe phylogenetic relationships and classification schemes by
answering multiple choice questions.
5. Students will identify the major phyla of life with an emphasis on animals,
including the basis for classification, structural and physiological adaptations,
evolutionary history, and ecological significance by answering multiple choice
questions.
6. Students will identify the chemical structures, synthesis, and regulation of
nucleic acids and proteins by answering multiple choice questions.
7. Students will identify the substrates, products, and important chemical
pathways in respiration by answering multiple choice questions.
8. Students will describe the unity and diversity of animals and the evidence for
evolution through natural selection by answering multiple choice questions.
9. Students will describe the reasoning processes applied to scientific
investigations and thinking by answering multiple choice questions.
10. Students will describe basic animal physiology and homeostasis as maintained
by organ systems by answering multiple choice questions.
11. Students will describe modern evolutionary synthesis, natural selection,
Mendelian inheritance, micro and macroevolution, and speciation by answering
multiple choice questions.
12. Students will describe the structure of cell membranes and the movement of
molecules across a membrane by answering multiple choice questions.
IV. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES
A. Methodologies common to all sections
This course will be taught using a combination of lectures and laboratory
exercises that complement and supplement lecture material. Audio-visual
materials, models, and dissection of specimens will be employed to enhance
lecture and laboratory presentations.
V. COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND POLICIES
A. Required Textbooks and Equipment
1. Zoology by Hickman, et al, (W. C. Brown/McGraw Hill) Fifteenth Edition.
2. Exploring Zoology: A Laboratory Guide by Smith & Schenk, (Morton Publishing) 1 st ed.
B. Course Policies – (This course conforms to the policies of Angelina College as
stated in the Angelina College Handbook.)
Academic Assistance – If you have a disability (as cited in Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990) that may affect your participation in this class, you should see Karen
Bowser, Room 208 of the Student Center. At a post –secondary institution, you
must self-indentify as a person with a disability; Ms. Bowser will assist you in
with the necessary information to do so.
Attendance Policy – Attendance will be required as per Angelina College Policy.
Records will be turned in to the academic dean at the end of the semester. Do not
assume that non-attendance in class will always in an instructor drop. You must
officially drop a class or risk receiving a failing grade. This is official Angelina
College Policy.
Course Conduct
1. Absolutely no cell phone use is allowed during labs or class.
2. No Food, drinks, or tobacco in class.
3. Courteous and respectful behavior will be expected in class at all times.
VI. COURSE SCHEDULE
Day
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
VII.
Topic
Safety, Fundamental Laboratory Skills
Animal Cells & Tissues, Reproduction & Cell Division
Development, Taxonomy & Systematics
Protists
Lab Exam 1
Sponges, Ctenophores & Cnidarians
Flatworms, Roundworms & Rotifers
Molluscs & Annelids
Lab Exam 2
Arthropods
Echinoderms
Tunicates & Lampreys, Fishes
Amphibians & Reptiles
Birds & Mammals
Lab Exam 3
Exercise
1
2, 3
4, 5
6
1-6
7, 8
9, 10
11, 12
7-12
13
14
15-18
19-20
21-22
EVALUATION AND GRADING:
A. Grading Criteria (percents, extra credit, etc.)
Lecture and lab grades will be combined to give one grade for the course. Lab is worth 1/3 of
the total course grade.
Lab (1/3 of total course grade)
Lab Exams (3 total)
Lab/Dissection Reports
80%
20%
B. Lab Exams:
There will be three regular lecture exams that will be given as shown on the class schedule.
Make-up exams must be completed within seven days of the missed exam. Make-up exams
may be given in short-answer or essay format at the instructor’s discretion.
The instructor may modify the provisions of the syllabus to meet individual class needs by
informing the class in advance as to the changes being made.
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