IB Courses

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TOPIC
PAGE
Background of IB
1
The IB Program
2
Typical Course
Selections
3
Certificate
Students
4
Examinations
4
Benefits
5
Biology
6
Chemistry
7
English
8
French
9
Mathematics
10
Math Studies
11
History
11
Physics
12
Theory of
Knowledge
13
CAS
14
Learner Profile
17
Pre-Diploma
Courses
18
Contact
Information
19
Notes
20
IB Diploma
Programme
Yarmouth
Consolidated
Memorial High
School
2014-2015
1
BACKGROUND OF THE IB PROGRAM
The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is recognized throughout the world as a very comprehensive
and challenging high school curriculum. Currently there are over 2000 schools in more than 144 countries that offer
the program. YCMHS became one of those schools in April, 2007.
The International Baccalaureate was originally conceived and designed to meet the needs of the children of
members of the international diplomatic and business communities. Since those students were often highly mobile, it
was not uncommon for them to experience schools where the curriculum and expectations were deemed inadequate.
Since European countries in particular required secondary students to pass a rigorous series of exams, such as the
British “A Levels” or the French “Bach”, a consistently high level of preparation was necessary.
Thus, ten member schools of the International Schools Association created the International Baccalaureate
Organization in Geneva in 1963. At the outset, it received funding from governments and private benefactors, such
as the Ford Foundation and the Mountbatten Fund. The founders then set out on their mission of creating an
international curriculum that would satisfy the demands of various nation education ministries.
From 1963 through 1969 working parties, consisting of both university and secondary teachers, devised the various
syllabi and prepared a set of examinations that was first administered on a trial basis in 1969. Since the results met
the expectations of the participating schools, negotiations with governments and a number of major universities
were conducted. Consequently, the IB was recognized as a credential in lieu of national exams and as sufficient for
university admission. Though the process of introducing the IB to universities around the world would be a long
one, the promotion of the program was facilitated more than anything by the high quality of preparation exhibited by
IB graduates after they entered post-secondary education.
The greatest boost during those formative years came in 1966 when Mr. Alex Peterson, Director of the Department
of Educational Studies at Oxford University, assumed responsibility for directing the project. Since the IB was so
closely linked with Oxford, which supplied continuous evaluation during its entire experimental period in 1976,
considerable credibility was derived from the relationship alone. Yet more than anything else, acceptance was won
by the inherent quality of the program itself, and universities around the world extended their recognition not only
for admission purposes, but in terms of advanced placement and credit as well.
The project received unanimous recognition in UNESCO’s General Conference in 1975 and was confirmed at the
first Intergovernmental Conference at The Hague in 1976 where fifteen countries agreed on a plan of action and
offered moral and financial support. Rapid expansion quickly followed. One of the most pivotal events in the early
growth was the acceptance of the IB in 1978 into the first public school, Francis Lewis High School in Queens, New
York. Greatly encouraged by the experience, the school began to publicize broadly the benefits of the IB in various
periodicals and journals.
Coincident with the public demand for excellence in education, the time could not have been better. Forward
thinking public schools around the world sought to join the IB family.
2
THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM
The IB Diploma program is a comprehensive curriculum designed for the last two years of high school, which
consists essentially of six core courses, a unique seventh course called the Theory of Knowledge, an extended essay
of up to 4000 words, and a service requirement. A school may choose whatever options it wishes within each of the
six subject groups. For example, we have chosen French for our Language B (foreign language). Potential IB
courses include the following (those that YCMHS currently offer are indicated by asterisks):
Group 1: Language A: Literature HL*
First language literature, including the study of selections from
world literature
Group 2: Language Acquisition Language A SL*
students.
A self-taught literature course for fluent or bilingual
Language B*
A foreign language course for students with previous
experience in the language
Language ab initio*
A foreign language course for beginners
Classical languages
Classical Greek, Latin
Group 3: Individuals & Societies
History*, Geography, Economics, Philosophy, Psychology, Social and
Cultural Anthropology, Business and Management, Information
Technology in a Global Society, Islamic History
Group 4: Experimental Sciences
Biology*, Chemistry*, Physics*, Environmental Systems, Design
Technology
Group 5: Mathematics and
Computer Sciences
Mathematics HL, Mathematics SL*, Math Studies SL*, Further
Mathematics, Computer Science
Group 6: The Arts
Visual Arts*, Music, Theatre Arts
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS
1.
Theory of Knowledge
The Theory of Knowledge course is a unique study for secondary school students. This course gives the IB
a distinct and special character.
2.
Extended Essay IB Diploma
Diploma students must prepare a 4000-word essay, under the supervision and guidance of a teacher, in one
of the disciplines that they have studied. Due by December of the final year, the essay is graded by an
external examiner.
3
(continued from page 3)
3.
CAS
All diploma students must engage in activities that involve various aspects of Creativity, Action and
Service, all of which must fulfill certain learning outcomes.
HIGHER AND STANDARD LEVELS
Most courses are taught at two levels, higher and standard. Of the six basic courses, diploma students must take
three at each level. All higher level courses are two years in duration and offer a syllabus that often exceeds the
requirements of first-year university. Standard courses, though still rigorous, do not require the same breadth and
depth as the higher level. They are also two year courses, though the school can opt to teach some in one year.
YCMHS courses include English, History, Biology, Chemistry, and French at the higher level, and Physics,
Chemistry, French, Visual Arts, Mathematics, and Math Studies at the standard level.
TYPICAL COURSE SELECTIONS
A typical diploma student attending YCMHS who is interested in the sciences** might structure their program, with
Theory of Knowledge, to include:
Higher Level
English A
History
Chemistry
Standard Level
Mathematics
Physics
French
**It should be noted that with the intent of the IB diploma program to provide students with a well-rounded
academic program, it may not be possible for a student to take three IB sciences and fulfill the requirements for both
the IB diploma and a NS High School leaving certificate.
A student attending YCMHS who is interested in the humanities might structure the program in this fashion:
Higher Level
English A
History
Biology
Standard Level
Math Studies
Visual Arts
French
Although all efforts are made to accommodate the course selections of every student, timetable restrictions may
cause the occasional conflict. The IB Diploma program is always available, but the scheduling of a student’s first
choice in courses cannot be guaranteed.
4
INDIVIDUAL COURSE STUDENTS
Some IB students do not opt for the full diploma, but take a limited number of courses based on their particular
interests and aptitudes. For example, one with a scientific bent might take Chemistry or Biology, while a more artsoriented student might be found in English, French or History. These are students with all-around ability who are not
committed to the full program, but do profit in varying degrees from limited participation.
EXAMINATIONS
YCMHS operates with a two-tier evaluation system within the IB program. Students receive their IB scores as well
as regular school marks. IB students’ final marks are externally graded on a scale of one (1) to seven (7).
The International Baccalaureate Organization’s maintenance of its high standards is in great measure attributable to
its system of external examinations. The examinations office in Cardiff, Wales, at the direction of headquarters in
Geneva, oversees the developments, administration, and grading of all IB examinations. Most students write in May,
except for those in the Southern Hemisphere, who write in November.
Thus, YCMHS students write in May at the completion of their respective courses. Those who begin the program in
September of 2013 for example, usually write their final exams in May of 2015.
Since the primary objective of the IB is “learning how to learn,” with special focus on the development of cognitive
skills and effective capacities, assessment procedures are designed to emphasize process rather than content, and to
achieve a balanced assessment of a student’s performance.
The form of assessment is defined with reference to the specific performance criteria for each subject and may
consist of some or all of the following: essay and short answer questions, document and data-based questions,
multiple choice objective tests, and oral exams. The latter, which is a required part of all language exams, involves
individual interviews. Written exams, which consist of from one to three separate papers, range from two and a half
to four and a half hours in total length.
IB students around the world take identical exams on the same day in various subjects. The papers are dispatched
immediately to examiners around the world. For example, papers from Nova Scotia could be sent to countries as
diverse as Belgium, Brazil, Lesotho, and Luxembourg. Exam results are collected in Cardiff and sent to students and
universities in July. Since IB exam results are not available until many months after university admission and
scholarship decisions are made, those universities that utilize IB results for either acceptance and/or scholarship
purposes rely on “anticipated” grades from the IB teachers and internal school marks as a basis for their decisions.
SCHOOL MARKS
All YCMHS IB students also receive school grades in the same fashion as everyone else. Thus, a student who may
have done well throughout the program, but performed poorly on an IB exam would not suffer an extreme hardship
because the permanent school record would reflect the work during the course. IB marks are usually converted to
percentage marks in IB courses so as not to disadvantage students’ ranking and scholarship opportunities.
5
PROGRESS REVIEW MEETINGS
IB teachers and the coordinator meet periodically to discuss the program, share ideas, and most importantly, review
student performance. Attention is paid not only to student academic progress but also to how well students are
coping with the demands of the program. There are some individuals who may possess sufficient aptitude but may
find the demands so stressful that remaining in the full program may not be in their best interest. In such cases the
recommendation would be to reduce the load somewhat by taking the academic level course. All decisions are made
strictly in accordance with what best serves the student.
BENEFITS
There are a number of special benefits gained by IB students, particularly those in the full diploma program. They
include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
A genuine challenge, even to the most academically inclined
The development of a critical thinking approach
A program and curriculum that is recognized worldwide
An internationally based standard of achievement
The acquisition of an international and multi-cultural perspective
The development of excellent time management and study skills
Classes with other highly motivated students
Social service activities
Enhances scholarship opportunities
Course credit or advanced placement standing at many universities
6
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
International Baccalaureate Biology HL
Biology is the study of living organisms, applying the techniques of the experimental sciences. This study is
undertaken at a variety of levels from the molecular to that of the biosphere, each with its own distinctive
approaches and methods. However, by the end of the course the student should have developed an appreciation of
the interactions among these levels, and of organisms as functioning entities within the biosphere.
The design of the International Baccalaureate Biology program seeks to incorporate recent scientific thinking in
many countries. Curriculum content has been selected with the realization that because biology is continuously and
rapidly progressing both in breadth and depth, the contemporary biology curriculum can never be considered to be
stable. Scientific method is best developed and understood through personal experience, therefore the emphasis
throughout the program is on providing students with ample opportunities for research and discovery.
Topics:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Statistical Analysis
Cells
The Chemistry of Life
Genetics
Ecology and Evolution
Human Health & Physiology
AHL
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Nucleic Acids and Proteins
Cell Respiration and Photosynthesis
Plant Science
Genetics
Human Health & Physiology
Two Options:
Option D: Evolution
Option G Ecology and Conservation
The final mark for this course will consist of:
SL
HL
Exam Paper 1
20%
20%
Exam Paper 2
32%
36%
Exam Paper 3
24%
20%
IA Labs and
24%
24%
Group 4 Project
7
International Baccalaureate Chemistry
This course is offered in both higher level and standard level.
IB Chemistry is designed to further the student’s understanding of chemistry and how it applies to the world while
also helping the students advance their problem-solving strategies.
The students will work collaboratively on lab activities that involve the use of computer and probe technology where
appropriate. They will develop their own purposes and procedures to investigate topics. They will need to make
choices in terms of data collection, processing, analysis, evaluations and presentations. The presentation format will
include technology (data spreadsheets, Powerpoint, webpages, video and audio programs, as well as specific
chemistry programs). They will develop laboratory manipulative skills and mathematical skills, including the use of
significant digits and experimental error, necessary to analyze and interpret experimental data.
Topics:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Basic Principles, Terminology, Formulae, Equations, Stoichiometry
Atomic Theory
Structure and Bonding
Energetics
State of Matter
Physical Equilibrium
Chemical Equilibrium, including REDOX, Acids, and Bases
Kinetics
Periodicity
Organic Chemistry, Naming, Mechanistic Principles, Reactions
Group IV Project (all sciences)
Option Topics (chosen by instructor)
The final mark for this course will consist of:
SL
HL
Exam Paper 1
20%
20%
Exam Paper 2
32%
36%
Exam Paper 3
24%
20%
IA Labs and
24%
24%
Group 4 Project
8
International Baccalaureate English
This course is offered in higher level only.
The English program is a literature course studied at the first language level of the student. It encourages an
appreciation of literature and the knowledge of the student’s own culture and that of other societies. Students and
teachers engage in complex discussions and analysis of major texts from world literature. The purpose of the
programme is to broaden the student’s global perspective in becoming an active, compassionate, lifelong learner.
The aims of the English program are to enable the student to express ideas with clarity, coherence, precision, and
fluency in both written and oral communication; to engage in a rigorous approach to literary analysis; to encourage a
personal appreciation of literature and to develop an understanding of the techniques involved in literary study and
criticism; to introduce literary classics and a range of modern writing in different literary genres, styles and contexts;
and to promote an international perspective through the comparative study of works from the student’s own and
other cultures. Students’ writing and speaking skills are assessed using a variety of methods which give a broad
picture of the students’ linguistic proficiency and ability to think critically.
Thirteen literary works are selected for examination at the higher level. These works are selected according to a
four-part format set by IB, including World Literature, texts for Detailed Study, Groups of Works, and School’s Free
Choices. Past selections for YCMHS have included the following:
A Thematic Unit of Works in Translation
A Doll’s House, So Long a Letter, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich
Detailed Study
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Macbeth, poetry of Seamus Heaney,
Groups of Works
The Glass Menagerie, Death of a Salesman, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, and Blood Relations
School’s Free Choice
Mercy Among the Children, Things Fall Apart, and Lord of the Flies
The final mark for this course will consist of:
HL
Exam Paper 1
20%
Exam Paper 2
25%
Works in
Trans essay
25%
IA Oral
15%
Presentation
IA Oral
15%
Commentary
9
International Baccalaureate French (Language B)
This course is offered in both higher level and standard level.
The French Language B programme is communicative in that it focuses principally on interaction between speakers
and writers of the target language. The main aim of the programme is to prepare the leaner to use the language
appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes. The skills of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing will be taught and developed through the study of a wide range of oral and written texts if
different styles and registers. Equal emphasis will be given to the teaching of these four skills. Authentic materials
will be used wherever possible and students will be given the maximum exposure to the French language.
The four language skills listed above will be integrated as far as possible with the preparation and presentation of all
learning activities and assessment tasks. In particular, the continuous assessment of oral work will be integrated into
regular classroom activities. The teaching of an appropriate range of grammatical structures will also be integrated
as far as possible with the study of themes and texts and the acquisition of skills.
The aims of the French B Language programme are to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Develop the ability to communicate accurately and effectively in speech and in writing within a range of
contexts;
Develop the ability to understand the language demands of transactional and social contacts;
Provide students with a sound linguistic base for further study, work and leisure;
Offer insights into the culture of the countries where the language is spoken;
Provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation.
The final mark for this course will consist of:
SL
HL
Exam Paper 1
25%
25%
Exam Paper 2
25%
25%
Written Assign 20%
20%
IA Oral
20%
20%
IA Oral Activity 10%
10%
International Baccalaureate French ab initio
Language ab initio is a language acquisition course designed to provide students with the necessary skills and
intercultural understanding to enable them to communicate successfully in an environment where the language
studied is spoken. This process encourages the learner to go beyond the confines of the classroom, expanding an
awareness of the world and fostering respect for cultural diversity.
This course uses a balance between approaches to learning that are teacher-centered (teacher-led activities and
assessment in the classroom) and those that are learner-centered (activities designed to allow the students to take the
initiative, which can also involve student participation in the evaluation of their learning). The teacher is best placed
10
to evaluate the needs of the students and is expected to encourage both independent and collaborative learning. This
course develops students’ linguistic abilities through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills.
French ab initio is organized into three themes.
• Individual and society
• Leisure and work
• Urban and rural environment
Each theme has a list of topics that provides the students with opportunities to practice and explore the language as
well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive
skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations.
There are five assessment objectives for French ab initio. Students will be assessed on their ability to:
1. demonstrate an awareness and understanding of the intercultural elements related to the prescribed topics
2. communicate clearly and effectively in a range of situations
3. understand and use accurately the basic structures of the language
4. understand and use an appropriate range of vocabulary
5. use a register and a format that are appropriate to the situation.
The final mark for this course will consist of:
SL
Exam Paper 1
30%
Exam Paper 2
25%
Written Assign 20%
IA Ind. Oral
25%
International Baccalaureate Mathematics SL
Mathematics SL is a course designed to give students who already have a strong work ethic and concrete
background in mathematics the necessary tools to prepare for further study of mathematics and related fields, such
as science. Basic knowledge of mathematical skills and concepts are assumed during the course of study.
The course will focus on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical
techniques. Students will apply their new mathematical knowledge to solve realistic problems.
This course is a blend of direct instruction, portfolio work (which involves independent student mathematical
investigation and modeling), and independent research of mathematical topics. A variety of assessment techniques
will be administered as checkpoints for student learning.
Topics:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Irrational numbers
Statistics and Probability Theory
Vectors
Analytic Geometry
Calculus (differential and integral, minimum 35 hours of class time)
The final mark for this course will consist of:
SL
11
Exam Paper 1
Exam Paper 2
Exploration
40%
40%
20%
International Baccalaureate Math Studies SL
This course is intended for students who are likely not planning to continue studying mathematics after high school.
These students may come from various backgrounds and strengths. They will be hard working and self-motivated.
The purpose of the course is to give students experience in several topics of mathematics with very practical
applications. They will be able to explore how mathematics is relevant in other subjects that they may be studying
concurrently. By working through contextual problems, they will learn to think logically, extract relevant
information, make conclusions and communicate solutions clearly. Students will be expected to solve problems that
lend themselves to a variety of approaches, and multi-stepped solutions. Students will also develop problem solving
approaches of their own.
Students will become proficient at using technology when appropriate. They will learn that mathematics is one
language that is universal throughout the globe, and that information can be conveyed clearly using tables, charts,
graphs, and universal symbols and language. Students will explore international currencies and learn about
mathematicians from different countries and their discoveries. From the development of geometric ideas by
Pythagoras in ancient Greece, to the writings of Al’Khwarizmi on algebra, students will be exposed to mathematical
discoveries in an historical and geographical context.
The final mark for this course will consist of:
SL
Exam Paper 1
40%
Exam Paper 2
40%
Project
20%
International Baccalaureate History
This course is offered in higher level only.
International Baccalaureate History studies the late 19th century to modern day through the studying of: (a)
Communism in crisis; (b) Origins and development of authoritarian and single party states; and (c) The Cold war;
(d) Imperial Russia, revolutions, emergence of Soviet State; (e) The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 1924 – 2000;
(f) The Second World War and post-war Western Europe, 1939 - 2000. In addition to regular testing procedures,
there are written papers required throughout the course and an internal assessment due in the winter of the student’s
second year. There will an in-school examination process and the IB offers a final external exam for which all
students are expected to prepare. The higher level option in history requires students to develop a more
comprehensive understanding of a wider variety of regional historical topics.
The final mark for this course will consist of:
HL
Exam Paper 1
20%
Exam Paper 2
25%
Exam Paper 3
35%
IA Historical
20%
12
Investigation Essay
International Baccalaureate Physics
This course is offered in standard level only.
Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences, as it seeks to explain the universe itself, from the very
smallest particles to the vast distances between galaxies. Students will study physics keeping in mind the scientific
method, critical thinking, and the international language of mathematics.
Physics SL Core
Topic 1: Physics and physical measurement
Topic 2: Mechanics
Topic 2 is enhanced with projectile motion, navigation with vectors and more advanced vector
application problems. Several topics are extended and deeper problem solving is employed. This
enhancement would be similar to Topic 9 AHL.
Topic 3: Thermal Physics
Topic 4: Oscillations and Waves
Topic 4 is enhanced with topics from Option A and AHL Topic 11.
Topic 5: Electric Currents
Topic 5 is enhanced with more advanced circuit analysis. Also motors and generators are studied
such as in AHL Topic 12, electromagnetic induction.
Topic 6: Fields and Forces
Topic 7: Atomic and Nuclear Physics
Topic 8: Energy, Power and Climate Change
Options
Option B: Quantum Physics and Nuclear Physics
Option E: Astrophysics
Students may opt to study any option of their choosing independently.
The final mark for this course consists of:
SL
Exam Paper 1
20%
Exam Paper 2
32%
Exam Paper 3
24%
IA Labs and
24%
Group 4 Project
13
International Baccalaureate Visual Arts
This course is offered in standard level only.
Diploma candidates in the International Baccalaureate Programme must complete one subject from each of the six
subject groups. Visual Arts is one course from the sixth group of arts and electives.
Students have the option of selecting either Visual Arts Standard Level A (SLA), or Visual Arts Standard Level B
(SLB).
Visual Arts (SLA) is designed for the arts student with great imagination and interest for creating art. (SLA) students
are required to spend 105 hours in studio work, and 45 hours on research related activities in their workbooks.
Visual Arts B (SLB) is designed for the student whose interests lie more with critical analysis of art. (SLB) students
are required to fulfill 45 hours of studio time, and 105 hours on research workbook related material.
The course will investigate why different cultures produce art and encourage students to integrate a variety of
traditions and techniques into their own artworks. A variety of drawing, painting and print media will be used to
explore culture groups from Africa, Asia, Australia, North, Central and South America, and Europe. The research
workbook is necessary for student reflection on the role of art in the world.
Topic 1: Cultural Link to Art Making
Topic 2: Artistic Techniques and Processes
Topic 3: Focused Self-Directed Artistic Investigation
Topic 4: Learning From Other Artists
Topic 5: Art Vocabulary
Topic 6: Sources and References
Topic 7: Critical Observation and Reflection
Topic 8: Relationship Between Investigation and Art Pieces Made
The final mark for this course consists of:
SL
Studio Work
60%
8 to 12 Art Pieces
Investigations
40%
18 – 20 Investigation Workbook Pages
Candidate Statement
Art Titles Form
15 Minute Video Interview
Theory of Knowledge
This course is obligatory for every candidate for the Diploma because it is a key element in the educational
philosophy of the IB. Its purpose is to stimulate critical reflection upon the knowledge and the experience of
students both in and outside the classroom. The course is thus “philosophical” in the sense that it is meant to
encourage students to acquire a critical awareness of what they and others know through analyzing concepts and
arguments as well as the bases of value judgements, which all human beings have to make.
14
The aims of the Theory of Knowledge programme are to lead students to:
• Engage in reflection on, and questioning of, the bases of knowledge and experience;
• Be aware of subjective and ideological biases;
• Develop a personal mode of thought based on critical examination of evidence and argument, and;
• Formulate rational arguments
Performance Criteria
Students should be able to:
• Use language clearly, consistently, and appropriately;
• Appreciate the strengths and limitations of the various kinds of knowledge, as well as their similarities and
differences;
• Relate subjects studied to one another, to general knowledge, and to living experience;
• Demonstrate awareness of the virtues and the limitations of both their individual outlook and the views common to
the communities and cultures to which they belong, and;
• Show proper appreciation of the power of reason to recognize its capacities and its own limitations, to overcome
ignorance and prejudice as well as to advance both academic knowledge and practical understanding between
individuals, communities, nations, and cultures.
Program Outline
1.
2.
3.
4.
Knowledge
Ways of Knowing
a) Reason
b) Emotion
c) Perception
d) Language
Areas of Knowledge
a) Mathematics
b) Natural Sciences
c) Human Sciences
d) History
e) Ethics
f) The Arts
An exploration of what it means to live a “good life”
Essays and Assessment
Diploma students are required to submit one essay, for external assessment, from the list of specific topics provided
by IB. Diploma students will also be internally assessed on an in-class presentation they make during the course.
CAS (Creativity, Action, Service)
The IB Diploma Programme seeks to provide a comprehensive and well-balanced educational experience. Thus,
every diploma student is required to engage in constructive “non-academic” service-related activities. These
activities must meet the following four criteria:
1.
Real, purposeful activities with significant outcomes
15
2.
3.
4.
Personal challenge – tasks must extend the student and be achievable in scope
Thoughtful consideration, such as planning, reviewing progress, reporting
Reflection on outcomes and personal learning
Following the four criteria, eight learning outcomes must be met as well:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Increased awareness of your own strengths and areas for growth
You are able to see yourself as an individual with various skills and abilities, some more developed than
others, and understand that you can make choices about how you wish to move forward.
Undertake new challenges
A new challenge may be an unfamiliar activity, or an extension to an existing one.
Planned and initiated activities
Planning and initiating will often be in collaboration with others. It can be shown in activities that are part
of larger projects as well as in small student-led activities.
Worked collaboratively with others
Collaboration can be shown in different activities, such as team sports, playing music in a band, or helping
in a kindergarten. At least one project, involving collaboration and integration of at least two creativity,
action, and service activities, is required.
Shown perseverance and commitment in their activities
At a minimum, this implies attending regularly and accepting a share of responsibility for dealing with
problems that arise in the course of activities.
Engaged with issues of global importance
You may be involved in international projects but there are many global issues that can be acted upon
locally or nationally.
Considered the ethical implications of your actions
Ethical decisions arise in almost any CAS activity. Evidence of thinking about ethical issues can be shown
in various ways, including journal entries and conversations with CAS advisers.
Developed new skills
As with new challenges, new skills may be shown in activities that you have not previously undertaken, or
in increased expertise in an established area.
Each activity does not need to cover every outcome, but each outcome must be met and have evidence to prove it by
the end of the two years. Some outcomes may be demonstrated many times in a variety of activities.
Students are encouraged to develop their own program to meet their own needs and interests, as well as to
complement their past experiences. It is emphasized, however, that students must have a program which provides
them with opportunities for growth in creativity, action, and service.
In the grade 12 year, the diploma student will have to write a reflective essay, describing each activity that they did
and how they met the outcomes. Also, the student will meet with their CAS advisor to go into further detail about
their activities and provide their evidence of completion.
16
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GRADE 10 IB PRE-DIPLOMA COURSES
English 10 Pre-Diploma
This course is designed to prepare students for the rigorous demands of the two-year IB English course. Students
must be interested in literature and willing to make the time commitment necessary for reading and for synthesizing
ideas presented by this literature. Students will be responsible for daily reading assignments in order to prepare
adequately for class, and some summer reading. Students will become knowledgeable of the political, scientific,
literary, artistic, philosophical, and social interrelationships of the time period and geographical area from which
each text originates. Students are expected to develop a refined ability for oral and written expression in order to
succeed in IB English.
French 10 Pre-Diploma
This concentrated course will focus on intensive French language acquisition in terms of speaking, understanding
and writing. Students will be expected to immerse themselves as much as possible in the French language through
French media, for instance, television, radio and Internet. The goal of this course will be to bring students as close as
possible to the French Immersion 10 level. This course is not open to French Immersion Students. There are two
levels of pre-diploma French. One French course is designed for students enrolled in French Immersion; the other is
designed for students in French Core.
History 10 Pre-Diploma
Throughout the course, there will be a focus on the understanding and interconnections between historical events.
The course will look at the beginnings of humanity to the Renaissance. Significant time will be spent on student
writing, reading, analysis, and evaluation in a historical context. In addition to the acquisition of European history
content that forms the foundation for IB History, students will learn and practice the skills of historical investigation,
document analysis, and thesis development and presentation.
Math 10 Pre-Diploma
This is a full year grade 10 honours course in Mathematics. Students who consistently work hard and seek extra help
when necessary are usually rewarded with success. Approximately 60 minutes of homework should be completed
five times per week. Attendance is essential since investigative learning and some practice will be done in small
groups. The course consists of all topics in the current Math 10 curriculum with the following additions: radical
operations and equations, exponential laws and equations, various notations, analysis of functions, linear
programming, completing the square, factoring quadratics, quadratic inequalities, and transformations of quadratics.
It is recommended that students have a strong background in numeracy skills.
Science 10 Pre-Diploma
This Science 10 is a demanding pre-university course that is designed for motivated secondary school students. Its
purpose is to bridge the gap of knowledge expected for students entering the standard/ higher level International
Baccalaureate Chemistry and Physics courses. The learning outcomes closely compare to the Essential Graduation
Learning Outcomes for the Nova Scotia Science 10 curriculum, but are more intensely studied on a wider scope,
with emphasis on topics in Chemistry and Physics. A minimum of 20 hours will be spent on laboratory work. The
mark for the course is based on tests, lab work, homework, and assignments.
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CONTACT INFORMATION
If you require additional information or have any questions regarding the IB programme at
YCMHS, please contact:
Michael Drew
IB Coordinator
Yarmouth Consolidated Memorial High School
146 Forest St
Yarmouth, Nova Scotia
B5A 0B3
Email:
[email protected]
Phone:
Fax:
School Website:
IB Website:
(902) 749-2810, ext. 9
(902) 749-2811
http://www.ycmhs.com
http://www.ibo.org
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NOTES:
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