RPWCDT-Community-Action-Plan_TEXT-ONLY

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Rosneath Peninsula West Community Development Trust
COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN MAY 2011
Prepared for RPWCDT by Community Links Scotland
Rosneath Peninsula West
Community Development Trust
www.rosneathpeninsulawest.com
Community Action Plan May 2011
Prepared by
Community Links Scotland
63 Kilbowie Road
Clydebank
G81 1BL
Tel: 0141 952 4382
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.comlinks.org.uk
Published May 2011
Copyright © Rosneath Peninsula West Community Development Trust, 2011
All rights reserved. Any unauthorized reprint or use of this material is prohibited. No part of this book
may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including
photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system without express written
permission.
Photographs by Community Links Scotland
Copies available from RPWCDT, Community Links Scotland and the library in Cove Burgh Hall.
Acknowledgements:
Thanks to Kilcreggan, Cove, Peaton, Ardpeaton and Portkil residents for their participation in the
consultations.
CONTENTS
1.0
Background
2.0
Introduction
3.0
Methodology and Summary
4.0
Needs Analysis
5.0
Policy Context
6.0
Demand Analysis
7.0
Project Prioritisation
8.0
Project Profiles
Youth centre
All-weather 5-a-side pitch
Indoor sports facility
Improved Rainbow Centre
Play area
Affordable family housing
New business workshop spaces at Fort Road
Sheltered housing
Befriending services for the elderly
Evening public transport
Community petrol station
Improvements of pavements
Marine access facility
Community festivals
Nursery/after school club
Watersports centre and marina
Improvement of foreshore
Community woodland
Wind farm
9.0
Additional Project
10.0
Community Campus
11.0
Conclusions and Recommendations
12.0
Appendix
2
1.0 BACKGROUND
1.1
GEOGRAPHY
The Rosneath Peninsula is located in the west of Scotland, in the Argyll and Bute Council area. It is
surrounded by Gare Loch on the east, Loch Long on the west and the Clyde Estuary on the south. The
peninsula is six miles long and between one mile and two and a half miles wide and encompasses the
villages of Clynder, Rosneath, Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and Peaton.
The Rosneath Peninsula is located approximately 50 miles from Glasgow. It is accessible by ferry from
Gourock and by road leading around the north of the Peninsula, where it connects to Garelochhead.
The nearest major town to the Rosneath Peninsula is Helensburgh, approximately 30 minutes by car
from the furthest point on the Peninsula.
1.2
HISTORY
Traditionally, the Peninsula was predominately agricultural; however, the development of steamboats
in the early 19th century brought people along the Clyde to the peninsula, with the area developing
into a popular holiday spot for wealthy Glaswegians. Many of the impressive houses which were built
at this time still stand along the shore front today. Initially, these were used predominately as summer
houses, however, in later years, as Glasgow became increasingly accessible, more people settled on
the peninsula permanently. Before the massive expansion in private car ownership, the main way to
access the peninsula was by ferry with numerous piers located all along the peninsula. These have
gradually shut as the road north becomes the preferred way to access the peninsula with only one pier
remaining in Kilcreggan.
In the Second World War the Rosneath Peninsula developed as a key defence base, with both
American and British Naval bases located in the north of the Peninsula. Since the 1960s, submarine
nuclear deterrents, Polaris and then Trident, have also been based at Faslane. The Ministry of Defence
is therefore still a major employer in the area and many peninsula residents either work or have
worked at the naval bases.
Many other residents commute to Glasgow or Helensburgh each day for work. Despite this, there is
still strong community spirit in the area, with many community groups encompassing a wide variety
of interests active on the Peninsula.
2.0 INTRODUCTION
2.1
ROSNEATH PENINSULA WEST COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TRUST
Rosneath Peninsula West Community Development Trust (RPWCDT) covers the area on the west side
of the Rosneath Peninsula from 55°58”N to 56°06”N. It includes the communities of Kilcreggan, Cove,
Ardpeaton, and Peaton.
The Development Trust was formed with the consent of the Cove and Kilcreggan Community Council
to take forward the aspirations of the Rosneath Peninsula West. The Trust Board was formed in April
2010 and had fifteen members. The first role of the Development Trust, as agreed with the
Community Council, was to find out what the needs, priorities and aspirations were for the residents
of the area and to find ways forward to achieve these. The Trust appointed Community Links Scotland
to carry out extensive community consultation, liaise with MAST architects and all other relevant
organizations and to bring together the various strands of a Community Action Plan.
3
2.2
TIMESCALE
The Community Action Plan was launched alongside the Community Development Trust on
November 6th 2010 and followed a timescale highlighted below.
DATE
ACTION TAKEN
NOVEMBER 6TH 2010
COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN LAUNCH - 150 ATTENDED
NOVEMBER 2010
COMMUNITY, LOCAL GROUPS & BUSINESS CONSULTATION - 417 SURVEYS COMPLETED
NOVEMBER 2010
NEEDS ANALYSIS, POLICY CONTEXT
DECEMBER 2010
SURVEY RESULTS & FIRST DRAFT PROPOSALS
FEBRUARY 2011
COMMUNITY PRIORITISATION EVENT - 165 PARTICIPATED
MARCH 2011
OUTLINE DRAFT PROJECTS WITH TRUST
APRIL 2011
PREPARE FINAL ACTION PLAN REPORT
MAY 2011
PRESENT PLAN TO COMMUNITY TRUST AND PENINSULA WEST COMMUNITY
2.3
CONTENT OF COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN
A Community Action Plan of this nature will provide the Trust with a clear and realistic end product
which they can use to further the aims and ambitions of the client group as a whole in addition to
individual groups and organisations in the villages. The resulting document will therefore not only be
reflective of the views of many of the residents, it will also provide tangible opportunities for
individuals and groups to take their own priorities forward under a community plan umbrella.
The Trust’s Community Action Plan has:











Confirmed individual and community needs
Identified various options to meet these needs
Identified costs of the various options
Identified fundraising needs and options, for immediate capital and longer term
revenue/running costs
Identified any targets which should be met in running costs
Identified ownership of sites and buildings
Detailed the designs which translate ideas into a proposal, which includes physical/financial
implications
Engaged with partner agencies, confirm their roles and agree their commitments in the
development process
Identified ways in which local people can become involved in the planning and decision
making process to develop an understanding and ownership of the project.
Identified employment opportunities
Established means for encouraging new businesses
3.0 METHODOLOGY AND SUMMARY
In order to prepare a Community Action Plan that was representative of the whole community of
Rosneath Peninsula West, Community Links Scotland carried out an extensive and varied consultation
and analysis which is summarised below.
4
3.1
NEEDS ANALYSIS
Identifying the underlying needs of the community involved an analysis of the socio-economic profile
of the Peninsula West and surrounding areas using statistics from the Scottish Index of Multiple
Deprivation (SIMD), Small Area Population Estimates (SAPE), Census and Official Labour Market
Statistics (Nomis). This found that the population of the area as a whole is declining; however, people
of pensionable age are increasing both in absolute terms and as a proportion of the population, while
the numbers of children and working age adults are declining.
The area has a large number of households with dependent children and 16 - 19 year olds make up a
larger than average proportion of the population. There are relatively high levels of income and
employment among residents, however, many people leave the Peninsula each day for work. There
are also relatively high house prices and poor childcare provision making it difficult for families with
young children in particular to move to the area. The peninsula is in a relatively isolated rural area,
however, there are still a high number of local services including a doctor’s surgery, community
centre, local shops and post office.
3.2
POLICY CONTEXT
This section identified a number of national and local government policies to explore how the
Community Action Plan and the projects outlined could contribute to the aims and objectives of these
policies. The policies researched were:
National Policies
 Scottish Government Purpose, Strategic Objectives and National Outcomes
 Government Economic Strategy
 The Scottish Economic Recovery Plan - Update from 3rd March 2010
 Community Learning and Development Strategy
 Skills for Scotland: A Lifelong Skills Strategy
 All Our Futures: Planning for a Scotland with an Ageing Population
 Enterprising Third Sector: Action Plan 2008-2011
 Scottish Community Empowerment Action Plan: Celebrating Success, Inspiring Change
Local Policies
 Argyll and Bute Structure Plan and Local Plan
 Argyll and Bute Single Outcome Agreement
 The Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009-2013
 Argyll and Bute Council Corporate Plan 2010 – 2013 and beyond
 Argyll and Bute Council Equality and Diversity Scheme 2009 – 2012
 Argyll and Bute’s Integrated Children’s Services Plan 2009 – 2012
 Argyll and Bute’s Older Persons Charter 2008-10
 Community Safety Strategy 2009-2012
 Antisocial Behaviour Strategy 2005-2008
 Argyll and Bute Local Transport Strategy 2007-2010: Moving Forward
 Argyll and Bute Local Housing Strategy 2004 -2009
 Argyll and Bute Woodlands and Forestry Strategy
 Argyll & Bute Community Planning Partnership’s Community Engagement Strategy
3.3
DEMAND ANALYSIS
In order to gather information on areas of concern and the priorities of the local community for
development of the Peninsula West area, four consultations were conducted with individual
households, young people, community groups and local businesses.
Household Survey
5
The individual households survey was sent to all adults within the Peninsula West area, a total of 1,268
adults. 28.5% of the adult population (a total of 361) of Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and Peaton
responded and provided their opinion on the most important issues facing the area. The survey
required respondents to rate their priorities in six areas: business and housing, transport, health and
welfare, physical environment, employment and tourism, and community and recreation.
Respectively, the top priority issues selected by local residents were: affordable housing, availability of
petrol, sheltered housing, improvement of foreshore, crèche facilities/after school club and a young
people’s place. Other issues that were highlighted by respondents as key areas of concern or priorities
for development in the Peninsula West area were:
 Public transport including ferry and bus timetables and frequency
 Support for young people to find and sustain employment and remain in the area
 Appearance of the village generally, in particular to promote tourism
 Promoting tourism through community events
 Tourist facilities/attractions to increase business opportunities in the area
 A sports hall and outdoor sports facilities
 Small business units/workshops
Young People’s Survey
A young people’s survey regarding a potential youth facility was conducted by youth work staff during
outreach sessions in Kilcreggan. 20 young people aged between 10 and 16 from the Kilcreggan area
completed this, about a fifth of this age group in the area. 75% thought that there was not enough for
young people to do in the area, 90% indicated they would use a new youth facility and 80% felt a
young people’s place would prevent young people from getting into trouble. The top facilities selected
by the young people for inclusion in a young people’s place were: sports hall, cinema, café and games
room. The top activities to be held in a young people’s place were: youth activities, keep-fit, music and
dance of all kinds. Finally the young people surveyed also indicated they felt that services such as
careers/jobs advice, money/welfare rights advice and youth drop-in centre should be provided at a
new young people’s place.
Community Groups Survey
The community groups survey was sent to 59 community groups in the Peninsula West area with 25
groups (42% of identified groups) responding. The majority of the groups currently use Cove Burgh
Hall and believed this to be adequate for their purposes. A third of respondent community groups
indicated that they required financial support to continue to run and almost 50% said that they would
benefit from additional information and advice regarding funding sources. This was also the top
priority group support for local community groups. The main priorities of the community groups
surveyed were for the provision of community notice boards, lockable storage, and leaflets,
publications or information stands.
Business Survey
A local businesses survey was sent to 66 identified businesses located in the Peninsula West area. 11
local businesses responded to the questionnaire, employing 53 staff between them. The majority of
businesses indicated they did not have any problems sourcing labour or services in the Peninsula West
area. Almost 50% of respondents selected information on potential grant funding sources for
development initiatives as the top priority business support service. The top priority transport issue for
local businesses was competitively priced fuel sourcing, followed by village centre parking.
Appearance of the village generally was selected as the top environment issue in relation to the dayto-day running and future developments of the business.
6
3.4
PROJECT PRIORITISATION
From the responses to the four consultations, 18 areas were identified for further prioritisation. At a
community prioritisation event in February, 160 community members completed additional questions
on their priorities for the local area and the form that projects to meet these should take. This enabled
further prioritisation of the key projects to be pursued by the Trust and allowed details of the format
of these projects to be determined. This resulted in the 19 project profiles outlines in section 6.
3.5
PROJECT PROFILES
Each of the project profiles outlines the aims, outputs and outcomes to be expected from each
project. They then detail how the projects would tackle community needs, meet the community
demands and contribute to the national and local policies outlined in previous chapters. Finally, each
profile sets out tangible projects which could be taken forward by the Trust or other local groups,
along with examples of previous, similar projects conducted by groups in other communities to enable
the Trust to meet their aims of taking forward the aspirations of the Rosneath Peninsula West
community. The projects profiled are:
 Youth centre
 All-weather 5-a-side pitch
 Indoor sports facility
 Improved Rainbow Centre
 Affordable family housing
 Socially rented sheltered housing
 New business workshop spaces at Fort Road
 Rosneath Road (Mill Brae – Barbour Road) pavement
 Evening public transport
 Community petrol station
 Community woodland
 Play area
 Marine access facility
 Improvements to foreshore
 Community festivals
 Water sports centre/marina development
 Befriending service for elderly
 After school club/nursery
 Wind farm
3.6
COVE & KILCREGGAN COMMUNITY CAMPUS
This section outlines in greater detail how each of the projects identified could work together to
ensure that the aims of the Trust are met and the potential of the Peninsula West area is maximised.
4.0 NEEDS ANALYSIS
SUMMARY
The needs analysis used statistics from the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD), Small Area
Population Estimates (SAPE), Census and Official Labour Market Statistics (Nomis), amongst others,
to identify the underlying needs of the Peninsula West community.
The needs analysis showed that, similar to the Argyll and Bute Council, the Peninsula West area has an
ageing population. However, there are also high levels of 16-19 year olds and households with
dependent children. The population has also been declining in recent years, particularly the number of
7
children in the area. The life expectancy in the area is higher than both Argyll and Bute and Scotland
averages, although there is some evidence of ill health and unhealthy lifestyle habits.
On the whole, the area has relatively high levels of income and employment compared to Scotland.
However, despite its proximity to Glasgow and the large towns of Helensburgh and Greenock, the
area is relatively deprived for geographic access to services. There are low levels of people on out-ofwork benefits on the Peninsula, however, the vast majority of people leave the area each day to access
employment. Of those that remain in the Peninsula for work, a high proportion are self employed.
House prices in the Peninsula West area are relatively high, with the gap in prices between the rest of
Argyll and Bute increasing in recent years.
The needs analysis suggests that this is a relatively well off area although the high house prices may
prevent some people from moving to or remaining in the area. On the whole, the area has an ageing
population and is relatively isolated, suggesting care should be taken to ensure services and activities
are provided to ensure the elderly population are not socially excluded. However, indications of higher
than average numbers of 16-19 year olds and a declining number of families with children suggest that
the area should ensure these residents are catered for to encourage them to remain on the peninsula.
The low proportion of employees suggests the area is predominately made up of small businesses
which can disadvantage local young people who may find it more difficult to access employment.
4.1
INTRODUCTION
Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and Peaton are located along the west coast of the Rosneath peninsula.
This section will utilise statistical information from the General Register of Scotland, the Scottish
Index of Multiple Deprivation 2009, and the 2001 Census, amongst others, to illustrate the socioeconomic profile of this area. These figures will highlight the extent of deprivation and the main issues
facing the area. Statistics have been selected to be the most recent, however, due to the breadth of
information included, it is not possible for all data to come from the same year.
4.2
POPULATION DEMOGRAPHICS
Population estimates for mid 2007 are provided by the General Register Office Scotland (GROS).
While more recent population data is available from GROS, the mid 2007 SAPE (Small Area
Population Estimates) are used here for continuity with the data used in SIMD 2009 (Scottish Index of
Multiple Deprivation). The information is available at data zone level. The 6505 data zones in Scotland
have been created by combining 2001 Census output areas and nest within local authority boundaries.
Data zones have populations of between 500 and 1,000 household residents and some effort has been
made to respect physical boundaries.
The peninsula is split into five data zones, one of which only contains the settlement of Rosneath (data
zone S01000780). The largest data zone, while covering much of the peninsula also includes the
settlement of Clynder (S01000792). The other three data zones (S01000760, S01000761, and
S01000783) cover the rest of the peninsula and each contain part of the villages of Kilcreggan, Cove,
and Ardpeaton. As shown in the Figure 1, data zone S01000761 stretches from the southern edge of
Rosneath round to Kilcreggan, data zone S01000760 covers only the village of Kilcreggan and data
zone S01000753 reaches from the northern edge of Kilcreggan up to Ardpeaton.
8
Figure 1: Datazones on the Rosneath Peninsula
The population of the three data zones that contain the villages of Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and
Peaton in 2007 was 1588. This covers a much larger area than the villages themselves; however, this
area will also contain individuals who will benefit from the community plan. Therefore looking at the
detailed data zone information for the larger area may provide a more accurate representation of the
current demographics of the area to be covered by the Community Action Plan. The Table 1 below
shows the population breakdown for each of the three data zones in the Kilcreggan peninsula and for
the area as a whole (excluding the Rosneath and Clynder data zones) in comparison to the Argyll and
Bute and Scotland figures.
While there is a lower proportion of under 16s in the Peninsula West area than in both Argyll and Bute
and Scotland, the proportion of 16-19 year olds in the population is much greater. Across the three
data zones that comprise the Peninsula west area, 16 – 19 year olds account for 5.35% of the area,
higher than the 4.82% and 5.13% in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively. In one of the areas, 16 19 year olds account for 6.67% of the population, 38% higher than Argyll and Bute and 30% higher
than in Scotland as a whole.
Across the Peninsula West area, residents of pensionable age account for over 25% of the total
population, higher than the 24% and 19% in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively. In one of the
data zones (towards the South East of Kilcreggan), pensioners account for almost 30% of all residents
in the area.
29.7% of all households in the Peninsula West area contain dependent children, slightly higher than
the 26.8% and 28.2% rate of household with dependent children in Argyll and Bute and Scotland
respectively.
9
S01000760
S01000761
S01000783
Kilcreggan
SE Kilcreggan
Cove/Ardpeaton
All three datazones
Argyll and Bute
Scotland
Count
Percentage
Count
Percentage
Count
Percentage
Count
Percentage
Count
Percentage
Count
Percentage
Female
35
7.13%
41
6.81%
39
7.88%
115
7.24%
7,634
8.36%
447,656
8.70%
Male
43
8.76%
41
6.81%
36
7.27%
120
7.56%
7,780
8.52%
469,295
9.12%
Total
78
15.89%
82
13.62%
75
15.15%
235
14.80%
15,414
16.87%
916,951
17.82%
Female
15
3.05%
11
1.83%
20
4.04%
46
2.90%
2,029
2.22%
128,046
2.49%
Male
12
2.44%
14
2.33%
13
2.63%
39
2.46%
2,371
2.60%
135,910
2.64%
16 - 19
Total
27
5.50%
25
4.15%
33
6.67%
85
5.35%
4,400
4.82%
5.13%
20 - 59
Female
139
28.31%
146
24.25%
113
22.83%
398
25.06%
22,313
24.43%
20 - 64
Male
155
31.57%
171
28.41%
144
29.09%
470
29.60%
29.87%
WA
Total
294
59.88%
317
52.66%
257
51.92%
868
54.66%
27,289
49,60
2
54.30%
263,956
1,436,41
6
1,526,22
0
2,962,63
6
60>
Female
61
12.42%
103
17.11%
81
16.36%
245
15.43%
13,870
15.18%
646,483
12.57%
Male
31
6.31%
75
12.46%
49
9.90%
155
9.76%
8,064
8.83%
6.88%
Total
92
18.74%
178
29.57%
130
26.26%
400
25.19%
24.01%
Female
250
50.92%
301
50.00%
253
51.11%
804
50.63%
21,934
45,84
6
Male
241
49.08%
301
50.00%
242
48.89%
784
49.37%
45,504
49.81%
Total
491
100.00%
602
100.00%
495
100.00%
1588
100.00%
91,350
100.00%
354,174
1,000,65
7
2,658,60
1
2,485,59
9
5,144,20
0
0 -15
65>
Pensio
ners
All ages
Table 1: Population figures for the Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and surrounding area (SAPE 2007)
50.19%
27.92%
29.67%
57.59%
19.45%
51.68%
48.32%
100.00%
This table shows that as a whole the Kilcreggan, Cove, and Ardpeaton area has a lower proportion of
younger people and an ageing population compared to Scotland, which is similar to, though to a
slightly less extent, than the Argyll and Bute local authority area.
Between 2001 and 2009 the overall population of the Peninsula West area has declined by almost 4%
with the population of children (those aged 16 and under) declining by almost a quarter (23.1%). The
working age population also declined by 7%, with only a rise in the pensioner population of almost
24% counteracting these population reductions. In the Kilcreggan data zone the number of pensioners
increased by 45% between 2001 and 2009 while the number of children decreased by almost 30% in
the same period.
2001
2009
% Change Between
2001 and 2009
S01000760
572
501
-12.41%
S01000761
608
614
0.99%
S01000783
506
506
0.00%
1686
1621
-3.86%
S01000760
130
93
-28.46%
S01000761
97
79
-18.56%
S01000783
89
71
-20.22%
Total
316
243
-23.10%
S01000760
371
305
-17.79%
S01000761
346
348
0.58%
S01000783
306
296
-3.27%
Total
1023
949
-7.23%
S01000760
71
103
45.07%
S01000761
165
187
13.33%
S01000783
111
139
25.23%
Total
347
429
23.63%
Population
Total
Children
Working Age
Pensionable Age
Table 2: Change in demographics of the Peninsula West area between 2001 and 2009 (Scottish Neighbourhood
Statistics)
4.3
MULTIPLE DEPRIVATION
The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) was released on 29 October 2009 and measures the
relative level of deprivation in each data zone in Scotland by ranking each of the 6505 data zones in
Scotland according to the level of deprivation they display. Deprivation is calculated using indicators
in the domains of income, employment, health, education, skills and training, geographic access to
services, housing and crime. The data zones are then assigned a number between 1 and 6505
according to how relatively deprived the area is overall and in each of the seven domains. The lower
the rank (or percentage out of 6505) of the data zone, the more deprived it is, with the areas in the
15% most deprived classed as the worst off in Scotland. This is a relative measure so there is always a
number 1 (the most deprived) and a number 6505 (the least deprived area in Scotland).
All the data used is the most up-to-date that was available at the time the index was constructed. In
most cases this is from 2007 and 2008 but some older data was used where nothing more recent was
available. While the economic situation has changed, it is still a valid picture of the distribution of
deprivation. Investigations were carried out to look at the impact of including more recent
unemployment data in the Index but the effect on the overall distribution was negligible.
SIMD
2009
Rank
Data zone
S01000760
60.48%
Kilcreggan
S01000761
56.83%
SE Kilcreggan
S01000783
61.91%
Cove/Ardpeaton
Housing
domain
rank
2004,
2006 &
2009
Geographic
Access
domain
2009 rank
SIMD
Crime
2009
rank
Income
domain
2009
rank
Employment
domain 2009
rank
Health
domain
2009
rank
Education,
Skills and
Training
domain
2009 rank
70.22%
59.05%
74.37%
71.51%
56.97%
5.49%
84.61%
67.73%
60.22%
76.43%
62.01%
62.34%
4.12%
70.90%
81.64%
59.92%
90.22%
76.79%
36.03%
2.43%
84.83%
Table 3: SIMD percentages for the Peninsula area
This table shows that for the majority of the domains, all three data zones are in the 50% least
deprived data zones in Scotland. The exceptions to this are the housing domain where one of the data
zones (S01000783) is just out with the third most deprived in Scotland. However, all three of the data
zones are very relatively deprived for the geographic access domain.
The ScotPHO also provides statistics at the Intermediately Zone level, which can help build up a
picture of the Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and Peaton area. Despite higher proportions of pensioners
in the population than in Scotland, the rates of lone pensioner households and pensioners claiming
pension credit are lower than the national average. The crime rate and level of assault victims in the
area are also much lower than the Argyll and Bute and Scotland rates, which backs up the relatively
high SIMD crime rank shown above, suggesting this is not a high crime area.
4.3.1 Geographic Access
The geographic access domain is calculated by measuring the drive and public transport times
between central areas in each data zone and selected core services. Table 4 shows these indicators
and the travel times for each data zone compared to the averages for Argyll and Bute and Scotland.
Datazone(s)
12
Datazone(s)
S01000760
Kilcreggan
S01000761
SE Kilcreggan
S01000783
Cove/Ardpeaton
Argyll & Bute
Scotland
Drive
time to
GP
2009
(mins)
Drive
time to
Petrol
Station
2009
(mins)
Drive
time to
Post
Office
2009
(mins)
Drive
time to
Primary
School
2009
(mins)
Drive time
to
Secondary
School
2009 (mins)
Drive time
to
shopping
facilities
2009
(mins)
Public
transport
travel
time to
GP 2009
(mins)
Public
transport
travel
time to
Post
Office
2009
(mins)
2.84
15.05
4
0.44
22.81
20.32
11.54
10.37
33.71
4.9
15.81
6.2
1.91
22.99
20.65
9.62
9.40
26.38
6.2
14.57
4.55
2.56
23.32
22.28
18.74
9.71
45.42
4.80
1.71
5.14
1.94
3.23
1.25
2.03
0.96
9.42
2.79
9.01
3.03
18.78
11.30
12.97
9.41
27.10
15.08
Table 4: Travel times in each data zone compared to Argyll and Bute and Scotland
This table shows that from each data zone the majority of the drive and public transport times to key
services is much higher than in Scotland and occasionally in the rest of Argyll and Bute as well. Each of
the three data zones in the Peninsula West area is in the 6% most deprived nationally for geographic
access to services, with one area (from Cove to Ardpeaton) the 158th most deprived data zone in
Scotland in terms of access to services.
81% of households in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area have at least one car, while 29%
contain two or more. This is much higher than 72% of households in Argyll and Bute as a whole with
access to a car with 22% containing two or more. In addition, 43% of those from the Kilcreggan area
who are in employment travel to work by car or van, highlighting issues faced with public transport in
the area (Census, 2001).
4.3.2 Labour Market
The percentage of the population of the three datazones that cover the Kilcreggan, Cove and
Ardpeaton areas that receive key out of work benefits is approximately 8.4%. This is much lower than
the 11.6% in Argyll and Bute and the 14.6% of the population of Scotland as a whole. For the two data
zones immediately surrounding Kilcreggan and up the coast to Ardpeaton, this percentage reduces to
7% of the population receiving these benefits in February 2010 (NOMIS, 2010).
Across all three of the data zones covered by this plan only 7.3% of the population aged between 16
and 24 are receiving benefits; lower than the 10.9% and 13.3% in Argyll and Bute and Scotland
respectively. However, in the Kilcreggan data zone (S01000760) 10 of the 44 (23.8%) people aged
between 16 and 24 are claiming key out of work benefits.
According to the 2001 census, 479 working aged people are working or studying within the Peninsula
area, 23.4% of whom are self employed. 30% of economically active residents that both live and work
in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area are self employed (Census, 2001). This is much higher
than the 20% rate in Argyll and Bute and the 13% of self employed residents in Scotland as a whole.
However, between 2006 and 2007, the total stock of businesses registered for VAT for the whole of
Argyll and Bute increased by less than 1% compared to an increase of over 3.5% across Scotland as a
whole.
13
Public
transport
travel
time to
shopping
facilities
2009
(mins)
Of the 1257 economically active people resident in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area, 67%
leave the area for work or study with only 27% working in the area (Census, 2001). 71% of those that
leave the Argyll and Bute Council area for work travel over 20km to access their employment each day
and are probably employed in Inverclyde or Glasgow.
56% of the 581 parents in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area are part of a couple with
dependent children and both working (Census, 2001).
4.3.3 Education, Skills and Training
In 2008 there was a school roll of 85 in Kilcreggan Primary School and 89 in Rosneath Primary School.
Less than 5% of the pupils at Kilcreggan Primary School are registered for free school meals, which is
lower than the 10.5% across Argyll and Bute.
4.3.4 Health
The Table 5 below shows the health rates that make up the SIMD 2009 Health indicator for the
Peninsula West data zones compared to the averages across Argyll and Bute and throughout
Scotland. However there are examples of ill health in the area, notably in data zone S01000760
(Kilcreggan) which has a standardised mortality ratio of 119, much higher than the Scottish average of
100.
Overall across the Peninsula West area there are reasonably good levels of health, however, the data
zone surrounding Kilcreggan has a higher standardised mortality rate than regionally at 19% higher
than expected compared to 10% lower than expected in Argyll and Bute (SIMD, 2009). The average
standardised mortality ratio across the Peninsula West area is 5% lower than expected but still
represents a higher mortality rate than across the whole of Argyll and Bute.
Data Zone
S01000760
Kilcreggan
S01000761
SE Kilcreggan
S01000783
Cove/Ardpeaton
A+B averages
National
Averages
Hospital
Episodes
Related
to Alcohol
use(ISD,
20042007)3
Hospital
episodes
related to
drug use
(ISD,
20042007)4
Proportion
of live
singleton
births of
low birth
weight
(ISD, 20042007)
Estimate of the
proportion of
population
being
prescribed
drugs for
anxiety or
depression or
psychosis (ISD,
2007)6
Standardised
Mortality Ratio
(ISD, 20042007)
Comparative
Illness Factor
(DWP, 2008)2
Emergency
admissions
to hospital
(ISD, 20042007)5
119
74
79
0
0
0.09
0.09
89
77
62
38
0
0
0.09
76
52
56
18
0
0
0.09
90.21
81.67
97.16
112.74
51.08
0.06
0.08
100
102.17
100
100
100
0.06
0.09
Table 5: Health Domains in each data zone compared to Argyll and Bute and Scotland
Further health data is also available from the Scottish Public Health Observatory (ScotPHO), however,
this data is only available at a larger level Intermediary Zones (IZ). Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and
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Peaton are all contained within the one IZ - Garelochhead - which also covers the villages of Rosneath
and Garelochhead and surrounding areas as shown in Figure 2.
Figure 4: Garelochhead Intermediary Zone
Despite the large coverage of this data, the statistics provided still present us with an indication of the
levels and types of ill health faced by the Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and Peaton area. Overall, the
life expectancy for both males (76.4) and females (80.9) is higher than both the Argyll and Bute (75.3
for males and 80.2 for females) and Scottish (73.9 for males and 79.1 for females) averages. However,
the rate of alcohol related deaths and early deaths from heart attacks in under 75s are both also above
the Argyll and Bute and Scottish averages. In addition, the percentage of smokers (40.7%) is also
much higher than the Argyll and Bute (26.1%) and Scotland (27.3%) and is the worst smoking rate
across the whole of the Argyll and Bute area.
4.3.5 House Prices
The average house price in the Kilcreggan data zone increased by 125% between 2001 and 2009,
much higher than the 100% and 103% rise in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively. The mean
house price difference between Kilcreggan and the rest of Argyll and Bute in 2001 was £31,032 while it
increased to £89,072 in 2009.
House sales, mean
price : 2001 (£)
House sales,
mean price :
2009 (£)
% Change Between
2001 and 2009
S01000760 Kilcreggan
107,205
241,500
125.27%
S01000761 SE Kilcreggan
S01000783
Cove/Ardpeaton
81,050
169,096
108.63%
88,212
133,563
51.41%
76,173
152,428
100.11%
Data Zone
Argyll & Bute
15
Scotland
78,220
159,075
103.37%
Table 6: Average house price in each data zone compared to Argyll and Bute and Scotland (Registers of Scotland)
The average cost of houses sold in the Peninsula West area across the last 12 months was £192,251.88
(April 2010 - March 2011). Only 10 out of the 32 properties sold went for less than £100,000, making
the area difficult for first time buyers and those on low incomes to access (Registers of Scotland House
Price Search).
5.0 POLICY CONTEXT
SUMMARY
In order to develop the policy context for the Community Action Plan, a number of existing national
and local government policies were researched. They are:
NATIONAL POLICIES
 Scottish Government Purpose, Strategic Objectives and National Outcomes
 Government Economic Strategy
 The Scottish Economic Recovery Plan - Update from 3rd March 2010
 Community Learning and Development Strategy
 Skills for Scotland: A Lifelong Skills Strategy
 All Our Futures: Planning for a Scotland with an Ageing Population
 Enterprising Third Sector: Action Plan 2008-2011
 Scottish Community Empowerment Action Plan: Celebrating Success, Inspiring Change
LOCAL POLICIES
 Argyll and Bute Structure Plan and Local Plan
 Argyll and Bute Single Outcome Agreement
 The Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009-2013
 Argyll and Bute Council Corporate Plan 2010 – 2013 and beyond
 Argyll and Bute Council Equality and Diversity Scheme 2009 – 2012
 Argyll and Bute’s Integrated Children’s Services Plan 2009 – 2012
 Argyll and Bute’s Older Persons Charter 2008-10
 Community Safety Strategy 2009-2012
 Antisocial Behaviour Strategy 2005-2008
 Argyll and Bute Local Transport Strategy 2007-2010: Moving Forward
 Argyll and Bute Local Housing Strategy 2004 -2009
 Argyll and Bute Woodlands and Forestry Strategy
 Argyll & Bute Community Planning Partnership’s Community Engagement Strategy
The policy context section found that by developing the economy of the local area, encouraging
community action and trying to reverse population decline, the Community Action Plan as a whole
contributes to the visions of the Scottish Government and Argyll and Bute Council.
In addition, each individual project set out in this plan can contribute towards specific policies of the
relevant departments. Both the Scottish Government and Argyll and Bute Council are keen to build
lifelong learning strategies, provide for an elderly population, ensure children and young people
receive high quality activities and facilities, develop local transport networks, provide additional
affordable housing and engage local communities in determining their own needs and ways to tackle
these.
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Any projects developed by the Trust or its partners should aim to contribute to one of the identified
priorities of the local or national government. This could enhance the prospects of the Trust when
applying for funding and in negotiating with the local council and partner organisations to progress
the projects.
5.1
NATIONAL POLICIES
5.1.1 Scottish Government Purpose, Strategic Objectives and National Outcomes
The overriding purpose to which all the work of the Scottish Government and its partners is aimed at
is:
“To focus the Government and public services on creating a more successful country, with opportunities
for all of Scotland to flourish, through increasing sustainable economic growth.”
Therefore all projects must show how they can contribute to the achievement of this purpose. In May
2007 the Scottish Government streamlined the resources of government to enable them to focus on
increasing the success of the country and meeting the purpose. This was organised around five
strategic objectives that describe where the Scottish Government and others should focus their
actions. There are 15 national outcomes which describe what the Government wants to achieve over
the next 10 years.
The strategic objectives are:
 Wealthier and Fairer – enable businesses to increase their wealth and more people to share fairly
in that wealth
 Safer and Stronger – help local communities to flourish, becoming stronger, safer places to live,
offering improved opportunities and a better quality of life
 Healthier – help people to sustain and improve their health, especially in disadvantaged
communities, ensuring better local and faster access to health care
 Smarter – expand opportunities for Scots to succeed from nurture through to lifelong learning
ensuring higher and more widely shared achievements
 Greener – improve Scotland’s natural and built environment and the sustainable use and
enjoyment of it
The national outcomes are:
 We live in a Scotland that is the most attractive place for doing business in Europe.
 We realise our full economic potential with more and better employment opportunities for our
people.
 We are better educated, more skilled and more successful, renowned for our research and
innovation.
 Our young people are successful learners, confident individuals, effective contributors and
responsible citizens.
 Our children have the best start in life and are ready to succeed.
 We live longer, healthier lives.
 We have tackled the significant inequalities in Scottish society.
 We have improved the life chances for children, young people and families at risk.
 We live our lives safe from crime, disorder and danger.
 We live in well-designed, sustainable places where we are able to access the amenities and
services we need.
 We have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their
own actions and how they affect others.
17
 We value and enjoy our built and natural environment and protect it and enhance it for future
generations.
 We take pride and strong, fair and inclusive national identity.
 We reduce the local and global environmental impact of our consumption and production.
 Our public services are high quality, continually improving, efficient and responsive to local
people’s needs.
5.1.2 Government Economic Strategy
This strategy sets out how the Scottish Government will work with businesses and individuals to
achieve the purpose shown above. Five strategic priorities have been set out to achieve the aim of
economic growth and a strong, successful Scotland:
 Learning, skills and well being
 Supportive business environment
 Infrastructure development and place
 Effective government
 Equity
A number of key approaches have been defined in relation to each strategic priority. The most
relevant strategic priorities to this project and their related key approaches are:
Learning, Skills and Well-being
 A focus on giving every child a strong start in life
 A focus on school education enabling all our young people to succeed and gain the skills they will
require as individuals and to contribute to the wider economy
 A supply of education and skills which is responsive to, and aligned with, actions to boost demand
 An approach to health and well-being that ensures all Scots enjoy the right level of physical and
mental health to give them the opportunity to maximise their potential
 The creation of the conditions for talented people to live, work and remain in Scotland
Supportive Business Environment
 Responsive and focused enterprise support to increase the number of highly successful,
competitive businesses
 Targeted support to business in the pursuit of opportunities outside of Scotland and the
development of internationally competitive firms
 A broader approach to business innovation in Scotland that moves beyond viewing innovation as
the domain of science and technology alone
 A clear focus on strengthening the link between Scotland’s research base and business innovation
and addressing low levels of business R&D
Equity
 To provide the opportunities – and incentives – for all to contribute to Scotland’s sustainable
economic growth
 To accord greater priority to achieving more balanced growth across Scotland, to give all across
Scotland the chance to succeed
 To promote economic growth and environmental quality and responsibility as mutually
advancing
5.1.3 The Scottish Economic Recovery Plan - Update from 3rd March 2010
This plan aims to stimulate lasting improvements in Scotland’s long-term economic performance by
concentrating effort on three broad areas:
 Investing in innovation and industries of the future
18
 Strengthening education and skills
 Supporting jobs and communities
5.1.4 Community Learning and Development Strategy
Community Learning and Development (CLD) is seen as a key tool in delivering the Scottish
Government’s commitment to social justice. This strategy establishes that CLD capacity should be
targeted towards activities aimed at closing the opportunity gap, achieving social justice and
encouraging community regeneration and outlines three national priorities to achieve these:
 Achievement through learning for adults - raising standards of achievement in learning for adults
through community-based lifelong learning opportunities incorporating the core skills of literacy,
numeracy, communications, working with others, problem-solving and information
communications technology (ICT)
 Achievement through learning for young people - engaging with young people to facilitate their
personal, social and educational development and enable them to gain a voice, influence and a
place in society
 Achievement through building community capacity - building community capacity and influence
by enabling people to develop the confidence, understanding and skills required to influence
decision making and service delivery
These priorities should be reflected in the CLD strategies and action plans developed and delivered by
community planning partners.
5.1.5 Skills for Scotland: A Lifelong Skills Strategy
Through the Lifelong Skills Strategy the Scottish Government set out a vision for a smarter Scotland
with a globally competitive economy based on high value jobs, with progressive and innovative
business leadership. The four key parts of this vision are:
 People can work in teams, are creative and enterprising and hungry to continually learn new
skills. They expect to realise their aspirations and are equipped to achieve their potential in a
constantly changing world. People are motivated to contribute to Scotland’s future and are
confident that they can do so.
 People are entrepreneurial and innovative, small businesses are encouraged to grow and there is
strong, coherent support for businesses of all sizes. Migrant workers and overseas students play a
valuable role in an expanded workforce and economy.
 Employers improve productivity by investing in their own staff and are able to access a skilled
workforce that is increasingly literate and numerate with good ICT and problem solving skills.
 Learning and training providers work as one system and thanks to wider use of technology and elearning, barriers of geography and rurality have been reduced.
5.1.6 All Our Futures: Planning for a Scotland with an Ageing Population
23% of the population of the areas covered by this Community Action Plan are of pensionable age or
above, therefore it is useful to look at strategies aimed specifically at this demographic. This strategy,
published in 2007 by the current administration, has three basic premises to ensure the needs of an
ageing population are met:
 Older people are contributors to life in Scotland
 There are barriers which need to be broken down between generations
 Services should be in place to ensure that people can live life to the full as they grow older.
A new Community Action Plan for the Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and Peaton area can contribute to
the achievement of these priorities by providing the facilities/services/activities that cater both
19
specifically for older people and/or encourage intergenerational cooperation. To achieve this, six
priority areas for action were identified:
 Improving opportunities and removing barriers
 Forging better links between the generations
 Improving and maintaining health and well being
 Improving care, support and protection for older people
 Developing housing, transport and planning services
 Offering learning opportunities throughout life
5.1.7 Enterprising Third Sector: Action Plan 2008-2011
The aim of this action plan is to encourage a culture of enterprise throughout the third sector in order
to make Scotland a world leader in the development of an enterprising third sector. The document
sets out seven objectives to enable the achievement of this goal:
 Opening markets to an enterprising third sector
 Investing more intelligently
 Promoting social entrepreneurship
 Investing in skills, learning and leadership across the third sector
 Providing support for business growth
 Raising the profile of enterprise in the third sector
 Developing the evidence base – on the third sector in Scotland
5.1.8 Scottish Community Empowerment Action Plan: Celebrating Success: Inspiring Change
This action plan reinforces the Scottish Government’s commitment to community empowerment
which they define as:
“Community empowerment is a process where people work together to make change happen in their
communities by having more power and influence over what matters to them.”
By producing a Community Action Plan to take the development of the Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton
and Peaton areas forward, the community council is already contributing towards empowering the
local community. The Community Action Plan process will also allow local residents to have a say in
the future of the area and encourage them to get involved with any future developments.
As well as contributing to the achievement of national policies, this Community Action Plan and any
resulting actions can also contribute towards Argyll and Bute Council’s vision for the local area.
5.2
LOCAL POLICIES
5.2.1 Argyll and Bute Structure Plan and Local Plan
The Argyll and Bute Structure Plan provides a strategic land use framework up to 2012, which has
guided the preparation of the Argyll and Bute Local Plan. This Local Plan has a 5-year plan-period and
is to replace all previous local plans in Argyll and Bute with the exception of the Loch Lomond Local
(Subject) Plan 1986. Together the Argyll and Bute Structure Plan November 2002 and the Argyll and
Bute Local Plan will be known as the Development Plan.
The Structure Plan sets out economic, social and environmental objectives to guide an investment
strategy for Argyll and Bute. These objectives are carried over as the main objectives of the Argyll and
Bute Local Plan.
Economic and Social Objectives
20
 to improve economic competitiveness and the relatively poor economic performance of Argyll
and Bute as a whole
 to enhance the economic and social prospects of the geographically diverse local communities in
Argyll and Bute
 to promote appropriate responses to the variety of challenging economic, transport-related and
planning circumstances facing these local communities
 to treat the rich natural and historic environment of Argyll and Bute as a not fully realised
economic asset which, if safeguarded and enhanced, can stimulate further investment and
increased economic activity
Environmental Objectives
 to safeguard the diverse and high quality natural and built heritage resources, including the
abundant landward and maritime biodiversity of Argyll and Bute
 to reinforce the strength of protection given to the European and national statutorily protected
nature conservation sites, habitats, species and built heritage sites, with which Argyll and Bute is
particularly richly endowed
 to enhance and invest in the quality of the natural and built environment and to engage
development more effectively with this enhancement process
 to encourage development of a scale, form, design and location appropriate to the character of
the landscape and settlements of Argyll and Bute
The Argyll and Bute Local Plan identifies five key underlying issues in the local authority area:
 An ageing population
 A continued reduction in the number of young economically active families
 A rapidly changing economic base with traditional industries in decline and suffering from
globalisation and new industries emerging that are more dependent on accessibility, the inherent
skills of the workforce and a high quality environment and the loss of local retail outlets
 The need for a significant investment in public services infrastructure
 To reduce and ameliorate the effects of peripherality – by encouraging the expansion of local
facilities throughout Argyll and Bute
The specific policy within the Argyll and Bute Local Plan which addresses the improvement and/or
development of new community facilities (Policy LP COM 1 - Community Facility Development)
emphasises the council’s commitment to community facilities as ‘the social foundations on which
many communities rely on’. This policy aims to encourage new services and facilities that support and
enhance a community and help retain the local population in the face of a declining number of young
economically active families. It stresses any new facilities or improvements to existing facilities must
be in keeping with the character of the town and surrounding area.
5.2.2 Argyll and Bute Single Outcome Agreement
The Single Outcome Agreement objectives for Argyll and Bute are linked to each of the fifteen
national outcomes outlined above, with a number of local outcomes contributing towards the
achievement of each national outcome in the Argyll and Bute area. These local outcomes are formed
from the statements set out in the Community Action Plan.
5.2.3 The Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009-2013
The Argyll and Bute Community Plan was produced by the Argyll and Bute Community Planning
Partnership. It aims to establish Argyll and Bute as a ‘leading rural area’ through the achievement of
three visions: outstanding environment, vibrant communities and forward looking communities, with
associated statements:
21
Vibrant Communities
 safe supportive communities with positive culture and sense of pride in the area
 well balanced demographically with young people choosing to stay or move to the area
 vibrant local economy that is based on core attributes of the area, flexible and open to new
opportunities
 well connected economically and socially
 a sense of history with a view to the future
 high quality public services and leisure/community facilities that attract people to settle in Argyll
and Bute
Outstanding Environment
 high quality environment that is valued, recognised and protected
 the environment is respected as a valued asset that can provide sustainable opportunities for
business
 a high quality image and identity that is recognised and appreciated globally
 an area that is accessible, yet retains its remote character
Forward Looking Communities
 communities that are culturally rich with a desire to excel
 proactive communities where local people and organisations look for and create opportunities
 dynamic public services with more delivery of high quality ‘professional’ services from Argyll and
Bute
 partnership working across all sectors to coordinate developments, promote Argyll and Bute and
remove constraints
 communities that encourage lifelong learning
 Within these visions there are five key goals of the Community Planning Partnership:
 town centre and waterfront regeneration - Campbeltown, Helensburgh, Oban, Rothesay and
Dunoon (CHORD)
 improvement to the strategic transport network
 vulnerable areas and South Kintyre in particular
 modernising social and healthcare services
 reducing alcohol and drugs related disorder and crime
5.2.4 Argyll and Bute Council Corporate Plan 2010 – 2013 and beyond
The corporate plan sets out strategic objectives for the council’s work, based on the three visions
outlined in the Community Plan:
 Environment – promoting our cultural, social and natural heritage and protecting our unique area
 Social Change – affecting demographic change, caring for vulnerable people and lifelong learning
 Economy – creating an attractive, well connected, modern economy
 Organisational Development – continuous improvement, innovation and culture change
The Corporate Plan also outlined a number of areas in which they wish to work in partnership with
others to develop. The most relevant to the Community Action Plan are:
Developing the Economy
 Developing Argyll and Bute as a quality destination, creating higher quality jobs and extending
the tourism season
 Rejuvenation of main towns to attract people and businesses to Argyll and Bute
 Bring high value jobs and careers to rural areas
22
 Support for agriculture, forestry, aquaculture and fishing as important sectors in the local
economy
Remote and Island Communities
 Development and support for vocational education so that young people can access training and
employment without leaving the area
 Improved methods to identify and provide support for excluded or deprived groups
5.2.5 Argyll and Bute Council Equality and Diversity Scheme 2009 – 2012
The Council’s Equality and Diversity Scheme is underpinned by the key principles from Argyll and
Bute’s Corporate Plan and aims to ensure that:
 no one is disadvantaged because of their race or ethnic origin, disability, gender, age, sexual
orientation or religion and belief
 the differences between people are valued and good relations between groups are promoted
 people are treated fairly and with equal respect
 informed assessments are made on the impact of policies and services
 people are involved in the decisions that affect them and encouraged to participate in public life.
3.2.6 Argyll and Bute’s Integrated Children’s Services Plan 2009 – 2012
The vision of the Integrated Children’s Services Plan for Argyll and Bute:
“We are committed to working with our communities to develop and improve quality of life and
opportunity for all of our children, young people and their families”
In order to achieve this vision, the department strives to ensure that:
 All partner agencies work collaboratively and inclusively to benefit Argyll and Bute’s children and
young people.
 Children, young people and their families/carers receive high quality services when required
5.2.7 Argyll and Bute’s Older Persons Charter 2008-10
The purpose of this charter is to set out how Argyll and Bute Council, and its partner agencies, will
work towards ensuring the needs of older people in the area are met. In order to achieve this vision,
the document aims to:
 Make Argyll and Bute a place where older people can live positive, contributing lives as valued
citizens
 Ensure that services in Argyll and Bute have a positive approach to older people
 Enable as many older people as possible to participate in inclusive, mainstream activities
 Address effectively the wider issues most commonly cited by older people as problematic –
transport, income levels, advice and information, community and road safety and the local
environment
 Ensure equity of access to care services throughout the area
 Enable vulnerable older people to remain supported in their own homes for as long as possible
with a good quality of life and respecting individual choices
 Ensure the welfare and continuing social inclusion of those living in care homes
5.2.8 Community Safety Strategy 2009-2012
This Strategy outlines five priorities for the five locally based community Safety Partnerships across
the Argyll and Bute Council area:
 Ensuring neighbourhoods and towns are safe from violence, antisocial behaviour and disorder
 Tackling vandalism and criminal damage within communities and towns and ensuring the
environment is respected and valued
23
 Improving road safety and promoting safe driving
 Improving water safety
 Engaging residents in developing safe neighbourhoods and providing public reassurance about
personal safety
5.2.9 Antisocial Behaviour Strategy 2005-2008
This Strategy reports that in the Kilcreggan and Cove area:
“Occasional problems arise with young people, under 18 years of age, from outside the area causing
trouble. A small number of vandalism and alcohol related offences are reported.” (p.22)
The strategy has four overarching themes. These are:
 To promote safe and attractive communities in which people want to live
 To reduce incidents of antisocial behaviour
 To engage with local communities to ensure they have an effective input to the development and
implementation of strategy and local initiatives
 To achieve effective joint working between partners
The strategic focus will be on:
 Diversion - to identify and provide a range of opportunities which are targeted at individuals and
groups who engage in antisocial behaviour and to develop access, delivery and support structures
to encourage targeted individuals and groups to participate in activities which divert them from
conduct which constitutes antisocial behaviour
 Prevention - to work with partners to prevent the occurrence, reoccurrence or escalation of
antisocial behaviour
 Enforcement - to provide a framework, processes and procedures to address incidents of
antisocial behaviour and, where necessary, apply sanctions and enforcement measures available
through antisocial behaviour legislation
5.2.10 Argyll and Bute Local Transport Strategy 2007-2010: Moving Forward
The core vision for this Transport Strategy is to enable a vibrant Argyll and Bute through the
achievement of five objectives:
 Encouraging a growing and sustainable economy in Argyll and Bute
 Improving people’s transport experience
 Managing the effect of transport on Argyll and Bute’s rich natural environment
 Improving accessibility for all our communities
 Improving journey safety and personal security for everyone in Argyll and Bute
5.2.11 Argyll and Bute Strategic Housing Investment Plan (SHIP) 2011-2016
The SHIP is intended to supplement the Local Housing Strategy and outlines the overall housing
development priorities for the local authority area as well as identifying specific areas for investment.
The main focus of the SHIP is on the provision of affordable housing to mitigate increasing housing
need in the Argyll and Bute area. It is predicted that the Helensburgh and Lomond area will face the
largest growth in unmet need in Argyll and Bute and it is therefore planned to develop 303 new build
units across Argyll and Bute, 48 (16%) of which would be in Helensburgh and Lomond. However, the
Helensburgh and Lomond area is not prioritised for future housing development within the five year
period of the SHIP and due to further resource constraints on the SHIP programme, these
developments may not take place.
On the basis of a housing needs and demand assessment completed in 2010, the SHIP highlights that
housing development should primarily be general needs housing and smaller sized units (one and two
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bedroom). The SHIP also highlights the problem of in-migration to Argyll and Bute as pushing up
house prices and deterring local residents from accessing the housing market and restricting the selfcontainment of the area. Sites for housing development are prioritised by Argyll and Bute Council on
the basis of their contribution to addressing overall housing need, their contribution to regeneration
or other policy initiatives to support community growth and sustainability and the potential for
barriers to development to arise through land ownership issues and inadequate development
opportunities.
Given the funding constraints imposed upon the local authority and the low levels of affordable house
building predicted, the Trust could contribute to the aim of the SHIP and associated housing
objectives outlined in the Local Housing Strategy by developing local affordable housing that meets
the needs and demands identified in the SHIP and addresses rising housing need in the area.
5.2.12 Argyll and Bute Local Housing Strategy 2004 -2009
There are thirteen objectives set out in this strategy. The most potentially relevant to any community
project are:
 Improve information and advice services
 Address issues of fuel poverty and energy efficiency
 Build strong, safe and attractive communities
 Empower communities and increase community participation
 Support economic development
 Increase understanding of operation of housing system
 Increase understanding of particular needs groups
 Enable independent living for vulnerable people and those with particular needs
 Address issues of homelessness through implementation of the Argyll and Bute Homelessness
Strategy
5.2.13 Argyll and Bute Woodlands and Forestry Strategy
This strategy is currently still in draft form and at the consultation stage, however, it will allow us to
see the priorities for Argyll and Bute in this area. The overall vision of the Woodlands and Forestry
Strategy is:
“The woodland and forests of Argyll and Bute will make a significant contribution to climate change
mitigation, have significant levels of economic value retained locally, enhance biodiversity and
environmental quality and support the further development of recreation opportunities for the benefit and
well-being local people and visitors alike.”
To meet this vision, the Argyll Islands Woodlands Partnership was created. The strategy also draws
attention to the opportunities to expand community involvement in biodiversity, recreation, woodfuel
and environmental education projects, building on good practice established by enterprises on Mull.
5.2.14 Argyll & Bute Community Planning Partnership’s Community Engagement Strategy
This Strategy identifies four areas within which to prioritise action towards improving community
engagement:
 Increase involvement of all communities particularly children and young people, disabled people,
those from different ethnic groups as well as other under-represented groups in community
planning processes at local level and around subjects they are interested in
 Build capacity of management, staff, community leaders and groups and individuals in
community engagement
 Increase the coordination of our efforts in community engagement, sharing experiences,
knowledge, skills, resources and funds
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6.0 DEMAND ANALYSIS
SUMMARY
Three postal consultations were conducted in order to determine the priorities of the local community
for projects to improve the Peninsula West area. These sought the opinions of individual households,
community groups and local businesses. The surveys required respondents to rate their priorities in six
areas: business and housing, transport, health and welfare, environment, employment and tourism,
and community and recreation. A further face-to-face consultation with young people was
undertaken by youth work staff during outreach sessions in Kilcreggan. This focussed on the priorities
of the young people in relation to a potential new youth facility in the area.
The individual households survey received responses from 28.5% of the adult population of
Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and Peaton. The issues highlighted as top priorities for the area were
affordable housing, availability of petrol, sheltered housing, improvement of foreshore, crèche
facilities/after school club, and a young people’s place. Respondents also indicated other priority
issues for the development of the Peninsula West area including public transport, support for young
people, appearance of village generally, promoting tourism, tourist facilities, sports area and small
business units:
Twenty-five local community groups responded to a community groups survey. This found that the
majority of the groups currently use Cove Burgh Hall and believed this to be adequate for their
purposes. Financial support and advice on funding were highlighted as priorities to ensure the
continued success of these groups. The community groups that responded to the survey also
indicated a need for more advertising mechanisms on the peninsula by prioritising community notice
boards and leaflets, publications or information stands.
Eleven local businesses responded to local business survey. These businesses employed 53 staff
between them and indicated they had no problems sourcing labour or services in the area. The survey
found that respondents prioritised projects to provide additional information on potential grant
funding sources for development initiatives, supply competitively priced fuel sourcing and improve
the appearance of the village generally.
Twenty young people aged between 10 and 16 from the Kilcreggan area completed a young people
survey. The majority felt that there was not enough for young people to do in the area and almost all
said they would utilise a new youth facility if one was developed. The young people highlighted that a
young people’s place should include facilities such as a sports hall, cinema, café and games room and
should involve activities like youth activities, keep-fit, music and dance. In addition, the young people
felt that a young people’s place should also provide services such as careers/jobs advice,
money/welfare rights advice and a youth drop in centre.
From the four consultations, it was determined that the priorities for the area were for services to
provide for the elderly, for young people and to halt the decline in population in the Peninsula West
area. There was also concern regarding the general appearance of the area, in particular the
overgrowth of knotweed along the foreshore and the community prioritised projects to tackle this.
From the four consultations, it was determined that the priorities for the area were to provide services
for both elderly and young people, as well as facilities and activities that will allow intergenerational
interaction. The surveys also highlighted a desire to build on the existing community facilities in the
area to ensure all residents are provided for and to halt the decline in population in the Peninsula West
area. There was also concern regarding the general appearance of the area, in particular the
overgrowth of knotweed along the foreshore, and the community prioritised projects to tackle this.
The community also highlighted the importance of providing a local source of fuel on the Peninsula
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and improving the economy of the area through increasing tourism. This would include projects to
provide additional facilities/services to tourists, provide local business with the opportunity to grow in
the tourism sector and host community festivals to attract visitors.
6.1
INDIVIDUAL HOUSEHOLD SURVEYS
6.1.1 Introduction
Questionnaires were posted to all 1,268 adults in the Kilcreggan, Cove, Ardpeaton and Peaton areas.
A total of 361 questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 28.5%. Respondents were asked to
indicate which of the four areas, or other, they were from. 65.4% of the completed questionnaire
respondents came from Kilcreggan (236), 25.8% were from Cove (93), 8.86% from Peaton (4),
Ardpeaton (7) and Other (21). This section will analyse the combined responses of all respondents. As
the responses also vary by area, further sections will also analyse the responses from Kilcreggan,
Cove, Peaton, Ardpeaton and Other individually.
Gender
As the graph 2 shows, there are more females than males among the survey respondents. This is overrepresentative of females who account for only 51% of the population of the area (SAPE, 2007).
Age
The age group represented the most among the respondents is 50-65 year olds, accounting for 33% of
respondents but only 26% of the population of the area (SAPE, 2007). This is followed by over 65s and
40-49 year olds, meaning that respondents aged over 40 are over represented among the consultation
responses. Conversely, there were only 8 of the 361 respondents (2.22%) aged under 21 and only 19
aged between 22-29, meaning the under 30 year old age groups were not represented in the
responses.
6.1.2 Structure of Report
The issues to be explored in the consultation questionnaire were grouped into 6 categories: transport
issues, health and welfare issues, environmental issues, employment support issues, community and
recreation issues, and business and housing issues. Throughout the survey, questions in each of these
categories required respondents to prioritise 6 options by ranking them between 1 for highest priority
down to 6 for their lowest priority. If all responses had been completed in this way, it would add up to
the same amount of 1s, 2s etc as respondents to the survey and allow us to directly compare the
number of respondents selecting each option at each priority level.
However, a number of respondents did not correctly fill out these questions. The mistakes ranged
from only ranking the options up to, for example, four then leaving the others blank to using each
priority more than once, for example indicated every option was a priority option. This report has
opted to analyse the total of all the responses regardless of how they were completed to ensure we do
not exclude any respondents from the analysis. However, this results in differing numbers of
selections for each number so that the number of options selected can outweigh or not add up to the
total number of respondents. For example, for transport issues 361 respondents ranked 431 options as
number one and only 277 as number five.
In order to combat this, the responses to each question have been presented in two formats.
 Firstly, they have been presented in a bar graph showing the percentage of the total respondents
that selected each option as one of their top three priorities (by entering 1, 2 or 3). This allows us
to compare the options according to the percentage of respondents rating them as a top three
priority.
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 This is followed by a breakdown of the total priority one selections, as a percentage of all the
priority 1 selections made. This allows us to compare the options according to how often they
were rated as priority one.
6.1.3 Peninsula West Transport Issues
Respondents were asked to rank the relative importance of six transport issues to the area: availability
of petrol, village parking, reducing traffic speed in villages, public transport, pavements and good
walking and cycling links to village.
Top Three Priorities
The graph 4 shows the percentage of respondents selecting each option as one of their top three
priority transport issues. The transport issue ranked as a top three priority by the most respondents
from all areas (66%) was the availability of petrol in the Peninsula West. This was followed by public
transport, selected as a top three priority by 62% of respondents. Pavements was also selected as a
top three priority by over half the respondents (55%).
Top Priority
Availability of petrol was also selected the most often as the respondents’ top priority, with 164 of the
361 respondents indicating this was their number one priority. This was followed by public transport
and then reducing traffic speeds in the villages.
6.1.4 Peninsula West Health and Welfare Issues
In another question respondents were asked to rank health and welfare issues from one to six in terms
of how important they felt the need for each one was. The options were: sheltered housing, care
home, chiropodist, physiotherapist, befriending services for the elderly and support services for young
people, e.g. job search.
Top Three Priorities
The graph 5 shows that the health and welfare issues selected as a top three priority by the most
respondents were sheltered housing selected as 1, 2 or 3 by 68% of respondents. This was followed by
support for young people and befriending for the elderly which were selected as a top three priority by
59% and 54% of respondents respectively.
Top Priority
A third of top priority selections by respondents from Peaton, Ardpeaton or Other areas were for
sheltered housing (120) followed by support for young people, selected by 106 respondents.
Chiropodist and care home were selected as a top priority the least often, receiving less than 10% of
all the number one selections.
6.1.5 Peninsula West Environmental Issues
Respondents ranked the need they felt there was for six environment improvements to the area:
improvement of foreshore and elimination of knotweed, provision of piers and slipways, community
gardens and play areas, appearance of local village generally, natural/ local history visitor centre and
garden services for the elderly.
Top Three Priorities
Improvement of the foreshore received the most top three priority selections (73%) followed by the
appearance of the village generally (70%) and community gardens and play areas (59%). On the other
hand, natural/local history visitor centre was selected as a top three priority by only 21% of
respondents.
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Top Priority
Improvement of the foreshore received the highest proportion of the 1st priority selections with 116
respondents from all areas selecting this option as their top environmental priority for the Peninsula
West area. This was followed by appearance of local village generally which was selected by 110
respondents as their number one priority. One the other hand, reflecting the graph 6 above,
natural/local history visitor centre was selected as a 1st priority by the fewest respondents (only 18 out
of 361).
6.1.6 Peninsula West Employment Support Issues
Respondents were asked to rank employment issues from one to six in terms of how important they
felt the need for each one was in the local area. The options were: small business administration and
IT support, organised community events to promote tourism, money management advice, crèche
facilities/after school care, heritage/architecture trail and improving business opportunities through
tourism.
Top Three Priorities
The graph 7 shows that the employment issue rated as a top three priority by the most respondents
was improving business opportunities through tourism, which was rated as 1, 2 or 3 by 62% of
respondents. This was followed by crèche facilities/after school care and organised community events
to promote tourism which were selected as a top three priority by 59% and 55% of respondents
respectively. The option selected the least often as a top three priority was money management
advice, rated as 1, 2 or 3 by only 20% of respondents from all areas.
Top Priority
The crèche facilities/after school care was selected by the most respondents (115 of 361 respondents)
as their top priority employment issue for the area. This was followed by improving business
opportunities through tourism and organised community events to promote tourism which were
selected the second and third most often as the top priority employment issue.
6.1.7 Peninsula West Community and Recreational Issues
Respondents were asked to rank the relative importance of six community and recreational issues to
the local area. The options were: a young people’s place (e.g. youth café), sports hall, improvements
to outdoor sports facilities, Rainbow Centre renovation in tandem with Burgh Hall, community IT
facilities (e.g. printer and photocopier) and community information updates/newsletter.
Top Three Priorities
The graph 8 shows that four out of the six options were selected as a top three priority by over 50% of
respondents. A place for young people, improvements to outdoor sports facilities, a sports hall and
Rainbow Centre renovation were all selected as a top three priority by 69%, 67%, 65% and 51% of
respondents from all areas respectively.
Top Priority
A young people’s place received the most top priority selections, with just over a quarter of all 1st
priority selections for this option (114 respondents). This was followed by a sports hall, improvements
to outdoor sports facilities and Rainbow Centre renovation which were all selected the next most
often as the top priorities of around 80 respondents each.
6.1.8 Current Use of Community Facilities
Respondents were asked to indicate how often they used a selection of community facilities in the
local and wider area. These included Burgh Hall, the bowling club, play park, sailing club and scout
hall. The table below shows that the Burgh Hall was used the most often by respondents while 75% of
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respondents reported never using the Bowling Club and Scout Hall, making them the least utilised
facilities. 13 respondents from all areas had never used any of the facilities suggested, while 76 of the
361respondents (21%) had only ever used Burgh Hall.
Burgh Hall
The largest proportion of respondents from all areas indicated they used Burgh Hall a few times a
year, while over a quarter also reported using the hall weekly (101 respondents). Only 18 respondents
from all areas indicated they never used Burgh Hall.
Bowling Club
The vast majority of respondents (267) reported never using the bowling club while only 20 use it a
few times a year or more.
Play Park
The majority of respondents also reported never using the play park, although 10 respondents each
reported using the facility weekly, fortnightly and monthly.
Sailing Club
The largest proportion of respondents indicated they never used the sailing club, although at less than
a third of respondents, this facility is still used more often compared to others in this question. 13% or
46 reported using the hall on a weekly basis, making it the second most often used facility.
Scout Hall
The Scout hall was also selected as never being used by the majority of respondents (263 of 361). 18
respondents reported using the Scout hall on a weekly or fortnightly basis, however, 15% of
respondents did not provide an answer to this question.
6.1.9 Peninsula West Business and Housing Development Issues
Respondents were asked to rank the business and employment opportunities they would like to see
developed in the Peninsula West villages. The options to be ranked between 1 (top priority) and 6
(lowest priority) were: affordable housing, small business units, tourist facilities/attractions,
horticultural and related businesses, retail business and larger processing and industrial businesses.
Top Three Priorities
The graph 9 shows that affordable housing was selected as a top three priority by the majority of
respondents from all areas (70%). This is followed by small business units and tourist facilities and
attractions which were both selected as one of their top three priorities by 61% of respondents.
Top Priority
The option selected as the number one priority by the most respondents from all areas was affordable
housing (selected by 179 of the 361 respondents). This was followed by tourist facilities/attractions
and then small business units, 58 and 57 respondents respectively selecting these options as their top
priority for the Peninsula West area. In contrast, larger processing and industrial businesses was only
selected as the top priority by nine respondents to the questionnaire.
6.1.10 Type of Housing
Respondents were asked to rank five forms of housing according to which they felt was most
important to include in any future housing developments in the Peninsula West area. The options
were: flats/apartments, two-bedroom houses, three-bedroom houses, four-bedroom houses and fivebedroom houses.
30
Top Three Priorities
The graph 10 shows that both two and three bedroom houses were selected most often as a top three
priority for respondents from all areas, by 84% and 83% respectively. Flats/apartments were also
prioritised by 75% of respondents, while four and five bedroom houses were selected as a top three
priority by only 18% (64 respondents) and 4% (16 respondents) respectively.
Top Priority
Flats/apartments received the highest proportion of all top priority selections, with 133 respondents
selecting this housing option as most important for the Peninsula West area. This is followed by three
bedroom houses (133 respondents) and two bedroom houses (96). On the other hand, only 13
respondents selected four bedroom houses as their top priority and only 8 respondents from all areas
rated five bedroom houses as the most important housing type for the local area.
6.1.11 Most Important Local Issues
Respondents were also asked to rank how important they felt the following issues were to the
Peninsula West area: local transport, local health and welfare, local environment, local affordable
housing, local community and recreation and local business and employment.
Top Three Priorities
The graph 11 shows that the local issues ranked as a top three priority by the most residents from all
areas (61%) was local health and welfare. This was followed by local community and recreation, local
affordable housing and local environment which were all selected as a top three priority by over 50%
of respondents. Local transport and local business and employment received the lowest number of
top three priority selections by 47% and 45% respectively of respondents from all areas.
Top Priority
The graph 12 shows that local health and welfare received the most 1st priority selections, with 98
respondents selecting this as their top priority for the Peninsula West area. This was followed by local
affordable housing and local community and recreation, which were rated as the most important local
issues by 87 and 86 respondents from all areas respectively. The issues receiving the least top priority
selections were local environment then local business and employment.
6.1.12 Comparison of Areas
This section will compare the responses from each area within the Peninsula West area: Kilcreggan,
Cove and other (Peaton, Ardpeaton and other). For each question the options were rated 1-6
depending on how many respondents from each area selected them as a top three priority. In the
graphs below, the larger the coloured section, the higher the priority that option was rated by the
respondents from that area. This allows us to explore the areas where opinions differ between the
areas in the Peninsula West.
Peninsula West Transport Issues
Public transport was selected as a top three priority by the most Cove respondents, while respondents
from other areas selected reducing traffic speed in the villages most often as a top three priority.
Availability of petrol was selected as a top three priority most by Kilcreggan respondents and
therefore also the Peninsula West area as a whole.
With the exception of village parking, which was rated as a top three priority the least times by
respondents from every area, there are some slight differences between the top priorities across
areas. A major difference between areas is in the level of importance given to reducing traffic speed in
villages with respondents from Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas much more likely to rate this as a
top three priority than in Cove and Kilcreggan. Similarly, good walking and cycling links to village were
31
also rated as a top three priority by respondents from Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas more often
than those from Cove and Kilcreggan. On the other hand, availability of petrol and pavements varied
in importance by respondents from different areas, with those from Peaton, Ardpeaton and Other
areas less likely to select these options as a top three priority for the Peninsula West area.
Peninsula West Health and Welfare Issues
Support services for young people was selected as a top three priority by the highest percentage of
respondents from Peaton, Ardpeaton and Other areas. However, respondents from Kilcreggan, Cove
and the overall Peninsula West area selected sheltered housing most often as a top three priority. As
shown on the graph 14, within the health and welfare question, the priorities of respondents from
each of the three area groups vary slightly, but not to the extent seen in some other questions.
Peninsula West Environmental Issues
The prioritisation of environmental issues varied between the different area groups, with the largest
percentage of respondents from Cove and Kilcreggan and the overall area selecting the improvement
of the foreshore (including elimination of knotweed) as a top three priority, while respondents from
the Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas prioritised community gardens and play areas. Respondents
from Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas were also slightly more likely to select the provision of piers
and slipways and slightly less likely to select the appearance of the village generally than respondents
from both Kilcreggan and Cove.
Peninsula West Employment Issues
The graph 16 shows that there was quite a wide variation in the employment support priorities of
respondents from each area. Crèche/after school facilities was selected as a top three priority most
often by respondents from Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas. Cove respondents rated organised
community events to promote tourism most often as a top three priority while the largest percentage
of Kilcreggan respondents, and therefore of the overall area, selected improving business
opportunities through tourism as one of their top three priorities.
Cove respondents were less likely to select crèche facilities/after school and Kilcreggan respondents
were less likely to select organised community events to promote tourism as a top three priority than
respondents from other areas. Respondents from Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas selected
improving business opportunities through tourism less often than in both Kilcreggan and Cove.
Peninsula West Community and Recreation Issues
As illustrated in the graph 17, there was no variation in the relative prioritisations of the community
and recreation options between each area. In all areas a young people’s place was selected as a top
three priority by the largest proportion of respondents, followed by improvements to outdoor sports
facilities and sports hall.
Peninsula West Business and Housing Issues
Respondents from Kilcreggan and Cove selected affordable housing most often as a top three priority
for the Peninsula West area. However, slightly more Peaton, Ardpeaton and other respondents
selected tourist facilities/attractions as a top three priority, making this the highest prioritised
business option for the Peaton, Ardpeaton and other area.
Respondents from Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas were also slightly less likely to select small
business units as a top three priority than respondents from Kilcreggan and Cove. On the other hand,
retail business, horticultural and related business and tourist facilities/attractions were selected as a
top three priority by a lower proportion of Kilcreggan and Cove respondents than respondents from
Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas.
32
Type of Housing
Respondents from Kilcreggan and Peaton, Ardpeaton and other areas, selected two bedroom houses
most often as a top three priority housing type. The largest proportion of Cove respondents selected
three bedroom houses as a top three priority for the Peninsula West area. Flats/apartments was
selected by the third largest percentage of respondents from each area.
Most Important Local Issues
The local issues most important to respondents varied widely between areas in the Peninsula West.
For both Kilcreggan and Cove, local health and welfare was selected as a top three priority by the
largest percentage of respondents. However this was selected by only the fourth largest percentage
of respondents from Peaton, Ardpeaton and other, while these respondents selected the local
environment most often as a top three priority. This option was selected the second and third least
often by respondents from Cove and Kilcreggan respectively.
6.2
COMMUNITY GROUP SURVEY
A questionnaire was sent to 59 identified community groups in the Peninsula West area. A total of 25
groups responded; a response rate of 42%. This section analyses the responses to this consultation.
6.2.1 Type of Groups
The groups/organisations that the survey was sent to were grouped into seven categories to show the
types of groups/organisation operating in the area. The graph 21 illustrates the percentage of each
type of group the survey was sent to compared to the percentage of groups that responded to the
survey. This shows that groups concerned with providing services for elderly people and groups
organised around arts/crafts/music/film and activities/interests are both well over represented among
survey respondents. On the other hand, groups that exist for the promotion of a specific interest or
entity and active groups (those involving sport) are under represented among the survey respondents.
6.2.2 Frequency of Group Meetings
The graph 22 illustrates the frequency of groups meetings as a percentage of answers from all
respondents and shows that the vast majority (two thirds) of respondent groups meet on a weekly
basis. The respondents that selected ‘other’ met twice a year, between two and six times a year or did
not indicate how often they met.
6.2.3 Size of Group Meetings
Respondents were also asked to indicate how many people attended meetings of the group. The
graph 23 shows that the largest proportion of groups that responded to the survey (7 responses)
required space for between 10 and 20 members at each meeting. This was closely followed by
respondents with less than ten members (6 groups) and 20 – 30 members (5 groups) attending each
meeting.
6.2.4
Demographics of Group Members
Area
The graph 24 shows that over 70% of the groups that responded to this survey had members from
Kilcreggan, followed by 64% with members from Cove. Very few Ardpeaton or other respondents
were specifically mentioned as being involved in the groups, however, around a third of respondents
reported group members from all or most of the areas.
Age Range
The graph 25 shows the ages of members of the groups that responded to this survey. This shows that
over half the groups have members aged between 50-65 years old. Overall the age range of group
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membership is very focused on over 40 year olds. However, 15% of groups indicated they had
members aged under 17 while a further 10% indicated their membership covered all age groups. None
of the respondent groups indicated that they had members aged between 17 and 29. This could be
due to a lack of suitable groups to interest this age group or disengagement by residents of these ages
with organised group activities.
6.2.5
Facilities
Current Facilities
The graph 26 shows the number of respondents indicating how often they used each of the suggested
facilities. As can be seen, there are a large number of groups that did not provide an answer for every
option. Three groups did not provide an answer to any of the options while the largest proportion (11
of the 25 respondent groups) only provided an indication of how often they used the Burgh Hall,
leaving the other options blank. As a result of this Burgh Hall was reported as being used most often,
with over a third of respondent groups using this facility on a weekly basis. Two of the groups had
never used any of the suggested facilities while a further two had only ever used the Burgh Hall.
Other Facilities
Respondents were then asked which other areas they visited to use facilities. Only eight of the
respondent groups left comments indicating which other facilities they utilised. Respondents’
comments included:
 Princess Louise Hall in Rosneath
 Meetings are held in members' houses
 Green space for fetes
 Kilcreggan Hotel
 Gibson Hall, Garelochhead
 Rosneath
 Rosneath school
 Youth Café
State of facilities
Respondents were asked if the current facilities used by their group/organisation were adequate for
their purposes. Only a small minority of respondents (4 groups) indicated that their current facilities
were not adequate, citing the expanding size of the group and the unsuitable facilities at the current
venue.
New Facilities – Overall Selections
Respondents were asked to rate the top five facilities they felt their group/organisation would most
benefit from. The graph 27 illustrates the number of groups selecting each option as one of their top
five priorities. This shows that the options selected the most often as beneficial to the groups that
responded to the survey were community notice board; leaflet, publication and information stand;
lockable storage and community printer, scanner and photocopier.
New Facilities - Top Priority
The pie chart 28 illustrates the percentage breakdown of top priority selections amongst each of the
options. This shows that a community notice board was selected by the most respondents as a facility
that would benefit their group.
Other Suggestions
Respondents were also provided with space to make additional suggestions of potential facilities for
the Peninsula West area that would benefit their group. The following 14 suggestions were provided:
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 Updated PCs
 Primary school
 Local radio
 Community online access, printer
 Computer access in the library at Cove Burgh Hall
 A sports and recreation building incorporating facilities such as a gym, indoor bowling area,
exercise area, smaller games rooms
 Spotlights
 Buses not adequate
 Knotweed control and grass cutting
 Fitness and leisure club
 New youth facilities, new football pitch, poor swings
 More children
6.2.6
Finances
Current Turnover
Of the respondents that provided information on their annual financial turnover, the largest
proportion indicated that they generated between £1,000 and £5,000 each year. This was followed by
around a third of respondents who raised less than £1,000 annually.
Financial Assistance
Respondents were asked if they felt their group required any ongoing financial assistance in order to
continue to run. The graph 30 illustrates the percentage of those that responded to the questionnaire
replying each way. This shows that the majority of respondents did not feel their group requires
ongoing financial assistance.
Information and Advice
However, the majority of respondents (57% of those that provided an answer to this question) did
report that their group would benefit from additional information and advice regarding funding
sources, as shown on the graph 31.
6.2.7 Support
The respondents were asked to rank five types of support services according to which would be most
beneficial to their group/organisation. However, not all respondents correctly completed this question
(only four respondents accurately ranked each option between one and five), meaning the selections
for each option do not add up to the total number of respondents, as they should. Given the low
numbers correctly completing this question it would be inaccurate to only report these responses and
therefore all the selections made are included in the graph 32 according to the number of respondents
selecting each. This allows us to see which option got the most overall selections and also which was
voted as a higher priority the most often.
Overall Selections
The graph 32 shows that by far the most often prioritised option, both overall and as a number one
priority, was support with identifying potential funding sources. This was followed by help with
completing funding applications and capacity building for new and existing members. On the other
hand, providing information on Disclosure Scotland and updating existing constitutions were ranked
as the options with the least benefit to the respondent groups, receiving no priority 1, 2 or 3 selections.
Top priority
35
Of the respondents that completed this question and indicated a priority one preference (only 18 of
the total 25 respondents), 67% ranked identifying potential funding sources as the most beneficial
support for their group/organisation. Of the total respondents to this questionnaire, 48% (12
respondents) rated indentifying funding sources as their top priority, reinforcing the 48% of
respondents who said they would benefit additional information and advice on funding in an earlier
question.
Other Suggestions
Respondents were also provided with space to make additional suggestions of other services that they
felt would benefit their group. Only two respondents provided answers, with one suggesting that
external tutors were needed to provide educational classes and the other commenting that the groups
would benefit from additional young members.
6.2.7 Local Issues
The respondents were asked to rank local issues according to which they felt was most important to
the Peninsula West area. However, not all respondents correctly completed this question (only 15
respondents accurately ranked each option between one and six), meaning the selections for each
option do not add up to the total number of respondents, as they should.
Given the relatively high number completing the question correctly, which allows a more accurate
overview of the responses, two versions of each graph have been presented in this section. The first
illustrates the priorities of all the responses while the second only presents the correctly completed
responses. This allows us to ascertain any differences in overall and top priorities caused by the
incorrect responses.
Overall Selections – All Responses
The graph 34 shows the number of respondents that ranked each option at each priority level,
including the number of respondents that did not complete the question.
This graph shows that, when including all responses, the local issues that were rated as a first, second
or third priority by the most groups that responded to the survey was local health and welfare (64% of
respondents), followed by local affordable housing (52% of respondents) then local community and
recreation (48% of respondents).
Overall Selections – Correctly Completed Responses
The graph 35 shows the number of respondents that ranked each option at each priority level,
excluding the respondents that incorrectly completed the questions (10 respondents). This slightly
alters the order of priorities, however, local health and welfare was still selected as a top three priority
by the largest proportion of respondents (73% of the respondents that accurately recorded all six
priorities). This was then followed by local community and recreation (60% of those that correctly
completed the question) then local affordable housing (53% of the 25 respondents that correctly
completed the question).
Top Priority Local Issue – All Responses
The pie chart 36 shows the breakdown of all number 1 selections by option. As many respondents did
not complete the question correctly, with some not indicating any number one for any option and
others indicating number one for more than one option, this is not an accurate reflection of the
breakdown of priorities among all respondents, only among all responses. In total there were 31
number one selections in this question.
The graph shows that 32% of all priority one selections were for local health and welfare (almost a
third of all priority one selections). This was followed by local affordable housing and local community
and recreation selected as a priority one issue for the Peninsula West area in 7 and 5 responses
respectively.
36
Top Priority Local Issue – Correctly Completed Responses
The pie chart 37 shows the breakdown of the priority one selections by option of all the respondents
that correctly completed this question. In total fifteen respondents correctly completed this question
and of these 46% (7 groups) selected local health and welfare as their top priority for the Peninsula
West area. This was followed equally by local affordable housing and local community and recreation.
6.2.8 New Groups
Respondents were asked to suggest additional groups/clubs that could be set up to benefit the
Peninsula West villages. Six respondents provided comments including:
 Something for 14 to 18 year olds
 Horticulture - gardening society, rambling group
 Adult literacy classes and learning, linked with the library
 OAP weekly activity, café club, creative craft meeting
 Gardening club, community garden (by the fire station)
 Youth club, sports hall
6.2.9 Additional Comments
At the conclusion of the questionnaire, respondents were provided with a space to include any
additional thoughts on issues that the Trust could pursue. The following comments were provided by
respondents:
 We are devastated at the thought of the school closure
 Need to have greater communication between all the local associations
 Massive knotweed problems in the area
 Need decent playing fields and play areas
 All suggested local issues are of equal importance
 Additional signage on the main roads to attract tourist to the Clyde Sea Loch Trail, with a direct
route to Peaton and Rosneath peninsula west for tourists
 Retention of the primary school
 Cove Burgh Hall is central part of social, cultural and recreational activities of the community
6.2.10 Conclusions
From this consultation with community groups/organisations operating in the Peninsula West area,
the following conclusions can be generated:
 The majority of respondent groups meet on a weekly basis with less than 20 members.
 The members of most groups come predominately from Cove and Kilcreggan but a small section
of groups have members from all the villages in the Peninsula West area.
 Very few young people (particularly aged between 17 and 30) are involved with the respondents
groups although this may be as only 3 of the 8 identified groups for young people in the Peninsula
West responded to the survey.
 On the other hand, residents over the age of 50 attend the majority of the respondent groups,
which may be a result of the over-representation of groups which provide services/activities for
older age groups among the survey respondents.
 Cove Burgh Hall was the most often used facility in the area, with respondents also using a
number of facilities not suggested or outwith the Peninsula West area. The vast majority of
groups that responded to the questionnaire felt their current facilities were adequate for their
needs.
 This was reflected in the new facilities respondents selected as most beneficial to their group,
with very few physical improvements/facilities being prioritised. The exception to this was a need
for lockable storage, although all other prioritised facilities expressed a demand for better
37
communication mechanisms in the area. This included notice boards, leaflets, computer access
and access to a printer and photocopier and a suggestion for a local radio station.
 The annual turnover of the respondent groups varied, with the majority having a reasonable
income of between £1,000 and £5,000 a year. In addition, over two thirds of respondents did not
feel they required any ongoing financial assistance in order to continue to operate.
 Over half of those that answered indicated they would benefit from information and advice on
funding sources, which was also selected by respondents as their top priority type of support for
their group.
 Local health and welfare, local affordable housing and local community and recreation were
selected most often as the most important issues for the Peninsula West area, reflecting the
priorities of the overall community survey.
 The additional comments and suggestions for new groups in the areas supported the retention of
the local school and the provision of a variety of types of group, in particular more
activities/facilities for young people.
6.3
YOUTH SURVEY
A consultation regarding a potential youth facility in Kilcreggan was conducted by Community Links
Scotland's youth work staff during youth outreach sessions in Kilcreggan. In total, 20 young people
completed this questionnaire. Almost all of these young people were aged between 13 and 16, with
two under 12 and one aged 22. Around three quarters of the young people were male. A further three
young people completed the questionnaire at the community prioritisation day in February.
6.3.1 Current Use of Youth Facilities
Almost 60% of the young people surveyed did not currently attend any community facilities or youth
activity groups in the Kilcreggan area and 70% did not think there was enough for young people to do
in the area.
Several of the young people reported that they received information, support or advice from family,
friends or their school while the majority did not provide an answer. When asked where they usually
meet friends, the response was the local park, school or just generally around the village.
6.3.2 New Youth Facility
Almost all the young people that responded said they would use a new youth facility if there was one
available in the Kilcreggan area and 83% thought that a youth facility would stop young people from
getting into trouble. The majority of respondents commented that this was because a new facility
would give them something to do to keep them from getting bored and somewhere to go other than
on the streets.
The young people were then asked to rate how important it would be to include a selection of
facilities, activities and services in any new youth facility.
Facilities
The facilities that were rated the most important by the young people were a sports hall, a cinema, a
games room and a café. Other suggestions included astro turf and a skate park.
Activities
The activities that were selected most often were youth activities, keep fit, music activities and dance
of all kinds. Other suggestions for activities were climbing, skateboarding and windsurfing.
Services
The services that were rated as most important were careers/job advice, money/welfare rights and a
youth drop-in centre.
38
The respondents also reported that they were most likely to use any new youth facility on weekday
evenings, Sunday afternoons and afternoons throughout the holidays. In comparison, relatively few
said they would use the facilities on Saturdays, particularly in the evening, or on Fridays.
6.3.3 Conclusions
 The young people that completed the questionnaire were mainly male and aged between 13 and
16.
 Most of the young people did not currently use any youth facilities in the area (57%) while a larger
number (70%) believed that there was not enough for young people to do in the Kilcreggan area.
 Currently, young people are just meeting friends at outdoor locations through the area including
the local park and school.
 Over 90% of the young people that completed a questionnaire said they would use a new
community facility.
 The majority (83%) thought a new facility would keep young people from getting into trouble.
 A sports hall, cinema and games room were rated as ‘extremely important’ by over 50% of the
young people that completed the question.
 Keep fit and music activities were rated as important by the young people.
 Careers/job advice and money/welfare advice were also selected as ‘extremely important’ by over
60% of the young people.
 Weekday evenings were by far the most often selected time that young people would use a youth
facility.
6.4
BUSINESS SURVEY
6.4.1 Introduction
A business survey questionnaire was sent to 66 identified businesses located in the Peninsula West
area. A total of 11 groups responded; a response rate of 17%. The consultation was sent out during the
festive period of December 2010 which may account for this low response level. This section will
analyse the responses to this consultation.
Type of Business
A wide range of businesses from the Peninsula West area responded to the survey including botanic
gardens, café, trade, motor garage, architect, doctor's surgery, car repair service, embroidered goods,
naval architects/surveyor, general store and website design/development.
The majority of these businesses are located in Kilcreggan, while three are based in Cove. Between
the 11 respondent businesses, 32 full-time staff and 17 part-time staff were employed. Two of the
businesses also employed some part-time seasonal staff.
Business Support Services
Six of the respondents were a part of a business support network while four were not. Three
businesses indicated that they would benefit either from being part of a business support network or
the development of a local Peninsula network.
The business support service rated the number top priority most often was information on potential
grant funding sources for development initiatives, selected as the top priority by 45% of respondents.
This was followed by sustainability advice e.g. energy conservation, recycling, etc.
One respondent also highlighted that a key business support issue in the Peninsula West area is the
requirement of a better postal service.
39
6.4.2 Local Transport
The top priority transport issue of the local businesses that responded to the survey was competitively
priced fuel sourcing, selected as the top transport priority by 36% of respondents. This was followed
by village centre parking, which was also selected as the first or second priority by almost two-thirds
(64%) of respondent businesses.
One business respondent also commented specifically that ferry should run later in the evenings.
6.4.3 Local Environment
Appearance of the village generally was selected as the top environment improvement for the
Peninsula West area in relation to the day-to-day running and future developments of the business.
This was followed by protection of local environment/shoreline as a key environmental improvement
for the Peninsula West area.
One respondent also commented that the sea wall needs constant repairs and is in need of updating
as the sea water level is rising.
6.4.4 Local Resources
The majority of businesses indicated they did not have any problems sourcing labour or services in the
Peninsula West area. The main areas where some businesses did face difficulties sourcing resources
locally were suitable skilled labour and infrastructure services.
Two respondents also left additional comments highlighting problems in assessing other services
locally:
Struggle to get delivery at times
Broadband capacity needs improvement
6.4.5 Additional Facilities/Services
Seven comments were left suggesting a facility or service not yet available in the Kilcreggan, Cove,
Ardpeaton and Peaton area that, if provided, would assist local businesses:
 Direct road signage from A82 - Peaton for tourists. Lots of tourists would benefit the Peninsula
West area and bring money to the area. This could link in with existing tourist route "Clyde Sea
Loch Trail"
 A tourist/heritage/local producers type of network trail for tourist/visitors to the Peninsula
 Develop tourism in the summer months, April - October
 Meeting and conference facilities
 High speed broadband, currently only 2MB max
 A local pot hole filler and road drain cleaner. In the olden days we had two men on the peninsula
doing this full time now we have much more traffic and no road maintenance to speak of
 A printed business directory of local businesses available at outlets free or low cost – also put an
online version in an extended business section of rosneathpeninsula.org
6.4.6 Potential Business Opportunities
Twelve suggestions were provided outlining potential business opportunities/gaps in provision in the
Peninsula West area that the Trust could help address/fill:
 Sailing courses for beginners - young, not so young - and other opportunities to enjoy the lochs
e.g. sea kayaking
 Expand on the caravan park idea
 Promote the area as a place of interest in a historical sense
 There are many heritage possibilities, could have a small museum with the history of the
peninsula
40
 Use the local forestry to run a mountain bike race/hill race (running)/motor sport/any of the above
on an annual basis, promote water sport activities to exploit what we already have
 Open Sailing Club to the public and develop woods/walks to give tourists something to do when
they are here!
 The peninsula would be the ideal place for outdoor activities for young and old. Walking,
climbing, canoeing, sailing, etc. This could attract large groups of people, schools, scouts, and
guides etc. to come and enjoy the outdoors.
 Take advantage of the potential for renewable energy, particularly wind
 The Cove and Kilcreggan foreshore could be used to stage an annual arts festival. It would create
identity, jobs and bring people to the peninsula.
 Use outdoor sculpture/art to create a modern identity for Cove and Kilcreggan, perhaps art that is
left sitting and evolves with the natural effect of the elements. It would be great to create identity
using the lamppost numbers i.e. signs for each lamppost that bear the number of that post? It's
something the kids at the primary school could be involved with as well as every household. If
they were ceramic it would be inexpensive and would give quirkiness to the Shore Road in
particular.
 Guided day tours from Glasgow - different themes possible – e.g. walking, scenery, architecture,
archaeology and defence
 I plan to have a tea room in future and further develop the gardens here, providing additional
employment and bringing more people to the area.
6.4.7 Conclusions
From this consultation with businesses based in the Peninsula West area, the following conclusions
can be generated:
 There is a range of full time and part time employment in the Peninsula West area.
 Businesses desired information on where/how to access funding to develop the business further
and advice on the best means to ensure the sustainability of the business.
 The price of fuel and the lack of parking in the centre of the villages were key transport issues
affecting the day to day running and future developments of local businesses.
 The environment issues that impact upon the day-to-day running and future developments of
Peninsula West businesses are the appearance of local villages generally and the protection of the
local environment and foreshore.
 The majority of businesses were able to source resources in the Peninsula West area, however,
some businesses faced problems finding suitable skilled labour and infrastructure services locally.
 There were a number of additional facilities/services highlighted by respondents that could assist
local businesses. These mainly concerned the promotion of the area and facilities in the area for
tourists as well as the means to promote local businesses and ensure they have the facilities
required.
 The additional business opportunities in the Peninsula West area identified by respondents
focussed primarily on the development of the tourism sector in the area through the provision of
additional activities, events and attractions to attract visitors to the area.
7.0 PROJECT PRIORITISATION
SUMMARY
Building on the responses to the four consultations, further questions were developed surrounding the
top priorities in each of the six areas explored in the consultations. At a community prioritisation event
held in Cove Burgh Hall in February 2011, attended by approximately 160 members of the local
community, potential projects were prioritised within 18 areas:
41
Community and Recreation
Young people’s place
Outdoor sports facilities and sports hall
Rainbow Centre
Business/Employment
Affordable housing
Tourist facilities and attractions
Small business units
Transport
Availability of petrol
Public transport
Paths and pavements
Physical Environment
Improvement of foreshore and removal of knotweed
Appearance of villages, community garden and play area
Piers and slipways
Employment
Improving business opportunities through tourism
Nursery/breakfast club/after school club
Organised community events to promote tourism
Health and Welfare
Sheltered housing and care home
Befriending services
Support for young people
The responses at the community prioritisation event showed strong community support for:
 A youth centre, with the Rainbow Centre selected as the preferred location
 Renovation of the Rainbow Centre
 Sports facilities, both indoor sports facilities (including a gym) and an outdoor all-weather 5-aside sports pitch
 Affordable family and sheltered housing
 An upgrade of the foreshore and pavement on the road from Kilcreggan to Rosneath
 Evening public transport, particularly the ferry from Gourock
 A community petrol station, however, there is little willingness to pay additional cost for local fuel
 A new marine access facility which can accommodate more boats and a variety of types of boats
to encourage tourism to the area
 A variety of festivals to encourage community interaction as well as attract tourism
 Any projects that encourage additional tourism to the area and boost the local economy
Overall the community prioritisation event broadly confirmed the priorities of the local community
highlighted in the four consultations. It also provided further details on the potential location of new
facilities and the structure of new projects to take forward the community’s priorities. The responses
gathered at the community prioritisation event allowed the development of specific project ideas, as
outlined in the 19 project profiles in Section 8.
The community prioritisation event was attended by approximately 160 members of the local
community. This event included further consultation including a project prioritisation exercise
(involving marking priorities on A1 boards) in addition to a public meeting and presentations by the
Trust and Community Links Scotland. Participants had the opportunity to prioritise and provide
opinions on 18 initial project ideas within 6 themes: community and recreation, business and housing,
transport, physical environment, employment and tourism, and health and welfare. The event was
42
intended to gather further opinion in order to allow the development of specific potential project
ideas for the Peninsula West area that would form the basis of the Community Action Plan and future
priorities for the Trust.
7.1
COMMUNITY AND RECREATION
Young People’s Place
An overwhelming majority of residents thought that there should be a separate young people’s youth
centre. The majority thought that this should be located at the Rainbow Centre, reflecting the
preferred purpose of a renovated Rainbow Centre as highlighted below.
Should there be a separate youth centre?
Yes
No
Location
Rainbow Centre
King George V Sports Area
Old Tennis Club
Church Road Park
Kilcreggan House
Number
49
2
Number
28
7
6
1
0
The type of facilities highlighted as beneficial to young people in the Peninsula West area included a
café, climbing wall, indoor 5-a-side pitch and IT facilities. One additional suggestion was made for an
outdoor activity group for young people.
Facilities
Café
Climbing wall
Indoor 5 aside Pitch
IT Facilities
Games Room
Recording Studio
Number
21
19
17
13
10
9
Arts Room
Music Practice Space
Crafts Woodwork
Performance Space
Computer video games space
Training Kitchen
9
7
6
5
4
0
Outdoor Sports Facilities
Outdoor Sport
All weather 5 aside pitch
Number
27
Improve existing tennis courts
15
43
Assault course
Full rugby pitch
Golf course
Athletic track
Basketball
14
10
2
2
0
The most popular outdoor facility for development in the area was an all-weather 5-a-side pitch and it
was suggested by the majority of those that responded that these should be located at the current
King George V sports area. This was followed by improving the existing tennis courts, with
participants also selecting the existing tennis courts as a location for new or improved outdoor sports
facilities. An assault course was also selected as a potential outdoor sports facility, which could also be
developed as a tourist attraction for the local area or as part of a children’s play area. Both tourism and
children’s play facilities were selected as important issues for the Peninsula West area in other
questions at the prioritisation day.
Location of outdoor sports facility
Place
King George v Sports Area
Old Tennis Courts
Church Road Park
Number
24
10
0
Indoor Sports Facilities
A gym/fitness suite along with a swimming pool were selected as the most preferred indoor sports
facilities. The desire for the provision of a gym in the Peninsula West area was also backed up by the
selection of keep fit/gym as a new community group/project and the positive response to the
suggestion that the Rainbow Centre could be renovated to provide space for a gym.
Indoor sport
Gym/fitness suite
Swimming pool
Badminton courts
Health suite
Exercise class
Squash
Dancing
Number
23
23
10
8
4
4
1
Rainbow Centre
The vast majority of those that completed this board at the prioritisation day thought that the
Rainbow Centre should be renovated. Only one participant indicated that the facility should not be
renovated but sold off to raise money to provide the other suggested projects for the local area.
Should the Rainbow Centre be Renovated
Number
Yes
No
45
1
44
When asked what function the Rainbow Centre should be used for if it was renovated, the majority of
participants selected youth centre/drop-in. This reflected a high level of priority given by the local
community throughout the process to the provision of facilities and services for young people.
A gym was selected the next most often for inclusion in a renovated Rainbow Centre, again
highlighting a desire for this local resource that has been shown throughout the questions.
Participants also selected arts and crafts workshops and, to a lesser extent, an arts centre as potential
functions of a renovated Rainbow Centre. This reflected a desire for workshops as a form of small
business unit as outlined in the business and housing section, although few participants wanted these,
as business units, to be located in the Rainbow Centre. An arts and crafts exhibition was also the
second most popular community event that could be held in the local area. This indicated a strong
interest in arts and crafts among the local community, suggesting a desire for projects to increase the
provision of and promote arts and crafts in the area.
Function
Youth centre drop in
Gym
Arts and crafts workshop
Arts centre
Sports centre
Nursery
Performance space
Meeting rooms
Office space
Cafe
Conference space
Wedding/main event space
7.2
Number
43
17
15
9
5
5
4
3
1
1
1
0
BUSINESS AND HOUSING
Affordable Housing
The opinion of the local community was divided as to whether new housing should be developed by
adapting existing buildings or on a vacant site. However the majority of participants did indicate that
‘above Church Road’ would be the preferred location for any new housing.
Area
Adapt existing buildings
Vacant site
Location
Above Church Road
Between Argyll and Barbour Road
Next to School Road
Number
33
26
Number
34
12
9
Housing that was suitable for families and sheltered housing emerged as the preferred types of
housing development for the Peninsula West area, with both receiving a far higher number of
selections than any other type of housing. This was concurrent with the desire highlighted by the local
community throughout the process to attract young families to ensure the sustainability of the area
and to provide for the elderly to prevent them having to leave the Peninsula to access appropriate
housing.
45
One participant commented that what was needed in the area was ‘mid affordable housing in order
for families in first time houses to move on thus freeing up houses for first time buyers’.
Type
Family
Sheltered
Single person
Wheelchair Access
Amenity
Other
Number
48
42
5
3
0
0
Tourist Facilities and Attractions
Participants indicated that sports facilities/water sports should be developed as tourist attractions in
the area. These initiatives would benefit the community through the provision of additional local
facilities and would tie into the community demands for a gym, 5-a-side pitch and assault course
highlighted in other questions.
Information points around the area as well as, to a lesser extent, additional road signage were also
selected as a priority to help attract tourists to the area. Participants also indicated support for the
development of the existing visitor centre at Linn Gardens as a tourist attraction for the Peninsula
West area.
Attraction
Sports facilities/water sports
Information points around the area
Development of visitor centre at Lynn
Gardens
Additional Road Signage
Tourist accommodation
Information centre
Café/tea/restaurant
Caravan park
Number
41
30
21
18
14
8
5
2
Small Business Units
Workshop space was the most popular option for business facilities in the Peninsula West area.
Type
Workshop space
Business centre
Office Space
Meeting facilities
Storage space
Other
Number
39
14
7
3
1
0
Fort Road was also selected by the majority of participants as the preferred location for the
development of business units.
46
Location of Business Units
Where
Fort Road
Rainbow Centre
Next to fire station
Field above South Ailey Road
7.3
Number
23
9
7
2
TRANSPORT
Pavements and Paths
Participants selected Shore Road as their preferred location for new footpaths. This was closely
followed by ‘Mill Brae - Barbour Road’, with both options receiving the vast majority of selections
made.
Location
Shore Road Footpath
Mill Brae – Barbour Road
School Road
Argyll Road
Number
48
37
11
5
Of those that completed the additional questions on transport, opinion was divided on the most
important issues regarding local pavements. Pavement width and overhanging hedges were both
selected as top priority issues.
Issue
Widen pavements
Cut back overhanging hedges
Increased crossing areas
Number
6
5
3
While only a small number of participants completed the question, ‘upgrading existing pavements’
received the most selections as the top pavement/path issue in the Peninsula West area. This was
followed by ‘creating additional pavements where possible’ and ‘creating a shore front footpath were
possible’.
Public Transport
The majority of participants indicated that they thought the last bus from Helensburgh should leave
later than its current time of 22.05. However, there was little demand for the bus service to extend
well beyond midnight, with the majority of participants indicating that just after 11 or just after 12
would be most appropriate.
Time
23.05
0.05
22.05
1.05
Later than 01.05
Number
20
17
1
0
0
47
Similarly, the vast majority of participants indicated a desire for the last ferry from Gourock to leave
much later than it currently does. The preferred time was just after nine o’clock, much later than the
current times of 18.10 on Mondays to Saturdays and 16.15 on Sundays.
Time
21.10
Later than 21.10
20.10
19.10
Number
28
6
5
4
Participants also indicated that the most problematic transport links faced by the Peninsula West are
related to the Ferry timetable. The top issue was with the timing of the ferry from Kilcreggan and the
train leaving Gourock, followed by the link between the Ferry from Gourock and the bus at Kilcreggan
to the other areas of the Peninsula.
Problem
Ferry from Kilcreggan to train in Gourock
Ferry from Gourock to bus in Kilcreggan
Bus from peninsula to ferry in Kilcreggan
Train from Glasgow to Helensburgh
Bus from Peninsula to train in Helensburgh
Number
20
11
8
8
0
For the largest proportion of participants, the development of an evening ferry service to and from
Gourock was the most important transport improvement that could be made in the area. This was
followed by a more frequent ferry service and a weekend ferry service to and from Gourock,
highlighting the importance of this link to the local community.
Transport
Evening ferry service to and from Gourock
More frequent ferry service to and from
Gourock
Weekend ferry service to and from Gourock
More frequent ferry service to Helensburgh
More frequent bus service to Helensburgh
Evening bus service
More frequent bus service within Peninsula
Number
46
27
22
9
6
2
1
The majority of participants felt that the biggest transport issues facing the Peninsula West area were
in travelling to wider areas from the Peninsula.
Issue
Travelling to wider areas such as Gourock
and/or Helensburgh
Travelling within the Peninsula
Number
11
2
Among those that answered the additional questions on transport, opinion was roughly equally split
on whether additional information on public transport timetables would be beneficial. However,
48
slightly more participants felt that disabled access to public transport on the Peninsula was a problem
than thought it was not a problem.
Availability of Petrol
Opinion on the location of a potential petrol station was split between a central Kilcreggan location at
Rosneath Road and a location in Cove, next to the fire station. This may reflect a split in the addresses
of the people selecting each option.
Location
Rosneath road at site of old surgery
Next to fire station
At Kilcreggan car park
Number
40
34
7
The vast majority of respondents indicated that they would only be willing to pay Helensburgh prices
for petrol on the Peninsula. However a small proportion indicated they would consider paying more if
a petrol station was developed in the local area.
Price
Helensburgh Price
5p extra per litre
10p extra per litre
20p extra per litre
Number
52
17
5
1
Additional questions were also completed by a small selection of participants. These indicated that
the majority would use a petrol station in the local area as their main source of fuel and that this petrol
station would be used primarily for fuel rather than other services.
As your main petrol
station
Would you use a local petrol Station?
If you were unable to
Rarely
Never
get to Helensburgh
Total
12
1
13
Diesel
13
7.4
0
0
What services would you like to see provided at a local petrol station?
Petrol
Air
Shop
Car wash
Total
9
5
2
0
29
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
Appearance of Villages, Community Garden and Play Area
Community woodland and play areas equally received the most selections as a desired improvement
to the Peninsula West area, followed by community garden and sculptures. This suggests a desire for
outdoor gathering areas as a priority for members of the local community.
Improvement
Community Woodland
Play area
Community garden
Community sculptures
Benches
Allotments
Number
32
32
21
19
16
14
49
Bulb plants
Picnic area
Flower Tubs
Hanging Baskets
Skate park
Sensory Garden
12
10
7
4
2
1
Of the participants who completed the additional questions on physical environment, all thought that
community spaces should be ‘suitable for all age groups’.
Piers and Slipways
More than double the number of participants favoured the creation of a new marine access facility and
community pontoon compared to those favouring an upgrade of the existing facility in Kilcreggan.
The most favoured location for any new marine facility was the ‘old boat yard’ in Kilcreggan.
Improvement
New marine access facility – community
pontoon
Upgrade existing pier
Overnight berth
Location
Old boat yard
Kilcreggan pier upgrade
Sailing Club
Number
45
20
7
Number
44
16
8
Of the few participants that completed additional environment questions, opinion was split on what
the main purpose of improvements to piers and slipways should be with ‘attract new business’, ‘make
business in the area easier’, ‘attract tourism to the area’ and ‘make commuting easier’ all being
selected by an equal number of people.
Again, although few participants completed the question, ‘encouraging increased use of the existing
pier’ was selected as the preferred focus of any improvement to the piers and slipways in the
Peninsula West area.
Improvement of Foreshore
A path along the shore was selected most frequently as a desired improvement to the local
environment. This reflects the location in which most participants indicated they would like to see
new paths and pavements developed. A large proportion of respondents also indicated that litter bins
should be provided in order to improve the appearance of the area. This concern with litter in the local
area, and particularly on the shore front, was highlighted in a number of comments left on the original
community consultation.
Improvement
Path along the shore
Litter bins
Better access to the beach
Sculpture Trail
Parking on foreshore
Signage
Number
55
41
21
13
4
1
50
7.5
EMPLOYMENT AND TOURISM
Organised Events
The event that the largest proportion of participants would like to see in the local area in order to
attract tourism was a music festival. This was closely followed by an arts/crafts exhibition, regatta
festival and Celtic festival. In total 222 selections for potential events were made, suggesting strong
support for hosting festivals in the local area in order to attract tourism.
Event
Music festival
Local arts/crafts exhibition
Cove Regatta festival
Celtic festival
Farmers market
Local history festival
Walking festival
Film festival
Theatre festival
Highland games
Nature festival
Fiddlers rally
Number
44
36
34
31
24
15
10
9
6
5
5
3
Nursery/Pre-school/Afterschool Care Facility
There were not many responses to the question regarding the use of childcare facilities. However, this
may have reflected the demographic of participants at the prioritisation event as many potential
participants were attending a “save our school” event in Rosneath on the same day.
Days
1 day a week
2 days a week
3 days a week
4 days a week
5 days a week
Nursery Number
0
0
0
0
0
Pre-school Number
0
0
3
1
2
Breakfast Club Number
1
0
1
1
4
Afterschool
Club - Number
1
2
7
1
5
Improving Business Opportunities through Tourism
The aspects of the Peninsula West area that should be promoted to tourists emphasise the active side
of the local area including sport, water and walking activities. If these were to be developed this could
provide the area with a clear image to present in attracting tourism. This could be coupled with
additional signage in the area, potentially highlighting the sights from certain key areas, to presenting
the area as a tourist destination.
Aspect
Sports facilities/water sports
Views/beauty
Walking/hiking
Heritage/architecture
Specific attractions
Number
34
31
30
18
10
51
Camping/Caravanning
9
These views were reinforced in the selection of activities the Trust could undertake to attract tourist to
the area. Participants indicated that more facilities and activities should be provided in the area for
tourists and again highlighted the potential of using walks in the local area to attract tourists. The
development of a tourist website for the area and the provision of signage at key sites on the
Peninsula West were also selected as potential activities to help develop tourism.
Idea
Facilities/activities for tourists
Walks
Website
Signage/heritage sites
Promotional Leaflets
More tourist information
7.6
Number
35
32
26
21
14
14
HEALTH AND WELFARE
Befriending Service
The majority of participants selected the elderly as the group that any new befriending service should
focus on, with some support for befriending services for people who are disabled as well. Participants
also, on the whole, thought that befriending should take the form of assisting with shopping and to
attend social events.
Group
Elderly
Disabled people
Families/households new to the area
New parents
Young people
Type
Assisting people with shopping/errands
Assisting people to attend social activities
Assisting people around the house
Home based
Weekly group
Number
50
23
18
11
7
Number
36
32
12
5
2
Two additional comments were left regarding the befriending service that ‘school children could get
involved in Lunch Club’ and ‘old and young people should be brought together to achieve mutual
understanding’.
Sheltered Housing/Care Home
There was no clear opinion among participants on where any sheltered housing developments should
take place. The church on Shore Road and Kilcreggan House were both equally selected by the largest
proportion of participants, suggesting there is some preference for renovating existing property in the
area as opposed to a new development. Both properties were available for sale at the time of the
consultation, however, the church was sold shortly after and is not longer a possible location for the
housing.
52
Location
Church on Shore Road
Kilcreggan House
Shore Road next to fire station
South Ailey Road
Number
34
34
23
0
The majority of participants considered a care home in the local area should provide services for the
elderly in general rather than for a specific condition or any other group of people. One participant
suggested that a ‘respite care-home with volunteers from community’ should be provided in the area
instead of sheltered housing/care home accommodation.
Service
General care for elderly
Care home for specific condition –
Alzheimer’s
Care home for physical disability
Care home for mental health
Number
47
7
6
3
Support for Young People
The largest proportion of participants indicated a preference for support for young people to be
provided through a centre based youth club. This reflected the emphasis on renovating the Rainbow
Centre as a youth centre. This was followed by the importance of providing job opportunities for
young people from the area. One additional suggestion was left by a participant to ‘include a central
based youth club that could include a homework club for both primary and secondary pupils using
teaching talent in the region’.
Type of support
Centre based for youth club
The provision of job opportunities for young
people
Combination of Streetwork/youth club
Introduction of activities for young people
Provision of local learning opportunities for
young people
Careers advice for young people
Streetwork
Health/healthy living advice for young
people
Number
35
19
7
7
7
3
1
1
Twenty-two participants indicated they thought it would be beneficial to set up a volunteering
programme for young people This would involve young people earning rewards (such as trips to the
cinema) if they volunteer a certain number of hours on tasks such as befriending or picking up litter.
One participant also left an additional comment that ‘young people should be part of keeping the
community in good condition in order for them to have pride in their area’.
The vast majority of respondents felt that employment opportunities should be provided for young
people within the local area, either through existing businesses or as an integral part of any
community projects developed.
53
Opportunity
Encourage apprenticeships in local
businesses
Include Employment opportunities in
community projects
Encourage entrepreneurship in young
people
Provide support to allow young people to
access jobs out with the peninsula
7.7
Number
26
21
13
8
OTHER PROJECTS
In addition to the large scale often capital intensive projects, several other smaller projects and/or
group based projects were raised throughout the various surveys and prioritisation events.
Community Groups Identified at Prioritisation Day
Activity
Youth group
Gardening club
Keep fit/gym
IT classes
Afterschool clubs
Book club
Badminton
Any sports activities
Running group
Youth football
Netball (for adults)
Bridge club
Number
24
23
21
17
10
10
6
4
3
3
3
2
A new youth group was selected most often as an additional community group to be developed in the
area. This reinforced the importance given by the community throughout the consultation of the plan
to providing a variety of activities for the young people of the Peninsula West area, as highlighted in
the responses to a number of the questions asked throughout the community day.
Also identified at the prioritisation day was a gardening club which does not appear to exist in the
Peninsula at present. A gardening club could also tie in with improving the appearance of the local
area and providing support to the elderly, which were also concerns raised in the consultation. Keep
fit/gym was also selected by several local community members at the community open day. However,
the Peninsula West area is already served by a number of keep fit/sport groups including: zumba,
yoga, line dancing, karate, football, table tennis, country dancing and badminton. This suggests either
that people are not aware of these clubs, which should then be better advertised, the available clubs
do not cover the breadth of interests in the area or that people more specifically would like to see a
gym developed in the local area. The latter suggestion is backed up by the low number of respondents
selecting ‘any sport activities’ as an additional resource for the area and the high number of
participants selecting gym/fitness suite as a preferred indoor sports facility for the area.
54
Respondents also selected IT classes as a further group for the area. There is currently a computer club
operating across the whole of the Peninsula, and this response suggests there is potential either for
this club to expand to provide IT training or for the separate provision of IT courses in the area.
7.8
FAVOURITE PROJECTS
Fifty-five participants indicated what their favourite project for the Peninsula West area was, with
some indicating second preferences as well. The table below shows the number of participants
highlighting each project idea as their favourite indicating that a community wind farm was the most
popular. This was followed by projects for young people and the creation of a path along the shore
front.
Project Idea
No' of Participants Favourite Project
Wind Farm
Youth project
Shore Path
Environment
Sports facilities
Sheltered Housing
Pier development
Petrol
Recreation
Events to promote tourism
Health
Woodland/play area
Affordable housing
Tourism facilities
Provision for elderly
Knotweed
Improvements to ferry service
General appearance
Berth for yachts
Walking group
Close generation gap
Transport
Meeting place/Rainbow Centre
Income generating projects
Sculpture path
Total number of participants
12
6
5
4
4
4
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
55
No' of Participants Second Favourite
Project
2
2
2
2
1
0
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
2
2
1
1
25
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS
“Any Initiatives should have as a priority the encouraging of local community spirit and pride. There are
many activities/interests already catered for but it needs a real dose of enthusiasm and vibrancy.”
55
“I believe that we need to provide more facilities for our younger generation so that we can retain youths
and entice new families to the area. We cannot allow our village to become retirement area.”
“We definitely need more facilities for young people to stop them carrying out anti-social behaviour that
we so often see.”
“Would prioritize affordable housing but would strongly oppose the provision of more Rosneath type
council housing.”
“[B]ring tourists and families here to visit and live. This in turn helps us boost local business. Sailing,
walking, peace, art is the way ahead”
Additional comments on paths and pavements:
“Need to have a proper kids crossing halfway up School Road”
“Create a cycle track from Kilcreggan to Coulport”
“Create a path along the top of the Peninsula, probably linking in with other long distance paths”
“Create pavements/paths for Peaton and Ardpeaton”
“Extend footpath from Cove to Peaton and along Mill Brae to Rosneath Caravan Park in order to attract
visitors to walk to Kilcreggan.”
“Keep the road drains clear at all times”
“Paths at the village where zebra crossing is”
“Keep the road drains clear, stop frost damage and the winter won’t damage the roads so much”
“Direct road signage from A82 to Coulport for tourists. Road A817 won awards for driving on; lots of
tourists could benefit and bring money to the area. This could link in with existing tourist route ‘Clyde Sea
Loch Trail’.”
“Would like some street lighting in Ardpeaton as it is very dark especially in the winter months.”
“More frequent ferries to Helensburgh on Saturdays”
Additional comments on public transport:
“Later ferries from Gourock to Helensburgh”
“Bus and ferry times linked”
“Weekend ferry, winter timetable, disabled access”
“Extend ferry services weekend, winter disabled access”
“More frequent ferries to Helensburgh on Saturdays”
“Safer bus service, drivers go too fast, take too many risks”
“Ferry service into Glasgow for people working in the city”
“Train to and from Gourock is very unreliable when we take ferry”
“Make the bus slow down and turn off its engine when stationary”
“Kilcreggan Ferry should be linked with CalMac ferries to Dunoon (instead of arriving two minutes after
Dunoon ferry leaves)”
“Wheelchair access on ferry is vital”
“Good transport system on the Peninsula”
“Properly lit dog walking paths”
“Projects to increase biodiversity, without rich biodiversity all the rest will be poor”
“Maintain stone walks along Shore Road”
“Restore the area of Fort Road which is a nature conservation and is being developed by the private sector
- would be interested in the conservation of it all”
“Community woodland and play area - I was involved in a similar project in Cornwall and it was very well
received by young and old”
56
“I would like to see a coastal warden being employed to keep the peninsula’s beach clean from the
dangerous items that get washed up all the time”
Additional comments on the environment:
“Give the Council power to fine households that allow raw sewage to go into the loch.”
“Putting in the litter bins causes more litter if they are not maintained”
“Extend the sewage scheme to included houses past Cove village to at least Knockderry”
“Plastic waste & sewage related waste more unsightly even more than knotweed”
“Marine Conservation - Cowal has an ‘adopt a beach’ scheme. Should we campaign for the peninsula to
join?”
“It would be great to have an environment art festival every year along Cove and Kilcreggan.”
Additional comments on organised events:
“Need to be more welcoming to newcomers”
“Food fair and real ale festival”
“Walking festival based on the Cowal Fest which combines walking, local history, music, visiting local
artists/crafts people in their homes/studios”
“A half marathon run for charity”
“A local swimming pool would be appreciated. Perhaps it would be sited at Rosneath Caravan Park and
used by the local residents and tourists.”
“A pool of drivers willing to do out of hours hospital runs in the case of emergencies.”
“Young people can feel quite cut off from career service, etc, so it would be handy to have advice more
locally.”
“We could enshrine [lamp posts] by creating a unique sign, perhaps ceramic, for each post bearing its
number.”
‘Submarine museum’
‘Resurface tennis courts as all weather surface with markings for other sports such as basketball’
‘Walking group’
‘Community garden plots’
‘Investigation of feasibility of connecting mains gas’
‘All new housing to be fitted with solar panels’
‘Replace notice boards in Cove and Kilcreggan’
‘Credit union’
‘Barter system for work and assistance’
‘Community shop’
‘Community access to IT, broadband and business support’
‘A path along the spine of the peninsula possibly linking other long distance paths. This would be small in
size separate from the forestry track’
‘Interest free loans to fit solar power panels to existing housing’
‘We need to keep the village post office which is under threat, maybe run it as a community post office”
‘Anti-litter campaign’
‘Community register to match people who want to grow vegetables but don’t have land with people who
have land but can’t or don’t have time to grow fruit and vegetables.’
‘Coastal path from Kilcreggan to Cove’
“I would be interested in the issues of the sustainable generation of energy e.g. wind farm and hydro
energy.”
8.0 PROJECT PROFILES
57
Nineteen potential project ideas were developed using the information from the needs analysis, policy
context, the four consultations and the community prioritisation event. The project profile for each
idea intends to provide tangible projects which could be developed by the Trust to ensure the
identified needs and demands of the local community are met.
The aims, outcomes and outputs of each project are outlined along with details of how the projects
would tackle community needs, meet the community demands and contribute to the national and
local policies outlined in previous chapters.
This information can then be used by the Trust when planning potential projects and applying for
funding so that they are able to take forward the aspirations of the Rosneath Peninsula West
community.
Community and Recreation
YOUTH CENTRE
AIM
The aim of this project would be the creation of a dedicated space for the young people of the
Peninsula West area.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the outputs that could be achieved are:
 The provision of a youth centre catering for young people
 The involvement of a significant number of young people from the area in diversionary activities
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
 Reduced impact of antisocial behaviour and young people on the streets in evenings as a result of
diversionary activities
 Better informed young people with access to support services to enable them to develop as
citizens
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
While there is a lower proportion of young people in the Peninsula West area than in both Argyll and
Bute and Scotland, the proportion of 16-19 year olds in the population is much greater. Across the
three data zones that comprise the Peninsula west area, 16 – 19 year olds account for 5.35% of the
area, higher than the 4.82% and 5.13% in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively. In one of the
areas, 16 -19 year olds account for 6.67% of the population, 38% higher than Argyll and Bute as a
whole.
29.7% of all households in the Peninsula West area contain dependent children, slightly higher than
the 26.8% and 28.2% rate of household with dependent children in Argyll and Bute and Scotland
respectively.
Current Provision in Area
While a number of groups for young people such as Rainbows, Cubs, Scouts and Guides are held in the
area, there are no youth groups outwith these organisations and no dedicated youth space in the
Peninsula West area. There is currently a project under consideration/development to renovate the
58
tennis pavilion at the top of Church Road to create, even in the short term, a dedicated youth centre
for the Peninsula West area.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
Almost a third of respondents to the household survey selected ‘a young people’s place’ as their top
community and recreation priority for the Peninsula West area. 69% selected this option as one of
their top three priorities, making this the fourth most popular option in the whole survey.
Young People Survey
91% of the young people who completed the survey responded that they would use a new youth
facility if it was provided in the area and 83% thought that it would reduce antisocial behaviour.
Community Prioritisation Event
96% of the participants that completed the Young People’s Place board indicated that there should be
a separate youth centre in the Peninsula West area. 68% of participants believed this should be
located in the Rainbow Centre.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The Argyll and Bute Antisocial Behaviour Strategy 2005-2008 identified that within the Kilcreggan
and Cove area:
“Occasional problems arise with young people, under 18 years of age, from outside the area causing
trouble. A small number of vandalism and alcohol related offences are reported.” (p.22)
The strategy is committed to projects which are targeted at individuals and groups who engage in
antisocial behaviour and aims to encourage them to participate in activities which divert them from
conduct which constitutes antisocial behaviour.
In addition, a dedicated youth centre, including the provision of services and activities directed at
young people could contribute to the Scottish Government’s national outcome:
“Our young people are successful learners, confident individuals, effective contributors and responsible
citizens.”
POTENTIAL PROJECT
The Trust could purchase the Rainbow Centre with the aim of converting the building into a youth
centre. A dedicated space specifically for young people to gather would prevent them from hanging
about the streets and potentially engaging in antisocial behaviour. The Trust could also engage
outside organisations to provide support services to young people for example talks on health issues
and activities, such as sport activities, to engage young people. The provision of a facility allowing
young people to interact would also provide an ideal scenario for the Trust to engage young people in
wider issues relating to the Peninsula West area, perhaps with the development of a youth subcommittee of the Trust or similar.
Facilities at Youth Centre
Respondents to the young people’s survey selected a sports hall, cinema, and games room as the top
priority facilities for inclusion in a youth centre. Participants at the community prioritisation event
highlighted a café, climbing wall and indoor 5-a-side pitch as the top three facilities.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
59
Community Preference
68% of the participants at the Community Prioritisation Event felt that a youth centre should be based
in a renovated Rainbow Centre.
In addition to considering the Rainbow Centre as a youth venue, the Trust are also committed to
assisting the existing youth group and their efforts to improve the old tennis court pavilion. It is
possible that in the longer term this building could be demolished and replaced with a sports centre
featuring a separately accessed youth wing.
Current Ownership of Site
The last recorded proprietor of the Rainbow Centre was Dumbarton District Council, the assets of
which will have been transferred to either West Dunbartonshire Council or Argyll and Bute Council
upon reorganisation of the local authorities in Scotland. The Rainbow Centre is a listed building,
Category C(S), which may limit the renovations that can be undertaken. Details of the ownership of
the tennis courts and bowling club could not be determined exactly but may be owned by the local
authority.
COST OF PROJECT
£270,000 - improved Rainbow Centre
£350,000 - attached to a new indoor sports facility
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Big Lottery Fund Growing Community Assets stream can support communities to develop
community facilities where these are owned and controlled by the local community. Big Lottery Fund
can provide up to £1m where there is strong evidence of need for project. A mandate of 10%
community support is required for successful projects.
The Robertson Trust can support Scottish charities to improve facilities contributing up to 10% of
overall capital costs with priorities including young people, education and community sports.
Garfield Weston Foundation and Tudor Trust provide funding for small charities and both have
recent history of contributing towards community owned facilities in rural Argyll.
BBC Children in Need will fund up to £20,000 of building costs for projects that aim to make positive
changes to the lives of disadvantaged children and young people.
The Links Foundation aims to benefit communities throughout the UK by providing, or assisting, in
the provision of facilities or services necessary to improve quality of life. The Foundation provides
funding of on average £20,000 for revenue and capital costs of projects.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Cove and Kilcreggan Youth Café – This group is currently trying to convert the old tennis pavilion into
a youth centre. To prevent duplication of projects, the Trust could work closely with this group to
develop any facilities/activities for young people in the area, access funding and generate interest in
renovating the old tennis pavilion in the short term. For the longer term, the Trust could work with the
group to involve young people in a larger scale redevelopment to create a modern, lasting facility for
the young people of the area.
Argyll and Bute Youth Services – The Trust should also involve the council youth services in any
proposed project. The department may be able to assist by providing advice and contacts to other
groups working with young people. They may also be able to provide practical help through funding or
60
support to maintain the centre and any youth activities as part of their commitment to providing
“enjoyable opportunities, challenging experiences and effective support” to young people aged 11 to
25 years old in Argyll and Bute.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Route 81 Youth Project, Garelochhead
Route 81 Youth Project redeveloped the former Outdoor Education Centre in Garelochhead to provide
a facility that is for the whole community and run by the community. The centre is intended to serve
the needs of local young people and the wider community while sustaining itself through residential
visitors using it on a commercial basis as an outdoor activities residential centre.
The Loft Youth Project
The Loft Youth Project was established to address the needs of young people in Keith. The Loft runs
an informal drop-in where young people are largely responsible for the development and running of
the provision. Loft Trading was set up in 2005 to provide commercial, work based learning
environments for the young people and to provide SVQ accredited training. This project aims to
provide better training and learning opportunities for young people and to significantly improve the
built environment in which this learning takes place.
Community and Recreation
ALL-WEATHER 5-A-SIDE PITCH
AIM
The aim of this project would be the creation of an all-weather 5-a-side pitch for use by local residents
and community groups throughout the year in order to increase options for recreational activities in
the area and provide a resource to enable local residents to live healthy lifestyles.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the outputs that could be achieved are:
 The creation of an all weather 5-a-side pitch
 The development of 8 new sport clubs involving 100 local residents
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
 Increased opportunities for healthy living for local residents
 Increased provision of sport activity groups across all age groups and interests in the community
 Additional facilities to allow increased social interaction and community events for the Peninsula
West area
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
Across the Peninsula West area, there are reasonably good levels of health, however, the data zone
surrounding Kilcreggan has a higher standardised mortality rate than regionally and nationally at 19%,
higher than expected compared to Argyll and Bute (SIMD, 2009). The average standardised mortality
ratio across the Peninsula West area is 5% lower than expected but still represents a higher mortality
rate than across the whole of Argyll and Bute.
Current Provision in Area
There are poorly maintained tennis courts in very poor condition located in Cove and the King George
V sports area located in Kilcreggan which over recent years has been colonised by vegetation from the
61
adjacent Site of Scientific Interest. There is also a small ash football pitch at Kilcreggan Primary
School. None of these pitches have appropriate associated facilities and are not suitable for use all
year round, in all weather conditions.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
Almost a quarter of respondents selected improvements to outdoor sports facilities as their top
priority community and recreation issue, while two thirds indicated that this option was one of their
top three priorities for the Peninsula West area. In addition, 7 comments left by respondents to the
community questionnaire specifically called for the development of an all-weather 5 a-side/astro turf
pitch in the Peninsula West area.
Community Prioritisation Event
39% of participants completing this board at the community open day indicated they would most like
to see an all-weather 5-a-side pitch developed in the Peninsula West area. This option was selected
over improving the existing tennis courts (21%), assault course (20%), full rugby pitch (14%) and golf
course and athletic track (both 3%).
RELEVANT POLICIES
The development of sports facilities in the Peninsula West area that are accessible all year round
would contribute towards the Scottish Government’s Healthier Strategic Objective to “help people to
sustain and improve their health, especially in disadvantaged communities, ensuring better, local and
faster access to health care”.
The Scottish Government Strategy for the wider impact of the Commonwealth Games, A Games
Legacy for Scotland, aims to create a network of community sports hubs across Scotland to improve
the use of, and access to, facilities for physical activity and competitive sport. Community sports hubs
can be based in local facilities such as sports centres, community centres and/or schools and will
provide a home for local clubs and sports and provide information and advice to local people, bringing
together communities.
The Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009-2013 also has a commitment towards creating vibrant
communities through ‘high quality public services and leisure/community facilities that attract people
to settle in Argyll and Bute’ and forward looking communities which are ‘proactive communities
where local people and organisations look for and create opportunities’. The development of outdoor
sports facilities could contribute to both these aims of Argyll and Bute’s Community Planning
Partnership.
The Trust would seek funding to develop an outdoor multi-use sports facility that could be used for a
number of sports and in all weather conditions.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Community Preference
71% of participants completing the Outdoor Sports Facilities board at the community prioritisation
event indicated they felt the current King George V sports area on the east of Kilcreggan was the most
suitable place to locate any renovated outdoor sports facilities or a sports hall. With the existing tennis
courts/bowling green open space/park identified as the alternative site.
Current Ownership of Site
The west half of King George V park appears to still be owned by the survivors of Ronald McNair
Teacher. The east half of King George V park appears to be owned by John and Jeanette Phipps.
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COST OF PROJECT
£120,000 (3rd generation adult size synthetic grass pitch including drainage, fencing/gates, lighting,
goals, etc.)
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Sport Scotland can provide up to 50% funding for community sports facility development that will
drive an increase in community based sports participation. To secure investment, the input of
strategic sports partners, Argyll and Bute Sports Development and Helensburgh and Lomond Sports
Council, is essential to ensure the project fits with areas sports development objectives.
The Gannochy Trust supports charities and develops youth and recreation projects and The
Robertson Trust prioritises community sports projects which can contribute to either capital or
revenue costs for this development.
Peter Harrison Foundation Awards are made to registered charities for projects involving sporting
activities that provide community development opportunities.
Comic Relief has an ongoing commitment to sports development where these activities are used as
part of a wider set of regeneration objectives or to improve the quality of life for the most
marginalised in the community.
Helensburgh & Lomond Sports Council/Argyll and Bute Sports Development – The Trust should
develop projects in conjunction with Helensburgh and Lomond Sports Council and the relevant Argyll
and Bute Council department in order to be eligible for Sports Scotland funding. In particular, these
organisations can provide advice on types of facilities and relevant partners to progress the project
and support the Trust with accessing funding for sports facilities
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Muirkirk Enterprise Group
The Trust designed and built an outdoor sports complex, with facilities for tennis, volleyball, netball
and basketball.
Princess Royal Sports Community Trust
The Trust owns the stadium building it operates from and provides facilities for physical recreation
and leisure time activity, including a multi-gym, astro-turf sports pitches and out of school childcare.
The Trust also delivers outreach coaching/fitness sessions to local schools, nursing homes and in
various town halls in the area.
Community and Recreation
INDOOR SPORTS FACILITY
AIM
The aim of this project would be the creation of an indoor sports facility for the Peninsula West area to
allow the provision of sport and keep fit activities and encourage healthy living among residents of the
area.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the outputs that could be achieved are:
 The development of indoor sports facilities
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 The development of 12 new sporting activities encouraging 150 of local residents to get involved
in healthy living activities
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
 Increased opportunities for healthy living for local residents
 Increased provision of sport activity groups across all age groups and interests in the community
 Additional facilities to allow increased social interaction and community events for the Peninsula
West area
NEED FOR PROJECT
There are no dedicated indoor sports facilities, including a gym/fitness suite, in the Peninsula West
area. Local residents have to travel to Garelochhead and Helensburgh to access these facilities.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
A sports hall was rated as the third priority by respondents from each area. Almost a quarter of all
respondents selected this option as their top community/recreation priority while 67% selected a
sports hall as one of their top three community/recreation priorities.
Ten comments were left requesting indoor sports facilities including a gym and sports hall suitable for
badminton, 5-a-side football and similar sports. Four respondents suggested that Cove Burgh Hall and
two suggested that the Sailing Club could be renovated to allow provision of these indoor sports
facilities. Of the 40 suggestions (made by 116 respondents) for new groups/clubs for the Peninsula
West area, the vast majority were for indoor activities. Six respondents also suggested a gym would
be beneficial for the local area.
Young People’s Survey
70% of the young people who completed this questionnaire felt that it was ‘extremely important’ to
include a sports hall in any youth centre development. Further 20% also felt it was ‘important’.
Community Prioritisation Event
A gym/fitness suite, along with a swimming pool, were selected as by far the most preferred indoor
sports facilities, each selected by 32% of the participants on the day. The desire for the provision of a
gym in the Peninsula West area is also backed up by the selection of keep fit/gym as a new community
group/project (by 17% of participants who left suggestions) and the positive response to the
suggestion that the Rainbow Centre could be renovated to provide space for a gym (also selected by
16% of participants).
RELEVANT POLICIES
The development of sports facilities in the Peninsula West area that are accessible all year round
would contribute towards the Scottish Government’s Healthier strategic objective to ‘help people to
sustain and improve their health, especially in disadvantaged communities, ensuring better, local and
faster access to health care’.
The Scottish Government Strategy for the wider impact of the Commonwealth Games (A Games
Legacy for Scotland) aims to create a network of community sports hubs across Scotland to improve
the use of, and access to, facilities for physical activity and competitive sport. Community sports hubs
can be based in local facilities such as sports centres, community centres and/or schools and will
provide a home for local clubs and sports and provide information and advice to local people, bringing
together communities.
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The Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009-2013 also has a commitment towards creating vibrant
communities through “high quality public services and leisure/community facilities that attract people
to settle in Argyll and Bute” and forward looking communities which are “proactive communities
where local people and organisations look for and create opportunities”. The development of indoor
sports facilities could contribute to both these aims of Argyll and Bute’s Community Planning
Partnership.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
The potential project would secure funding for community ownership and refurbishment of the
changing pavilion at the King George V park. Alternatively, the indoor sports centre could be located
on the site of the existing tennis pavilion and integrated with the tennis, bowls and all weather pitch
and be central to a community campus within this part of Cove/Kilcreggan.
Community Preference
71% of participants completing the relevant board at the community prioritisation event indicated
they felt the current King George V sports area on the east of Kilcreggan was the most suitable place
to locate any renovated indoor sports facilities/sports hall.
Current Ownership of Site
The west half of King George V park appears to still be owned by the survivors of Ronald McNair
Teacher. The east half of King George V park appears to be owned by John and Jeanette Phipps.
COST OF PROJECT
£1,570,000 (Assumed gross internal floor area 600 m2; includes badminton court, gym, hall/meeting
room, showers/toilets, changing rooms, demolition of existing pavilion)
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Sport Scotland can provide up to 50% funding for community sports facility development that will
drive an increase in sports participation at community level.
The Gannochy Trust supports charities and develops youth and recreation projects and The
Robertson Trust operates a priority for community sports which can contribute to either capital or
revenue costs for this development.
Peter Harrison Foundation Awards are made to registered charities for projects involving sporting
activities that provide community development opportunities.
Helensburgh & Lomond Sports Council/Argyll and Bute Sports Development – The Trust should
develop projects in conjunction with Helensburgh and Lomond Sports Council and the relevant Argyll
and Bute Council department in order to be eligible for Sports Scotland funding. In particular, these
organisations can provide advice on types of facilities and relevant partners to progress the project
and support the Trust with accessing funding for sports facilities
PROJECT EXAMPLE
Wellhouse Community Trust
The Trust have three community facilities in Easterhouse including “the hub” (a community education
and employment facility), “innerzone” (a facility for young people) and “hubSports” (a sports facility).
The organisation directly delivers two community cafes, walking club, elderly lunch club,
cheerleading, ICT, various social and community events/evenings, advice and support, youth drop-in,
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youth holiday programmes, music/recording studio, family excursions, family support, a wide variety
of volunteering opportunities and confidence building initiatives.
Community and Recreation
RAINBOW CENTRE
AIM
The aim of this project would be to redevelop the Rainbow Centre to create a facility meeting local
community need.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the outputs that could be achieved are:
• The creation of an additional high quality community facility for the area
• Saving a significant social and historical building from falling further into disrepair
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• A redeveloped building, creating an additional community resource for the Peninsula
• Increased community involvement and ownership of this resource
NEED FOR PROJECT
Current Provision in Area
The Cove Burgh Hall provides facilities to local residents and community groups it is, however, almost
full to capacity and another community owned facility is clearly required to meet the needs of one or
more of the following: nursery/after school accommodation, arts venue, youth facility, sports facility
or business centre.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
Rainbow Centre renovation in tandem with Cove Burgh Hall was selected as the fourth priority by
respondents from all areas. Six respondents suggested ways to renovate the Rainbow Centre to
reopen it, including turning the centre into a sports facility or utilising it as a youth centre.
COMMUNITY PRIORITISATION EVENT
98% of all participants completing the Rainbow Centre Renovation board at the community day
thought the Rainbow Centre should be renovated. When asked what function the Rainbow Centre
should be used for after renovation, the majority of participants selected youth centre/drop-in. This
reflects a high priority given by the local community throughout the process to the provision of
facilities and services for young people.
16% of participants that completed this board selected a gym for inclusion in a renovated Rainbow
Centre, again highlighting a desire for this local resource that has been shown in other questions.
Participants also selected arts and crafts workshops (14%) and, to a lesser extent, an arts centre (9%)
as potential functions of a renovated Rainbow Centre. An arts and crafts exhibition was also the
second most popular community event that could be held in the local area. This indicates a strong
interest in arts and crafts among the local community, suggesting a desire for projects to increase the
provision and promotion of arts and crafts in the area.
RELEVANT POLICIES
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The Argyll and Bute Local Plan emphasises the Council’s commitment to community facilities as ‘the
social foundations on which many communities rely on’. The Local Plan supports the development of
new services and facilities that support and enhance a community and help retain the local population
in the face of a declining number of young economically active families. It also stresses any new
facilities or improvements to existing facilities must be in keeping with the character of the town and
surrounding area.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
This currently vacant and neglected community venue could be transferred into community
ownership to create a nursery/out of school care, hub for young people and recreation facilities taking
account of the need to complement rather than compete with the nearby Cove Burgh Hall.
LOCATION
Current Ownership of Site
The last recorded proprietor of the Rainbow Centre was Dumbarton District Council, the assets of
which will have been transferred to either West Dunbartonshire Council or Argyll and Bute Council
upon reorganisation of the local authorities in Scotland. The Rainbow Centre is a listed building,
Category C(S).
COST OF PROJECT
£270,000 (assumed gross internal floor area of 190 m2; includes refurbishment internally, external
fabric repairs, new entrance feature and external works)
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Big Lottery Fund Growing Community Assets stream can support communities to develop community
facilities where these are owned and controlled by the local community. Big Lottery Fund can provide
up to £1m where there is strong evidence of need for project. A mandate of 10% community support is
required for successful projects.
The Robertson Trust can support Scottish charities to improve facilities contributing up to 10% of
overall capital costs with priorities including young people, education and community sports.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Cove and Kilcreggan Youth Café - If the Trust opted to convert the Rainbow Centre into a youth
centre, they could work in partnership with the Cove and Kilcreggan Youth Café to prevent duplication
of services and ensure the development of the facility is driven by young people.
PROJECT EXMAPLES
Cassiltoun Trust
The Cassiltoun Trust was set up specifically to undertake the conversion of the Stables Block into a
community asset providing offices, a nursery, education and recreation facilities and some housing.
Eilean Eisdeal
The Trust have converted the old drill hall into a multi-purpose community facility, which provides a
centre for community, educational, social and arts activities, with a full arts programme.
Muirkirk Enterprise Group
The Trust purchased and refurbished a local building as a community facility, which now provides the
Trust’s office accommodation, meeting space for community groups and facilities for small business
start-ups.
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Development Trust Association Scotland has prepared a comprehensive report and strategy to
support asset transfer of local authority owned facilities to community ownership.
Community and Recreation
PLAY AREAS
AIM
The aim of this project is the creation of two children’s play areas.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the output that could be achieved is:
• Local children are able to benefit from a local and high quality play areas
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• More activities for children in the local area
• Increased interaction between children and parents
• Children will be healthier with more opportunities for outdoor play
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
While there is a lower proportion of under 16 year olds in the Peninsula West area than in both Argyll
and Bute and Scotland, 29.7% of all households in the Peninsula West area contain dependent
children. This is slightly higher than the 26.8% and 28.2% rate of household with dependent children
in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively.
Current Provision in Area
There is currently only one play area for local children situated in the park adjacent to the tennis courts
and bowling green in Cove/Kilcreggan.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
60% of respondents indicated that play areas were one of their top three environment priorities.
Seven comments were also provided expressing a desire for the development or improvement of play
areas in the local villages.
Community Prioritisation Day
Almost a fifth of participants at the community day who completed the relevant board selected play
areas as the most important improvement to the villages in the Peninsula West area. This option was
selected more than any other option except community woodland. The majority of participants that
completed the relevant question indicated that community spaces should be suitable for all ages and
comments suggested combining community woodland and play areas.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The Scottish Government’s Early Years Framework recognises the right of all young children to high
quality relationships, environments and services which offer a holistic approach to meeting their
needs. This holistic approach encompasses play, learning, social relationships and emotional and
physical wellbeing. The development of a play area in the Peninsula West area could contribute
towards the achievement of the following aims of the framework:
• Ensuring all children have the same outcomes and the same opportunities
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• Improving outcomes and children’s quality of life through play
• Improving play opportunities and addressing barriers to play
• Engagement and empowerment of children, families and communities
• Helping children, families and communities to secure outcomes for themselves
A play area development could contribute to the Scottish Government’s National Outcome and Argyll
and Bute Single Outcome Agreement of ‘our children have the best start in life and are ready to
succeed’.
The development of a play area in the Peninsula West area could also contribute towards the
objectives of the Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009-2013 by creating ‘high quality
leisure/community facilities that attract people to settle in Argyll and Bute’. It could also support the
aim of the Argyll and Bute Local Plan ‘to reduce and ameliorate the effects of peripherality – by
encouraging the expansion of local facilities throughout Argyll and Bute’.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
The Trust would work towards the creation of two play areas, one adjacent to the pier in Kilcreggan to
be used by visitors and local residents and the other at the site of the existing play area which would
be part of the community campus.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Within the existing play area park complex which includes the tennis courts and bowling green and at
the shoreside in Kilcreggan to the east of the pier.
Current Ownership of Site
Part of the site surrounding Kilcreggan pier is owned by Scottish Water, while Pier Cottage is owned
by the occupier. The remaining area surrounding the pier appears to be until recently owned by
McKellar’s Slipway Limited when all or some of the site was disposed to Donald Robert McIndewar
Bruce. This potentially includes the site of the old boat yard.
COST OF PROJECT
£60,000 (adjacent to old tennis courts/new indoor sports centre & youth centre)
£280,000 (at the site of the old boat yard, with beach access including perimeter railings)
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
If the play area is incorporated at least in part in a woodland setting then funding can be secured
through Forestry Challenge Fund Forestry for People strand.
In addition, Score Environment Landfill Tax is able to contribute on average up to £20,000 with play
areas as a priority theme.
A further option could be Argyll and the Isles LEADER with recent play area awards covering 50% of
costs for a new project in Arrochar 2011.
There are advantages to improving existing play areas which are currently owned by Argyll and Bute
Council rather than developing new sites. The local community council, for example, could secure
funding for new play equipment with the ongoing management, maintenance and public liability
being taken forward by the local authority.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
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Argyll and Bute Council Community Services (Play Areas) – The Trust could arrange a partnership with
the relevant Council department for maintenance of any play areas developed.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Muirkirk Enterprise Group
The group developed two adventure playgrounds for the village of Muirkirk in East Ayrshire.
Petersburn Development Trust
The Trust was set up to develop Petersburn Park and secured £367,000 worth of funding to create a
unique outdoor play facility. The aim was to transform an area of derelict land into a safe environment
for young children and families.
Business and Housing
AFFORDABLE FAMILY HOUSING
AIM
The aim of this project would be to increase the quantity of affordable housing on the Peninsula
suitable for families with young children and first time buyers.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the outputs that could be achieved:
• The provision of 94 units of affordable housing for sale or rent to the local community
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• More families with young children attracted to the area
• More provision for first time buyers from the community to prevent them having to leave the area to
access affordable housing
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
Between 2001 and 2009 the population of the Peninsula West area declined by 4% with the
population of children (those aged 16 and under) declining by 23%. The working age population also
declined by 7% with only a rise in the pensioner population of almost 24% counteracting these
population reductions.
This may in part by due to a 125% increase in average house prices in Kilcreggan between 2001 and
2009, higher than the 100% and 103% rise in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively. The average
house price difference between Kilcreggan and the rest of Argyll and Bute in 2001 was £31,032, while
it increased to £89,072 in 2009.
Current Provision in Area
The average cost of houses sold in the Peninsula West area over 12 months was £192,251.88 (April
2010 – March 2011). Only 10 out of the 32 properties were sold for less than £100,000, making the area
difficult for first time buyers and those on low incomes to access (Registers of Scotland House Price
Search).
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
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50% of respondents from all areas selected affordable housing as their top business priority for the
Peninsula West area and almost a quarter selected it as top local issue. Fourteen respondents
commented on the need for affordable housing in the area, with a further six specifying the need for
affordable housing to ensure young families are able to move to the area. Respondents to the survey,
from all areas, also prioritised two and three bedroom houses that are suitable for families.
Community Prioritisation Event
Housing that was suitable for families emerged as the preferred type of housing development for the
Peninsula West area, selected by 49% of the participants who completed the Affordable Housing
board. This concurred with the desire highlighted by the local community throughout the process to
attract young families to ensure the sustainability of the area, with one participant commenting that
what was needed in the area was ‘mid affordable housing in order for families in first time housing to
move on, thus freeing up houses for first time buyers’.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The Argyll and Bute Local Plan identifies ‘an ageing population’ and ‘a continuing reduction in the
number of young economically active families’ as two key issues faced by the Argyll and Bute Council
area. Similarly the Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009-2013 aims to create vibrant communities
that are ‘well balanced demographically with young people choosing to stay or move to the area’.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
There are two potential options that the Trust can pursue in the provision of affordable housing in
Peninsula West area.
Option 1
The Trust itself could purchase land in the Peninsula West area and develop housing. This would
potentially require a loan to cover the costs of the land purchase and the housing development, which
would be paid back through the income earned on selling or renting the property. However, this would
allow the Trust greater control over the housing built and how this was then managed. In addition the
Trust could develop a wider employability project into the house building, to employ and train local
young and/or unemployed residents.
Option 2
The Trust could work in partnership with one of the local housing associations, Dunbritton HA and
Argyll Community Housing Association (ACHA). There are no current plans by the housing
associations to develop housing in the Peninsula West area and this area is not on the list of areas
prioritised by Argyll and Bute Council for housing development. At some point in the future, however,
this option would allow the Trust to work in partnership with a housing association for the purchase
and development of land for housing. This would reduce the risk taken on by the Trust alone, as
capital funding would be raised by the association in part funded by a Housing Association Grant.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Community Preference
A slightly higher proportion of participants at the community prioritisation event felt affordable
housing should be developed by adapting existing buildings in the area than on a vacant site (by 56%
to 44% of those that completed this board). However, the majority of participants did indicate that
the site above Church Road would be the preferred location for any new housing (62% of participants
that completed this board).
Current Ownership of Site
The south east part of this site is owned by Ishbel Montgomery.
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COST OF PROJECT
£9,800,000 (92 units and including approx 200m access road to site)
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Community Land Trust Fund
Various funding bodies amalgamated to establish the Community Land Trust Fund
(www.cltfund.org.uk). The Technical Assistance Fund (TAF) has been established to provide
community groups with a grant of up to £2,500 so that they can employ a consultant or consultants
for up to five days to assist with certain aspects of the development of their community land trust, and
to work up their initial ideas into a comprehensive business plan that is ‘investment ready’.
Forestry Commission: National Forest Land Scheme and Rural Affordable Housing
Forestry Commission has a commitment to maximise community access and benefits of FC land
through the National Forest Land Scheme (NFLS). Within this remit there are options for community
organisations, registered social landlords and other appropriate housing bodies to acquire forest land
for affordable housing and woodland crofts. There is considerable forestry land on the Rosneath
Peninsula and enquiries could be made to develop these options further.
Rural Housing Service
The Rural Housing Service is a national charity which helps rural communities to develop practical
solutions to local housing problems. The Rural Housing Service provides advice and information on
housing issues and aims to help communities create new housing opportunities for local people
(www.ruralhousingscotland.org).
Option 1
The main source of funding for community land buy-outs is the Big Lottery’s Growing Community
Assets Fund. In addition, some funding for support with the development of the buy-out and monies
towards the purchase cost of assets including land may be gained from Highlands and Islands
Enterprise who offer assistance in the purchase of community assets. Grant is also available from the
Scottish Government.
Option 2
This option could be funded through a combination of a Housing Association Grant and private
finance. When taken forward by community led charitable Trusts there could be options for sourcing
ethical investment grants or loans including Triodos Bank loans. Rural Housing Service can provide
input and advice with regard to this.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Dunbritton Housing Association/Argyll Community Housing Association – The Trust could work in
partnership with one of the local housing associations to develop affordable housing in the area. This
would allow access to specific housing association land grants provided by the Scottish Government
and ensure less financial risk to the Trust.
Argyll and Bute Development Management – The Trust should work with the relevant Argyll and
Bute Council department to ensure that any development fits with the council’s priorities and to
ensure planning permission.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Dunbritton Housing Association
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Dunbritton Housing Association owns and manages 700 properties across Argyll and Bute. The
association has properties in Kilcreggan, Rosneath and Garelochhead.
Argyll Community Housing Association (ACHA)
ACHA is a community led housing association that manages 5,100 properties transferred from Argyll
and Bute Council as well as delivering associated housing services. The association manages
properties in Rosneath and Garelochhead.
Strathfillan Community Development Trust
Since its inception the Trust has successfully implemented a programme of work based on identified
community priorities. This has including the provision of low cost rental housing for local residents.
Business and Housing
NEW BUSINESS WORKSHOP SPACE
AIM
The aim of this project is the creation of new business workshops in the Peninsula West area.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the outputs that could be achieved are:
• Six new units provided for local businesses
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• Increased business start-ups in the area
• Attracting small businesses to the Peninsula West area
• Sustainable local businesses and economy, promoting local employment
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
According to the 2001 Census, 30% of economically active residents that both live and work in the
Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area are self-employed (Census, 2001). This is much higher than the
20% rate in Argyll and Bute and the 13% of self-employed residents in Scotland as a whole.
Current Provision in Area
There are currently retail units along the front in Kilcreggan and Cove, however, the majority of other
businesses in the area appear to operate from residential property as opposed to purpose-built
workshops.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
16% of respondents to the survey selected small business units as their top priority business issue for
the Peninsula West area and 61% selected them as one of their top priorities. The comments
regarding this suggested that small businesses were best suited to Peninsula West but highlighted
that they would require support in order to be viable in the area.
Business Survey
Access to business units or workshop space was selected as a top priority business support service for
the Peninsula West area by 45% of respondents to the business survey.
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Community Prioritisation Event
61% of participants at the community event who completed the Business Units board indicated that
workshop space was the preferred type of business unit for the Peninsula West area. This was
followed by 22% selecting a business centre for the area.
RELEVANT POLICIES
New business workshop spaces can help contribute to one of the key aims of the Scottish Economic
Strategy: to achieve equity by ‘according greater priority to achieving more balanced growth across
Scotland, to give all across Scotland the chance to succeed’.
The project could also help achieve the Argyll and Bute Local Plan objectives to ‘improve economic
competitiveness and the relatively poor economic performance of Argyll and Bute as a whole’ and
‘enhance the economic and social prospects of the geographically diverse local communities in Argyll
and Bute’.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
The project would see the Trust constructing six start up workspaces which would be located on Fort
Road adjacent to the existing industrial units.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Community Preference
56% of participants that completed the relevant board at the community prioritisation event selected
a site at the east end of Fort Road.
COST OF PROJECT
£500,000 (assumed 200 m2 gross internal floor area; 6 workspaces)
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Big Lottery Fund Growing Community Assets is a potential source of funding for this type of
community enterprise. Major Lottery funding could be matched by contribution from Scottish
Enterprise and charitable trusts such as Gannochy Trust and Lankelly Chase Foundation. Additional
funding could possibly be from local private sector sponsorship including businesses that are
interested in accessing local ‘work hubs’.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Mull and Iona Community Trust
The Trust is developing a community business resource centre which offers provision of serviced office
and meeting room space with audio-visual technology and a dedicated training room. All facilities will
be available for hire on a long or short term with optional reception/secretarial services available. In
addition to office space, the resource centre will also contain space for businesses to hire as a
‘surgery/treatment’ room to provide complementary therapies and counselling services at the centre.
Govanhill Community Development Trust
The Trust is a wholly owned subsidiary of Govanhill Housing Association and was initially established
to develop workspaces as a means of developing the local economy. The Trust currently own 2
developments which provide units for 27 small and medium sized enterprises.
Ore Valley Business Centre
Ore Valley Housing Association has developed a business incubation facility which offers a variety of
business spaces for rent.
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Health and Welfare
SHELTERED HOUSING
AIM
The aim of this project would be to provide sheltered accommodation for elderly residents who are
unable to continue to live in unsupported accommodation on the peninsula.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the output that could be achieved is:
• The provision of one sheltered accommodation, catering for 12 local residents
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• Elderly residents are able to remain on the Peninsula even when they are unable to live unsupported
for health reasons
• Increased employment opportunities for local residents
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
Across the Peninsula West area, residents of pensionable age account for over 25% of the total
population, higher than the 24% and 19% in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively. In addition, in
one of the data zones (towards the South East of Kilcreggan) pensioners account for almost 30% of all
residents in the area. The proportion of pensioners in the entire Peninsula West area increased by
almost 25% between 2001 and 2009 and in the Kilcreggan data zone increased by 45% in the same
period. This has exacerbated the problems with housing elderly residents in the area and, if the
increase continues at this rate, could lead to further problems in the future.
Current Provision in Area
Dunbritton Housing Association currently have limited amenity housing stock in Rosneath and
Garelochhead (15 units) suitable for elderly residents. The next nearest accommodation provided
specifically for elderly residents is in Helensburgh where Bield Housing Association operates 12
amenity and 28 sheltered flats.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
A third of total respondents selected sheltered housing as their top health and welfare priority and
68% selected sheltered housing as a top three priority. Overall, just under half of the survey
respondents selected sheltered housing as one of their top three priorities. Fifteen respondents
commented on the need for housing that is suitable for the elderly and those with health problems in
the area, although comments were not specific as to what form this accommodation should take.
Community Prioritisation Event
Sheltered housing was selected by 42% of participants who completed the relevant board as the most
important type of housing development for the Peninsula West area. This reflects a desire by the local
community to ensure that the elderly are provided for in the area to prevent them having to leave the
Peninsula to access appropriate housing. Three quarters of participants felt that specific elderly
housing in the area should provide services for the elderly in general rather than for a specific
condition.
RELEVANT POLICIES
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The Scottish Government’s Strategy All Our Futures: Planning for a Scotland with an Ageing
Population emphasises that services should be in place to ensure that people can live life to the full as
they grow older.
In addition, the Argyll and Bute’s Older Persons Charter 2008-10, aims to ‘ensure equity of access to
care services throughout the area’ and to ‘make Argyll and Bute a place where older people can live
positive, contributing lives as valued citizens’. The Trust can contribute to each of these by providing
facilities in the Peninsula West area for older residents to ensure that they are able to continue to live
in and contribute to the local community.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
There are several options to provide sheltered housing that could be developed by the Trust in
partnership with specialist housing and/or care providers. The two local general housing associations
could be partners or specialist associations such as Bield Housing Association or Hanover Housing
Association could lead this project. There may be options for the private sector to provide input or
alternatively the Trust could develop this independently as a community or co-operatively run
organisation.
Latest policies, which include service user and agency evidence, suggest that the demand for the
current model of sheltered housing is in longer term decline. There is a growing preference towards
the “core and cluster” approach for schemes in which a warden, community alarm and communal
facilities will be shared between residents and the other older people living in the vicinity in their own
homes irrespective of tenure. This could be a further option to be explored for Cove and Kilcreggan
and across the wider Peninsula.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Community Preference
The Kilcreggan House was selected by the largest proportion of participants (37%), suggesting there is
some preference for renovating existing property in the area as opposed to a new development.
Current Ownership of Site
Kilcreggan House is currently owned by the Way Christian Ministries although it is up for sale at offers
around £750,000.
COST OF PROJECT
£1,130,000 (12 single person units)
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Various local and national funders could contribute towards capital development costs such as NHS,
Community Health Partnerships, Argyll and Bute Council and Housing Association Grants and
related loan schemes. Consideration has to be made towards ongoing running costs and affordability
of services long term.
If a community owned social care and housing project is pursued then there could be potential to
secure Big Lottery Fund Growing Community Asset stream. In addition, several trusts have strong
health and care themes such as The Robertson Trust, Henry Smith Charity and Garfield Weston.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Bield Housing/Hanover Housing - The Trust could work with specialist providers of sheltered housing
to develop sheltered housing. This would allow access to specific housing association land grants
provided by the Scottish Government and ensure less financial risk to the Trust.
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Dunbritton Housing Association/Argyll Community Housing Association – The Trust could work
with one of the local housing associations to develop sheltered housing in the area. This would allow
access to specific housing association land grants provided by the Scottish Government and ensure
less financial risk to the Trust.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Argyll Community Housing Association (ACHA)
ACHA is a community led housing association that manages 5,100 properties transferred from Argyll
and Bute Council as well as delivering associated housing services. The association provides
approximately 200 sheltered units in 11 complexes at Oban, Benderloch, Dunoon, Sandbank,
Lochgilphead, Ardrishaig, Inveraray, Tarbert, Bunessan, Rothesay and Bowmore. The majority of
these employ wardens to support the tenants by checking on them in the morning, offering advice
and organising social and recreational activities.
Dunbritton Housing Association
Dunbritton Housing Association owns and manages 700 properties across Argyll and Bute, of which
around 120 are amenity homes. The association has three general needs units for rent in Craigrownie
Gardens in Kilcreggan.
Killin Care Trust, Falls of Dochart Retirement Home
A rural care home was faced with closure and with the isolation of Killin, the nearest alternative care
home would be in Callander or Aberfeldy almost 20 miles way. For many of the older residents that
are not able to continue to live independently the alternative would be to have to move from their
own community, resulting in isolation from family and friends. When closure was announced in 2002,
a group of concerned local people set up the Killin Care Trust to secure funding to retain the
retirement home under community ownership.
Health and Welfare
BEFRIENDING FOR ELDERLY
AIM
The aim of this project is the development of a befriending service, utilising local volunteers to provide
support and companionship to elderly residents.
OUTPUTS
By the end of this project the outputs that could be achieved are the development of:
• The number of contact hours recorded
• The number of elderly residents receiving support through the befriending service
• The number of local residents engaged in volunteering
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• Reduction in isolation and social exclusion among elderly people in the Peninsula West area
• Increased employability of local volunteers
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
Across the Peninsula West area, residents of pensionable age account for over 25% of the total
population, higher than the 24% and 19% in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively. The
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proportion of pensioners in the entire Peninsula West area increased by almost 25% between 2001
and 2009 and in the Kilcreggan data zone increased by 45% in the same period.
Current Provision in Area
Despite the high numbers of elderly residents in the Peninsula West area, there is little current
provision of befriending services. The nearest identified service is the Cowal Elderly Befriending
Scheme which offers a range of befriending services to elderly people in rural areas. This includes oneto-one visiting, trips out and about on a wheelchair accessible minibus and telephone and peerbefriending. Within the immediate area the only befriending services are aimed at carers and children
with disabilities rather than elderly residents:
• The Princess Royal Trust Helensburgh & Lomond Carers provides support to carers throughout the
area including a drop-in service, information and advocacy services, befriending service, social
programme and newsletters and publications.
• The befriending service offers support to vulnerable children experiencing a range of difficulties,
which may include autistic spectrum disorders, in Argyll & Bute by recruiting adult volunteers who are
matched up with children on a one-to-one basis. The service also offers befriending to siblings of
children with disabilities or difficulties.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
53% of respondents selected befriending for the elderly as one of their top three health and welfare
priorities for the Peninsula West area. Nine respondents also commented on the importance of the
local provision of services to ensure elderly residents are able to remain in the area.
Community Prioritisation Event
46% of participants that completed this board selected the elderly as the group that any new
befriending service should focus on, with some support for befriending services for people who are
disabled as well. 41% of participants thought that befriending should take the form of assisting with
shopping, while 37% thought befriending services should help people attend social events.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The Scottish Government’s Strategy All Our Futures: Planning for a Scotland with an Ageing
Population emphasises that services should be in place to ensure that people can live life to the full as
they grow older.
In addition, Argyll and Bute’s Older Persons Charter 2008-10, aims to ‘ensure equity of access to care
services throughout the area’ and to ‘make Argyll and Bute a place where older people can live
positive, contributing lives as valued citizens’. A befriending service for the Peninsula West area would
contribute to each of these by providing support and companionship to combat the negative effects
of social isolation and ensure elderly residents are able to remain in their own home as long as
possible.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
A number of residents indicated their interest in volunteering for a befriending project. The Trust will
facilitate a meeting of any number of volunteers and give assistance through existing befrienders in
Argyll and Bute to establish a group for the Rosneath Peninsula.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Big Lottery Fund Investing in Communities: Life Transitions (www.biglotteryfund.org.uk) strand
would be the most relevant to assist older people adapt to changes affecting their life including
isolation and vulnerability.
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The Robertson Trust (www.therobertsontrust.org.uk) support Scottish charities to develop
community based projects with one of the major priorities covering care initiatives
Tudor Trust (www.tudortrust.org.uk) support charities to alleviate poverty with potential for this
befriending project to secure funding under the health theme ‘support for older people’
Lloyds TSB Foundation for Scotland Henry Duncan Awards
(www.ltsbfoundationforscotland.org.uk) can provide revenue funding support for the befriending
service to ensure marginalised people can ‘play a fuller role in the community’.
Argyll Voluntary Action (AVA) – AVA currently co-ordinates volunteering across the area and the
Trust could work in partnership with them to develop a Time Bank scheme specifically for the
Peninsula West area.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Volunteer Centre for East Dunbaronshire (VECD)
The Befriending Service was first introduced by VCED over 11 years ago and there have since been
approximately 300 successful matches. Befriending is a supported relationship between two people
who have regular contact for an agreed time and engage in social activities. The befriending
relationship is initiated, supported and monitored by Volunteer Centre Befriending Service staff.
Befriending aims to make a difference to the quality of life of people experiencing social isolation due
to ageing, disability or other changes in their circumstances.
Oxgangs Carers Befriending Service
The Befriending Service offers clients/carers friendship through one to one contact. This can either be
in the persons own home or alternatively if the carer/client wishes, the volunteer befriender can take
the person they are matched with out for social activities. The service is available to a range of age
groups with a variety of care needs.
Transport
EVENING PUBLIC TRANSPORT
AIM
The aim of this project would be to improve the provision of public transport to and from the
Peninsula West area.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the output that could be achieved is:
• Increased number of Peninsula West residents who will have a safe and affordable journey home
from Helensburgh or Gourock later at night
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• A more accessible area
• More attractive area to families
• More accessible activities and facilities for young people from the Peninsula West area
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
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Elderly residents often suffer the most from poor public transport links and an inability to access wider
areas. Across the Peninsula West area, residents of pensionable age account for over 25% of the total
population, much higher than the 24% and 19% in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively. The
proportion of pensioners in the entire Peninsula West area increased by almost 25% between 2001
and 2009.
Young people unable to access private transport also suffer from poor public transport links. Across
the three data zones that comprise the Peninsula West area, 16 – 19 year olds account for 5.35% of the
area, higher than the 4.82% and 5.13% in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively.
Of the 1257 economically active people resident in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area, 67%
leave the area for work or study (Census, 2001). 71% of those that leave the Argyll and Bute Council
area for work travel over 20km to access their employment each day. The vast majority of these are
employed in Inverclyde or Glasgow and therefore a late evening ferry link to allow them to travel
home from work is vital.
Current Provision in Area
Bus services - At present, buses to Helensburgh (service 316) only operate on an hourly basis Monday
to Saturday and a two hourly basis on Sundays. This service stops altogether just after ten o’clock
Mondays to Sundays. From Helensburgh round to the Peninsula West area, a journey can cost
anything between £2.45 and £2.85 and takes approximately 35 to 45 minutes. These services are
operated on an alternate basis by Wilson’s of Rhu and Garelochhead Coaches, partly on behalf of SPT.
Ferry services -The ferry service between Gourock, Kilcreggan and Helensburgh is operated by Clyde
Marine Transport Ltd on behalf of SPT. The ferry does not operate on a consistent basis with half an
hour and an hour and a half between consecutive ferries Monday to Saturday and there are only three
ferries on a Sunday during the summer period. The last ferry to Kilcreggan from Gourock is just after
six o’clock Monday to Saturday and twenty-five past four on Sundays. If commuters are travelling
from Glasgow, they have to be on the twenty-five past five train from Glasgow Central to Gourock in
order to catch the last ferry to Kilcreggan. This is the only ferry available when leaving Glasgow after 5
o’clock at night, severely limiting options for commuters. A single ferry trip from Gourock to
Kilcreggan costs £2.35 and takes just under fifteen minutes.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
Public transport was selected as their top transport priority by over a quarter of respondents to the
community survey and as a top three priority by 62%. This was the second most important transport
issue after the availability of petrol on the peninsula. Five respondents commented on the need for
later bus services while ten comments were left regarding the need for later ferry services in the
evenings, particularly to accommodate commuters.
Community Prioritisation Event
Later bus from Helensburgh - Over half of participants who completed the relevant board at the
community day selected ‘around 11’ as the ideal time for the last bus from Helensburgh, with a further
45% selecting midnight.
Later ferry from Gourock - 41% of participants selected evening ferry service from Gourock as their
most important public transport improvement for the Peninsula West area. 65% of participants
completing the board indicated that the ferry from Gourock should continue to operate until around
9pm.
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RELEVANT POLICIES
The national transport strategy, Scotland’s Transport Future 2004, aims to:
“promote economic growth, social inclusion, health and protection of our environment through a safe,
integrated, effective and efficient transport system.”
With regards to the Peninsula West area, the Argyll and Bute Transport Strategy recognises that ‘poor
transport services on and across the Clyde river and estuary are currently a constraint on economic
development and growth in our commuter belt. As a result the area has not fully benefited from the
economic regeneration of Glasgow’.
Specific aims of the strategy that improvements to evening public transport to the Peninsula West
transport can contribute towards are:
• Make it easier to travel by public transport
• Increase the number of journeys undertaken by sustainable modes, e.g. bus, train, walk, cycle
• Expand the number of accessible and affordable transport links in our area
• Encourage Community Transport provision
POTENTIAL PROJECT
The Trust will work with the Community Council and local transport groups to make requests of the
transport providers to alter the times to better suit the local peninsula residents.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Strathclyde Passenger Transport contributes to community transport schemes as well as strategic
transport provision including community car share schemes.
When led by a community based charity, there are several other potential funders including
Trusthouse Charitable Foundation, whose priority is to tackle the affects of rural deprivation.
Community transport schemes for the elderly have previously received funding support.
Garfield Weston Foundation is another possible funder under their theme to support rural
development initiatives.
Argyll and the Isles LEADER is a possible source of funding support covering 50% of costs for
innovative projects that add to rather than replace statutory responsibilities and infrastructure.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Wilson’s of Rhu – The Trust will need to negotiate with current service providers to encourage
increased bus services to the area.
Garelochhead Coaches - The Trust will need to negotiate with current service providers to encourage
increased bus services to the area.
Strathclyde Partnership for Transport – The Trust should work with SPT who co-ordinate public
transport services and subsidies local bus and ferry services and who could encourage service
providers to change their provision to the area.
Clyde Marine Services Limited – The Trust will need to negotiate with current service providers to
encourage increased ferry services to the area.
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Rural Community Transport Initiative – If the Trust were unable to encourage existing bus service
providers to alter their services, the Trust could work with the Rural Community Transport Initiative to
develop community transport provision. This initiative provides assistance to community and
voluntary groups for community transport measures which are of particular help in the more remote
areas of Scotland, particularly where there are no scheduled bus services or where services are very
limited.
Transport
COMMUNITY PETROL STATION
AIM
The aim of this project is the development of a community owned and managed petrol station in the
Peninsula West area.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the output that could be achieved is:
• The creation of a self serving petrol station, providing local residents with convenient affordable fuel
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• More accessible fuel making it is easier for residents to travel
• More services making the Peninsula West a more attractive place to settle
• The Peninsula West area becomes a more attractive place to do business
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
Each of the three data zones in the Peninsula West area are in the 6% most deprived nationally for
geographic access to services, with one area (from Cove to Ardpeaton) the 158th most deprived data
zone in Scotland in terms of access to services. This is partially due to the high drive times to the
nearest petrol station which is calculated as just over fifteen minutes for the purposes of the SIMD.
This compares to an average of just over five minutes in Argyll and Bute and less than two minutes
across Scotland as a whole. 81% of households in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area have at
least one car, while 29% contain two or more. This is much higher than 72% of households in Argyll
and Bute as a whole with access to a car with 22% contain two or more. In addition, 43% of those from
the Kilcreggan area who are in employment travel to work by car or van, highlighting the high use of
fuel within this area (Census, 2001).
Current Provision in Area
A Google map search found that the nearest regularly open petrol station to Kilcreggan (the Esso in
Helensburgh) was located approximately 16 miles away. This would take around 30 minutes and could
cost over £4 in petrol to travel to the petrol station.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
Availability of petrol was selected as the top priority by 45% of respondents and as a top three priority
by 66% of respondents. Comments on this topic supported any measures to increase the availability
of petrol in the area.
Business Survey
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Competitively priced fuel sourcing was selected as a top priority transport issue affecting the day-today running and future development of the respondent businesses. 36% of respondents of the
business survey selected this option as their top transport priority and 64% selected it as one of their
top three transport priorities for the Peninsula West area.
Community Prioritisation Event
69% of the participants who completed the Community Petrol Station board indicated they would
only be willing to pay Helensburgh prices at a petrol station on the Peninsula, while a small proportion
(23%) suggested they would pay up to 5p more for petrol. 12 of the 13 participants who completed
additional questions on transport indicated they would use a petrol station in the Peninsula West area
as their main petrol station.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The development of a petrol station within the Peninsula West area would contribute towards the
achievement of two of the Scottish Government’s National Outcomes:
• We live in well-designed, sustainable places where we are able to access the amenities and services
we need.
• We have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own
actions and how they affect others.
The review of the Rural Petrol Stations Grant Scheme in 2004 highlighted that ‘the provision of rural
fuel supply is an important contributor to sustaining communities’. This report also suggested that
rural petrol stations bring a number of social, economic and environmental benefits to local areas
including reduced costs of travel to access fuel, greater community interaction, increased profitability
of local businesses, more attractive area to do business, potentially increase tourism and reduced
travel time and therefore carbon emissions in accessing fuel.
In addition, this project could contribute to the following objectives of the Argyll and Bute Local Plan:
• to improve economic competitiveness and the relatively poor economic performance of Argyll and
Bute as a whole
• to enhance the economic and social prospects of the geographically diverse local communities in
Argyll and Bute
• to promote appropriate responses to the variety of challenging economic, transport-related and
planning circumstances facing these local communities
The Argyll and Bute Local Transport Strategy 2007-2010 also highlighted the need to
• Encourage a growing and sustainable economy in Argyll and Bute
• Improve accessibility for all our communities
POTENTIAL PROJECT
A community owned petrol station either taken forward by the Trust or through an independent
community trading company to take forward community ownership of the new facility.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Community Preference
49% of participants at the community prioritisation event who completed the relevant board
indicated that a petrol station should be located at the site of the old surgery on Fort Road. This,
however, was closely followed by 42% of participants who selected the site next to the fire station in
Cove as their preferred location.
Current Ownership of Site
The north half of the site at the fire station in Cove (4650 square metres) is owned by Scottish Water.
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At the site of the old surgery, there are two separately owned sites, both of which are owned by the
Lomond and Argyll Primary Care National Health Service Trust.
COST OF PROJECT
£230,000
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Big Lottery Fund Growing Community Assets contributed over £400k to the Trossachs Petrol
Station buy-out with community ownership providing both social and economic outcomes. As an
innovative project, Argyll and the Isles LEADER would be a further possibility contributing up to 50%
of costs and Scottish Enterprise administer the Rural Petrol Station Grant Scheme that could
contribute a small amount to this local project.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Trossachs Area Community Transport
The Group recently completed a community buy-out of Aberfoyle garage site in February 2011. They
received funding from the Big Lottery Fund, Forth Valley & Lomond LEADER and Scottish Enterprise
under the Rural Petrol Station Grant Scheme to buy, improve and run the local garage site.
Morvern Community Development Company
In 1999 land adjacent to Lochaline Stores was purchased and developed to construct a petrol and
diesel filling station together with additional parking spaces for community use. This facility is leased
to Lochaline Stores under a lease and operating agreement. There are also bottle banks and
community notice boards on the edge of the petrol station site. MCDC has also been involved in
landscaping of the bank below the shop and improvements to the village hall car park which are both
under MCDC ownership.
Colonsay Community Development Company
As part of a commitment to developing a sustainable approach to the regeneration of the island, the
Trust run the island’s coal supply and only petrol pump.
Applecross Filling Station
Petrol station was transferred to community ownership under the Applecross Community Company in
July 2010. The stations has unmanned petrol pumps operated via card therefore is available 24 hour.
Transport
IMPROVEMENT OF PAVEMENTS
AIM
The aim of this project would be to improve the pavement and path network in the Peninsula West
area, specifically the creation of a pavement on the Mill Brae to Barbour Road section of Rosneath
Road in Kilcreggan.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the projects the output that could be achieved is:
• 175 metres of pavements provided
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• More accessible paths for all in the Peninsula West area
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• New and upgraded pavements in the area
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
The pavement on Shore Road ends just after the junction with Fort Road and there is then no footpath
on the hill up Mill Brae. As a result, this is a particularly dangerous section of the road for pedestrians.
The road connects Rosneath to Kilcreggan and the Peninsula West villages, however, the lack of
footpath prevents pedestrians walking across the Peninsula.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
Pavements and paths in the Peninsula West area were selected as a top three priority project by over
half of all respondents (55%) to the survey. Fourteen respondents left comments on the need to
improve Mill Brae and Barbour Road to ensure safe access to Rosneath from Kilcreggan on foot.
Community Prioritisation Event
‘Upgrading existing pavements’ received by far the most selections as the top pavement/path issue in
the Peninsula West area. This was followed by ‘creating additional pavements where possible’ and
‘creating a shore front footpath were possible’. Increasing pavement width and addressing
overhanging hedges were both selected as top priority issues for improving pavements. 37% of
participants that completed this board selected ‘Mill Brae – Barbour Road’ as a priority area for
new/upgraded footpaths.
RELEVANT POLICIES
Argyll and Bute Transport Strategy:
• In many of our towns and villages a lack of safe walking and cycling links reduce the opportunities to
take part in active travel.
• A start has been made on creating new links from towns and villages to schools through the
implementation of School Travel Plans and the Safer Routes to Schools initiative.
• There is a general lack of fit for purpose cycling / walking routes within local communities.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
There could be potential to add to this access project by development of paths as part of a training
and employment project to deliver wider benefits for those affected by unemployment and poor skills
attainment. This could be developed by the Trust in conjunction with Argyll and Bute Employability
Team. This model has been used to create a network of new or improved pavements and paths across
Helensburgh and Lomond previously. Further input from Argyll and Bute Access Team could support
inclusion of any new paths within the core paths plans for the area and consideration should be made
to develop routes to an adoptable standard by the local authority.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Current Ownership of Site
Council owned
COST OF PROJECT
£60,000 (Approx. 200m in length and 1.20m wide)
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
New Deal Work Programme will provide input if this is developed as an Employability Project. In
addition, with the support of the Access Team there could be further strategic paths funding available
from Argyll and Bute Council Access Team or other partners such as Paths for All or Sustrans.
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Alternatively, the Scottish Rural Development Programme could be accessed for a significant
proportion of costs where landowners (including private landowners developing projects of
community benefit) could register with Rural Payments SGRPD to secure funding contracts in line
with Argyll and Bute SRDP Rural Priorities to promote greater accessibility.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Argyll and Bute Employability Team – If the project had an employability element to it, the Trust
could work with the Employability Team. By working in partnership with this department, the Trust
would have access to a group of previously unemployed young people and their supervisors who can
help arrange and conduct improvements across the Argyll and Bute Council area.
Argyll and Bute Access Team – Some of the areas proposed for the development of paths in the
Community Plan are included in the Argyll and Bute Core Paths Plan. The Trust could therefore work
with the Access Team who are responsible for the development of core paths and could provide
support to develop and maintain these paths.
Paths for All – Paths for All is an existing project to develop paths across Scotland. The Trust could
work in partnership with this group to utilise their contacts and experience when developing paths in
the Peninsula West area.
Argyll and Bute Council Roads Department – As some of the proposed paths will be owned by the
Council, the Trust should also work with the Roads department to develop a long term maintenance
plan for any improvements.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Newburgh Community Trust
In 2006 there was the opportunity to purchase some of the town waterfront. The sea wall and the
three piers have lain neglected for half a century and through the Land Reform Act, the Trust was able
to take the opportunity to purchase these and regain part of the area’s heritage. This occurred just
after the community informally converted a former factory site into a recreational park. The group has
upgraded the riverside path as part of a much wider network of paths in the local area.
Birse Community Trust
BCT manages parish wide natural heritage, cultural heritage and footpath programmes together with
a wide range of community development projects and many related activities including the
publication of local books.
Employment & Tourism
MARINE ACCESS FACILITY
AIM
The aim of this project is the development of a new and improved marine access facility for the
Peninsula West area.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the output that could be achieved is:
• A new marine access facility suitable for non-commercial, private and visiting craft
OUTCOMES
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The associated outcome would be:
• More tourists are able to access the Peninsula West area, boosting local businesses
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
Of the 1257 economically active people resident in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area, 67%
leave the area for work or study with only 27% working in the area (Census, 2001). 71% of those that
leave the Argyll and Bute Council area for work travel over 20km to access their employment each
day. The vast majority of these will be employed in Inverclyde or Glasgow and an upgraded marine
facility and improved ferry link would greatly benefit them.
Current Provision in Area
There is a pier in the centre of Kilcreggan, from which a ferry operates to Gourock and Helensburgh.
This currently operates approximately 13 times between 7 am and 6pm every weekday with up to an
hour and a half between consecutive ferries. There are also three ferries on a Sunday during the
summer period.
The Cove Sailing Club also has small pier for member and visitor yachts to berth.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
53% of respondents indicated this was one of their top three environment priorities for the Peninsula
West area. Ten additional comments were also left by respondents highlighting the need for
improvements to the current pier to increase tourist numbers and make the Peninsula West area more
accessible to all.
Community Prioritisation Event
Of those that completed the Marine Access Facility board, 63% prioritised the creation of a new
marine access facility/community pontoon over improvements to the existing pier or the development
of an overnight berth.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The Argyll and Bute Local Plan aims ‘to promote appropriate responses to the variety of challenging
economic, transport-related and planning circumstances facing these local communities’ and ‘to
enhance the economic and social prospects of the geographically diverse local communities in Argyll
and Bute’.
In addition, the Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009 – 2013 aims to create vibrant communities with
outstanding environment that are ‘well connected economically and socially’ and ‘accessible, yet
retaining their remote character’.
The development of a new marine access facility in the Peninsula West area will also contribute
towards the aims of the Argyll and Bute Local Transport Strategy 2007-2010 to ‘encourage a growing
and sustainable economy in Argyll and Bute and ‘improve accessibility for all our communities’. This
strategy currently includes a commitment to upgrading the pier at Kilcreggan in the period 2010 to
2015, with £1.5 million allocated for both the Kilcreggan and Helensburgh piers.
This project could also contribute to the ‘Wealthier and Fairer’ and ‘Safer and Stronger’ strategic
objectives of the Scottish Government by promoting tourism, improving access to local businesses,
improving opportunities and providing a better quality of life for local residents by increasing access to
the Peninsula West area.
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POTENTIAL PROJECT
The Trust would look to construct a variety of marine access facilities to allow residents and visitors to
launch and moor boats and small craft at a new marine access point taking advantage of the site and
situation from the existing pier east to the old boat yard.
COST OF PROJECT
£200,000 (including lighting)
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Community Preference
Almost two thirds of those that completed the relevant board selected the old boat yard as the
preferred location of a new marine access facility, over any upgrade to the existing pier in Kilcreggan
or the Sailing Club.
Current Ownership of Site
Part of the site surrounding Kilcreggan pier is owned by Scottish Water, while Pier Cottage is owned
by the occupier. The remaining area surrounding the pier appears to be until recently owned by
McKellar’s Slipway Limited when all or some of the site was disposed to Donald Robert McIndewar
Bruce. This potentially includes the site of the old boat yard.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
The Scottish Government’s Scottish Rural Development Programme is a potential funder for this
project to revitalise social and economic wellbeing of the area.
As the development is on the Crown Estate (seabed), the project could secure funding through Marine
Communities Fund if the project is not seen to replace statutory responsibility.
There is existing commitment from Argyll and Bute Council to invest in the existing pier and dialogue
is needed to identify further match needed.
As a historic structure (B-listed Victorian pier), there is funding potential to enhance the pier as long as
this does not detract from the historical significance of the pier. Heritage Lottery Fund
(www.hlf.org.uk) could be a source of funding support where community are involved in participating
and learning about the historical significance of the pier. The Architectural Heritage Fund
(www.ahfund.org.uk) can fund both feasibility studies and offer grants and affordable loans for
relevant projects linked to the pier.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Argyll and Bute Council Roads and Amenity Services – The Trust should work with the relevant
Argyll and Bute Council department to ensure that any development fits with the council’s priorities.
Within the Local Plan, the Council set out an intention to conduct improvements to Kilcreggan Pier.
The Trust should negotiate with the Council to determine their plans and whether the Council would
fund the group to undertake them on their behalf.
McKellar’s Slipway Limited – McKellar’s Slipway Limited are the current owners of Kilcreggan Pier
and the Trust should work in partnership with them to develop a new pier suitable to meet the local
community’s demand as well as suitable for existing commercial purposes.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Newburgh Community Trust
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The trust purchased the sea wall and three of the former industrial piers and is applying for grants in
order to repair and upgrade these to allow commercial and recreational boats to visit.
Eilean Eisdeal
The trust purchased the harbour and some adjoining land and then refurbished the harbour, improved
facilities and organised moorings for islanders and visitors.
Eday Partnership
The Trust has built a new slipway which will be complemented by the installation of 4 mooring buoys,
a new shed and a marshalling yard which are currently under construction at the pier.
Employment & Tourism
COMMUNITY FESTIVALS
AIM
The aim of this project is the development of festivals organised by the local community to attract
tourist to the Peninsula West area.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the outputs that could be achieved are:
• The creation of four annual festivals
• A rise in footfall through the villages
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• Increased tourism to the Peninsula West area
• Promotion of businesses and individuals from the Peninsula West area
• Increased community interaction in the area
NEED FOR PROJECT
Current Provision in Area
Various local community groups hold events in the Cove Burgh Hall such as film nights, theatre shows
and music concerts. However, these are held for the local community and not advertised to attract
tourists to the area. Within the wider Helensburgh and Lomond area there are some festivals held to
attract tourism including the Lomond Folk Festival, Helensburgh and Lomond Real Ale Festival,
Clanscape and Loch Lomond Shores Farmers Market.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
18% of respondents selected organised community events to promote tourism as their top
employment priority for the Peninsula West area and 55% selected as one of their top three
employment priorities.
Community Prioritisation Event
In total, 222 selections for potential events were made, suggesting strong support for hosting festivals
in the local area in order to attract tourism. The event that the largest proportion (20%) of those that
completed the board would like to see in the local area was a music festival. This was closely followed
by an arts/crafts exhibition, Regatta festival and Celtic festival.
RELEVANT POLICIES
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Scottish Tourism: The Next Decade outlines the predicted change in tourism in Scotland over the next
ten years including that ‘the vast majority of visitors will live within a 3-hour travelling distance of their
final destination in Scotland. Visitors will want self-discovery and chances to try new things and will be
ever better travelled and more sophisticated, with an interest in culture and the arts, high and low
brow. They will be looking for rich opportunities to experience authentic Scotland and will be turned
off by any hint of a tourist trap’. This plan aims to increase tourism in Scotland by 50% by 2015 (from
2005 rates).
Festivals to promote tourism in the Peninsula West area will also contribute to one of the aims of the
Argyll and Bute Corporate Plan to improve the economy of the local authority area by ‘developing
Argyll and Bute as a quality destination, creating higher quality jobs and extending the tourism
season’.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
The Trust will assist in the co-ordination of a series of annual and bi-annual events which will be aimed
at both residents and visitors alike. Some of these will build on previous successes such as the Regatta
Week, while others will promote themes such as music, culture and architectural and natural history.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
The events would be located throughout settlements and sites in the various villages throughout the
peninsula.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
EventScotland’s National Funding Programme aims to develop domestic tourism across Scotland
and can provide some funding towards marketing costs to increase the reach of the event. The
National Events Programme can provide funding of between £4,000 and £25,000 for up to 25% of the
costs of events which:
• generate economic benefits for specific regions of Scotland
• attract visitors to specific regions of Scotland from other parts of the country and beyond
• enhance the profile and appeal of the host region
• inspire and involve local communities
• have measurable outcomes
Creative Scotland (www.creativescotland.com) is the national arts body and arts lottery funding
provider, promoting investment across all sectors of arts in Scotland and providing investment for
national and regional organisations both for specific arts mediums and for flexible funded projects.
Funding for 2011/12 is fully committed, however, there are possible funding options going forward for
2012 together with advice and other resources.
Esmee Fairbairn Foundation (www.esmeefairbairn.org) provides funding for general charitable
causes but has a long standing priority to develop the arts with particular emphasis on projects of
national significance.
The Robertson Trust (www.therobertsontrust.org.uk) provides funding for Scottish based charities
and community projects with a thematic priority towards community arts where arts projects address
wider social needs such as health and education.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Event Scotland/Visit Scotland – The Trust could work in partnership with Event Scotland and Visit
Scotland to develop a project to increase tourism through community events. This would ensure
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tourism projects in the area tied into events in wider Scotland as well as increasing the scale and
potential audience for the event.
PROJECT EXMAPLES
Prestoungrange Arts Festival
The Prestoungrange Arts Festival (PAFS) started 10 years ago, first as an initiative to record the
history of Prestonpans, then as a means of using various heritage and arts projects to regenerate the
area and enrich the community. Its founder was Dr Gordon Prestoungrange, the Baron of
Prestoungrange, but PAFS is now managed by a group of directors drawn from the community. A
programme of mural painting on walls throughout Prestonpans was started in 2001, inspired by
Chemainus in Canada where murals have made the town a tourist destination and regenerated the
economy following the closure of its main industry. This was the start of a Global Mural Arts
Association with members across the world. Prestonpans was the first European member and hosted
the Murals Conference in 2006.
Balerno Village Trust
The group started a successful monthly farmers market (established in 2005) and an annual music
festival in partnership with the local church and folk club (started in 2008).
Ballater (RD) LTD
The group organises a walking festival which raises approximately £20,000 for the local economy and
maintains two websites supporting and promoting the local area.
Strathmore & The Glens Rural Partnership
The group is currently involved in organising and promoting a number of initiatives such as the
Blairgowrie & East Perthshire Walking Festival, Blairgowrie Community Markets, Better Place to Live
Fairs, Stride for Life Walks, Strathmore Centre for Youth Dialogue, Art Festival and a website which
includes maintenance of on-line business and voluntary organisation directories.
Employment and Tourism
NURSERY & AFTER SCHOOL CARE
AIM
The aim of this project is the creation of an after school care and nursery service within the Peninsula
West area.
OUTPUTS
By the end of this project, the outputs that could be achieved are:
• The provision of nursery places for children aged 6 months to school age and the provision of a
number of after school club places
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• More opportunities for parents to access employment through the provision of affordable, local
childcare
• More facilities in the Peninsula West area to attract families with young children to settle in the area
NEED FOR PROJECT
Statistical Evidence of Need
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While there is a lower proportion of under 16 year olds in the Peninsula West area than in both Argyll
and Bute and Scotland, 29.7% of all households in the Peninsula West area contain dependent
children. This is slightly higher than the 26.8% and 28.2% rate of household with dependent children
in Argyll and Bute and Scotland respectively.
Of the 1257 economically active people resident in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area, 67%
leave the area for work or study, 6% do not work or study and only 27% work in the area (Census,
2001). 56% of the 581 parents in the Rosneath, Clynder and Kilcreggan area are part of a couple with
dependent children and both working (Census, 2001). This affects the need for an after school
care/nursery service as there are high levels of working parents and people leaving the area to access
employment.
Current Provision in Area
Kilcreggan Primary School has a Pre Five Unit which provides care for three to five year olds between
9.30am and 11.30am Monday to Friday. There is also a private nursery, Kiddlywinks Nursery, located in
Clynder for two to five year olds which operates Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 4.00pm. There are four
nurseries, two out of school care providers and two crèches located in Helensburgh but nothing nearer
to the Peninsula West area. Every Wednesday during term times there is a ‘stay and play’ toddler
group at Cove Burgh Hall for 0 to 5 year olds.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
While crèche facilities/after school care was rated as the second employment priority overall and by
Kilcreggan respondents, those from Ardpeaton, Peaton and other selected this as their top
employment priority. Crèche facilities/after school care was selected as a top employment priority by
almost a third of all respondents to the survey and 60% of respondents selected this option as one of
their top three employment priorities.
Community Prioritisation Event
Of those present at the community day that did answer the relevant question, 86% indicated that
they would use a nursery/preschool/after school care facility at least three days a week, with 38%
suggesting they would use this facility five days a week.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The Scottish Government’s Early Years Framework recognises the right of all young children to high
quality relationships, environments and services which offer a holistic approach to meeting their
needs. This holistic approach encompasses play, learning, social relationships and emotional and
physical wellbeing. The development of an after school care/nursery facility in the Peninsula West area
could contribute towards the achievement of the following aims of the framework:
• Parents are supported to access employment and training to help reduce the risk of child poverty,
including through the provision of flexible, accessible and affordable childcare
• Ensuring all children have the same outcomes and the same opportunities
• Engagement and empowerment of children, families and communities
• Helping children, families and communities to secure outcomes for themselves
An after school care/nursery facility could contribute to the Scottish Government’s National Outcome
and Argyll and Bute Single Outcome Agreement of ‘our children have the best start in life and are
ready to succeed’. The project could support the aim of the Argyll and Bute Local Plan ‘to reduce and
ameliorate the effects of peripherality – by encouraging the expansion of local facilities throughout
Argyll and Bute’.
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POTENTIAL PROJECT
The Trust could support a not for profit community nursery based in the Rainbow Centre with an after
school care project linked to this or based in the school.
Current Ownership of Site
Rainbow Centre is currently owned by Dumbarton District Council.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Big Lottery Fund Growing Community Assets (www.biglotteryfund.org.uk) may be a possible source
of funding for capital and ongoing revenue costs where the community owns and controls the project
as a social enterprise.
NHS Highland (Argyll and Bute Community Health Partnership, www.nhshighland.scot.nhs.uk) and
Argyll and Bute Council are potential sources of support and funding where there is a strategic and
social need for child care provision (as opposed to purely commercial enterprise). Liaison with
strategic partners to identify needs and potential ongoing support is crucial.
BBC Children In Need is able to cover costs for projects to improve children’s quality of life where
there is strong evidence of disadvantage. In this case perhaps rural disadvantage may be an element
to emphasise. Some capital elements may be eligible but main focus would be on staff costs.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Kilcreggan Primary Pre-five Unit – The Trust should work in partnership with the existing pre-five unit
in Kilcreggan to ensure there is no duplication of services. The Trust could also determine if and where
the Trust could further develop the existing provision to establish a more comprehensive nursery and
after school care provision in the Kilcreggan area.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Cairndow Community Childcare
Cairndow Community Childcare is a small rural centre providing childcare for residents and visitors in a
safe, stimulating and friendly environment. It is run as a community business and provides affordable
childcare including pre school education, after school care and holiday clubs as a facility for the local
area.
Happy Days Community Nursery and Safe ‘Til Six Out of School Care
The community nursery and after school care organisations operate within Maryhill Community
Central Hall and are managed by a voluntary board of directors. Happy Days Community Pre-school
Nursery has been operating since 1991 and is now registered to provide education and care for 49
children aged 0-5 with 10 members of staff employed in the nursery. The Safe ‘til Six Out of School
Care was set up in1977 by a group of local parents concerned about the number of children going
home alone and is now registered to care for 89 children aged 5-14.
Employment & Tourism
WATERSPORTS CENTRE & MARINA
AIM
The aim of this project is the development of an expanded water sports complex and sailing club in the
Peninsula West area.
OUTPUTS
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By the end of the project the output that could be achieved is:
• A new/redeveloped water sports/sailing club facility in the Peninsula West area open to residents and
visitors to the area
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• High quality water sports facilities for the local community to promote healthy living
• Additional facilities to attract tourism to the area
• Increased employment opportunities in the local area
NEED FOR PROJECT
Current Provision in Area
Cove Sailing Club currently provides marina facilities along with a variety of sailing-oriented events.
However, a membership is required in order to use the facilities at the Sailing Club, meaning this is not
open to visitors to the Peninsula West area or residents for occasional use only.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
Over two thirds of respondents to the community survey selected improvements to outdoor sports
facilities as a top three community priority, 62% selected improved business opportunities through
tourism as a top three employment priority and 61% of respondents selected tourist
facilities/attractions as a top three business priority for the Peninsula West area.
Community Prioritisation Event
30% of those that completed the relevant board selected sports facilities/water sports as the preferred
tourist attraction in the area. On a separate board, over a quarter of participants suggested the Trust
should promote water sports to attract tourists to the area. 34 participants selected a Regatta festival
as a preferred community event to promote tourism in the Peninsula West area.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The development of sports facilities in the Peninsula West area that are accessible all year round
would contribute towards the Scottish Government’s Healthier strategic objective to ‘help people to
sustain and improve their health, especially in disadvantaged communities, ensuring better, local and
faster access to health care’.
The Scottish Government Strategy for the wider impact of the Commonwealth Games, A Games
Legacy for Scotland, aims to create a network of community sports hubs across Scotland to improve
the use of, and access to, facilities for physical activity and competitive sport. Community sports hubs
can be based in local facilities such as sports centres, community centres and/or schools and will serve
as a home for local clubs and sports and provide information and advice to local people, bringing
together communities.
The Argyll and Bute Community Plan 2009-2013 also has a commitment towards creating vibrant
communities through ‘high quality public services and leisure/community facilities that attract people
to settle in Argyll and Bute’ and forward looking communities which are ‘proactive communities
where local people and organisations look for and create opportunities’. The development of sports
facilities as part of a marina development could contribute to both these aims of Argyll and Bute’s
Community Planning Partnership.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
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The Trust could work with the Sailing Club to redevelop the existing Sailing Club buildings,
incorporating additional indoor sports facilities to complement its existing outdoor sports facilities.
Membership of the Sailing Club could be expanded to both subsidise the existing and increased
functions of the Sailing Club.
Current Ownership of Site
The current proprietors of the Cove Sailing Club site are the Trustees for Cove Sailing Club.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Sports Scotland is the national sports development body which also distributes lottery funding for
strategic sports projects there could be potential funding if the water sports facility was of national
and/or regional significance and delivered wider public benefits rather than for private members only.
Affiliation with National Water Sports Councils including Scottish Sailing Institute would be required
to ensure strategic support for the initiative.
Big Lottery Fund Growing Community Assets could be a possibility if there are wider social goals
incorporated into the project
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Cove Sailing Club – The current owners of the Sailing Club who would have an interest in any
development which improves sailing provision. The Trust should work in partnership with this group
to build on their current provision and plans for water sports provision.
Physical Environment
IMPROVEMENT OF FORESHORE
AIM
The aim of this project is the improvement of appearance and access to the foreshore across the
Peninsula West area for the benefit of local residents and tourists.
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the outputs that could be achieved are:
• Creation of walkway along the shore side of Shore Road
• Creation of five beach access points
• Elimination of knotweed along the foreshore to allow improved access
• The provision of sculptures, litter bins, benches and signage along the foreshore
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• Improved appearance of Peninsula West area
• More attractive tourist destination
• More accessible paths for all in the Peninsula West area
• Upgraded pavements in the area
• Increased use of the area’s natural resources for the benefit of the local community
NEED FOR PROJECT
Current Provision in Area
Many parts of the foreshore are currently inaccessible due to a lack of access points and high levels of
knotweed. There is no footpath on the shore side of Shore Road for the majority of the Peninsula
West.
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COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
73% of respondents selected improvements of foreshore as one of their top three environment
priorities. Pavements and paths in the Peninsula West area were selected as a top three priority
project by over half of all respondents (55%) to the survey. Improvements to the foreshore was
selected as a top three environment priority by 73% of respondents to the community survey. Nine
respondents also left comments specifically calling for a path to be created along the shore front.
The appearance of the village generally was selected as the second priority overall, as a top priority by
30% of respondents and as one of their top three priorities by 70% respondents.
Community Prioritisation Event
A path along the shore was selected by 41% of those that completed the relevant board as the most
desired improvement to the foreshore. This reflects the location in which most participants indicated
they would like to see new paths and pavements developed. 30% of participants also indicated that
litter bins should be provided in order to improve the appearance of the area. Better access to the
foreshore was selected by 16% of participants that completed this question. ‘Upgrading existing
pavements’ received by far the most selections as the top pavement/path issue in the Peninsula West
area. This was followed by ‘creating additional pavements where possible’ and ‘creating a shore front
footpath where possible’. Increasing pavement width and addressing overhanging hedges were both
selected as top priority issues for improving pavements. 47% of those that completed the board
wished a new footpath on Shore Road.
Community sculptures and benches were selected as the fourth and fifth prioritised improvements to
the Peninsula West area. 30% of participants that completed the board selected litter bins and litter
pickings as an environmental issue to be addressed by the Trust.
RELEVANT POLICIES
Improvements to the foreshore in the Peninsula West area could contribute to the achievement of one
of the Scottish Government’s National Outcomes: ‘we value and enjoy our built and natural
environment and protect it and enhance it for future generations’.
This project could contribute to the following outcomes of the Argyll and Bute Local Plan:
• to treat the rich natural and historic environment of Argyll and Bute as a not fully realised economic
asset which, if safeguarded and enhanced, can stimulate further investment and increased economic
activity
• to safeguard the diverse and high quality natural and built heritage resources, including the
abundant landward and maritime biodiversity of Argyll and Bute
The Invasive Non-Native Species Framework Strategy for Great Britain 2008 is a joint approach
between the British, Scottish and Welsh Assembly Governments and it outlines actions to address the
problems caused by invasive non-native species. This highlights that ‘invasive non-native species of
flora and fauna are considered the second biggest threat after habitat loss and destruction to
biodiversity worldwide and the greatest threat to fragile ecosystems such as islands’. In order to
achieve this, the strategy outlines commitments to embracing individual initiatives, encouraging
effective partnerships and looking for further ways to support individuals in tackling the problems
caused by invasive non-native species.
The Argyll and Bute Transport Strategy highlights the key issues surrounding the provision of paths in
the local authority area that a project to create a path along the front can help tackle:
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• A lack of safe walking and cycling links in many of our towns and villages reduces the opportunities
to take part in active travel.
• There is a general lack of fit for purpose cycling and walking routes within local communities.
POTENTIAL PROJECT
The Trust and associated interest groups will take forward a series of linked projects combined to
enhance the foreshore through improved access, additional signage and litter bins, the introduction of
a series of information points and the introduction of a footpath along an extended section of the
foreshore. In addition to these items, the Trust’s Environmental Group and others will continue the
regular treatment for the reduction and long term removal of the knotweed issue. The Trust will also
consider the creation of a series of focal points such as a band stand, open air venue and play area
which will appeal to residents and visitors alike.
COST OF PROJECT
£70,000 (information points, signage, benches, litter bins)
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Current Ownership of Site
The majority of foreshore in the UK, defined as the area between mean high water and mean low
water (spring tides in Scotland), is owned by Crown Estates. However, in 1973 the Cove and Kilcreggan
Trust took over most of the foreshore area within Cove and Kilcreggan to ensure that the
management and control of the foreshore was maintained by local people. Over the years the Trust
has, so far as within the limits of its resources, endeavoured to maintain the main areas of the
foreshore to which the public have access.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Creative Scotland (formerly Scottish Arts Council) has recently launched its new investment
programme with 15 new strands of investments for arts and culture, lead by not for profit
organisations and individuals. The most relevant strands are for arts events and festivals (e.g.
sculpture art festival) and capital programme £10k - £100k on basis of one of the priorities being to
promote investment in places and engaging artists (e.g. public arts sculpture trail).
Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) under their ‘thriving rural communities priorities’
package to improve community facilities, improve access routes and facilities, and improve recreation
facilities in your local area. This can link with local authority core paths plans in conjunction with A&B
Access Forum.
Paths for All is able to support local health walking initiatives with funding to help get projects
started. For community based work Paths for All have small grants (up to £2,000) and large grants (up
to £40,000) available and development staff can offer advice on funding as well as advice on setting up
local health walk groups, volunteer action teams and technical advice on paths specifications.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Cove and Kilcreggan Trust – The Trust owns the majority of the foreshore and is committed to
maintaining it for the local community. The Trust should therefore work in partnership with this group
to build on their work maintaining the foreshore and utilise their expertise and resources in this area.
Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) – SEPA are specialist in the removal non-native
invasive species and in the past have been involved in implementing community projects to target
this.
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PROJECT EXAMPLES
Newburgh Community Trust
In 2006, there was the opportunity to purchase some of the town waterfront. The sea wall and the
three piers have lain neglected for half a century and through the Land Reform Act, the Trust was able
to take the opportunity to purchase these and regain part of the area’s heritage. The group has
upgraded the riverside path as part of a much wider network of paths in the local area.
Dumfries and Galloway Riparian Non-Native Species Project
This project involved a partnership between SEPA, Nith District Salmon Fishery Board (DSFB), Annan
DSFB, Solway Heritage, Galloway Fisheries Trust and the Criminal Justice Service. The aim of the
project was to tackle the spread of Japanese Knotweed, Himalayan Balsam and Giant Hogweed on a
river catchment scale across the Rivers Nith and Annan to reduce their extent on the local
environment. Control work is being undertaken over 5 years by the District Salmon Fishery Boards, as
well as an education leaflet with reporting strip, website and public awareness raising for unknown
and emerging invasive species.
Ayrshire Rivers Trust (ART)
Since 2008 ART have been undertaking a control programme of Giant Hogweed on rivers and burns
throughout Ayrshire. Himalayan Balsam and Japanese Knotweed within the Doon catchment was
then targeted which was possible due to funding received from SEPA’s restoration fund and the Doon
Salmon Fishery Board. ART also trained volunteers from angling clubs in the safe use of pesticides and
during the season; these volunteers have actively been targeting their local waters with good results.
Physical Environment
COMMUNITY WOODLAND
AIM
The aim of this project is the creation of community woodland space for local residents of all ages to
enjoy in the Peninsula West area
OUTPUTS
By the end of the project the output that could be achieved is:
• Woodland located and transferred to community ownership for use by the local community
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• More facilities for local people to use
• A healthier community, with people spending more time outdoors
NEED FOR PROJECT
Current provision in Area
There is no community woodland on the western side of the peninsula, the only similar facility being
situated at Clachan Glen in Rosneath.
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Community Survey
30% of respondents selected the appearance of the villages as their top environment priority for the
Peninsula West area with 70% selecting it as one of their top three priorities. 60% of respondents also
indicated that community gardens and woodlands were one of their top three environment priorities.
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Community Prioritisation Event
Almost a fifth of participants at the community day who completed the relevant board selected
community woodland as the most important improvement to the villages in the Peninsula West area.
This option was selected more than any other option except play areas. Comments suggested that
projects should aim to promote biodiversity, protect the nature conservation area at Fort Road and
combine community woodland and play area.
RELEVANT POLICIES
Community woodland would contribute to the achievement of one of the Scottish Government’s
national outcomes: ‘we value and enjoy our built and natural environment and protect it and enhance
it for future generations’.
The development of a community woodland would contribute to the following outcomes of the Argyll
and Bute Local Plan:
• to treat the rich natural and historic environment of Argyll and Bute as a not fully realised economic
asset which, if safeguarded and enhanced, can stimulate further investment and increased economic
activity
• to safeguard the diverse and high quality natural and built heritage resources, including the
abundant landward and maritime biodiversity of Argyll and Bute
The project could also contribute to the following objectives of the Argyll and Bute Community Plan
2009-2013:
• high quality environment that is valued, recognised and protected
• an area that is accessible, yet retains its remote character
• proactive communities where local people and organisations look for and create opportunities
The Argyll and Bute Woodlands and Forestry Strategy aims to promote the woodland and forests of
Argyll and Bute as they:
“ make a significant contribution to climate change mitigation, have significant levels of economic value
retained locally, enhance biodiversity and environmental quality and support the further development of
recreation opportunities for the benefit and well-being local people and visitors alike.”
POTENTIAL PROJECT
Developing a community woodland at Fort Road woodland which will include new paths, enhanced
biodiversity, natural play areas and will be developed using a programme of conservation events and
activities. Access and Lease agreements need to be in place with owners of the site to secure funding
and consideration needs to be made with regard to public liability and ongoing management and
maintenance of the woodland and any developments.
POTENTIAL LOCATION
Community Preference
Fort Road woodland was identified as the preferred woodland area for this project.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
Forestry Commission operate a Challenge Fund to promote social value and community use of
woodland and Kilcreggan and Cove would be eligible to apply for the Forestry For People strand of
funding (areas of existing woodland with community access over 1ha in size). This can cover both
capital and revenue costs for community activities including structured volunteering, training and
conservation events to develop and use community woodlands.
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Scottish Rural Development Programme now include Scottish Natural Heritage grants under their
umbrella and there could be potential to secure funding under landscape, biodiversity, access and
community strands.
Heritage Lottery Fund (Your Heritage up to £50,000) could contribute to such projects celebrating
both natural and social heritage aspects although there has to be strong community involvement in
learning about and participating in development of a community woodland.
POTENTIAL PARTNERS
Perth and Argyll Conservancy – Perth and Argyll Conservancy provide local services for the Forestry
Commission. The Trust could work with this group to develop a plan to increase woodland in the
Peninsula West area.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Strathfillan Community Development Trust
The Trust manage 95 hectares of community woodland (of which they own 10 hectares) in the villages
of Crianlarich and Tyndrum in the Forth Valley.
Birse Community Trust
The Trust holds ancient shared rights over the Forest of Birse Commonty (c.3750 ha) and the native
pinewoods there (c.550 ha) and manages land and buildings at a dozen sites spread across the parish,
including five local woodlands with a total area of approximately 1,000 hectares.
Physical Environment
WIND FARM
AIM
The aim of this project is the creation of a wind farm development in the Peninsula West area to raise
income for investment in community projects led by RPWCDT.
OUTPUTS
By the end of this project the outputs that could be achieved are:
• The erection of wind turbines
• The generation of electricity for use locally and for sale to the grid
• Profit raised to be reinvested in community projects
OUTCOMES
The associated outcomes would be:
• Income generation to fund projects for the benefit of the local community
• Contribute to the reduction in carbon emissions to combat climate change
• Create job opportunities in the Peninsula West area
COMMUNITY DEMAND FOR PROJECT
Windfarm Survey
92% (435 individuals) of those surveyed indicated that the Trust should progress a wind farm project,
meaning at least 34% of the total population (1268 individuals) of the Peninsula West area support this
development.
Community Survey
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There were no questions directly relating to renewable energy in the community survey. However,
nine respondents commented on the benefits that renewable energy could bring to the Peninsula
West area including keeping fuel costs low and improving the appearance of the area.
RELEVANT POLICIES
The relevant Scottish Government targets which a renewable energy development in the Peninsula
West area could contribute towards are:
• Reducing carbon emissions by 80% by 2050
• Supporting the EU target of 20% of Europe’s energy requirements being met from renewable
resources by 2020
• 50% of Scottish demand for electricity should be met from renewable sources by 2020
In order to achieve these targets the Scottish Government outlines the following action related to the
wind farm development by the RPWCDT:
‘We will actively promote community led energy generation and energy saving projects. Such approaches
can stimulate communities to take their activism into wider areas and promote community regeneration.’
A wind farm development can contribute to the achievement of the vision of the Argyll and Bute
Renewable Energy Action Plan 2010-2013: ‘Argyll and Bute will be at the heart of renewable energy
development in Scotland by taking full advantage of its unique and significant mix of indigenous
renewable resources and maximising the opportunities for sustainable economic growth for the
benefit of its communities and Scotland.’ Specifically, this project will contribute to the following
priorities of the Argyll and Bute Renewable Energy Action Plan:
• Secure related benefits for the communities of Argyll and Bute, including the more peripheral,
remote and economically fragile communities
• Support locally owned community based renewable projects
• Develop the industry in a manner that promotes long term sustainability and recognises the need for
co-existence with our communities, other economic activities and our outstanding environment
• Protect our unique environment whilst at the same time securing economic benefit for our
communities.
In addition, the development of renewable energy in the Peninsula West area will contribute towards
the Scottish Government and Argyll and Bute Council outcomes of:
• We realise our full economic potential with more and better employment opportunities for our
people
• We have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own
actions and how they affect others
• We value and enjoy out built and natural environment and protect it and enhance it for future
generations
• We reduce the local and global environmental impact of our consumption and production
POTENTIAL PROJECT
A preferred site has been identified north of Cove which has adequate height to maximise wind
capture. The desk top research phase of the project identified initial viability which needs to be
investigated over 12 month period and this feasibility study is ongoing. The Trust is confident of
positive outcomes to take this project forward.
POTENTIAL FUNDERS
CARES Community Energy Scotland Loan Scheme Community Energy Scotland
(www.communityenergyscotland.org.uk) provides funding and technical support to those
communities who are developing income-generating projects such as community wind farms.
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Big Lottery Fund Growing Community Assets (www.biglotteryfund.org.uk) may contribute to
development of sustainable energy projects that bring real and lasting legacies to their local
communities.
Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP, www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Rural/SRDP) brings
together a number of funding schemes, some of which are part-funded by Europe. The most likely
sources of funding in the SRDP for renewable energy projects in community facilities are Rural
Priorities and LEADER.
Scottish Power Green Energy Trust (www.scottishpowergreentrust.co.uk) supports community
projects that provide renewable energy which deliver wider social benefits up to £25,000.
Various ethical loans funds may be appropriate to secure affordable loans for this type of social
enterprise including Social Investment Scotland Loan Fund and Triodos Bank.
Forestry Commission (www.forestry.gov.uk) has a commitment to promote wider community access
and benefits from FC-owned estate and this includes support for renewable energy enterprises. There
could be potential funding or in kind support from FC for the Trusts project.
PROJECT EXAMPLES
Fintry Development Trust
Fintry Development Trust was set up in response to a large wind farm development planned for the
area. Through negotiation, the community managed to come to an arrangement with the windfarm
developers whereby the developers would pay the full initial cost of the Fintry Turbine and the village
would pay this back over the first 15 years of operation. This meant that the village wouldn’t have to
raise any money to pay for the turbine. During the first years (while the cost of the turbine is being
paid off) the income from the turbine to the village will be between £50,000 and £100,000 per year.
Once the turbine has been paid off, this will rise to nearer £400,000 to £500,000 per year (depending
on electricity prices).
Stronsay Development Trust
The Trust is building a 900Kw community wind turbine on the island to allow the community to
maximize the benefit from renewable technology by not-for-profit generation of a sizeable
independent income stream through the sale of electricity to the local grid. The independent income
stream from this project will create a fund which will allow the community to become more
sustainable and independent and will generate financial, social and environmental benefits.
Rousay, Egilsay and Wyre Development Trust
The Trust is working towards the installation of a community-owned and managed wind turbine,
which will generate electricity which can be sold to the National Grid to provide revenue to invest in
further community projects.
Isle of Gigha Heritage Trust
The Trust operate a community owned wind project to provide a sustainable source of income for the
island to secure the long term sustainability of the community. Since the turbines were installed in
2003, they have proven to be the mainstay of income generation for the Isle of Gigha Heritage Trust.
The three turbines produce a total of 675 kW maximum capacity and this power is exported directly to
the national grid. They fully paid for themselves of loans, grants and share issues since March 2009,
and therefore any monies generated by the turbines can be passed straight on to the Trust.
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9.0 ADDITIONAL PROJECTS
In the previous chapter, the project profiles in the main focused on the large physical projects or the
provision of services. In addition to these, however, a number of other smaller project suggestions
emerged from the consultation and prioritisation processes which are certainly worthy of further
highlighting. These projects should be taken forward by either existing community/voluntary groups
or public sector agencies, any of which the Trust could help and support without taking on the long
term responsibility.
9.1
VOLUNTEERING PROGRAMME FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
Community Demand for Project
Twenty-two participants at the community prioritisation event indicated they thought it would be
beneficial to set up a volunteering programme for young people. This would involve young people
earning rewards (such as trips to the cinema) if they volunteered a certain number of hours on tasks
such as befriending or picking up litter. One participant also left an additional comment that ‘young
people should be part of keeping the community in good condition in order for them to have pride in
their area’.
Potential Project
The Trust could either link into an existing time bank project such as the one run by Argyll Voluntary
Action or set up a local one specifically tailored to the needs of the area and the participating young
people. This would involve coordinating tasks for young people to complete in the local area such as
cutting grass or visiting elderly residents and recording the time volunteered by each young person.
Rewards would then be arranged appropriate to the number of hours to encourage young people to
volunteer to a certain level.
Case Study
An example of the type of project the Trust could set up is the Dream Scheme network which offers
advice to groups wishing to set up a youth volunteer project (www.dreamscheme.org.uk).
9.2
APPRENTICESHIPS IN LOCAL BUSINESSES
Community Demand for Project
Support services for young people was voted as the second health and welfare priority overall by
respondents from Cove and Kilcreggan, while those from Ardpeaton and Peaton rated it as their top
priority. Support service for young people was selected as the top priority by 30% of all respondents
and a top three priority by almost 60% of respondents from all areas. In addition, five respondents
commented specifically on the need to support young people to find employment in tandem with
raising wider job opportunities within the Peninsula area.
82% of the young people surveyed selected careers/job advice as either ‘extremely important’ or
‘important’.
24% of participants who completed the relevant question at the community prioritisation event
selected ‘the provision of job opportunities for young people’ as the type of support that should be
provided to young people in the Peninsula West area. 38% of participants considered that the Trust
should encourage apprenticeships for young people with local businesses while 31% felt the Trust
should incorporate employment opportunities into community projects.
Potential Project
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The Trust could work alongside local businesses to encourage them to offer apprenticeships to local
young people. This could involve the Trust promoting schemes which support businesses to employ
young unemployed people and assisting local businesses to access funding and support to progress
such schemes.
9.3
CINEMA/FILM NIGHTS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
Community Demand for Project
Over 50% of young people that completed the young people’s survey indicated that they thought a
cinema was extremely important for the area. In addition, just under half of the young people selected
‘cinema’ as one of their top three priorities for the area receiving more priority selections than any
other option. Two respondents to the community consultation specifically suggested a cinema for the
Peninsula West area.
Potential Project
The Cove and Kilcreggan Film Society currently run film nights in the Cove Burgh Hall and similar
events could be aimed directly at young people with appropriate films, purchasing licences to show
the latest films on the large screen at the Cove Burgh Hall. Regional Screen Scotland
(www.cinemaconsultant.co.uk) provides information and support to community groups looking to
develop cinema facilities in rural areas. Alternatively, the Trust could also arrange trips to a local
cinema for young people in the evenings when they are unable to travel by themselves.
9.4
GARDENING CLUB
Community Demand for Project
A gardening club was the fifth most frequently suggested community group in the community survey.
Gardening services for the elderly was selected by 40 respondents to the community survey as their
top priority health and welfare issue for the Peninsula West area.
18% of the total suggestions for additional community groups in the Peninsula West area were for a
gardening club (23 participants). There does not appear to be a gardening club in the Peninsula West
area at present. A gardening club could also tie in with improving the appearance of the local area and
providing support to the elderly, which were also raised as concerns in the consultation. Further
project suggestions by participants included ‘community register to match people who want to grow
vegetables but don’t have land with people who have land but can’t or don’t have time to grow fruit
and vegetables’ and ‘community garden plots’. 14 participants also selected allotments as a desired
improvement to the Peninsula West area.
Potential Projects
The Trust could develop a gardening club through contacting individuals who expressed an interest
during the consultation process or advertising for people interested in setting up a group. The Trust
could then work with this group to access funding for projects such as assisting elderly residents with
gardening and providing horticultural services to communal areas in the village.
9.5
LITTER PICK-UPS
Community Demand for Project
Improvement of the foreshore and elimination of knotweed was selected as the top priority overall by
respondents to the community survey. Almost a third of all respondents selected improvement of the
foreshore and elimination of knotweed as their top environment project and 73% selected this option
as one of their top three priorities. Fifteen respondents commented on the need to improve the
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foreshore by preventing the dumping of waste and three respondents suggested the set-up of a
beachcombers group.
30% of participants at the community prioritisation event selected ‘litter bins/litter picking’ as the
environment issue that the Trust should focus on. Four participants indicated a willingness to
volunteer for occasional beach clean-ups.
Potential Project
The Trust could organise regular community clean-ups of the foreshore area. This could be led by a
beachcombers group if interest in this was maintained. The clean-up could take place over a day and
involve dividing the foreshore and allocating sections to groups of volunteers. An element of
competition could be introduced to encourage people to participate and to maximise the area
covered. At the end of the day a community event such as a BBQ could be held to reward all those
who had taken part and further encourage community interaction.
9.6
HERITAGE/ARCHITECTURE TRAIL
Community Demand for Project
A heritage/architecture trail was selected as a top three employment priority by 40% of respondents
to the survey. In addition, tourist facilities/attractions was selected as a top three business priority by
61% of respondents. Nine respondents suggested that the Peninsula West area would be good for
tourism while four respondents also commented that there was an ideal opportunity to utilise the
history and heritage to improve tourism business opportunities in the area. Another respondent
commented that the current peninsula paths in the area do a good job as a heritage/architecture trail.
22% of participants at the community prioritisation event selected information points as the preferred
tourist attraction for the area. One participant also commented that an audio tour of the Peninsula,
linked with information points, would be a good initiative to attract tourism. 24% of participants
suggested the views in the Peninsula West area should be promoted to tourists using information
points to highlight the sights from certain key areas.
Potential Project
The Trust could develop a heritage/architecture trail in the area and provide promotional material to
attract tourists to the area. This would involve consulting with local people to ascertain the areas and
buildings to be included on the trail, gathering historical information for inclusion on interpretive
boards throughout the trail and producing leaflets or audio recordings to guide visitors along the trail.
The Trust would need to gain permission from land and property owners to include their site in the
trail and to allow a trail to travel through land as this may increase the footfall through the land,
causing additional damage.
9.7
COMMUNITY NOTICE BOARD AND LOCKABLE STORAGE FOR COMMUNITY GROUPS
Community Demand for Project
24% of the community groups that responded to the survey selected a community notice board as the
facility that would most benefit their group. This was the top facility for community groups. 20% of
community groups that responded to the survey selected ‘lockable storage’ as a facility that their
group would most benefit from. This was the second most often selected facility. In addition, a
number of potential community groups suggested by respondents to the household survey already
exist in the Peninsula West area. This suggests that, for some groups and residents at least, there is a
lack of effective communication of the opportunities and groups available.
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Potential Project
The Trust could access funding from Awards for All or Scottish Community Foundation to invest in a
community notice board and lockable storage. These would benefit local community groups by
allowing greater advertising opportunities for them and providing additional facilities which will allow
groups to purchase equipment to diversify their activities. A community notice board could be placed
in a prominent location within either Kilcreggan or Cove village and provide advertising space to local
community groups free of charge or for a small fee to cover costs. Lockable storage could be provided
within an area of the Cove Burgh Hall as the most often used facility by local community groups.
9.8
SUPPORT SERVICES FOR LOCAL COMMUNITY GROUPS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES
Community Demand for Project
‘Identifying potential funding sources’ was selected as the top support service for community groups
by 48% of the community groups that responded to the survey. Due to the apparent lack of
knowledge of community groups in the area by many residents, support provided by the Trust could
also involve advertising existing groups to ensure that residents were aware of what was available and
how to access it.
Businesses desired information on where and how to access funding to develop the business further
and advice on the best means to ensure the sustainability of the business. ‘Information on potential
grant funding sources for development initiatives’ was selected as the top priority most often (by 45%
of respondents with 64% selected it as a top three priority). This was followed by ‘sustainability advice
e.g. energy conservation, recycling, etc.’ which was selected as a top three priority by 64% of
respondent businesses. ‘Access to shared small business services’ and ‘new local business networks
e.g. a co-operative or purchasing partnership’ were both selected as a top three business support
service by 45% of respondents. One business respondent also suggested the provision of ‘a printed
business directory of local businesses available at outlets free or low cost – also put an online version
in an extended business section of rosneathpeninsula.org’.
Potential Project
The Trust could link with Argyll Voluntary Action and/or Business Gateway to arrange for support from
these organisations to be provided in the Peninsula West area.
9.9
PARKING IN VILLAGE
Community Demand for Project
Village centre parking was selected as the top priority transport issue for 27% of respondents to the
business survey and as a top three transport priority for 64% of respondent businesses. Village parking
was also selected as a top three transport priority by 106 respondents to the household survey and
two respondents commented on the need for additional off-road parking in the villages, particularly at
the ferry terminal.
Potential Project
The Trust could look to develop the land surrounding the pier as additional parking for people using
the ferry or the local shops in Kilcreggan.
10.0 COMMUNITY CAMPUS
SUMMARY
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Four potential ‘campuses’ are outlined in this section. These are intended to provide an example of
how the different projects outlined in this Community Action Plan could come together to revitalise
the Peninsula West area. The four areas include:
 Community campus - located at the old tennis courts on Church Road and encompassing outdoor
sports facilities including tennis courts and an all-weather 5-a-side pitch, a children’s play area
and an indoor centre to be used as a sports centre with a dedicated youth space for the area. This
would ensure recreational provision for all residents in the area and, through the provision of
multiple facilities in the one location, encourage increased interaction between different age and
interest groups on the Peninsula.
 Tourism campus - located at the site of the current Kilcreggan Pier, including a play area,
bandstand, community sculptures, and information points. This would help boost the local
economy by providing additional facilities and activities to attract tourists to the area.
 Business campus - located at the end of Fort Road, a business campus could include small offices,
communal function/meeting rooms or ‘hot desk’ facilities, providing much needed physical space
to local entrepreneurs. This would encourage businesses from wider areas to create their base on
the peninsula and provide facilities to enable new business start-ups, increasing local
employment opportunities and boosting the economy of the local area.
 Foreshore campus - develop the entire foreshore area including the removal of knotweed, litter
bins, benches, viewing points and community sculptures and artwork. This would benefit both
local residents and visitors to the area by providing additional recreation facilities and improving
the appearance of the local area.
By locating similar projects together, the Trust could distinguish certain areas in the Peninsula West
for specific purposes, ensuring the potential of each area is maximised.
10.1 COMMUNITY CAMPUS
The Trust could work towards creating a community campus which would contain a range of facilities
for use by the community for recreational purposes. The aim would be to create an area which is
inclusive of a wide range of interest and age groups in the Peninsula West area. This could therefore
include outdoor sports facilities including tennis courts and an all-weather 5-a-side pitch; a children’s
play area; and an indoor centre to be used as a sports centre with a dedicated youth space for the
area.
The ideal site for the location of a community campus would be the area currently occupied by the old
tennis courts/pavilion with either complete or partial redevelopment to reinvent this area as the Cove
and Kilcreggan Community Campus for all in the area to enjoy. As the Cove and Kilcreggan Bowling
Club is adjacent to the site, this also provides a facility for older residents to enjoy alongside children,
young people and residents utilising the outdoor sports facilities.
The community campus could be used by a range of local residents with the children’s play area used
during the day by parents with young children and also potentially by a nursery service if this was to be
provided in the nearby Rainbow Centre. The youth centre would be utilised primarily in the evenings,
at the weekends or during school holidays with the youth centre also using the outdoor sports
facilities on the site. The outdoor sports facilities could also be provided for hire to local residents to
encourage healthy lifestyles and greater social interaction among many people who commute to work
away from the Peninsula. The youth centre would include, or have a separate entrance.
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By creating an area that provides facilities for residents on the peninsula from childhood to old age the
Trust would also be able to foster intergenerational relations in the area and stimulate increased pride
in the local area, focused upon this redeveloped area in which all have a stake. This could also
potentially reduce incidences of vandalism and graffiti of facilities (as reported in previous children’s
play parks in the area) as young people would also be part of this shared campus and thus be less likely
to damage any part of it.
To accompany the community campus and ensure all aspects of the needs, demands and aspirations
of the local community are catered for the Trust could consider developing other areas of the
Peninsula West to create tourism and business campuses.
10.2 TOURISM CAMPUS
The Trust could develop further facilities and activities for visitors to the area taking advantage of an
asset of the area, the foreshore, to successfully market the Peninsula West area to tourists. The
tourism campus could encompass a play area, a bandstand for musical performances, community
sculptures/artworks and information points.
The space surrounding the pier in Kilcreggan could be used to create a tourism campus in the heart of
the village. If located here the tourism campus could also encompass an upgraded marine access
facility which would allow easier access to the peninsula for visitors and create a tourist hub. The
location of the tourism campus at the pier in Kilcreggan would allow easy access to these facilities for
day visitors on the ferry, tourists staying within the Peninsula West villages and tourists staying in the
nearby caravan park at Rosneath.
These facilities would be used mainly by tourists during the summer tourism season but could also be
enjoyed by the local community throughout the year. By combining a range of facilities the tourism
campus would provide activities for a range of age groups and types of visitors. This could include a
play area for families with young children, musical performances to suit all ages and tastes,
community sculptures for those interested in locally produced artwork, and information points for
those interested in the history and scenery of the area.
The tourism campus would provide a specific tourist attraction in the area which can be used to
promote the area to potential visitors. By attracting tourists to the foreshore area, a tourism campus
could boost local businesses and employment through increased tourist spending in the local village.
10.3 BUSINESS CAMPUS
In order to accommodate the demand for small business units in the Peninsula West area and to
encourage new business start-ups and employment opportunities, the Trust could develop a business
campus in the Peninsula West area. The business campus could include small offices, communal
function/meeting rooms or ‘hot desk’ facilities which could be hired by local people who require a
small space to work at on an irregular basis, providing much needed physical space to local
entrepreneurs.
This could be located at the end of Fort Road, a location which is close to key amenities in Kilcreggan
but isolated from the main village centre and residential areas. In particular, the site would be located
close to the ferry link to Gourock for ease of business travel to wider areas and the proposed petrol
station which may attract businesses require the use of cars or vans throughout the area. The site is
also not far from the main road to Garelochhead, within walking distance of Kilcreggan village centre
and could provide good views across the Clyde estuary to Gourock, providing an attractive setting for
businesses.
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The facilities at the business campus could be used on a regular basis by businesses hiring a unit as a
permanent office, either new or developing local businesses or businesses from outwith the area
seeking a low cost rural base for their operations. The facilities could also be hired by local
entrepreneurs requiring occasional use of a meeting/conference room or desk space and high quality
office equipment. The Trust could also use the business campus as a base for their activities and could
provide/arrange for business support services such as training or an advice service to be provided from
the campus.
The development of one campus containing a range of business units would allow local
businesspeople to network and allow easy advertising of the facility to businesses in wider areas. This
would generate direct income for the area through hire of units while the presence of additional
businesses would also provide local employment opportunities and boost the local economy.
10.4 FORESHORE AREA
The Trust could develop the foreshore to increase the attractiveness of the area to tourists and its
functionality for local residents. In developing this area, the Trust could implement a number of
projects:
 The removal of knotweed which currently prevents access to the beach would open up the
foreshore to increased potential uses for walkers or events
 Provision of litter bins and organising clean-ups to improve the appearance of the area to ensure
it is suitable for use by local residents and visitors to the area
 Benches and viewing points provided by the Trust to allow both residents and tourists to take
advantage of the views across Loch Long
 Community sculptures/artwork located along the foreshore. This would increase the
attractiveness of the area, create continuity between the villages in the Peninsula West area and
promote community pride by displaying the work of local people. This could also be developed
with young people to increase their sense of ownership of the local area and help prevent
incidences of vandalism and antisocial behaviour.
The foreshore is a key asset of the Peninsula West area which the Trust should utilise to try and
encourage tourism to the area. Increased tourism would benefit the community by developing the
economy and generating local business and employment opportunities. In addition, development of
the foreshore would directly benefit local residents by increasing the attractiveness of the local area
and providing an additional facility for community recreation.
11.0 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
11.1 ROSNEATH PENINSULA WEST COMMUNITY ACTION PLAN
The declining population on the Peninsula, particularly among children and working age individuals,
suggests development is needed to ensure the area remains an attractive place for individuals and
families to live and work. This involves creating opportunities for local employment and providing
community services and facilities within an attractive and accessible local area.
The increasing proportion of the Peninsula West area’s population of pensionable age or above raises
concerns over the provision of services and facilities to address any support needs they may develop
while ensuring they can remain on the Peninsula. It is therefore vital that projects to support the
elderly, such as sheltered housing and befriending services, are implemented to ensure that these
community members are also included in the development of the Peninsula West area. Projects such
as the Community Campus and volunteering scheme for young people are also important to develop
intergenerational ties within the community, helping to strengthen the community as a whole and
ensure all feel included.
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The sustainability of the local area is also threatened as younger people who could contribute to the
area’s economic and social life leave the area. A key issue resulting in young people and those with
young families leaving the area is a lack of affordable housing. House prices within the Peninsula West
area have been rising much quicker than average in the last decade. The development of affordable
housing would contribute to combating this and provide the means for young couples or those with a
young family to remain in or move to the Peninsula West area.
Projects to improve local community facilities and services, the local economy and the appearance of
the local area will contribute to improved quality of life in the Peninsula West area, thus making it
more attractive to potential new residents, particularly families with young children.
11.2 CREATING QUALITY COMMUNITY FACILITIES
In order to create high quality community facilities to attract people to settle in the Peninsula West
area, the Trust could work towards creating a community campus containing recreational facilities.
These facilities could be used by a range of interest and age groups on the Peninsula, contributing to
increasing intergenerational relations and community interaction. The community campus could
encompass outdoor sports facilities including tennis courts and an all-weather 5-a-side pitch, a
children’s play area and an indoor centre to be used as a sports centre with a dedicated youth space.
This would contribute to tackling some of the identified needs and demands in the area as well as
providing an area of focus for all community activities.
To complement the facilities on offer at the Cove and Kilcreggan community campus and to ensure
that the demands for recreational facilities evidenced in the community consultation are met, the
Trust could also consider developing further facilities around the Peninsula West area. A gym and
indoor sports facility could be developed in partnership with the Sailing Club to create an inclusive
water and indoor sports centre.
The Trust could also look to develop the Rainbow Centre located close to the community campus. This
would allow some sharing of activities and facilities between the Rainbow Centre, Cove Burgh Hall
and the new community facility, which are all located within a quarter of a mile of each other. In
particular, to complement the facilities currently in the area and those already proposed, the Rainbow
Centre could be redeveloped as either a venue for a community-run nursery service or an arts centre
to display the work of local artists.
By developing local community facilities, the Trust will contribute towards making the area more
attractive to potential residents and help counteract the declining population in the Peninsula West
area. Additional facilities will also enhance the area for existing residents, ensuring the aspirations of
local residents for their area are met and facilities are provided to accommodate the high community
participation in this area.
11.3 BOOSTING THE LOCAL ECONOMY
Along with developing community facilities to attract more people, particularly families with young
children, to settle on the Peninsula, the Trust should consider ways to increase employment and
business opportunities in the area and provide services to assist small businesses and parents in
employment.
In particular, the development of a nursery and after school club in the Peninsula West area would
support the numerous working families with dependent children. This would also provide employment
for a number of childcare providers and could be utilised to provide apprenticeships for young people
looking to work in care. The Trust could also look to develop a dedicated business campus in the area,
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with small units to encourage and support new and developing businesses. These facilities would
allow local entrepreneurs to develop businesses providing local employment opportunities and
boosting the economy in the area. This would also allow ease of support provision to local businesses
within this campus and allow networking between local entrepreneurs to boost their business.
The development of tourism in the Peninsula West area would also increase revenue for existing
businesses and generate new business opportunities in the area. This could take the form of
increasing the overall attractiveness and advertising of the area to tourists or creating events which
would generate a great deal of tourism for a short period. These events could contribute to the
economy of the local area by increasing foot fall to the villages and spending at local businesses during
events and also by promoting the work of local residents, for example musicians or artists, the
benefits of which could expand beyond the festival itself.
Alongside this, the Trust could aim to improve the overall appearance of the local area and the
marketing of the area to tourists. This could include developing more facilities for tourists and drawing
attention to some of the features of the Peninsula West area, i.e. through provision of information
points, a shore walkway, viewing points across Loch Long to the Cowal Peninsula and a shore front
children’s play area for tourists. This could be developed as one overall tourism campus which could be
marketed to potential visitors and would help boost the local economy through tourism spending in
the area.
11.4 APPEARANCE AND ACCESSIBILITY OF THE LOCAL AREA
Any work to improve the appearance of the area by tackling knotweed infestation, installing artwork
and increasing the accessibility of the area through improvements to public transport and a local
petrol station would help boost the local economy. These improvements would make the area more
attractive to do business in and to tourists who would then spend money locally, thus increasing local
employment opportunities. In addition, projects which improve the overall appearance of the local
area also increase the attractiveness of the area to people who may settle in the area, thus boosting
population.
Projects to improve the appearance of the local area include the redevelopment of dilapidated
buildings and facilities (such as play areas or the pier) and improvements to the foreshore area
including the elimination or reduction of knotweed, the introduction of a walkway along the front and
the provision of sculptures, benches and litter bins in the villages. In addition, the development of
community woodland would provide a community run nature area for residents and visitors to enjoy,
which could also be used educationally for local young people.
The accessibility of the local area can be improved by projects aimed at increasing the provision of
public transport, both the ferry and the bus, to the area. Without access to private transport, the
Peninsula is relatively isolated in the evenings and inaccessible past ten o’clock at night. This prevents
many residents from utilising activities and facilities in the nearby towns, highlighting both the need
for additional facilities/activities within the area and the need to encourage increased provision of
public transport where possible.
A large proportion of the working population travel to their place of employment by car or van,
therefore improvements to public transport would encourage more sustainable means of travel.
Where this is still not suitable and residents require use of private transport, the provision of cheap
and accessible fuel on the Peninsula would prevent unnecessary journeys to Helensburgh for fuel,
contributing to the protection of the environment. The availability of fuel on the Peninsula would also
make the area more attractive to potential residents and to businesses looking for a rural base
containing key facilities.
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11.5
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. On the basis of the information contained in this Community Action Plan, the Trust should
determine the priority they wish to afford each project for development in the area.
2. The Project Profiles outline potential projects and give details of funders and contacts to other
groups who could help support the development of the project. The Trust should utilise these to
gather as much information as possible on the potential barriers and risks of each project from Trusts
who have developed similar projects. The Trust should also look in more detail at the requirements of
key funders to further ascertain the feasibility and suitability of each project for the Peninsula West
area.
3. The Trust should determine a timeline for conducting each project on the basis of its priority to the
Trust and local community and the level of preliminary work to be completed to prepare for the
project.
4. The Trust should consider developing a sub-committee structure to allow small groups of Trust
members to take responsibility for the development of projects, with each sub-committee then
reporting back to the whole group at regular meetings. This would enable the Trust to pursue
numerous projects at once without overburdening committee members and ensure that individual
expertise and interest in particular projects is capitalised on.
5. The Trust should work with the many already existing community groups when implementing
projects. There is a high community group participation rate in the area and the Trust should build on
this to help implement projects and increase social interaction between different groups of
individuals, particularly age groups, in the area.
12.0 APPENDIX
12.1 COMMUNITY GROUPS SURVEY
List of community groups surveyed:
Amenity Society
Guides
Angling Club
Karate Club
Art Group
Kayak Club
Badminton Club
Library
Beavers
Lifelong Learning
Beekeepers
Line Dancing
Book Group
Literary Society
Bowling Club
Lunch Club
Bridge Club
Meals On Wheels
Peninsula Paths
Country Dancing
Rainbows
Cove & Kilcreggan Trust
RNLI
Cove Burgh Hall
Scottish Country Dancing
Cove Park
Scouts
Cove Sailing Club
Spinning Workshop
Craigrownie Church
SSPCA
Cubs
Stay & Play Toddler Group
Ethos Project
SWRI
Fairtrade Association
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Brownies
Old Peoples Welfare Assoc
Choir
Panters Football Club
Church Guild
Parent Teacher Assoc
Coastguard
Peaton Nature Reserve
Community Farm
Peninsula Magazine
Computer Club
Table Tennis
Film Society
Web Group
Fire Station
Yoga
Freemasons
Youth Centre
Friends Of Burgh Hall
Zumba
Friends Of Kilcreggan P S
Friends Of Linn Garden
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BUSINESS SURVEY
List of businesses surveyed:
Cove Village Store
Newman School of Motoring
David Alan Payne (Painting services)
North Ailey Farm
E Auld - Farmer
P Wilson Electrical Ltd
Ensign Motifs
Gordon Sutherland - Painter and decorator
Ferndene Builders
I. Ballantine - Farmer
James Auld Funeral Directors
Plug It
Kilcreggan Electrical Services
The Lighthouse
Kilcreggan Hotel
Thomas Ferguson & Son Building Contractors
Kilcreggan Medical Centre
Ian McLean, Video Producer
Kilcreggan Post Office
Propped Up Furniture Removers
Pure Green Space Ltd
G.B. Sutherland, Plumber & heating engineer
Quick Stitch: alterations and repairs
Ferndene Builders
RS Entertainments
Liam MacKenzie, Tree Surgeon
Scratch-2-Shine
Green Gardens
W. Paterson - Farmer
Hair Dressing and Make-Up Artistry
A. Mylne and Co. - Marine Craft Surveyors
Herron Pottery
Kilcreggan Body Shop
J & L Builders
Terrace on the Waterfront
K Spittal Plumbing and Heating
The Barbers Shop
K Walkers Family Butchers
The Creggan Inn
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Community Action Plan prepared for Rosneath Peninsula West Community Development Trust by
Community Links Scotland
Community Links Scotland
63 Kilbowie Road, Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire, G81 1BL
tel: 0141 952 4382 email: [email protected]
www.comlinks.org.uk
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