UNIT PLAN ROCK CYCLE

advertisement
The Rock Cycle
The dynamic transitions between igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rock
Bridgette Drake
Science
Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellow
Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
December 2010
1
Table of Contents
Rock Cycle Unit Plan Description…………………………………………………………3
Rock Cycle Unit Flyer………………………………………..……………………………7
Plan for Assessment: Formative Assessments…………….……………………………….
Plan for Assessment: Traditional Assessments……………………..…………..………….
Plan for Assessments: Performance Based Assessments………..…………………………
Sequence of Learning Experience (Unit Map) ………………..…………………………..
Lesson Plan 1: Rock Cycle/Intro to Rocks and Observations……………………………..
Lesson Plan: Build a Rock Cycle……………………………..……………………………
Lesson Plan 3: Let’s make Rocks and Drizzy Drake Raps …………….…………………
Artifacts for Lesson 1: (name)…… ……………………………………………Appendix A
Artifacts for Lesson 2: (name)……………………………………….…………Appendix B
Artifacts for Lesson 3: (name)…………………………………………….……Appendix C
Artifacts for Assessment..…………….………………………………...………Appendix D
2
Unit Description
Unit Title: The Rock Cycle
Grade Level: 8th Grade
Subject/Topic Areas: Earth Space Science
Key Words: Igneous, Metamorphic, Sedimentary, Sediments, Cementation &
Compaction, Weathering & Erosion, Heat & Pressure, Magma
Designed by: Bridgette Drake
Time Frame: Nov. 2010 (2 weeks)
School District: Indianapolis Public Schools
School: Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet School
Unit Focus – Overarching Essential Question
What is the rock cycle and how does it work?
This focus was chosen because it is the most essential piece that must be
taken from this unit in order to build a future understanding of how rocks
change from one type to the next. This unit is designed to address the
knowledge and understanding of the three types of rocks: metamorphic,
igneous and sedimentary and the processes involved within each.
What other essential questions will be considered?
What makes the rock cycle a cycle?
How do rocks change from one type to another?
What is the difference between intrusive and extrusive rocks?
Why are sedimentary rocks are usually found near water sources?
How can the layers in rocks be used in fossil dating?
What is the difference between lava and magma?
3
What enduring understandings will students acquire as a result of this unit?
Students will understand that the rock cycle does not always circulate in one
direction, but that rocks can change from one type to another depending on
conditions.
Students will understand that the layers in sedimentary are usually formed with
the oldest on the bottom and the youngest on the top.
Students will understand the differences between igneous, metamorphic and
sedimentary rock.
What knowledge will students acquire as a result of this unit?
Students will be able to explain the process of weathering and its role in breaking
down rocks and other materials into smaller and smaller pieces.
Students will be able to explain that metamorphic rocks are formed from other
rocks that change as a result of heat, pressure, or chemical reactions.
Students will be able to explain that some sedimentary rocks are formed from
sediments or particles which are deposited, compacted, and cemented into rock.
What skills will students develop as a result of this unit?
What skills will students develop as a result of this unit?
Students will develop problem solving and critical thinking strategies from inquiry
based labs. They will be able to discuss, participates in activities, labs and
discussions all of which will enhance their learning. Students will enhance their
How
willthinking
the content
accessible
to of
allactivities,
learners?labs, discussions and
critical
skills be
through
a variety
assessments.
4
How will the content of this unit be accessible to all learners?
In this unit incorporates visual, auditory, and tactile components. Students will be
able to discuss, ask and answer questions, listen to and watch a movie, takes
notes, have an inquiry based lab where they actually put together a rock cycle and
discover how the process works. Not only is the material focused on a variety of
learners but the assessment is as well. Students will be given the opportunity to
creatively demonstrate their knowledge of the rock cycle through poems, song,
raps, skits, movies, stories, comic books, etc. Necessary adjustments will be made
to accommodate those students who need extra assistance
5
Unit Outcome
Students will understand that the rock
cycle does not always circulate in one
direction, but that rocks can change
from one type to another depending on
conditions.
Students will understand that the layers
in sedimentary are usually formed with
the oldest on the bottom and the
youngest on the top.
Students will understand the differences
between igneous, metamorphic and
sedimentary rock.
Students will be able to explain the
process of weathering and its role in
breaking down rocks and other
materials into smaller and smaller
pieces
Students will be able to explain that
metamorphic rocks are formed from
other rocks that change as a result of
heat, pressure, or chemical reactions.
Students will be able to explain that
some sedimentary rocks are formed
from sediments or particles which are
deposited, compacted, and cemented
into rock.
Corresponding State Standard
7.3 Students collect and organize data to
identify relationships between physical
objects, events, and processes. They use
logical reasoning to question their own
ideas as new information challenges their
conceptions of the natural world.
7.3.10 Explain how the thousands of layers
of sedimentary rock can confirm the long
history of the changing surface of Earth
and the changing life forms whose remains
are found in successive layers, although the
youngest layers are not always found on
top, because of folding, breaking, and
uplifting of layers.
7.3.9 Explain that sedimentary rock, when
buried deep enough, may be reformed by
pressure and heat, perhaps melting and
recrystallizing into different kinds of rock.
Describe that these reformed rock layers
may be forced up again to become land
surface and even mountains, and
subsequently erode.
7.3.9 Explain that sedimentary rock, when
buried deep enough, may be reformed by
pressure and heat, perhaps melting and
recrystallizing into different kinds of rock.
Describe that these reformed rock layers
may be forced up again to become land
surface and even mountains, and
subsequently erode.
7.3.9 Explain that sedimentary rock, when
buried deep enough, may be reformed by
pressure and heat, perhaps melting and
recrystallizing into different kinds of rock.
Describe that these reformed rock layers
may be forced up again to become land
surface and even mountains, and
subsequently erode.
7.3.8 Describe how sediments of sand and
smaller particles, sometimes containing the
remains of organisms, are gradually buried
and are cemented together by dissolved
minerals to form solid rock again.
Source: Indiana’s Revised Academic Standards for Science – Final Draft 03.29.10
6
Ms. Drake
7th Grade – Science
[email protected]
317-775-9303
What is our next topic to study??
We will begin a 2 week unit on…
THE ROCK CYCLE!!
The Rock Cycle is a fundamental concept in geology that describes how rocks are changed
through geologic time from the three rock types: Igneous, Sedimentary, and Metamorphic.
The goal of this unit is to have students explain and identify the parts of the rock cycle and to
check their ability to classify the three rock types based on their characteristics.
Students should come away from this unit with a better understanding of:
(1) The qualitative differences between igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks
(2) The processes that change rocks
(3) The rock cycle not always circulating in one direction, but that rock can change from one
type to another depending on conditions.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - Parent Signature________________________________
Date _____________________
7
Plan for Assessment: Formative
Formative assessment allows a teacher to assess current misconceptions among students.
They also allow teacher to help the students formulate positive goals as to where they need to be
with their understanding of the topic. Formative assessment can also be used with regards to
pacing. If students seem to understand a concept we can move on quickly to the next task,
however if there is a misconception we can slow down to make sure everyone in the class is on
board with the objectives for the day.
At the beginning of my unit I gave a pre-quiz to evaluate my student’s knowledge, this
was scored but not graded. I just needed to see where my students were with their prior
knowledge. This just gave a starting point with regards to what misconceptions I might need to
address before moving into my actual unit. It was also used to assess their progress as I gave a
post test at the end of the unit as well.
Another method of formative assessment I used was on the first day of the unit I had the
students work in their groups to come up with any ideas, information, pictures, etc that they
knew about rocks and write it down on a big sheet of paper. The kids enjoy being creative but
this allows the students to collaborate as well pull ideas from each other regarding the subject
matter.
We also usually started the day with a sample benchmark question. These questions I
tried to match with the topics which were being discussed. They would allow me to see how the
students were strategizing to pick the correct answer while also allowing me again to analyze any
misconceptions. The benchmarks usually lead to discussion; this allows me to spot check what
they had learned from the prior lessons. During class discussion is also an excellent way to have
student lead discussions, students can teach one another and I can assess how well the concept is
fully understood. During this time I may guide my students or help facilitate the discussion but
student.
With every class the assessment was different as far as questioning was concerned. I
would have particular questions I may ask to start off the conversation, but I was assessing on a
per class basis so each was different. Questioning seemed to be the most informative tactic for
formative assessments; it allowed me to see even if it is just with a show of hands, who is
following along and understanding the concept at that point in time. Students answered questions
in a variety of ways: individually, in small groups, and as a whole class, written, and verbal.
8
Plan for Assessment: Traditional/Summative
Students were given two forms of traditional or summative assessment. They were given a quick
in the middle of the unit as well as a unit test at the end of the unit. The unit test also contained
material from the water properties and water cycle unit which the students had for the two weeks
prior.
The quiz will assess the following areas:




Being able to name the three types of rocks and how each form
Describing how bubbles are formed in rocks
How water along with wreathing and erosion breaks down rock
How volcanoes are formed and what part they play in the rock cycle
The test will summatively assess the following objectives
 Students will understand that the rock cycle does not always circulate in
one direction, but that rocks can change from one type to another
depending on conditions.
 Students will understand that the layers in sedimentary are usually formed
with the oldest on the bottom and the youngest on the top.
 Students will understand the differences between igneous, metamorphic
and sedimentary rock.
 Students will be able to explain the process of weathering and its role in
breaking down rocks and other materials into smaller and smaller pieces.
 Students will be able to explain that metamorphic rocks are formed from
other rocks that change as a result of heat, pressure, or chemical reactions.
 Students will be able to explain that some sedimentary rocks are formed
from sediments or particles which are deposited, compacted, and cemented
into rock.
9
Plan for Assessment: Performance-based Assessment
Task Blueprint
Revised from Wiggins & McTighe (p. 330)
The audience for this assessment task blueprint is other interns and your instructors (not your students).
Look at your learning outcomes as outlined in your brochure. Which understanding(s), skills, and/or knowledge will
you assess?
They will demonstrate their knowledge of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and the
process that change them. They will incorporate key vocabulary and terms. They will also will
incorporate the idea that the rock cycle not always circulating in one direction, but that rock can
change from one type to another depending on conditions.
Through what authentic task will students demonstrate understanding?
TASK OVERVIEW:
This is what their directions said:
Your task is to compose a rap, a song, a poem, a story book, a skit or any other creative way to tell about
the rock cycle that you made during the “Journey on the Rock Cycle”. Your creation needs to be
entertaining because you will be presenting this to the class (no posters) It should include the definition
of the rock cycle as well as information on how rocks can change from one form to another. Be sure
to include information on all three types of rocks (igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic). You
may use your notes as well as your textbook to help you. In order to receive credit, you must turn in a
copy of your lyrics (story, script, etc.), complete with names of every member of the group. You may
work alone or work with no more than 2 members in your class (for a max total of 3 in a group). You may
use costumes, props, music, etc. to make your presentation more interesting. This will be a large grade (50
points) and can definitely be a creative way to help your grade. . If I do not see you participating, you will
NOT receive credit. Please see me with any further questions.
Use the GRASPS protocol to order your assessment:
Goal: For students to creatively demonstrate their knowledge and understand of the rock cycle and the processes
involved.
Role: The students will have to create any way to tell me and the class about the rock cycle. They will be allowed to
work individually or with a small group as the directions imply.
Audience: The audience will myself along with peers in the classroom
Situation: I will be assessing the performances using the rubric provided. The other students in the class are to
provide support and positive feedback to those who are preforming.
Product: They will be creating a creative display of the knowledge they have attained from the unit. I gave them a
set of guidelines and expectations but they are free to develop a product of their choice.
Standards and Criteria for Success: The more creative the better! They need to have all of the material from the
rubric but as mentioned but this is very open to their interpretation
10
Rubric for Performance Bases Assessment
Element
Rock Cycle Correctly Defined
How Igneous Rock are formed and
Completed √
Points
Teacher Evaluation and Comments
5
10
characteristics of this type of rock
How Metamorphic Rock are formed
10
and characteristics of this type of
rock
How Sedimentary Rock are formed
10
and characteristics of this type of
rock
Correctly use 5 of following terms:
o
Cementation
o
sediments
o
deposition
o
compaction
o
lava
o
magma
o
weathering
o
erosion
5
Presentation
5
Creativity
5
11
Unit Plan Map
12
Daily Lesson Plan
School
Crispus Attucks Medical
Magnet School
Your Name:
Bridgette Drake
Date:
November 8th & 9th
Course:
Science
Length of Class:
90 min
Grade Level(s):
7th
Number of
Students:
22-29
# of Adults in
Classroom:
1
Rock Cycle/Intro to Rocks and Observations
Unit Topic/Title:
Rationale/ Purpose
for Lesson:
This lesson is to gain prior knowledge the students have about rocks as well as
introducing them to the earth space aspect of our science course.

Learning
Outcomes or
Objectives:
Student Academic
Standards:
Materials
Required:
Classroom
Geography:
Students will identify the three main types of rocks and the terminology
associated with rocks and the rocks cycle
 Students will identify properties that changed rocks from one form to
another including heat and pressure, cooling and crystalizing, compaction
and cementation, weathering and erosion.
 Students will see many examples of each type of rock and make
observations and develop questions regarding them.
7.3: Students collect and organize data to identify relationships between physical
objects, events, and processes. They use logical reasoning to question their own
ideas as new information challenges their conceptions of the natural world.
CONVA, laptop, PowerPoint, science notebook, markers, colored pencils, large
paper sheets, pretest handouts
The class is arranged where students sit in groups of 4 in lab tables. This allows
students to work individually, with a partner, or with a larger group. All tables are
arranged where they can see the front board and screen. The lab benches are on
both sides of the room. The CONVA is located in the back of the room. There is
an area to the left of the room which has smaller benches if students need to get
away from their group. Tables on this left side of the room can be moved to
create a more open space if necessary.
13
Approximately what percentage of the time are students do each of the following? (Should = 100%)
%
Independent reading
%
Partner work
%
10%
Independent writing
35%
Group work
%
10%
Direct Instruction by teacher
45%
Engaging in whole group
discussion
%
Lab work
Lesson Sequence
Estimated
Time Needed
(Minutes)
10
20
15
40
Detailed Description of Teaching and Learning
(Include language to identify instructional goals – activate prior knowledge, engage,
model, investigate, apply, review, closure, etc.)
Pretest on rocks to assess their prior knowledge. This will be a handout. I will
explain to students that it will not be graded but they will receive points for it.
Pass out large sheets of paper and have students work in groups at their tables. Have
students right down or draw pictures of any knowledge they have regarding rocks. If
the class seems to be stuck trying throwing out words such as cycle and see if they
can explore the idea.
As a class discusses what prior knowledge each group had. Let each group have a
turn in sharing with the class. Write main ideas or good information on the board but
acknowledge everything that each group says. This is not the time to discuss if a
group has good or bad information or that a groups information is wrote was right or
wrong. Have students lead discussion; the teachers role is just to facilliate and gain
insight prior knowledge. I usually asked for a volunteer to write some of the info on
the board so we can see the ‘big picture’ instead of doing it myself.
Have students get a sheet of paper from their science notebook. They should assign
categories as the power point suggest. The first part is to give them an intro into
rocks and what geologists do. Students will look at pictures of rocks to make
observations of rocks and to develop scientific questions regarding how they were
formed. They should write down at least three observations and one scientific
question for each slide which the picture of rocks occurs. The questions will be a
great way to start discussion.
Homework for Tomorrow
532-535 Answer Questions 2-5 on pg 535
We only have a class set of 7th grade books which is where this lesson is located. Students are to
use the remaining time in class to read and answer questions in their science notebook.
14
Assessments
The pretest will be evaluated to access prior knowledge. The sheets of paper the groups
brainstormed on will be viewed to see what types of misconceptions they may have or where they
are as far as their knowledge of the rock cycle is concerned.
Science notebooks will be collected to grade their rock observations as well as to see what questions
they have about how/why the rocks were formed.
Modifications / Special Considerations
All students will IEP’s will be given necessary accommodations and modifications.
15
Daily Lesson Plan
School
Crispus Attucks Medical
Magnet School
Your Name:
Bridgette Drake
Date:
November 12th and 15th
Course:
Science
Grade Level(s):
# of Adults in
Classroom:
7th
Length of Class:
Number of
Students:
90 min
22-29
1
Build a Rock Cycle
Unit Topic/Title:
Rationale/
Purpose for
Lesson:
In this activity, students first review the three rock types via a PowerPoint
slideshow (5 slides). Students are placed into teams, and the remainder of the
activity can be completed outdoors or in the classroom if enough room is
available. Teams receive shoeboxes containing large rock samples, and each
team member is responsible for describing the physical characteristics of a rock
and determining its type (igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic). Students then
work with their team to assemble a rock cycle that has been drawn out on a large
white shower curtain. Using sets of cards, students assemble the rock cycle by
placing cards (cards contain processes, descriptions of processes, or rock types)
on the shower curtain in the appropriate place. Students also place their
identified rock samples from the shoebox on the rock cycle. A brief set of
discussion questions can be used to debrief and conclude the lesson.



Learning
Outcomes or
Objectives:
Student Academic
Standards:

Describe rock samples based on their physical characteristics and
Determine if they are igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic.
Explain how the 3 rock types are related to each other and the processes
that change one rock type to another
Use inquiry to guide through their processes to label and describe the
components of the rock cycle
7.3.8 Describe how sediments of sand and smaller particles, sometimes
containing the remains of organisms, are gradually buried and are cemented
together by dissolved minerals to form solid rock again.
7.3 Students collect and organize data to identify relationships between physical
objects, events, and processes. They use logical reasoning to question their own
ideas as new information challenges their conceptions of the natural world.
4 shoeboxes (the large, stronger ones work best)
Materials
Required:
32 (8 rocks/group) samples of common igneous, sedimentary, & metamorphic
rocks
sandstone, limestone (with shells), conglomerate (or breccia)
basalt, pumice, granite
gneiss, shist (others: slate, marble)
16
16 (2 samples/group) plastic bags filled with sediment
Examples: (fine grained sand, coarse-grained sand, small pebbles)
4 white shower curtains (can be purchased for $2.50/each at Target)
4 (9x12) manila envelopes
8 packs of post-it notes
4 thick permanent markers (Red, Blue, Green, Black)
>15 copies of the Lesson Direction Sheet: Rock_Cycle_Directions.doc
(included)
4 copies of the Rock Cycle Cards: Rock_Cycle_Cards.pdf (included)
Rock Cycle PowerPoint: Rock_Cycle_PowerPoint.ppt (included)
Classroom
Geography:
In the beginning during the introduction where students take notes the class is in
normal format. However when the lab begins the tables are pushed to the edges
of the wall so students will have ample room to work in groups and build their
rock cycle
Approximately what percentage of the time are students do each of the following? (Should = 100%)
%
Independent reading
%
Partner work
%
Independent writing
%
Group work
%
Engaging in whole group
discussion
%
5%
Direct Instruction by teacher
20%
75%
Inquiry Based Lab Activity
Lesson Sequence
Estimated
Time Needed
(Minutes)
10-20
Detailed Description of Teaching and Learning
(Include language to identify instructional goals – activate prior knowledge,
engage, model, investigate, apply, review, closure, etc.)
1. To determine students’ prior knowledge of the rock cycle use slide #1 of the
PowerPoint (Rock_Cycle_Powerpoint.ppt) and talk with your students
about cycles. There are some suggestions of questions and discussion points
in the notes section of slide #1.
2. Slide #2-6 may also be used to discuss each rock type and the processes that
form them. Possible questions are provided in the notes section.
3. Have students set up a sheet of paper (or science journal page) as shown on
slide #8.
4. Pass out the directions sheets (Rock_Cycle_Directions.doc) and go through
the directions for the lab with the class using the sheet and/or slides #2-6.
5. Split the class into Teams
17
45-50
15
Remaining
time
6. Have 1 student from every team get their respective rock boxes. If the
lesson is being done outside, head out now, or move the desks/tables to the
corners of the classroom if the lesson is being done inside.
7. Have the students complete Step #1 on the directions sheet.
8. When the students have their rocks in their respective piles (Igneous,
sedimentary, and metamorphic) check to make sure each group has them
correctly sorted. After any corrections are made, hand the group their
shower curtain and manila envelope and have them complete Steps #2-4.
9. When the students are done with their Rock Cycle assess how well their
rock cycle was assembled. A nice assessment might be to ask the group
questions such as: “If I am a metamorphic rock, explain to me what
processes I need to undergo to become a sedimentary rock.”
10. Take pictures of the students’ rock cycles! These can be used later on for
assessment and can be shown to the students.
11. Clean-Up and return to the classroom or re-arrange desks.
To conclude this lesson, allow the students a few minutes to look over the questions
on their worksheet. As a class discuss the answers to these questions.
Alternatively, have the students answer the questions in their science notebooks, or
print the questions out and assign them for homework.
Students may work on their rock cycle rap
Homework for Tomorrow
Continue to Work on Rock Cycle Raps and finish lab worksheet and questions if not already turned
in
Assessments
Group Assessments:
(1) Check how well each group separated their rocks into the 3 rock types and evaluate their
reasoning by asking “why do you think this rock is igneous?” (see step 8 in the Main Lesson
Procedure)
(2) When finished with their Rock Cycles assess by asking each group questions such as: “If I am a
metamorphic rock, explain to me what processes I need to undergo to become a sedimentary rock.”
(see step 9 in the Main Lesson Procedure)
Written Assessments: Check each students Science Notebooks (or sheet of paper) for descriptive
terms and answers to discussion questions (if not completed orally as a class).
Worksheet: Students will turn in a worksheet with a completed rock cycle as well as the process
along the arrows. They will also answer questions on the back side. Pictures will also be taken of
each groups rock cycle to further assess.
Modifications / Special Considerations
All students with IEP’s will be given necessary accommodations and modifications.
18
Daily Lesson Plan
School
Crispus Attucks Medical
Magnet School
Your Name:
Bridgette Drake
Date:
November 18h and 19th
Course:
Science
Grade Level(s):
# of Adults in
Classroom:
7th
Length of Class:
Number of
Students:
90 min
22-29
1
Let’s make Rocks and Drizzy Drake Raps
Unit Topic/Title:
Rationale/
Purpose for
Lesson:
Learning
Outcomes or
Objectives:
Student Academic
Standards:
Materials
Required:
Classroom
Geography:
Students will engage class activity to explore how each type or rock is made.
They will each be able to see components of sedimentary, metamorphic and
igneous rock. They will manipulate playdough to make metamorphic rock and
use actual rock for igneous and sedimentary. The majority of class will be a
performance based assessment on their knowledge of the rock cycle. The
students have been working very hard on this project and are eager to share what
they have created.
Students will understand the differences between igneous, metamorphic
and sedimentary rock.
Students will use manipulatives to show how metamorphic rocks are
formed as well as real rocks for igneous and sedimentary.
Students will creatively demonstrate knowledge of the rock cycle, its
components, each of the three types of rocks and processes that allow
rocks to change from one type to another
7.3.10 Explain how the thousands of layers of sedimentary rock can confirm the
long history of the changing surface of Earth and the changing life forms whose
remains are found in successive layers, although the youngest layers are not
always found on top, because of folding, breaking, and uplifting of layers.
7.3.9 Explain that sedimentary rock, when buried deep enough, may be reformed
by pressure and heat, perhaps melting and recrystallizing into different kinds of
rock. Describe that these reformed rock layers may be forced up again to
become land surface and even mountains, and subsequently erode.
How is the room arranged for the lesson? What considerations will contribute to
the lesson --- interactive bulletin board, learning stations/centers, table for
panel presentation, etc.?
Approximately what percentage of the time are students do each of the following? (Should = 100%)
19
%
Independent reading
%
Partner work
%
{Add your own}
%
Independent writing
%
Group work
%
{Add your own}
%
Direct Instruction by teacher
%
Engaging in whole group
discussion
%
{Add your own}
Lesson Sequence
Estimated
Time Needed
(Minutes)
Detailed Description of Teaching and Learning
(Include language to identify instructional goals – activate prior knowledge,
engage, model, investigate, apply, review, closure, etc.)
Homework for Tomorrow





Assessments
Group/class discussion
How well they identified the different types of rocks and put them together in the rock cycle
As questions once their cycle is complete to see if they understand how rocks can move
from one type to the next.
Pictures will be taken of the completed cycles for further assessment
Check each students Science Notebooks for descriptive terms and answers to discussion
questions
Modifications / Special Considerations
In what ways will you differentiate for learners within the classroom who have special needs?
20
Download
Related flashcards

Geological processes

14 cards

Geological periods

11 cards

Geological processes

13 cards

Rocks

14 cards

Create Flashcards