Intro to Vindicator - For Discover Training

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Vindicator
Honeywell Vindicator
Presents
Intrusion Detection / VCC / Access Control
Operators Course
March 2011
Slide 1
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Welcome
• Welcome to Honeywell
Vindicator’s Operators
Training
– This training has been
developed by the Honeywell
Vindicator Training Group
March 2011
Slide 2
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operators Course
• Description: This course provides training
in the operation of the Vindicator IDS, ACS
and VCC software suites.
• Objective: to provide Security Personnel
and End Users the skills necessary to
operate the Vindicator Security Systems
• Audience: Security Personnel and End
Users
March 2011
Slide 3
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Intrusion Detection
Operators Course
Intrusion Detection
March 2011
Slide 4
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Intrusion Detection
• What is Intrusion Detection?
– An intrusion detection system (IDS) is a
device or software application that monitors
network and/or system activities for malicious
activities or policy violations and produces
reports to a Management Station.
– Intrusion prevention is the process of
performing intrusion detection and attempting
to stop detected possible incidents.
March 2011
Slide 5
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Intrusion Detection
• What is your responsibility?
– As the operator for an IDS system your job is
to monitor and respond to events that occur on
the IDS management station.
– There are two distinct IDS monitoring tools.
– The S.M.A.R.T. system.
– The VCC system.
March 2011
Slide 6
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Intrusion Detection (IDS)
•
Vindicator® V5 Intrusion Detection
System (IDS)
– The V5 IDS solution consists of
the V5 IDS server, required
downstream I/O, Vindicator®
Command and Control (VCC)
operator interface, and local I/O
modules to suit any size
application.
– Built on the V5 Network Security
Appliance™, the Vindicator IDS
solution is the central control unit
for enterprise-wide security
needs
March 2011
Slide 7
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Intrusion Detection (VCC)
•
Vindicator VCC (Command & Control)
– A graphical user interface that
connects to the V5 via TCP/IP,
LAN/WAN, RS485 or fiber. VCC
enables operators to monitor intrusion
and perimeter security, access control,
CCTV, and fire and life safety systems
from any location.
– VCC provides map based views of
facilities (which can be exported from
CAD, satellite images, etc.), intuitive
icons and control buttons, audible
alarms, and an easy-to-use interface
for monitoring 10’s of thousands of
alarm points.
– Events can be sent to one or many
VCC consoles and routed based on
priority, origin or type.
March 2011
Slide 8
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Lesson Summary
• In this session we talked about:
– Who benefits from this course
– What is Intrusion Detection
– What is your responsibility
– The V5 IDS System
– The Vindicator Command and Control System
• In the next lesson, we cover briefly how an intrusion
network is configured.
March 2011
Slide 9
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
V5 IDS Security Appliance
• Quickie Quiz
– 1. Name the two software tools used by
operators.
– 2. What is intrusion detection
– 3. What is intrusion prevention
– 4. What is the name of the security device that
manages the IDS system
March 2011
Slide 10
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
PC SMART PAC (S.M.A.R.T.)
YOUR OPERATOR
SOFTWARE
March 2011
Slide 11
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
PC SMART PAC
• What is PC Smart Pac
– The smart software supervises system
equipment status and distributes system status
changes to operator interfaces and peripheral
equipment.
– It also accepts commands from operators and
evaluates the significance of system events
against defined “normal” conditions.
March 2011
Slide 12
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
PC SMART PAC
• The S.M.A.R.T. System
– The V5 IDS server supports multiple alarm
types, including standard, delayed, combined,
auto-secure, two-man access and group
access alarms.
– Each type serves a specific purpose in the site
security plan and ensures that the security
scheme matches the operational reality for the
facility.
March 2011
Slide 13
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
PC SMART PAC
• The S.M.A.R.T. system
– The V5 IDS separates alarm points into
categories of importance as their status
changes.
– An alarm’s priority affects the way it is
displayed, the type of alarm employed when
the point goes off normal, and its position on
the Action List screen.
March 2011
Slide 14
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Lesson Summary
• In this session we learned:
– S.M.A.R.T supervises and manages your
system
– S.M.A.R.T is your interface to your IDS system
– S.M.A.R.T. separate alarms into separate
categories
March 2011
Slide 15
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
PC SMART PAC
• Quickie Quiz
– 1. Name three Alarm Types
– 2. True/False: The S.M.A.R.T.
S.M.A.R.T. SYSTEM
SYSTEM
accepts commands from operators
– 3. The S.M.A.R.T system separates alarm
points into ?
March 2011
Slide 16
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operations
Window Title
TABS
Status Line
S.M.A.R.T. Basics
March 2011
Slide 17
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operations
• Opening & Logging on to the S.M.A.R.T.
System,
March 2011
Slide 18
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operations
• Logging onto PC SMART PAC
– Please enter the user name and password
assigned to you from your system admin.
March 2011
Slide 19
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operator Screens Layout
Four Main Windows
1. Action windows
•
Attention window
•
Acton list window
2. Status window
3. Help window
4. Configuration window
March 2011
Slide 20
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operator Screens Layout (Cont)
• Window Title
• Status Line
•
•
Operator Name
Date and Time
• Tabs
• Shows Which
Window is Open
• Action (F10)
• Status (F11)
• Help (F12)
March 2011
Slide 21
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operator Screens Layout (Cont)
Dynamic Action Buttons
•
Unique to Each Alarm Point
•
Change Depending on Circumstances
Examples
March 2011
•
Acknowledge
•
Secure
•
Access
•
CCTV
Slide 22
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operator Screens Layout (Cont)
• Dynamic Action Buttons
Window Title
TABS
Status Line
Dynamic Action Buttons
March 2011
Slide 23
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Action Windows
The Attention Window (Shift + F10)
• Actions Requiring Immediate Attention
• Priority -- Order of Occurrence
The Action List Window (F10)
• Allows Deferred Action
• Priority Listing:
March 2011
•
Highest Priority First
•
Then Chronological
Slide 24
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Action Windows (Cont)
The Attention Window (Shift + F10)
• Lists Conditions Which Are off Normal
• Demands Immediate Operator Attention
• Automatically Displayed When Alarms Occur
• Events Must Have Action
•
•
•
•
March 2011
Acknowledge
Secure
Access
Defer
Slide 25
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Action Windows (Cont)
• Situations Calling the Attention Window:
March 2011
•
Alarms
•
Tamper Conditions
•
Trouble Situations
•
Testing Failures
•
Full Communications Failures
•
Two-Man Access Late
Slide 26
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Action Windows (Cont)
The Action List Window (F10)
• Also Allows Other Alarm Point Action to Be
Taken
• Allows the Operator to Deal With Deferred
Alarms
March 2011
Slide 27
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operator Screens
Status Line Information Format:
Alarm Point Number
Location and Description
Sensor Status (* = Sensor Active)
Alarm Point Status
Tags
100 Bldg 400 RM 301 Entry Door BMS
101 Motion Detected Bldg 400 RM 301
March 2011
Slide 28
*ALARM
SECURE
False
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Status Window (F-11)
Lists Current Status of All Points in the System:
• Points in Alarm
• Tamper Conditions
• Communications Failures
• Troubles
• Test Failures
• Points in Remote Access (Group Access)
• Points in Access
March 2011
Slide 29
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Status Window (F-11)
March 2011
Slide 30
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Status Window (Cont)
Moving in the Status Window
• Up and Down Arrow Keys
• Home and End Keys
• ‘Jump Key’
March 2011
•
Space Bar
•
Enter Point Number
Slide 31
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Help Window (F-12)
• On-Line Help contains much of the
manual.
• Indexed and organized by Topics
• Select Search Method by:
• Contents
• Index
March 2011
Slide 32
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Help Window (F-12)
March 2011
Slide 33
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
F12 Help F1
March 2011
Slide 34
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
F12 Help F2
March 2011
Slide 35
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
F12 Help F2 Spacebar
• Just enter your topic in the box.
March 2011
Slide 36
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Zone Status Conditions
Each Alarm Point Can Have Several Status
Conditions:
• Alarm
• Full Communications Failure
• Partial Communications Failure
• Test Failure
• Tamper
• Trouble
• Access
• Secure
March 2011
Slide 37
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
The Significance of Color
Flashing Red
- Unacknowledged Alarm
Steady Red
- Acknowledged Alarm
Flashing Yellow - Access Pending
Steady Yellow
- Access
Flashing Green - Secure Pending
March 2011
Steady Green
- Secure
Flashing Blue
- Unacknowledged Trouble, Comm Fail, Test Fail
Steady Blue
- Acknowledged Trouble, Comm Fail, or Test Fail
Slide 38
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operations
• What we learned this session
– How to log into S.M.A.R.T.
– Your screen layout
– The dynamic actions buttons
– Status line info format
– The significance of color
March 2011
Slide 39
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Operations
• Quickie Quiz
– 1. Name thee of your active windows
– 2. Name 4 alarm conditions
– 3. Name as may color statuses you can
– 4. What do you do to get to the help screen
– 5. Can you search by topic
March 2011
Slide 40
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and
Acknowledging
Your Real Responsibility
March 2011
Slide 41
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• The status screen is where you will be
living.
• The status screen gives you a..well, status,
of your entire network.
March 2011
Slide 42
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Status shows
– Total alarm points, Number of alarms, Tampers
– Communications Fails, Etc..
March 2011
Slide 43
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• When an alarm goes off it will display
immediately.
March 2011
Slide 44
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
What is displayed?
Alarm Point Number
Location and Description
Sensor Status ( * = Sensor Active)
Alarm Point Status
As long as this asterisk is present
this alarm cannot be secured. It means
what ever caused this alarm has not
been corrected.
March 2011
Slide 45
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Acknowledging an alarm
– After pressing F1 to acknowledge the alarm
you are given several options.
– Secure – Access – Tag – Defer – Defer All
March 2011
Slide 46
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Acknowledging an alarm
– To defer an alarm and come back to it later
select “F7”
– To defer several alarms at once select
“shift + F7”
March 2011
Slide 47
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Acknowledging an alarm
– Now you will want to tag the alarm, that is, was
it a real, false, nuisance, or maintenance
alarm.
March 2011
Slide 48
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Tagging an Alarm
– Since this was an actual alarm we will tag “F1”
Once an alarm has been tagged
It will return to the following screen.
Notice that the problem has been
corrected and the asterisks has
been removed
March 2011
Slide 49
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Acknowledging an alarm
– You can now select “F1” to secure the alarm
March 2011
Slide 50
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Secured Alarm
– This same procedure can be followed for all
alarm types.
March 2011
Slide 51
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Acknowledging an alarm
– Several alarm conditions exist here.
March 2011
Slide 52
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Acknowledging an alarm
– Each of these alarms can now be secured.
March 2011
Slide 53
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• What did we learn in this Lesson?
– All about the status screen
– The different alarm types
– Meaning of an asterisk
– Tagging alarms
– Deferring alarms
March 2011
Slide 54
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Monitoring and Acknowledging
• Quickie Quiz
– 1. Name 4 items under the status menu
– 2. Name 4 different alarm types
– 3. What does an asterisk denote
– 4. Name the different types of tagging
– 5. What does deferring the alarm point mean.`
March 2011
Slide 55
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
March 2011
Slide 56
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator ACS System Introduction
– The V5 Access Control Server is a
sophisticated access control system.
– The system uses an embedded multiprocessor based system specifically designed
for the task of access control.
– The operating system is Vindicator's networkbased Real Time Operating System (RTOS)
March 2011
Slide 57
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator ACS System Introduction
• V5 ACS Architecture
– The overall security system is comprised of at
least one V5 Access Control Server, card
readers, and electrically activated door locking
hardware.
– The V5 Access Control Server is capable of
working with a wide variety of card readers.
March 2011
Slide 58
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Access Processor Specification
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
March 2011
50,000 Event Access Control History
Manual Override Door Control
70 Defined Operators (per V5)
10 Card Formats
40,000 Cards
1,000 Controlled Locations
256 Authority Levels
256 Access Groups
4,000 Access Rules
Slide 59
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator ACS System Introduction
• Access Processor Specifications
–
–
–
–
–
Up to a maximum of 6 Portal Control Modules (PCM)
Up to a maximum of 6 Sensor Input Modules (SIM)
Up to a maximum of 6 Relay Output Modules (ROM)
8 RS-485 Ports (4 can be RS-232)
8 maximum Reader Bus’, consisting of any mix of
supported models: Mercury & Recognition Systems.
– 4 Standard 10/100BaseT Ethernet Switch
– 4 Optional Fiber Optic (SM or MM) 100BaseFX
Ethernet ports
March 2011
Slide 60
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator ACS System Introduction
• Access Control Equipment
ACSYS Processor
– UHS-1401 (UHS and DES also available)
Reader Types:
•
•
•
•
•
•
March 2011
ECS-7000 series (Magnetic Stripe)
Leema SCR-101 (SMART Card)
Indala MDR-12 (Proximity Card)
HID Prox
Mercury (Multi-drop & Weigand)
Biometrics (Hand, Weight)
Slide 61
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator ACS System Introduction
• Simple Access Control Diagram
All equipment circled
Is considered to be
a single portal.
March 2011
Slide 62
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Quickie Quiz
– 1. How many operators can be defined in
ACS?
– 2 How many RS-485 ports are on an ACSYS
module?
– 3. What is the name a module of the ACSYS
module?
March 2011
Slide 63
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• V5 Access Control Screen Terminal
March 2011
Slide 64
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• History (F10)
– The History window provides a view of recent events occurring on
this V5 Access Control Server
– The history will queue the last 50,000 events, but will only be able
to display 15 at a time.
• Items shown in the history include:
– •
–
–
–
–
•
•
•
•
– •
Access granted and denied events
Duress PIN use
Changes in reader mode of operation
Reader communications status changes
Abnormal door activity such as Forced and Held door
Door closed activity.
– The information provided on the History screen is logged to the
printer if one is connected to the V5 ACS. The printer also shows
operator Logon and Logoff events.
March 2011
Slide 65
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
History (F10)
• Interpreting Colors on the History Screen
– Red An unusual event that implies a threat to security of
personnel or the facility.
– Events of this type include Duress PIN usage, foreign or
inactivated card presentation, forced and held open doors,
etc
– Yellow Violations of system rules typical of normal system
processing.
– Examples include access denial due to schedules, rules,
or visitors waiting escorts. Incorrect PIN entries will also
appear as yellow.
– Green Normal access granted events
– White Changes in the reader and portal modes.
March 2011
Slide 66
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
History Screen
VIOLATION OF RULES
UNUSUAL EVENT OR
SECURITY VIOLATION
NORMAL ACCESS
March 2011
Slide 67
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
• Access Control Operations
– To be sure that you are seeing the latest and
greatest data in your history screen, after
going to the screen using the F10 key, press
the “END” key on your Keyboard
March 2011
Slide 68
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
• Lets the operator examine the condition, or "status"
of locations, personnel and portals.
• Find out who is where, manual door override, reset
Antipas-back violations, view locations and rules
applied.
• Pressing the Status button (F11) causes the Status
screen window to appear.
• Several aspects of the system can be examined by
selecting the matching function button:
March 2011
Slide 69
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
Once in the status screen you have several options
As an operator “location & Personnel” will be your most
Useful items.
March 2011
Slide 70
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
• Locations Shows information about a specific location's occupants,
entry rules and card readers.
• Personnel Shows information about cardholders and lets the
operator activate or deactivate cards.
• Shows anti passback violations by individuals which can be reset
from this screen.
• Portals Shows current portal status, and lets the operator override
the portal operation modes.
• Enroll Provides screens for enrolling user biometrics data and
activating cards.
• Replicates Used to check and compare the V5 ACS configuration
data with other V5 ACS replicant devices deployed at the facility.
• Info Shows the device model, revision, and network address.
• Shutdown used to shutdown & restart the system properly.
• Shutdown button only appears when a user with system
administrative privileges is logged into the system.
March 2011
Slide 71
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– As an operator you will only need to use
• Locations
– Locations will help you monitor each location and the
current status of each.
• Personnel
– Personnel will allow you to track movement in the Access
Control Environment. It will also allow you to manage your
personnel.
March 2011
Slide 72
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Locations
In this example there are only 5 Locations.
In an actual environment there may be well
over 100 locations
March 2011
Slide 73
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Locations
• Lets select reception.
March 2011
Slide 74
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Locations
• Now look at the new options available to you.
March 2011
Slide 75
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Locations
• New locale will just take you back to the previous
menu to choose a new location.
• Let’s take a peak at Who's Here.
The “Esc” Key
will back you
out to the
previous Screen
March 2011
Slide 76
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Locations
• Selecting “who’s here” does exactly that by showing
who is currently in the location you have selected.
March 2011
Slide 77
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Personnel
– Shows information about cardholders and lets the
operator activate or deactivate cards.
– Antipassback violations by individuals can be reset from
this screen.
You now have new
Items you can select
To manage the
Personnel.
March 2011
Slide 78
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Personnel
• You can now deactivate a users card
• Reset their anti passback (APB)
• Change the user (Lana Kane’s) location.
March 2011
Slide 79
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Personnel
• What is Anti Pass Back?
March 2011
Slide 80
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Status (F11)
– Personnel
• What is Anti Pass Back?
– Anti-Passback prevents users from ‘tailgating' through
controlled areas by tracking the entry and exit counts.
– A user can only exit an area that they have already
entered and can only enter an area that they previously
exited.
– If a user tailgates onto a site, the exit keypad will deny exit
to them because they are not logged into the area.
– If a user is onsite and tailgates off of the site, they will be
denied exit next time they try to enter.
March 2011
Slide 81
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• What did we learn in this section
– 1.
– 2.
– 3.
– 4.
F10 allows us to view the ACS history
What the color scheme means
F11 is our status screen with many options
The Location & Personnel screen is our
home.
– 5. We can manage individuals
– 6. What is the use for Anti Passback.
March 2011
Slide 82
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Access Control Operations
• Quickie Quiz
– 1. What is the F10 screen?
– 2. What button do you press to get the latest
history information?
– 3. Name the 3 message colors and what they
each mean
– 4. Do you need to have and access pads on
both sides of a door to use APB?
March 2011
Slide 83
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command &
Control (VCC)
A Visual Operation
March 2011
Slide 84
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• What is Command & Control?
– An ultra-simple operator interface
– A graphical user interface that connects to the
V5 via TCP/IP, LAN/WAN, RS485 or fiber.
– VCC enables operators to monitor intrusion
and perimeter security, access control, CCTV,
and fire and life safety systems from any
location.
March 2011
Slide 85
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• What is Command & Control
– VCC provides map based views of facilities
(which can be exported from CAD, satellite
images, etc.), intuitive icons and control
buttons, audible alarms, and an easy-to-use
interface for monitoring 10’s of thousands of
alarm points.
– Events can be sent to one or many VCC
consoles and routed based on priority, origin or
type.
March 2011
Slide 86
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• The Operators View
– The primary function for the operator in
command and control is the same as in
S.M.A.R.T.
– VCC provides a graphical interface for ease of
use for the operator.
– The acknowledgement and securing of alarms
is easy as point & click.
March 2011
Slide 87
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
 Browse and Navigate
 VCC operators may manually call-up items
of interest, and browse the map displays.
 For example, an operator may call up a list
of areas in access, or select from a list of
favorites.
 Selecting from the list brings up the
associated map.
March 2011
Slide 88
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• VCC Main Map View
March 2011
Slide 89
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
 Geographic Context of System Alarms
 The VCC provides operators with a display
of system status in a geographic context.
 This allows operators to quickly understand
where an alarm event occurred in relation to
the physical layout of the facility.
March 2011
Slide 90
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
 Geographic Context of System Alarms
 System status points appear as iconic
responders overlaying a familiar fixed
background.
 The background is typically a scaled site
plan showing significant landmarks or
building floor plan. Responders change
color and/or shape in response to status
changes of the associated item.
March 2011
Slide 91
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• An alarm is occurring
– Info about the alarm is also displayed when the
mouse is positioned over the alarm point.
March 2011
Slide 92
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• An alarm is occurring
– VCC will automatically drill down to the
location were the alarm is occurring.
March 2011
Slide 93
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
 Map Responder Colors
 A Map Responder is a hyper-link to a map and it
annunciates the highest priority condition of the
map it is pointing to.
 The color of a map responder indicates the highest
priority condition.
 For example: If the highest priority condition of the
map is Alarm, the Map Responder’s color is RED.
 If the highest priority condition is Access, the Map
Responder’s color is YELLOW
 If the highest priority condition is Comm Fail, the
Map Responder’s color is BLUE.
March 2011
Slide 94
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• Map Responders
March 2011
Slide 95
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
 Navigating Through Map responders
 Maps are typically organized into a hierarchy
meaningful to the site.
 The first map is always called the Home Map.
 The responders do not always need to look like
downward-pointing green arrows.
 The shape of the responders can be edited by the
Administrator in the configuration module.
March 2011
Slide 96
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
I have highlighted this alarm.
It brings up a text window with
a message on what should take
place next. In this case, call security
March 2011
Slide 97
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• Securing an Alarm
– First highlight the alarm point with your mouse.
– Photo here
March 2011
Slide 98
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• Securing an Alarm
– If a help text message window pops up for that
alarm follow those directions.
– Photo here
March 2011
Slide 99
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• Securing an Alarm
– You should then tag the alarm with the
appropriate tag.
– Photo here
March 2011
Slide 100
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• Securing an Alarm
– After the condition that caused the alarm has
been corrected you my then, and only then
secure the alarm.
March 2011
Slide 101
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• What did we learn in this lesson?
– VCC is a graphical user interface
– Alarm events can be sent to several consoles
– The acknowledgement and securing of alarms
is as easy as point and click.
– Maps are typically organized into a hierarchy
meaningful to the site.
– Alarms can come with help text to describe
what to do next.
March 2011
Slide 102
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
Vindicator
Vindicator Command & Control
• The End
March 2011
Slide 103
Honeywell Vindicator Proprietary
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