English - The Program for Infant/Toddler Care

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Infant/Toddler Language Development
Supporting Home Language
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Homework Discussion
• In your group, share one of the strategies
you developed for enhancing your
language promotion skills.
• Answer the following question:
Were you more aware of your
interactions with children as a result of
reflecting on these questions?
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Reflection
In your group, discuss and record your
responses to the handout “My Beliefs
About Second Language.”
Zero to Three: Cradling Early Literacy: Module 2: Session 5; Emergent Literacy in
Two Languages
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“For young children, the language of the
home is the language they have used since
birth, the language they use to make and
establish meaningful communicative
relationships, and the language they use in
constructing their knowledge and testing
their learning. The home language is tied to
children's culture, and culture and language
communicate traditions, values, and
attitudes.”
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC),
1995, p1, Zero to Three: Cradling Literacy
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Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
• Reflect on how different cultures have
different, yet equally valid, communication
styles that should be recognized and
honored.
•
Examine how child care in the child’s native
language supports the child’s ability to
communicate and identify with her/his
family.
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Learning Objectives (continued)
Participants will be able to:
• Discuss how a positive cultural
identity provides the child with an
important sense of self and family
belonging that supports a wide
range of learning capabilities.
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Consider the following statements:
•“Why do we need child care in the
child’s home language? “
•“My parents came to the United
States not speaking English.”
•“I went to kindergarten and learned
English. “
•“My English is great.”
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Early Messages
DVD Clip: Supporting Bilingual
Development
Early Messages: Facilitating Language Development and
Communication, California Department of Education and
WestEd, 2006
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BREAK
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What Research Says About Home
Language
Increasing numbers of children under three years
of age are cared for outside the family. For infants
whose home language is not English, there are
some issues we need to consider.
a. Many language experts believe that children
do best with a solid start in their home
language before attempting to learn a
second language.
From: PITC Trainer’s Manual Module III, Lesson 10
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What Research Says About Home
Language
b) Researchers also emphasize the role of the
home language in maintaining the bond
between the child and family.
c) With children from a truly bilingual home,
hearing English in child care is not such a
serious problem, but hearing the non-English
language also will support the child’s
identification with both cultures.
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What Research Says About Home
Language
d) Children learn language when they are
“bathed” in a rich linguistic environment.
e) Children from non-English-speaking families will
have a hard time being bathed in their home
language if they are cared for by Englishspeaking caregivers for 8 to 10 hours a day.
F
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What Research Says About Home
Language
Although some research shows that young
children are capable of learning more than
one language at a time, a growing number
of studies suggest that, from birth through
age four, children should be cared for in
settings that support them in learning the
home language.
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What Research Says About Home Language
Supporting children’s home language in group
care settings is best done through the assignment
of a primary care teacher who speaks the child’s
language.
The rationale for this position is as follows:
a) There is a strong need for children to learn both
languages.
b) Children need the home language to be able to
communicate with their families and identify with
their culture of origin.
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Reflection
With your group, discuss the following questions:
1. What would the infant’s experience be, if the
care teacher speaks the child’s home language?
2. How would the infant’s experience differ if the
care teacher does not speak their home
language?
3. What message might an infant get if the care
teacher cannot communicate with the family?
4.
What message might the family get?
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Supporting Bilingual Development
As you view this video clip,
reflect on the strategies you
can use to support bilingual
development.
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Working With Diversity
In your group, read and discuss Handout #24: Cultural
Differences in Adult-Child Communication, and reflect
on the following questions:
•
What are some issues raised in this handout?
•
Based on what you read, what do care
teachers need to consider when facilitating
language for children from non-English
speaking homes?
•
What if we all speak the same language – do
the issues raised in this handout still apply?
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What Does that Mean?
In your group, read the scenario about Antonio.
1. Figure out what the words mean.
2. What do you think would help Antonio
to understand what is being said to
him?
3. How might he be feeling?
4. What knowledge do you have as an
adult that helps you with guessing what
certain words mean?
Zero to Three: Cradling Literacy: Module 2: Session 5;
Emergent Literacy in Two Languages
WestEd.org
Summary
It is important to remember that learning a
second language can be a traumatic,
stressful, and even painful process for
young children.
Young children need care teachers who
can be sensitive to their individual and
cultural language needs.
The home language is tied to children's
culture, and culture and language
communicate traditions, values, and
attitudes.
WestEd.org
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