August 28, 2012 SLO PowerPoint

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Student Learning
Objectives
CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION &
T E C H N OL O G Y
AUGUST 28, 2012
LIBRARY SLO WORKSHOP
Created by Jane Boyd, Program Coordinator, Nassau BOCES Student Support Services
SLO Concerns!
Components of a SLO: 5 District Decisions
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Assess and identify priorities and academic
needs.
Identify who will have State-provided growth
measures and who must have SLOs as
“comparable growth measures.”
Determine District rules for how specific SLOs
will get set.
Establish expectations for scoring SLOs and for
determining teacher ratings for the growth
component.
Determine District-wide processes for setting,
reviewing, and assessing SLOs in schools.
From NY DOE engageny.org Introduction to SLO Deck
Why SLO’s – NYS Teaching Standards
Knowledge of students and learning
1.
a.
SLO’s address factors impacting student learning to bring all
students to higher levels of learning
2. Knowledge of content and instructional planning
a.
SLO’s include selection and justification of learning content
reflects a teacher’s depth of content knowledge
3. Instructional practice
a.
SLO’s provide a trajectory for student learning, formative
assessments provide ongoing feedback to teachers to guide
instruction
Why SLO’s – NYS Teaching Standards
4. Learning environment
a.
The level of intellectual challenge and stimulation needed in
the classroom for a successful SLO is implied through the
selection of learning content, evidence, and targets.
5. Assessment for student learning
a.
The selection and justification of evidence for an SLO reveals
how teachers use assessment tools.
6. Professional responsibilities
a.
Teachers participation in and completion of the SLO process
reflects the level of engagement in established practices and
polices.
7. Professional growth – Professional learning Community
100-Point Evaluation System for Teachers
60
EBOP,
etc.
20
Growth
20
Local
100
Student Learning
Objectives (focus of this
training)
6
Translating SLO’s to the HEDI Scale
This table illustrates the relationship between the Growth or Comparable
Measure component to the Overall Composite Score.
Components of a SLO: NYSED SLO Framework
All SLOs MUST include the following eight basic components:
Student Population
Which students are being addressed?
Learning Content
What is being taught? CCSS/National/State standards? Will this
goal apply to all standards applicable to a course or just to specific
priority standards?
Interval of
Instructional Time
What is the instructional period covered (if not a year, rationale for
semester/quarter/etc)?
Evidence
What assessment(s) or student work product(s) will be used
to measure this goal?
Baseline
What is the starting level of learning for students covered by this
SLO?
Target(s)
What is the expected outcome (target) by the end of the
instructional period?
HEDI Criteria
How will evaluators determine what range of student performance
“meets” the goal (effective) versus “well-below” (ineffective) , “below”
(developing), and “well-above” (highly effective)?
Rationale
Why choose this learning content, evidence and target?
From NY DOE engageny.org Introduction to SLO Deck
8
New York State Student Learning Objective Template
All SLOs MUST include the following basic components:
Population
Learning
Content
These are the students assigned to the course section(s) in this SLO - all students who are
assigned to the course section(s) must be included in the SLO. (Full class rosters of all
students must be provided for all included course sections.)
What is being taught over the instructional period covered? Common
Core/National/State standards? Will this goal apply to all standards applicable to a
course or just to specific priority standards?
What is the instructional period covered (if not a year, rationale for
Interval of
Instructional semester/quarter/etc)?
Time
Evidence
What specific assessment(s) will be used to measure this goal? The assessment must
align to the learning content of the course.
Baseline
What is the starting level of students’ knowledge of the learning content at the beginning
of the instructional period?
Target(s)
What is the expected outcome (target) of students’ level of knowledge of the
learning content at the end of the instructional period.
How will evaluators determine what range of student performance “meets” the goal (effective)
versus “well-below” (ineffective), “below” (developing), and “well-above” (highly effective)?
HEDI
Scoring
HIGHLY
EFFECTIVE
20
Rationale
19
EFFECTIVE
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
DEVELOPING
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
INEFFECTIVE
4
3
2
1
Describe the reasoning behind the choices regarding learning content, evidence, and target
and how they will be used together to prepare students for future growth and development in
subsequent grades/courses, as well as college and career readiness.
0
Student Learning Objective: SLO
Something is wrong with some of these!
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Behavioral Goal
Set at the end of the first grading period
Represents the most important learning
General and measurable
Based on current student learning
Aligned to my curriculum
Aligned to school or district priorities
Guidance on NYS Dist. Goal-Setting Process: SLO. March 2012
Student Learning Objective: SLO







Definition:
Academic Goal
Set at the start of the course
Represents the most important learning
Specific and measurable
Based on prior student learning data
Aligned to standards
Aligned to school or district priorities
Guidance on NYS Dist. Goal-Setting Process: SLO. March 2012
Student Learning Objective: SLO
Today:
 Go through this process, as best we can without
seeing some actual data..
 Goal is for you to complete a draft of an SLO for the
upcoming year.
 Answer as many questions as possible as they
arise.
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 For the purpose of creating an SLO draft, think in
terms of information from the 11-12 school year to
help guide your thoughts
 Keep in mind things like:
 the number of students traditionally in each class,
 the content of your course,
 evidence of learning – baseline (possible and already in place)
and summative assessments (final performance, task, final),
 how students have traditionally done (outcome) in your course
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Who needs an SLO?
 Right now, it is anyone that is not receiving a state-provided
growth measure which is 4-8 ELA and Math. See “Purple
Memo” and “Assessment Options for SLO’s”
 More than one SLO?
 Maybe
 How do you know what you need?
 50% or more of your students must be covered under your
SLO’s. That might mean you need two or maybe even three.
 Begin with the courses taught that have the largest number of
students, combining sections with common assessments.*
*p10 & 12 SLO Guidance March
Who Needs an SLO?
 D43. How are SLOs for Library/Media Specialists established
if these teachers do not have regular classes scheduled and
only schedule on-demand/teacher-requested basis for
specific topics and projects?
 Districts/BOCES will need to determine their specific rules around
which courses must have SLOs when contact time varies following
the State’s rules and the general principle of including the courses with
the most students first and making practical judgments about how
to consider different course meeting schedules like those in this
example.
Classroom Teaching Service
Teacher of Record
New Guidance - B12. When must school librarians be evaluated
under Education Law § 3012-c?
 "Classroom teacher" is defined as a teacher in the classroom teaching
service who is a teacher of record.
 Librarians who are certified as a library media specialist or school
media specialist (library) are teachers in the classroom teaching
service. For the 2012-2013 school year, teacher of record is
defined as a teacher who is primarily and directly responsible for a
student’s learning activities that are aligned to the performance
measures of a course, consistent with guidance.
 Therefore, a certified librarian who is not a teacher of record is
not a "classroom teacher“ and therefore would not need to be
evaluated under Education Law § 3012-c. However, if a certified
librarian is a teacher of record, he/she would be considered a
"classroom teacher" and therefore must be evaluated under Education
Law § 3012-c.
Is a Librarian a Classroom Teacher?
 Certified Library Media
Specialist or School
Media Specialist
 Teacher of Record
 Teachers in Classroom
Teaching Service
 Not a Teacher of Record
A teacher who is primarily and directly responsible for a
student’s learning activities that are aligned to the
performance measures of a course consistent with guidance
M2. What kinds of data will districts and BOCES need to collect in order
to determine who is the teacher of record for evaluation purposes?
Districts and BOCES will need to collect additional data elements to support
teacher of record determinations. (Teacher-Student Data Linkage)
 APPR and SLO’s
 Other evaluation
processes
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 What is “your” greatest concern when it comes to
writing an SLO? Why?








Population?
Learning Content?
Interval of Instructional Time?
Evidence?
Baseline?
Target?
HEDI Criteria?
Rationale?
 From here we are going to work backwards!
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Target:
Level of growth and skill that
students
are expected to achieve at the end
point of the interval of instructional time.
 Numeric
 Roster – actual scores for each student
 Written in the form of a statement on the SLO

Different formats consider the individual students growth,
might connect baseline to summative, might be a “ n percent of
students will ____________.”
 Aligned to school/district expectations
 Includes all populations: “including special populations”
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 HEDI Criteria: Translates different levels of
student growth to the four categories, Highly
Effective, Effective, Developing, Ineffective.
 Allocates points clearly and objectively
 It must be mathematically possible for a given
teacher to obtain any point value in the scale
 Description




Highly effective – exceeds district/BOCES expectations
Effective – meets district/BOCES expectations
Developing – below district/BOCES expectations
Ineffective – well-below district/BOCES expectations
Guidance on NYS Dist. Goal-Setting Process: SLO. March 2012
Selecting a model: HEDI Scale
 Who is HEDI and why is she bothering me now????
How will evaluators determine what range of student performance “meets”
the goal (effective) versus “well-below” (ineffective), “below” (developing),
and “well-above” (highly effective)?
HEDI
Scoring
HIGHLY
EFFECTIVE
20
19
18
EFFECTIVE
17
16
15
14
13
12
DEVELOPING
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
INEFFECTIVE
4
3
2
1
0
The HEDI Scale and the Overall Composite Score
Remember the relationship.
Example: Science Teacher
(SED Guidance document)
Here is the description of the course and the number of students.
Example: Science Teacher
(SED Guidance document)
Student
Roster
Every student must have a baseline score that will be on the Roster.
Based upon this information and any other data the teacher will propose a target.
Example: Science Teacher
(SED Guidance document)
• Where does the target come from?
•
Look at your patterns. What has student achievement been in the past?
What are the patterns for a number of years?
• The data warehouse may be your best source from some of this data –
state assessment trends.
• Not sure why this target was selected – Does it make sense that you
would go from 50% to 90%????
Example: Science Teacher
(SED Guidance document)
No decision is more crucial than
defining the target. A teacher’s
overall evaluation is based on how
this task is accomplished.
Example: Science Teacher
(SED Guidance document)
?
Now we see the actual results.
If the target was 90% and the actual results are 91%, what HEDI score
would you give a 91%?
Example: Science Teacher
(SED Guidance document)
Where did this evaluator’s score come from?
Who was consulted?
On what logic, formula, or experience was it
based?
Middle School Physical Education Example
• How do you correlate the 55-80 percent and the 9-17 points on the HEDI
scale?
• Notice that the evaluator assigned 80% to 13 points. You might ask, “What
is the logic?”
Middle School Physical Education Example
How would this teacher score a 14, 15, 16 or 17
(since 80% = 13 points and 81% = 18 points)?
Example:
7th Grade Social Studies
SLO Subject
7R Social
Studies classes
with 23 & 27
students
Baseline
A district created
pre-test.
TARGET (As
Approved by
Evaluator
75% of students
will score at least a
65% on the posttest
Actual Results
Evaluator SLO
Score
83% of the students
including special
populations (ISP)
• If this were the SLO, what HEDI score would you assign? What is your
rationale?
• Be prepared to defend your answer to the head union rep in your district
and to the State Education Commissioner as well.
• Record your decision to be used later in the presentation.
Example:
7 Honors Social Studies
SLO Subject
7H Social Studies
with 18 & 22
students
TARGET (As
Baseline
Approved by
Evaluator
A district created 85% of students
pre-test.
will score at least
a 85% on the
post
Actual Results
Evaluator SLO
Score
92% of the
students
including special
populations (ISP)
scored at least
85%
• Notice there is a different target for the honors class.
• What would this HEDI score look like?
• Record your decision to be used later in the presentation.
Important to Consider:
The Number of Students
 Look at Co-taught Living Environment SLO example
 How many students are in this class?
 Describe what you see in the baseline component.
What is the target statement?
 What HEDI rating is aligned to the target?
Important to Consider:
The Number of Students
 90% of all students = 90% of 19, which is aligned to




14 points on the HEDI scale
Do the math. 18/19 would be 95% or 18 points
17/19 students would be 89% or 13 points
16/19 students would be 84% or 8 HEDI points
What do you observe?
Translating SLO’s to the HEDI Scale
9
+
9
A minimally effective score in all three
categories will not equate to an effective
overall rating.
+
45 (45/60
is 75% of
available
points)
= 63
Translating SLO’s to the HEDI Scale
9
+
9
+
45 (45/60
is 75% of
available
points)
= 63
Translating SLO’s to the HEDI Scale
9
P63 APPR Guidance June
+
9
+
57 (57/60
is 95% of
available
points)
= 75
Translating SLO’s to the HEDI Scale
13
+
13
+
45 (45/60
is 75% of
available
points)
= 71
Translating SLO’s to the HEDI Scale
15
+
15
+
45 (45/60
is 75% of
available
points)
= 75
Selecting a Model:
The HEDI Scale and the Overall Composite Score
Assessment scores of 9 do not equate to a composite score of 75.
They actually represent only 45% of the available HEDI points and
equate to an “Ineffective” rating when combined with 75% (45
points) of the “Other Measures of Effectiveness” points.
How should HEDI results inform your target setting?
 No decision is more crucial
than defining the target. A
teacher’s overall evaluation is
based on how this task is
accomplished.
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Student Population: Students
included in the SLO




There is no minimum number of
students
The population is set on BEDS day
Even if the class enrollment changes it
is not abandoned. D27
Addresses the growth of “each
student” (A ROSTER IS REQUIRED)
but then it is the aggregate growth of
all the students that determines
whether or not the target is met.
P37, Section D. APPR Guidance April 2012
Student Learning Objective: SLO
Population*
These are the students assigned to the course section(s) in this SLO - all students who are
assigned to the course section(s) must be included in the SLO. (Full class rosters of all
students must be provided for all included course sections.)
 Population examples




Entire Third Grade – Rosters attached
7th Grade Social Studies – Mr. Smith’s classes and Ms. Jones.
Rosters attached which include 2 inclusion classes
4 Fifth Grade classes includes 12 students with IEP’s. Roster
attached.
3 US History and Government classes – Rosters attached
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 On your template record the course and section
information that will be covered by the SLO
 Include a statement about attaching the roster
 Add any information that might be relevant for a
supervisor to understand about the make up of the
class and that might be important in establishing
rationale for choices.
 Turn and Talk!
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Learning Content: Content to be taught in the SLO
 Identify the source for the standards: Common Core, State,
National, AASL Standards, etc.
 Include any relevant Common Core Literacy/Math standards
with NYS standards (Literacy in History/SS or Science & Technical
subjects) – might include district decisions

Name the exact standards and performance indicators


As appropriate, choose the “most important learning” or a “subset
of power standards.” What do you traditionally assess and does it
give you a picture of the year?
Align to district or school goals and vertically align
Learning
Content*
What is being taught over the instructional period covered? Standards?
Will this goal apply to all standards applicable to a course or just to
specific priority standards?
SLO Development Checklist OCMBOCES
*SLO Template
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Where can I find my standards?
 http://engageny.org/resource/common-core-state-
standards/ for Common Core Learning Standards
 http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/le
arningstandards/standards American Association
of School Librarians Standards for the 21st-Century
Learner
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Turn and Talk!
 Look at the examples provided. Make observations
as to how they are written.
 Discuss and list what the “most important learning”
might be for this course and what it is you assess.
 On your template record the course, the
source of your standards or the
curriculum, and cut and paste your
decisions regarding standards.
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Interval of Instructional Time: Timeframe within
which the learning content is being taught



One academic year, a semester? a quarter?
Every other day? - Describe
Start and end date
SLO Development Checklist OCMBOCES, SLO Guidance March 2012, APPR Guidance April 2012
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Evidence: Assessments used to determine students’
level of learning

List the specific baseline assessments (pre-assessment) and
summative assessment(s) that will be used to provide baseline
and summative data for the SLO.
If the course ends in a NYS assessment or a Regents exam, it must
be used as the summative assessment
 List of 3rd party assessments and Regents equivalents - FLACS
 District, Regional, or BOCES developed. Districts or BOCES must
verify comparability and rigor.


What could the other option have been?

(School-or BOCES-wide, group, or team results based
on State assessments)
New York SLO Development Guide
SLO Development Checklist OCMBOCES
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 What if the third option was chosen?
District,
Regional, or BOCES developed.
Align tightly to learning content
Include components of good assessment
practices
Scoring procedures – “vested interest”
BASELINES
VESTED INTEREST
• G4: Does vested interest rule apply to pre-tests
given to establish a baseline for a SLO?
• Answer: To the extent practicable, districts or
BOCES should ensure that any assessments or
measures, including those used for performancebased or performance task assessments that are
used to establish a baseline for student growth are
not disseminated to students before administration
and that teachers and principals do not have a
vested interest in the outcome of the assessments
they score.
CIT, Lupinskie Center, One Merrick Ave.
Westbury, NY 11590
BASELINES
VESTED INTEREST
• G4: Does vested interest rule apply to pre-tests given
to establish a baseline for a SLO?
• Answer continued: If it is impracticable to comply with
this requirement for pre-tests, such as in certain cases
when using a performance-based or performance task
assessment, the district or BOCES must have adequate
procedures in place to ensure that the security of such
assessments is not compromised (i.e., as with all SLOs the
principal and/or supervisor must ensure the rigor and
fairness of the targets and set the goals based on the
assessment that is used as the baseline and ensure that
such goals are adequately met based on summative
data).
CIT, Lupinskie Center, One Merrick Ave.
Westbury, NY 11590
Performance Tasks?
Performance Tasks
 How do SLO’s meet the requirement for
comparability? “Specify priority learning
standards in a grade or subject around which
assessments or performance tasks for
students will be constructed by District
Teams” (SLO Guidance March, Page 14)
 Includes a “standards-based” rubric (SLO Guidance
March, Page 30)
Student Learning Objective: SLO
OR – other
baseline options!
 Student performance on a grade-level
NYS ELA
BASELINES
D47: Question
• Can SLOs for students
with disabilities have a
different target for
growth?
APPR Guidance June 2012, p43
Response
• The target for students in
any SLO may be
differentiated because of
the baseline (starting point
of learning) and historical
academic data.
• It is important to keep in
mind that targets for all
students, regardless of any
special education
classification, should be
differentiated because of
baseline data and not
because of any special
education classification.
CIT, Lupinskie Center, One Merrick Ave.
Westbury, NY 11590
SUMMATIVE – VESTED INTEREST
• This can be an issue.
• Teachers may not score the summative assessment.
• Talk of scoring guidelines for Regents exams to
become more rigorous
• Performance task issues
• Questions regarding teachers’ involvement in the
creation of summative assessments
CIT, Lupinskie Center, One Merrick Ave.
Westbury, NY 11590
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Turn and Talk!
 Discuss your content and the best way to establish
evidence – baseline (initial – formative) and
summative. Think about the “most important
learning” and what it is you assess.
 Look at the examples to see how evidence has been
stated
 On your template record a description
of the baseline and summative assessment
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Baseline: Level of students’ knowledge and skill in
the targeted learning content at the beginning of
the interval of instructional time.
 Describes how students performed on the preassessment or other previous summative assessment
 Include any other data sources being considered –
that may impact your “target”
 Roster

Actual baseline scores for each
student are required
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Turn and Talk!
 What do you anticipate?
 What other district data might you look at to include
in the baseline data?
 Look at a variety of examples.
 Summarize the results. Put it in parentheses to
indicate it is not actual. The actual baseline
results will be recorded on the roster.
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Target:
Level of growth and skill that
students
are expected to achieve at the end
point of the interval of instructional time.
 Numeric
 Roster – actual scores for each student
 Written in the form of a statement on the SLO

Different formats consider the individual students growth,
might connect baseline to summative, might be a “ n percent of
students will ____________.”
 Aligned to school/district expectations
 Includes all populations: “including special populations”
Student Population, Baseline, and Target(s)
Training SLO Target Approach 1: Set a common growth
target.
90% of students, including special populations, will grow
by 60 percentage points or more on their summative
assessment compared to their pre-test for the standards.
(e.g., Student E’s target is 60 more than 30, or 90.)
Student
Pre-Test Score Summative Target
Student A
10
70
Student B
20
80
Student C
5
65
Student D
0
60
Student E
30
90
Student F
10
70
www.engageNY.org
63
Student Population, Baseline, and Target(s)
Training SLO Target Approach 2: Set a growth to
mastery target.
85% of students, including special populations, will
grow to score 75% or higher on the summative
assessment for the selected standards.
Student
Student A
Pre-Test Score
10
Summative Target
75
Student B
Student C
Student D
20
5
0
75
75
75
Student E
Student F
30
10
75
75
www.engageNY.org
64
Student Population, Baseline, and Target(s)
Training SLO Target Approach 3: Set differentiated
growth targets by student.
85% of students, including special populations, will
meet or exceed their individualized target.
Student
Student A
Student B
Pre-Test Score
10
20
Summative Target
80
80
Student C
Student D
Student E
5
0
30
75
70
85
Student F
10
80
www.engageNY.org
65
Selecting a model:
with Percent Mastery - “Target”
 80% of students will increase by 50 points from pre-
to post-test.
 75% of students will score at least 65% on the post-
test
 85% of students will progress half way from the pre-
test to 100%
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 HEDI Criteria: Translates different levels of
student growth to the four categories, Highly
Effective, Effective, Developing, Ineffective.
 Allocates points clearly and objectively
 It must be mathematically possible for a given
teacher to obtain any point value in the scale
 Description




Highly effective – exceeds district/BOCES expectations
Effective – meets district/BOCES expectations
Developing – below district/BOCES expectations
Ineffective – well-below district/BOCES expectations
Guidance on NYS Dist. Goal-Setting Process: SLO. March 2012
Translating SLO’s to the HEDI Scale
 There is a clear need for a tool that can create a HEDI
scale for any target, a Rosetta Stone that translates
any “target” language into a HEDI scale.
 This proposed BOCES Translation Scale (template) is
effective when an SLO uses percent of students as the
descriptor for the target (as shown earlier).
 It is just one of any number of possible templates
and allows supervisors and teachers to focus efforts on
appropriate target setting.
 Appropriate target setting should, in accordance with SED
guidelines, align “effective” teachers with the “effective”
band on the HEDI scale (but with which score—9, 13, 17?).
Fred Cohen, Data Warehouse Consultant
Translating Targets to the HEDI Scale
Fred Cohen, Data
Warehouse Consultant
Translating Targets to the HEDI Scale
 Make all changes in the Variable SLO Calculator in
the green boxes.
HEDI Anchor Point - 9 to 17
SLO Target Percent - as %
13
80%
 Enter the target selected and observe the change in
the table.
 Now change the HEDI Anchor point and make
observations.
 The HEDI Anchor Point is a district decision.
Translating Targets to the HEDI Scale
 To calculate a final HEDI rating when more than one
SLO is created:
HEDI Calculator
SLO
Target or Percent
Number Percent Mastery
HEDI
of
Mastery Achieve
Calculator students Selected
d
HEDI
score
HEDI
Points
Awarded
SLO 1
30
90%
92
14
5.7
SLO 2
21
65%
70
14
4.0
SLO 3
SLO 4
SLO 5
23
80%
78
12
3.7
0.0
0.0
SLO 6
0.0
Total
74
Calculated values are printed in red.
13.4
Translating Targets to the HEDI Scale
 Delete the contents under “Number of Students”
through the HEDI Score.
 There is a formula in the
last column.
 Enter the new informa-
tion. Use the Social
Studies example.
 Observe the effect on the
HEDI Calculator
SLO
Target or Percent
Number Percent Mastery
HEDI
of
Mastery Achieve
Calculator students Selected
d
HEDI
score
HEDI
Points
Awarded
SLO 1
#DIV/0!
SLO 2
#DIV/0!
SLO 3
SLO 4
SLO 5
#DIV/0!
#DIV/0!
#DIV/0!
SLO 6
#DIV/0!
Total
0
Calculated values are printed in red.
#DIV/0!
last column and the final score.
How should HEDI results inform your target setting?
 No decision is more crucial
than defining the target. A
teacher’s overall evaluation is
based on how this task is
accomplished.
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Turn and Talk!
 How do the sample SLO’s address targets and align
to a HEDI rating?
 What format will you use to address setting the
target?
 On your template, propose a target given current
information about how students traditionally done.
 District decisions include how the target will be
aligned to the HEDI criteria. At this point, you can
propose an alignment and what you see as a fair
distribution based upon past information.
Student Learning Objective: SLO
 Rationale – Include reasoning behind decisions.
Particularly targets and HEDI alignment. That
rationale could include




Reference to the population and content
Baseline data recorded on the roster
Other data considered – historical, cohort
National
 Any information that will help the reader grasp the
rigor of the SLO
 Rate your SLO! – using the Annotated SLO Rubric
Form
Resources
 APPR Guidance Document, June, 2012
 SLO Guidance Document, March, 2012
 From NY DOE engageny.org Introduction to SLO
 Assessment Options for SLO’s on engageny.org
 Nys-eval-plans-guidance-Purple memo.pdf
 http://www.ocmboces.org/teacherpage.cfm?teacher
=1518
 SLO Connections to NYS Teaching Standards.pdf
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