Cue for Treason

advertisement
Cue for Treason
English 9 Novel Unit
What is Cue for Treason
about?
Look at the novel covers that follow.
Jot down ideas you have about the
novel based on the pictures.
Vocabulary
cue – anything said or done, on or off stage, that
is followed by a specific line or action: An
off-stage door slam was his cue to enter.
treason – 1.the offense of acting to overthrow
one's government or to harm or kill its
sovereign.
2.a violation of allegiance to one's
sovereign or to one's state.
3.the betrayal of a trust or confidence;
breach of faith; treachery.
Novels
Novel – a fictitious prose narrative of considerable length and
complexity.
The novel is a unique genre with its own unique features (like
short story, play, and poetry). Within those features, there is
much room for variation. All of the elements of the short story
are present, but there are many more characters in many
more situations, many more and various conflicts, and
probably many themes (although there tends to be one central
theme or message).
The word “novel” means “new” (from latin: nova). In the 18th
Century, the novel emerged as a new form of writing.
Note that the following are NOT novels: novellas (a sort of very short
novel, or long short story); novelizations (when a screenplay is turned
into novel form).
Cue for Treason
Background information
Feudalism
European history is characterized by three related
systems: monarchy, primogeniture, and feudalism.
Monarchy is the political system whereby the monarch –
the king, or if there is none, the queen – is the head of
state.
Primogeniture is the system of inheritance or succession
by the firstborn son (or daughter if no sons are present).
Feudalism was a political and economic system in which
land was given by a monarch to a lord.
History Topics Overview
Great Britain
England, Scotland, and Wales
The Tudors
Henry VIII, Mary I
Henry VIII
Henry VIII was a Catholic king
who wanted a male heir.
There was no authority above
his regarding matters of state.
The Pope was the head of the
Catholic Church, the main
religion in England. There was
no authority above the Pope
regarding matters of religion.
This is called “the separation of
church and state”.
The Union of Church and State
When Henry VIII’s first wife produced no such
heir, he looked for another way to have one.
He requested that the Pope, the head of the
Catholic church, allow him to divorce his wife
and marry another.
The Pope refused the request; divorce was not
allowed, even for a king.
Henry needed a solution…
The Union of Church and State
Henry effectively created his own religion: Anglicanism. Under
Anglicanism, Henry was the head of both church and state, and
was the ultimate authority for both. So, he could determine
the rules regarding marriage and divorce.
The transition from Catholicism to Anglicanism was made
easier because Anglicanism shares most of the same aspects
as Catholicism.
Also, most of England’s political enemies – France and Spain in
particular – were strongly Catholic nations, and this worked
with Henry’s ideas for a stronger state unified under his rule.
Catholicism remained a powerful force in England, and in
Scotland in particular, and this led to many difficulties for
Henry and his successors.
Elizabethan Times
An overview
Divine Order:
The Great Chain of Being
God
Angels
Man
Animals
Birds
Fish
Plants
Minerals
Elements
Divine Order: The Great Chain of
Being
Divine Order:
The Divine Right of Kings
God
Angels
King/Queen
Man
Animals
Birds
Fish
Plants
Minerals
Elements
English Society
King
(1 person; ultimate rule; amount they worked varied by ruler)
Upper Class
(A few hundred people; didn’t work much, if at all)
Middle Class
(A growing group of businessmen; worked for profit)
Lower Class
(Everybody else; worked for survival)
English Society
King
Aristocracy
Gentry
Merchant Class
Poor/Peasants
English Society
King
Aristocracy
Gentry
Merchant Class
Poor/Peasants
The Great Chain of Being
MAN
-----------WOMAN
This arrangement is from the Bible.
God made Adam in His image; Eve was made from Adam,
and so is one step further removed from God.
The social roles taken on by men and women respectively
reflect this.
Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I was a unique ruler.
She defied the ideals of
womanhood of her age by
being strong, independent, and
a sole monarch.
Elizabeth never took a
husband. There are many
theories why this was so, but
most agree that she probably
did not want to lose power,
and taking a husband would
guarantee that; as long as she
was the sole monarch, she was
the highest authority in Great
Britain.
Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I did not expect to be
queen.
As a direct result of the conflict over
church and state in Great Britain,
Elizabeth was often targeted for
assassination. Her political enemies
were in constant contact with the King
of Spain, a Catholic.
Spain had a huge fleet of ships called
the Spanish Armada. Elizabeth sent
her fleet against them, and English
forces annihilated the Armada. As a
result, England ruled the seas virtually
undisputed for the next 200 years,
and built the greatest empire the
world has ever known.
Elizabeth loved the
theatre, and often had
plays performed at
Westminster Palace for
her and her subjects.
Part of Shakespeare’s
success was owed to
the Queen’s admiration
of his plays. The
Chamberlain’s Men
performed for her on
several occasions.
She was generally
considered to be a good
ruler by her subjects,
and left a huge mark on
history.
The Elizabethan
Theatre
An Elizabethan Theatre –
The Swan
The Globe Theatre
Cue for Treason
Background –
Great Britain
External Enemies
Ongoing project –
Chapter Summaries
After each chapter, you will be expected to write
a brief summary – two sentences or so.
Use the summary sheet provided to do your
work. Keep track of keywords on the left, then
write the summary on the right using the
keywords.
The summary sheets will be due on the day of
the final Cue for Treason test.
How to write a
Chapter Summary



Taking brief
notes as you read
is called active
reading.
Write your
keywords here.
A good idea is to
keep track of
them as you
read.
Write your summary here.
Summaries should be no more
than a few sentences.
You should aim for two
sentences only to summarize
the plot.
Also note any other things that
you consider significant, e.g.
about setting, characters or
character development, etc.
Vocabulary
pike (p. 13)
– spear
beadle (p. 14)
– an official of the church
fells (p. 14)
– hills
beck (p. 15)
– stream
crag (p. 15)
– steep part of a cliff
gentry (p. 16)
– upper-middle class
person in England
Malignant
– hateful or harmful
yeoman (p. 16)
dale
derision
cavalcade
moor
tarn
precipice
Peel
Larches
Heather
Chapter One:
Dawn is Dangerous
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Who is the narrator?
Who is the protagonist?
Predict who is the antagonist.
Describe the narrative point of view.
What is the setting of the novel?
In which county is this chapter set?
Why are they leaving the house when it
is still dark?
Chapter One:
Dawn is Dangerous
8. What is a beck?
9. Why was dawn so dangerous according to
Peter?
10. How is Peter able to warn the men of an
impending attack?
11. Explain how Peter narrowly escapes death.
12. What does Peter say at the end of the chapter
that hints that he and his family may be in
trouble?
Chapter Two:
Escape
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
At what time of day did school begin for Peter?
Describe Nathaniel.
Why was Peter convinced that the old people
envied his journey to school?
Why did George Bell go looking for Peter?
When did Peter realize he was in serious
trouble?
Why does Mr. Brownrigg insist that his son
cannot remain at home?
Why is Peter happy about leaving home?
Chapter Three:
Peril at Penrith
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
What type of games did Peter and his friends
play at the Stronghold when they were
younger?
What is a peel?
How far was it from the Stronghold to Penrith?
Penrith had very narrow streets that led to a
very large and spacious square in the centre of
town. Why had the town been designed this
way?
Who met Peter unexpectedly at the market?
Chapter Three:
Peril at Penrith
6. What news did Peter receive about Sir Philip
Morton?
7. What happened when Peter asked the travelling
merchants if they needed a boy to help them?
8. How did Peter decide to take his mind off his
homesickness?
9. Peter was shocked to see someone coming
through the archway. Who was it?
10. Where did Peter choose to hide?
Chapter 4:
There is Safety in Coffins
1.
Describe Peter’s very first stage
appearance.
2.
What does Peter plan to do when he
discovers that Sir Philip has set a watch
or guard at all roads leading out of
Penrith?
3.
How is the second part of his plan foiled?
Chapter Five —
Vocabulary
suffocate – to kill by cutting off an oxygen supply
troupe – a group of actors
thimbleful – a very small quantity
stammer – pauses in speaking
interjected – to break into a conversation
tethered – used a rope (or something) to restrict
movement
bracken – an area overgrown with ferns
vagabond – a vagrant, drifter, bum
motto – a phrase that expresses a goal or principle
Chapter Five:
Someone Was Watching
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Why were they unable to reach Kendal that
night?
How did the group of actors react when they
discovered Peter?
Why did William Desmond ask Peter if he could
sing?
Explain what happened when the men on
horseback discovered Peter hiding in the
wagon.
How did the Desmonds react when Peter was
discovered?
What happened to Christopher (Kit) Marlowe?
Chapter Six –
Vocabulary
Gizzard
Mocking
Farthing
Dagger
Sluicing
Meddle
Chapter Six –
Vocabulary
retorted
curtsy
inquisitive
vacancies
contradict
Chapter Six:
Rivals on the Road
1.
2.
3.
4.
What does Kit Kirkstone say that he
would like to do?
Why does Peter think that Kit is lying
about his name?
What is the significance of the title of
this chapter?
What address did Peter notice on Kit’s
envelope?
Chapter 7 –
Vocabulary
prejudiced – biased (pre+judge)
plague – a pestilence
pillion – pad or cushion
denounce –
gist
pauper
Chapter 7 –
Vocabulary
aloof
doleful
anxieties
destitute
barbarous
parapet
Chapter Seven:
Who is Kit Kirkstone?
1.
2.
3.
4.
What did the acting company have to
secure in each town before they could
perform?
Why did Peter say that Kit Kirkstone has
spoiled things for him?
Give evidence that Kit remained aloof
from the other boys.
What is a cockfight?
Chapter Seven:
Who is Kit Kirkstone?
5. What reasons did half of the company
give for wanting to finish the tour of
Abingdon?
6. Explain the Poor Law.
7. What company did the Desmonds intend
to join in London?
8. On what condition did Kit Kirkstone
accept employment with Mr. and Mrs.
Desmond in London?
Chapter Eight: The Man from Stratford
Chapter Nine: Re-enter Danger!
1.
2.
3.
4.
What clues were there in the preceding
chapters that indicated that Kit might
have been a girl?
What did Kit believe would happen if Mr.
Desmond discovered her true identity?
Explain why Kit and Peter decide to go
on alone to London without the
Desmonds.
Who was the man from Stratford?
Chapter Eight: The Man from Stratford
Chapter Nine: Re-enter Danger!
5. Why was Shakespeare able to feast Peter
and Kit that evening?
6. Who did Shakespeare refer to as pirates?
7. Whose eyes did Peter find himself looking
into when he lifted his head?
8. Do you think this was a good way to end
the chapter? Why or why not?
Chapters 10-12 –
Vocabulary
fellside – hillside or mountainside
delude – to deceive the mind
taut – pulled tight
conspiracy – a secret agreement to perform an act
haven – a place of sanctuary (i.e. safety)
hovel – a small, miserable dwelling
bung – a stopper in a cask or container
incriminate – to involve in an illegal act
Chapters 10-12 –
Vocabulary
sycamore – a tree
squall – a sudden, violent windstorm
confederates – accomplices
fetter – to shackle or restrain
anarchy – political disorder and confusion
sodden – soaked
abyss – a bottomless pit
scree – a slope at the base of a cliff strewn with rock debris
rapier – a slender two-edged sword
Chapter Ten: Sir Philip is the Man
Chapter Eleven: The House of the Yellow Gentleman
Chapter Twelve: Treason on Thames-side
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Why did Peter think that his voice might
reveal his true identity?
Whose appearance has upset Burbage?
Who saves Kit from a thrashing? Why?
Why had Kit run away from her home?
What is Kit’s real name?
Describe Katherine’s feelings about Sir
Philip Morton.
Chapter Ten: Sir Philip is the Man
Chapter Eleven: The House of the Yellow Gentleman
Chapter Twelve: Treason on Thames-side
7. Who is the yellow gentleman? Why does Peter
give him that name?
8. Why does Peter need a half a dozen daggers?
9. Whose name does Peter hear being discussed
by the yellow gentleman?
10. What was Peter excited to see half hidden
under a stack of letters?
11. Kit suspects treason. What evidence supports
her claims?
Chapters 13-15 –
Vocabulary
crestfallen – dejected
greensward – turf that is green with grass
prophesied – predicted
damsel – young woman
berth – safe distance
treble – triple (three times)
Chapters 13-15 –
Vocabulary
tumult – commotion
muddle – confuse
quill – a writing instrument made of a feather
vouch – to give personal assurance
ferret – to search about
Chapter Thirteen: The Clue of the Sonnet
Chapter Fourteen: Secret Agents
Chapter Fifteen: The Lonely Tower
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
How does Sir Francis Bacon decipher the
code of the sonnet?
What is the significance of the message?
Who was Robert Cecil?
What warning does Mrs. Brownrigg offer
to Boyd and the two apprentices?
Where did they decide to leave their
horses?
What is a perspective glass?
Chapter Thirteen: The Clue of the Sonnet
Chapter Fourteen: Secret Agents
Chapter Fifteen: The Lonely Tower
7. Why did Tom refer to watching with the
phrase, “This is like fishing”?
8. What evidence did Tom find that
someone had been at the peel recently?
9. What was one of the men carrying on his
fist?
Chapter Sixteen: The Heart of the Secret
Chapter Seventeen: Held for Questioning
Chapter Eighteen: Striding Edge
Chapter Nineteen: Besieged
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
What was the “patch of water” at the bottom of the
stairs?
When does Peter realize that the two men in the tower
are talking about Tom?
What incredible plot does Peter overhear while
listening to the two men?
What happens to Peter at the end of chapter 16?
Describe Peter’s situation at the beginning of chapter
17.
What does Peter discover when he attempts to run
away from Duncan?
How does Peter manage to free himself?
Chapter Sixteen: The Heart of the Secret
Chapter Seventeen: Held for Questioning
Chapter Eighteen: Striding Edge
Chapter Nineteen: Besieged
8. How does the wind keep Peter a prisoner?
9. What does Peter do to Anthony Duncan before
leaving the islet in chapter 18?
10. What thought keeps Peter going during the
swim?
11. How does Snap react at the sight of Peter?
12. Who comes to the house looking for Peter?
13. Describe what Peter and Kit intend to do after
their escape through the narrow window.
Chapters 20-25 –
Vocabulary
besiege – to surround with aggressive intent
morass – a low-lying bog or marsh
salvo – a simultaneous discharge of firearms
tyrant – an oppressive ruler
visage – the facial expression of a person
sovereign – a king or queen
ermine – valuable white fur (from a type of weasel)
chasm – a crack in the earth’s surface
Chapters 20-25 –
Vocabulary
sentinel – a guard
placid – calm
conjure – to create or summon magically
gallivanting – wandering
ruse – an action meant to confuse
hubbub – loud, confused noises
cambric – white linen fabric
centaur – a man/horse creature from Greek mythology
Chapters 20-25 –
Vocabulary
cuirass
halberd
Chapters Twenty to Twenty-five
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
What led Kit to believe that the magistrate was
allied with Sir Philip?
What was their plan of action once they
discovered that there was no one in authority
they could trust?
What does Peter think of Kit’s suggestion that
they sell one of the horses?
What route does Peter suggest they take to
London to avoid detection?
What was the Wool Pack?
Chapters Twenty to Twenty-five
6. Describe the incident in chapter 22 when Peter
and Kit encounter the four men.
7. Who interrupts the four attackers?
8. What does Peter mean in chapter 23 when he
states that he thought they would owe their
lives to Sir Philip?
9. How do the actors manage to apprehend Sir
Philip and his men?
10. What piece of bad news does Desmond relay
to Peter and Kit about the performance of the
play in London?
Chapters Twenty to Twenty-five
11. There is a narrative shift: Peter is no
longer telling the story. Why not?
Describe the new narrative point of view.
12. Who is John Somers?
13. Why are Kit and Peter introduced to
Queen Elizabeth I?
14. What happens to Sir Philip?
15. What happens to Kit and Peter?
Download
Related flashcards

Russian ballet

19 cards

20th-century actors

24 cards

Moscow Art Theater

17 cards

Create Flashcards