File - Peoria High School COOP

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Technical Assessment
Review
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COOP
1.1 What are the factors influencing prenatal
development?
Prenatal care, nutrition, medications, genetics,
environmental factors
1.2 Explain the general progression of physical and
sensory development in infants (birth to 12
months).
Head to foot, simple to complex, near to far. Senses
become more refined. Raise head, roll over, sit up,
crawl, creep, walk
1.3 List 3 activities that promote the physical and
sensory development in infants (birth to 12
months)
Tummy time, exposure to a variety of environments,
interactions with others, sensory stimulating
environments
1.4 List 5 pieces of equipment that promote the
physical and sensory development of infants (birth
to 12 months).
Walking toy, stacking blocks, musical toys, mobile, crib
mirror, water table (with adult facilitation)
1.5 Explain the general progression of physical and
sensory development in toddlers (12 months to 36
months)
Better at walking, running more fine motor skills and
gross motor skills abilities
1.6 List 3 activities that promote the physical and
sensory development in toddlers (12 months to 36
months)
Climbing equipment, riding a tricycle, throwing/rolling
a ball
1.7 List 5 pieces equipment that promotes the
physical and sensory development of toddlers (12
months to 36 months)
Ball, dump truck, shovel, art supplies, sand table
1.8 Explain the general progression of physical and
sensory development in preschoolers (3 years to 5
years)
Self-help skills, better articulation of words, more
refined fine motor skill development, more controlled
gross motor skill development
1.9 List 3 activities that promote the physical and
sensory development in preschoolers (3 years to 5
years)
Water and sand table, various art materials, stringing
beads
1.10 List 5 pieces equipment that promotes the
physical and sensory development of preschoolers
(3 years to 5 years)
Balance activities, balls, art supplies, sensory boxes,
playground equipment
1.11 Explain the general progression of physical
and sensory development in school-age children (5
years to 8 years)
Growth slows but skills becoming more refined, body
becomes slimmer along with better posture, losing teeth
1.12 List 3 activities that promote the physical and
sensory development in school-age children (5
years to 8 years)
Pumping legs on a swing, riding a bike, writing tools
1.13 List 5 pieces equipment that promotes the physical and
sensory development of school-age children (5 years to 8
years)
Swing, bike, pencils, scissors, balls
2.1 Explain the importance of nurturance and attachment
in children from birth to 8 years
Bonding and attachment that occurs early in childhood impacts
self concept, self esteem, personality and relationships for the rest
of the child’s life. Lack of nurturance can cause developmental
delays.
2.2 Describe social and emotional development in infants
(birth to 12 months)
Babies cries need to be responded to quickly, communicate via
crying and facial expressions, emotions become more specific,
stranger anxiety may occur, temperament becomes more
apparent, irritability, passivity, intensity. Attachment is
essential for development
2.3 Describe social and emotional development in toddlers
(12 months to 36 months)
Negativism, temper tantrums, separation anxiety, independent to
parallel to cooperative play
2.4 Describe social and emotional development in
preschoolers (3 years to 5 years)
Language improves, friendships and companionship
become more important, socio-dramatic play where they
imitate others
2.5 Describe social and emotional development in
school-age children (5 years to 8 years)
More aware of peers, stress of school is a challenge, selfregulation (ability to control impulses) starts to improve
3.1 Describe cognitive development in infants (birth to 12
months)
Start to realize they make things happen, object permanence, later
in infancy can establish goals and anticipate events
3.2 Describe cognitive development in toddlers (12 months
to 36 months)
Expressive language (communicating words and thoughts to
others) receptive (understanding others words) expands. Uses 2
word sentences early in toddler stage basic math (id shapes, small
vs. large)
3.3 Describe cognitive development in preschoolers (3 years
to 5 years)
Expressive language improves, rote counting, articulation
improves, take things literally, 3 step instructions
3.4 Describe cognitive development in school-age children
(5 years to 8 years)
Longer attention span, less egocentric, true counting improves,
can argue and reason
3.5 Why is brain research (and its application)
important to child development from birth to 8 years?
Pathways are created early on. Pruning occurs when a child
gets older and potential pathways are lost forever if they
have not been used. Providing children with lots of
opportunities to use and reinforce the pathways in the brain
is essential.
4.1 Describe verbal and nonverbal communication
development in children (birth to 8 years)
Crying, experimenting with sound, babbling, gestures, 12 or
so words by the end of first year. 2 word sentences, use
grammar correctly as a preschooler, vocabulary continually
expands
4.2 Describe the developmental stages of the prereading and reading processes
Pre-reading- print awareness, book handling skills,
sounds and rhythm of spoken language, letter
knowledge, vocabulary development, comprehending
stories
Reading- use knowledge of letter sounds to solve
unknown words, uses language, memory, pictures an
print as cues to read and understand text, analyze new
words and checks them against what makes sense and
sounds right, begins to retell the major points of the text
4.3 Identify the stages of writing development and
how to support children (birth to 8 years) in moving
through the continuum
Six stages of writing- drawing, scribble as writing, letterlike forms, reproducing letter strings, invented/phonetic
spelling, conventional spelling
Model for children, provide opportunities to see and
practice making letter formation and practice writing.
4.4 Describe book handling skills in:
small group-
whole group- title of book, author illustrator, how to hold
book, punctuation, reading from left to right, front/back
cover, words sentences.
Individually- allow the child to sit close or hold the book,
4.5 List 5 examples of how to integrate
environmental print and visual representations as
instructional tools to support language and literacy
development across all subject areas
Label things in the classroom, create puzzles from
familiar food boxes, literacy rich environment,
opportunities to write invitations, grocery lists etc…,
incorporating literacy into dramatic play (menus, guest
checks), centers labeled
4.6 Describe the difference between phonemic awareness
and phonics and list 2 activities used to facilitate
development.
The sounds that produce language are phonemes,
understanding how these can be manipulated is phonemic
awareness. Phonics is understanding the relationship between
spoken words and the written word.
same initial sound, rhyming words
5.1 Explain the responsibilities of professionals to
implement and maintain a safe early childhood work
environment
The primary responsibility. Age appropriate toys, child
proofing, locked hazardous supplies, hand washing,
sanitizing, food safety, daily checks of children. Meet
5.1 Explain the responsibilities of professionals to
implement and maintain a safe early childhood work
environment
The primary responsibility. Age appropriate toys, child
proofing, locked hazardous supplies, hand washing,
sanitizing, food safety, daily checks of children. Meet
licensing guidelines for safety, sanitation, storage of
hazardous materials and requirements for CPR and First Aid
training.
5.2 Describe appropriate clothing and shoes to wear
in order to ensure personal safety
Closed toe shoes, comfortable clothing to move around,
get dirty and play at their level. Clothing, jewelry and
hair that will get caught in moving parts.
5.3 Explain the importance of compliance with the
Arizona Department of Health Services Child Care
Licensing Regulations and the OSHA (Occupational
Safety and Health Administration) standards
Following these guidelines helps to ensure safety of children
and workers. Inspections will be done regularly to ensure
compliance. If non-compliance fixed or shut down.
5.4 How do you properly store—
Equipment-gardening tools should be inaccessible to
children
Medication- locked cabinet out of the reach of children
Supplies- accessible to staff, but out of reach of children,
should be accessible to children
hazardous materials- locked cabinet
5.5 What are emergency procedures?
Need to have first aid kit accessible to staff but not children, a plan
who notifies parents, emergency contact information, emergency
procedures posted, **conduct a fire drill every 30 days.
5.6 Describe basic First Aid and CPR techniques.
CPR- rescue breathing and chest compressions
First aid- apply pressure to bleeding, choking sweep mouth if you
can see object, utilize age appropriate Heimlich, how to clean and
cover a cut/scrape, allergic reactions
5.7 What are 4 basic health practices and prevention
procedures that prevent the spread of childhood illness and
communicable diseases?
Hand washing, proper diapering, sanitizing, covering mouth and
nose during sneezing/coughing, proper food handling procedures,
separate a child that shows signs of illness
5.8 What are some water, sun, and heat safety and
precautions for preschools?
Drinking water always accessible, shade structure, go out in cooler
parts of the day, sunblock applied when provided by parents with a
release form
5.9 List the top 10 possible safety hazards in and around the
childcare setting.
Choking hazards, toxic materials, trips and falls, sharp corners,
electrical outlets, appliances
5.10 Explain safe maintenance of toys, equipment, and
materials.
Sanitizing regularly, checking toys and equipment to see it is not
broken and in working order, storing hazardous materials away
from children
5.11 How and when should you clean and sanitize facility
and equipment?
Bleach water solution
Tables before and after use, toys daily(hard surfaced in infant
room) or if exposed to mouth, sheets and blankets weekly,
mats/cots monthly or immediately if soiled
5.12 Describe conditions and practices that promote safe
food handling.
Handwashing, appropriate temperatures for storage and cooking,
avoiding cross-contamination, proper use of equipment
6.1 List the proper hand washing procedures for adults
and children.
Wet hands, apply soap, wash for 15- 20 seconds, rinse, dry with a
one use paper towel, turn off water with a one use towel
6.1 Explain the purpose of the food guide pyramid in
identifying basic nutritional needs and the benefits of a
balanced diet.
Following FGP or My Plate, allows individuals to get all their
daily needs for all areas of nutrients. It provides a guideline for
appropriate servings and sizes to ensure the right amount.
Following these guidelines for food and exercise build healthy
eating habits, keep the immune system strong, prevent obesity
and other food related lifestyle diseases
6.2 Explain the purpose of the food guide pyramid in
identifying basic nutritional needs and the benefits of a
balanced diet.
Following FGP or My Plate, allows individuals to get all their
daily needs for all areas of nutrients. It provides a guideline for
appropriate servings and sizes to ensure the right amount.
Following these guidelines for food and exercise build healthy
eating habits, keep the immune system strong, prevent obesity
and other food related lifestyle diseases
6.3 Explain the consequences of an unbalanced diet
relating to childhood obesity and oral health
An unbalanced diet can result in childhood obesity, food related
illnesses such as diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood
pressure.
6.4 How do you perform and document a daily health
check?
Asking the child how they feel. Looking for signs of illness or
injury, listening for complaints of discomfort, watching for
behavior indicative of illness, abuse or neglect. Document
irregularities and make appropriate reports if warranted.
6.5 What are the indicators of physical abuse?
Physical marks, withdrawal from others, abnormal eating
patterns, poor hygiene,
6.6 How do you complete injury and illness
documentation?
If injury requires health professional, notify parents immediately
-Document what occurred, what measures were taken, time, date
location, how parents were notified, keep for 12 mos.
-illness notify families of exposure to illness
6.7 Describe how to plan nutritious food experiences that
appropriately involve the participation of children.
Allow children to participate in the selection, planning a
preparation as well as serving and clean-up of healthy food
choices. Make food interesting by selecting a variety of
temperatures, colors, shapes, textures. Follow My Plate and
licensing guidelines for appropriate meal selections. Family
style dining should be implemented whenever possible.
6.8 Explain how meal times can be used as learning
opportunities.
Sensory opportunity, nutrition education, math, socialemotional development, fine motor-skill development
6.9 What are special dietary needs of children?
Young children need whole milk for brain development, food
allergies may be more frequent, less fat, sugar and salt. Ease of
eating and not a choking hazard. Follow MyPlate guidelines for
children.
6.10 List 5 foods that may cause choking in young children
Hot dogs, grapes, hard candy, popcorn, chewy candy.
7.1 How do you arrange the physical environment to
facilitate planned and spontaneous activities both indoors
and outdoors for children (birth to 8 years)?
Lessons and activity centers should incorporate indoors and
outdoors. Time outside for child centered activities should be
included everyday
7.2 Describe a balanced daily schedule that meets the
developmental needs of children, allows for teacherdirected and child-directed activities, and limits transitions.
Structured lessons combined with student choice centers and free
play on the playground. Minimizing transitions by combining
activities or creating transitional routines helps.
7.3 Describe developmentally appropriate learning centers
for infants (birth to 12 months) that include both indoor and
outdoor environments.
Indoor- soft furniture for crawling and creeping, book center,
art/music, toys for cognitive development
Outdoor- areas for crawling and walking, ball play
7.4 Describe developmentally appropriate learning centers
for toddlers (12 months to 36 months) that include both
indoor and outdoor environments
Indoor- music and movement, reading/book center, block center,
art center, writing center,
Outdoor- climbing equipment, supervised sensory tables,
materials that can be scooped and poured, push and pull toys
7.5 Describe developmentally appropriate learning centers
for preschoolers (3 years to 5 years) that include both
indoor and outdoor environments
Indoor- blocks, dramatic play, housekeeping, art, science,
manipulatives, writing, reading/book, sensory, music
Outdoor- sensory, gross motor skill area
7.6 Describe developmentally appropriate learning centers for
school-age children (5 years to 8 years) that include both
indoor and outdoor environments
Indoor- Art, writing, literacy, science, fine motor skill
Outdoor- Gross motor, sensory
7.7 How do you use developmentally appropriate materials
and tools to support learning?
Select age appropriate, safe tools and materials to enhance learning
opportunities.
7.8 Describe the appropriate use of technology and media
resources to support learning?
Educational technology and media can be helpful in facilitating
learning, but is not an equal substitute for real life application.
Screen time should be kept to a minimum.
8.1 Describe 3 developmentally appropriate activities for
visual art.
Painting with standard and non-standard paint materials; draw
a picture depicting something of interest to the child, clay to
sculpt forms
8.2 Describe 3 creative movement and dramatic play using,
music, rhythm, sound, language, space, and materials to
promote creative expression
COOP teachers can explain a variety
8.3 How do you facilitate creative expression?
Provide art opportunities to include, music and movement,
visual art, dramatic arts
8.4 What is the difference between process art and product
art?
Product art- the goal is the end product Process art- the goal is
the sensory experience and creativity
9.1 How do you demonstrate respect for culture, language,
and identity to establish a caring community of learners?
Include themes and lessons that identify, recognize and
incorporate a variety of cultures language and identity while
encouraging caring and empathy.
9.2 How do you encourage children to identify, manage,
and express their emotions in an appropriate manner?
Help them to find words and ways to appropriately express
emotions. This is done through modeling as well as lesson and
discussion
9.3 How do you design the classroom environment to
promote pride and independence in young children?
Provide lots of self-help opportunities (putting item in cubbies
when they arrive or finish a project). Organize the classroom in a
way that children can initiate activities of their choice and assist in
the clean-up and management of the classroom.
9.4 Describe 3 developmentally appropriate practices that
promote self-regulation.
Have few and clear rules that children help develop.
Provide reminders when children need to self-regulate
Provide areas/activities for children who need time to self-regulate
9.5 List ways to provide opportunities for children to
demonstrate care of self, others, and the natural
environment.
Having helping roles as part of the classroom day
Encourage them to do things for themselves
Acknowledge whey they go out of their way to help others or their
environment
10.1 How do you encourage cooperation in play and learning
activities that respects the rights and property of self and
others?
Encourage team/partner interactions. Show and tell with
opportunities to explore other peoples belongings. Model
cooperation and respect for the rights and property of others.
10.2 Describe the problem-solving and conflict resolution
methods to use with children.
Enlist them to help you solve the problem or conflict.
Help them to understand why and behavior is not okay
10.3 Explain how transitions may affect a child's behavior.
Children can be easily frustrated and upset by transitions. A
predictable routine can reduce these frustrations.
10.4 List 3 transition techniques to maximize learning.
Songs that describe expected behavior
Give transitional time so that transition will be quicker and
smoother
Visual cues assist in the facilitation of transitions
10.5 Explain how changes in family issues may be
reflected in a child's behavior.
Children dealing with changes in the family may experience
regression, withdrawal, aggressive behavior
10.6 List 5 positive guidance techniques
Reinforce good behavior
Give clear directions and expectations
Tell the child what behaviors are okay
Provide a classroom is that is safe and adequately stocked
Ignore mildly annoying age appropriate behavior
Redirect behavior when you see it may evolve to problem
behavior
11.1 Describe the family's role in the education of their
child.
Family is a child’s first and most important teacher. Ideally the
family and EC Educators are working together in the education
of a young child.
11.2 Describe appropriate informal and written
communication with family members
Verbal updates about their child’s day and progress as well as
written communication keeping parents informed of going-ons in
the classroom
11.3 Describe ways the family can be involved in the
education of their child
Provide suggestions for activities that can be facilitated at home.
Bring home and family into the classroom
11.4 List 3 strategies you can implement to make all families
feel welcome and engaged
Lots of communication formal and informal
Invite the familes to be part of the classroom and instruction
Appeal to various family structures, cultures and dynamics
12.2 What are standards of practice for assisting children
with routine and transition activities?
Routines should be predicable for children. Transitions should kept
to a minimum and fun when possible.
12.3 Describe the difference between conduct learning
activities in small and whole group settings.
Small group 3-5 Whole group is entire class. Managing the large
group becomes a major focus and limits more individualized
instruction. Good for introductions of topics. Small groups lend
themselves to discussion and instruction that can meet various
levels of development.
12.4 How do you plan developmentally appropriate
activities for children (birth to 8 years)?
Consider developmental milestones, assessments, observations.
Know a child’s social and cultural context.
12.5 How do you conduct developmentally appropriate
activities for children (birth to 8 years)?
Attuned to a child’s age and developmental status as a unique
individual. Develop lessons that are challenging, but still allow a
child to be successful. Appeal to various types of learners and all
the lessons to be determined by the child when feasible
12.6 How do you evaluate developmentally appropriate
activities for children (birth to 8 years)?
Challenging while still allowing a child to be successful. A child’s
level of development in all areas, environment at home, family
support must all be considered.
12.7 When should you adapt instructional strategies to meet
individual and group needs?
When it becomes obvious that it is necessary. Student getting
frustrated, losing their attention, behavior concerns.
12.8 Describe what anecdotal note is and when you would
use one?
An observation of a child behavior noting the environment at the
time. Looking for triggers, noting strategies that work for that
child
12.9 How do you scaffold a play sequence?
Providing less support so that a child can achieve success without
support.
Dramatic play- adding new more complex tools to increase the
complexity of the learning environment.
13.1 Describe aptitude for working with children
An area of interest, understands and eager to continue learning
about how children learn and develop, qualities that would be
helpful (kind, patient, caring, creative, flexible)
13.2 Describe positive interpersonal behaviors with
children, families, colleagues, and supervisors
Work together to meet the needs of the child. Many opportunities
for communication and interaction and collaboration
13.4 Explain the following child development theories:
Piaget- stages of cognitive development: sensorimotor (birth to age
2) object permanence, learning through senses. Preoperational (27) egocentric, symbolic representation, conservation. Concrete
operations(7-11) thinking logically. Formal operations (11-adult)
abstract thinking
Montessori-Independent learning, practical life experiences, selfselections, long blocks of time
Vygotsky-Importance of social interaction, zone of proximal
development, scaffolding
Erikson- Psychosocial development, 8 stages with social conflict or
crisis
13.5 Describe effective instructional strategies to meet
educational needs of children birth to 8 years
Researched based, developmentally appropriate, incorporating
many senses, child guided. Incorporates child- centered as well as
teacher centered activities.
13.7 Explain how the Arizona Early Learning Standards for
preschoolers (3 years to 5 years) may be used to guide
development of learning activities and opportunities
They are a framework for educators developing
lessons/curriculum for preschoolers.
13.8 Explain how the Arizona Academic Standards for
school-age children (5 years to 8 years) may be used to
guide development of learning activities and opportunities
They are a framework for educators developing
lessons/curriculum for school age children.
13.9 List the characteristics of children with
exceptionalities.
May be delayed or gifted in comparison to age appropriate peers
in physical, emotional/social or cognitive abilities
13.10 List 3 reasons for observing young children
To learn about children, assess theory, evaluate behavior
concerns, gathering information to assist in curriculum
development, to evaluate growth
13.11 List 3 characteristics of quality anecdotal notes
Factual reports of a child’s actions, usually focused on a specific
behavior or area of development, should be used in future planning
13.13 Explain state law in reporting suspected child abuse or
neglect
Educators, child care providers, health professionals, and clergy
are mandatory reporters. Any reports made in good faith cannot
result in prosecution.
13.14 Describe confidentiality issues and how to handle
them effectively
Confidentiality should be maintained unless safety is an issue.
Only those that need to be made of aware of an issue should be
given confidential information.
13.15 Explain the role of the National Association for the
Education of Young Children and other professional
organizations to the work of an Early Childhood Education
educator
Membership provides resources through journals, conferences and
materials to provide guidance for EC educators in terms of
professionalism, ethics, training and current research and program
practices.
13.16 Explain the role of the Quality First Initiative
Provides financial support for training quality early childhood
teachers as well as safe and stimulating environments. It rates
providers and centers to ensure they are providing a safe, engaging
learning environment for kids.
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