Can Do`s? - Wikispaces

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Progress-Monitoring with WIDA
MINNETESOL Conference
November 3, 2012
John Wolfe,
MPS Multilingual Department
[email protected]
Rita Platt,
St. Croix Falls SD
[email protected]
http://www.mplsesl.wikispaces.com/
About
taking
notes …
Relax … Everything (and more) is on The Wiki
http://www.mplsesl.wikispaces.com/
Questions to be Answered
1. What is WIDA? How do all
those parts work?
2. How can teachers use WIDA
as a tool for monitoring
ELD progress?
(And why would you want to?)
3. How can students use WIDA
as a tool for monitoring their own ELD progress?
(And why would you want them to?)
WIDA Philosophy in a Nutshell
WIDA: The Bigger Nutshell
1. Language is the tool for learning!
2. LEP’s are in mainstream classrooms. (95% of the
time in MPS.)
3. LEP’s use their Limited English to learn in 5 basic
contexts (Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, Math, Social &
Amplification.)
4. EL’s English -- no matter how limited – is an asset
for learning. You work with what you’ve got!
5. WIDA is designed to help all teachers modify the
language demands of instruction to provide LEP
students with meaningful access to content.
WIDA Proficiency Levels
(Nutshell Perspective)
WIDA Levels describe
the difficulty of the
language we can
reasonably expect a
student to be able to
use for grade-level
content learning.
Two Key Roles of the ESL Teacher
English Language
Development
Meaningful Access to
Grade-Level Learning
Informed by
Informed by
Second Language Acquisition Theory
WIDA Standards & Tools
• a communicative focus,
• commitment to Academic language
• intensified practice of academic speaking
and listening
• opportunities to focus on FORM (i.e.,
grammar, correctness of language)
• systematic attention to developmentally
appropriate vocabulary & grammatical
structures
 differentiate instruction based on student
language proficiency,
 match the language demands of content
instruction to the student’s language abilities,
 (and, ultimately) provide learners with
supported opportunities to expand
proficiency through challenging language
tasks (speaking, listening, reading and
writing) above their current levels
(i+1 or ZPD)
In the service of both goals:
Ongoing Progress monitoring of English Language Development
Up the Triangle =
A More Specific View
(“Yeah, but what does
that look like?”)
But what might that look like in
a particular lesson in
a particular unit?
Remember!
language serves
content learning
But what does that look like
at different grades?
With different language
domains? (Speak/Listen/
Read/Write)
What students can
do with language
BROADLY
Performance Definitions for the levels of English language proficiency
At the given level of English language proficiency, English language learners will process, understand, produce or use:
6
Reaching
5
Bridging
4
Expanding
3
Developing
2
Emerging
1
Entering






specialized or technical language reflective of the content area at grade level
a variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in extended oral or written discourse as required by the
specified grade level
oral or written communication in English comparable to proficient English peers
the technical language of the content areas;
lengths linguistic in discourse, including a variety of sentence of varying complexity extended oral or written stories,
essays, or reports;
oral or written language approaching comparability to that of English proficient peers when presented with grade level
material



specific and some technical language of the content areas;
a variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in oral discourse or multiple, related paragraphs;
oral or written language with minimal phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that do not impede the overall meaning
of the communication when presented with oral or written connected discourse with occasional visual and graphic
support



general and some specific language of the content areas;
expanded sentences in oral interaction or written paragraphs;
oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that may impede the communication but retain
much of its meaning when presented with oral or written, narrative or expository descriptions with occasional visual and
graphic support



general language related to the content areas;
phrases or short sentences;
oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that often impede the meaning of the
communication when presented with one to multiple-step commands, directions, questions, or a series of statements
with visual and graphic support

pictorial or graphic representation of the language of the content areas;

words, phrases, or chunks of language when presented with one-step commands, directions, WH-questions, or
statements with visual and graphic support
Good … but
still too
hard …
WIDA CVC Criteria: Your New Best Friend
1 – Entering 2 – Emerging
3 – Developing
4 – Expanding 5 – Bridging
Linguistic
Complexity
Single words
Phrases, short
sentences
Series of related
sentences
Moderate
discourse
Complex
discourse
Vocabulary
Usage
Most
common
vocabulary
High frequency
vocabulary
General and
some specific
vocabulary
Specialized & Specialized &
some technical technical
vocabulary
vocabulary
Language
Control
Memorized
language
Errors inhibiting
communication
Meaning
overrides errors
Language
w/minimal
errors
Language
comparable to
English peers
… and the Can-Do Descriptors would then answer the question:
“What does ‘a series of related sentences’ look like in terms of Kindergarten?”
Can-Do Descriptors
CAN-DO Descriptors: Grade Level Cluster 3-5: For the given level of English
language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support through Level 4, English
language learners can process or produce the language needed to:
Writing
Reading
Level 1: Entering
Level 2: Beginning
Level 3: Developing
Level 4: Expanding
1.1 Match icons or
diagrams with
words/concepts
2.1 Identify facts and
explicit messages from
illustrated text
3.1 Interpret
information or data
from charts and graphs
1.2 Identify cognates from
first language, as
applicable
2.2 Find changes to root
words in context
3.2 Identify main ideas
and some details
4.1 Classify features of
various genres of text
(e.g., “and they lived
happily ever after”—
fairy tales)
1.3 Make sound/ symbol/
word relations
2.3 Identify elements of
story grammar (e.g.,
characters, setting)
3.3 Sequence events in
stories or contentbased processes
1.4 Match illustrated
words/ phrases in
differing contexts (e.g., on
the board, in a book)
2.4 Follow visually
supported written
directions (e.g., “Draw
a star in the sky.”)
3.4 Use context clues
and illustrations to
determine meaning of
words/phrases
1.1 Label objects, pictures,
or diagrams from
word/phrase banks
2.1 Make lists from
labels or with peers
3.1 Produce simple
expository or narrative
text
1.2 Communicate ideas by
drawing
1.3 Copy words, phrases,
and short sentences
1.4 Answer oral questions
with single words
2.2 Complete/produce
sentences from word/
phrase banks or walls
3.2 String related
sentences together
2.3 Fill in graphic
organizers, charts, and
tables
3.3 Compare/contrast
content-based
information
2.4 Make comparisons
using real-life or
visually-supported
3.4 Describe events,
people, processes,
procedures
4.2 Match graphic
organizers to different
texts (e.g., compare/
contrast with Venn
diagram)
4.3 Find details that
support main ideas
4.4 Differentiate
between fact and
opinion in narrative
and expository text
4.1 Take notes using
graphic organizers
4.2 Summarize contentbased information
4.3 Author multiple
forms of writing (e.g.,
expository, narrative,
persuasive) from
models
4.4 Explain strategies
or use of information
Level 5: Bridging
5.1 Summarize
information from
multiple related sources
5.2 Answer analytical
questions about gradelevel text
5.3 Identify, explain, and
give examples of figures
of speech
5.4 Draw conclusions
from explicit and
implicit text at or near
grade level
5.1 Produce extended
responses of original
text approaching grade
level
5.2 Apply content-based
information to new
contexts
5.3 Connect or integrate
personal experiences
with literature/content
5.4 Create grade-level
The CVC Criteria INFORM the CAN-DO Descriptors
CAN-DO Descriptors: Grade Level Cluster 3-5: For the given level of English language proficiency and with
Directions. If it’s true
that the CVC Criteria
inform the Can-Do
Descriptors, you
should be able to
detect “traces” of the
CVC criteria in the
Can-Do descriptors.
Level 1:
Entering
• Point to stated
pictures, words, or
phrases
Listening
In other words, you’ll
mark phrases in the
Can-Do Descriptors
that imply the
Language Proficiency
Levels define by the
CVC Criteria.
visual, graphic, or interactive support through Level 4, English language learners can process or produce the language needed to:
1. Mark indicators of
LINGUISTIC
COMPLEXITY in
YELLOW.
4. As you do this, pay
attention to how the
tasks make greater
language demands as
you move up the
strand.
• Identify objects,
figures, people from
oral statements or
questions (e.g., “Which
one is a rock?”)
• Arrange pictures or
objects per oral
information
• Follow two-step oral
directions
Level 4: Expanding
• Follow multi-step oral
directions
• Interpret oral
information and apply
to new situations
• Identify illustrated
main ideas from
paragraph-level oral
discourse
• Match literal
meanings of oral
descriptions or oral
reading to illustrations
• Identify illustrated
main ideas and
supporting details
from oral discourse
• Infer from and act on
oral information
Good … but
can it be
easier???
• Role play the work of
authors,
mathematicians,
scientists, historians
from oral readings,
videos, or multi-media
• Ask simple, everyday
questions (e.g., “Who is
absent?”)
• Answer simple
content-based
questions
• Answer opinion
questions with
supporting details
• Restate content-based
facts
• Re/tell short stories
or events
• Discuss stories,
issues, and concepts
• Recite words or
phrases from pictures
of everyday objects and
oral modeling
• Describe pictures,
events, objects, or
people using phrases
or short sentences
• Make predictions or
hypotheses from
discourse
• Give content-based
oral reports
• Answer yes/no and
choice questions
• Share basic social
information with peers
• Express basic needs or
conditions
• Name pre-taught
objects, people,
diagrams, or pictures
Speak
• Categorize contentbased pictures or
objects from oral
descriptions
Level 3: Developing
• Sequence pictures
from oral stories,
processes, or
procedures
• Match classroom oral
language to daily
routines
2. Mark indicators of
VOCABULARY USAGE
in PINK.
3. Mark indicators of
LANGUAGE CONTROL
in BLUE.
• Follow one-step oral
directions (e.g.,
physically or through
drawings)
Level 2: Beginning
• Draw in response to
oral descriptions
• Evaluate oral
information (e.g.,
about lunch options)
• Offer solutions to
social conflict
• Present contentbased information
• Engage in problemsolving
• Offer creative
solutions to
issues/problems
• Compare/contrast
content-based
functions and
relationships
Level 5:
Bridging
• Carry out oral
instructions containing
grade-level, contentbased language
• Construct models or
use manipulatives to
problem-solve based on
oral discourse
• Distinguish between
literal and figurative
language in oral
discourse
• Form opinions of
people, places, or ideas
from oral scenarios
• Justify/defend
opinions or
explanations with
evidence
• Give content-based
presentations using
technical vocabulary
• Sequence steps in
grade-level problemsolving
• Explain in detail
results of inquiry (e.g.,
scientific experiments)
“Student-Friendly” WIDA CAN DO Descriptors: Grade Level Cluster 3-5
Speaking
Reading
Writing
The
StudentFriendly
Can-Do’s
Listening
For the given level of English language proficiency and with visual, graphic, or interactive support through
Level 4, English language learners can process or produce the language needed to:
Level 1:
Entering
Level 2:
Emerging
Level 3: Developing
Level 4:
Expanding
Level 5:
Bridging
1.1 Listen and point
to pictures or
words
1.2 Follow one-step
directions
1.3 Listen and find
things or people
1.4 Listen to the
teacher and do the
classroom routines.
2.1 Listen to descriptions
and sort pictures.
2.2 Listen and arrange
pictures.
2.3 Follow two-step
directions.
2.4 Listen and draw
pictures.
2.5 Listen to choices and
express an opinion.
3.1 Follow directions.
3.2 Listen to an explanation
and match it to a picture.
3.3 Match descriptions to
illustrations.
3.4 Listen to a story and sort
pictures. [Listen to an
explanation and …]
4.1 Listen to
information and
apply to a new
situation.
4.2 Listen to an
explanation and
point out details
on an illustration.
4.3 Listen to [a story,
an explanation]
4.4 Listen about
authors [scientists,
etc.] and act out
what you hear.
5.1 Listen to follow
instructions about
[math or microscopes
or whatever]
5.2 [Using a model],
listen to a problem
and use models to
figure it out.
5.3 Listen and explain
figurative language.
5.4 Listen to [stories,
explanations] and give
opinions.
1.1 Tell what you
need. | Tell how
you feel.
1.2 Say the names of
things.
1.3 Repeat words and
phrases from
pictures.
1.4 Answer yes/no
questions. Answer
choice questions.
2.1 Ask everyday
questions.
2.2 Restate facts about
school topics.
2.3 Describe [people,
events, objects, or
people].
2.4 Talk about yourself
with other students.
3.1 Answer [simple]
4.1 Give reasons for
an opinion.
4.2 Discuss stories,
issues and
concepts.
4.3 Give oral reports.
4.4 Compare
solutions to a
problem.
4.5 Compare and
contrast [ideas
from a subject].
5.1 Use evidence to
defend opinions.
5.2 Give oral
presentations using
technical vocabulary.
5.3 List the steps you
take to solve a
problem.
5.4 Explain the results of
an experiment.
Level 1: Entering
1.1 Match symbols to
words [or
concepts]
1.2 Identify cognates.
1.3 Make
sound/symbol/wor
d relations
1.4 Match words on
the board to words
and pictures.
Level 2: Emerging
2.1 Read texts with
illustrations and
identify facts and
ideas.
2.2 Find changes to root
words in sentences or
stories.
2.3 Identify elements of
stories [characters,
setting, etc.]
2.4 Follow written
directions. (visually
supported)
Level 3: Developing
3.1 Interpret data from
charts and graphs.
3.2 Identify main ideas and
some details.
3.3 Sequence events in
stories [articles,
explanations, historical
accounts].
3.4 Use context clues and
illustrations to figure out
the meaning of words or
phrases.
Level 4: Expanding
4.1 Classify features
of genres.
4.2 Choose the
graphic organizer
that matches a
text.
4.3 Find details that
support main
ideas.
4.4 Distinguish fact
and opinion.
Level 5: Bridging
5.1 Summarize
information from [#]
sources.
5.2 Answer thought
questions.
5.3 Identify and explain
examples of figures of
speech. [Give
examples of figures of
speech.]
5.4 Make inferences.
1.1 Write the words
that tell about
things
1.2 Tell what I think
by drawing
1.3 Copy words and
short sentences
1.4 Answer questions
with one word
2.1 Make lists from labels
or with other students
2.2 Finish or write
sentences using word
walls
2.3 Fill in graphic
organizers, charts, and
tables
2.4 Write a comparison
about [some realia]
3.1 Write stories or reports
3.2 Write sentences that go
together
3.3 Write what is the same
and different about two
sets of information
3.4 Write about things or
people or ways to do
something
4.1 Use graphic
organizer to take
notes
4.2 Summarize
information about
a subject
4.3 Write different
kinds of texts
4.4 Tell how I solved
a problem
5.1 Write responses to
texts near my grade
level
5.2 Write about [new
situation] using
information I learned
in class
5.3 Make text-to-self
connections
5.4 Write stories or
reports
questions about [school
subjects]
3.2 Re-tell stories. [Re-tell
events.]
3.3 Listen to [stories,
explanations] and make
predictions.
3.4 Listen to [stories,
explanations] and guess
why things happened.
3.5 Offer solutions to
social conflicts.
3.6 Make presentations.
3.7 Solve problems.
Wolfe Platt | http://mplsesl.wikispaces.com/WIDA+Tools
Student-Friendly’s
do NOT Replace Can Do’s
WIDA Can-Do Descriptor Student-friendly version
Match oral language to classroom
and everyday objects
Listen and match words to things
Compare attributes of real objects
(e.g., size, shape, color)
Tells what is the same and what is
different in things
Indicate spatial relations of real-life
objects using phrases or short
sentences
Tell where things are
Apply content-based information to
new contexts
Write about [new situation] using
information I learned in class
Remember: These do NOT come from WIDA! They come from John & Rita
Two Key Roles of the ESL Teacher
English Language
Development
Meaningful Access to
Grade-Level Learning
Informed by
Informed by
Second Language Acquisition Theory
WIDA Standards & Tools
• a communicative focus,
• commitment to Academic language
• intensified practice of academic speaking
and listening
• opportunities to focus on FORM (i.e.,
grammar, correctness of language)
• systematic attention to developmentally
appropriate vocabulary & grammatical
structures
 differentiate instruction based on student
language proficiency,
 match the language demands of content
instruction to the student’s language abilities,
 (and, ultimately) provide learners with
supported opportunities to expand
proficiency through challenging language
tasks (speaking, listening, reading and
writing) above their current levels
(i+1 or ZPD)
In the service of both goals:
Ongoing Progress monitoring of English Language Development
Basically …
• The WIDA Tools are designed to indicate what
students should be able to do in the service of
grade-level learning at their proficiency level
• But we recommend also using them tool to bridge
from one level to the next
(as a tool for ELD)
• Can-Do Descriptors
(combined with the CVC Criteria)
can be the heart of
progress-monitoring.
Data-Based Decision Making
1. Assess
2. Analyze results
3. Set goals for student growthplan interventions to meet goals
4. Teach for growth toward goals
5. Reassess
6. Tweak plans
Repeat  Repeat  Repeat
Continuous Improvement Model
What is Reasonable to Expect?
Why can we use the Can-Do’s as a ELD
Progress Monitoring Tool?
• Because the Can-Do
Descriptors are
essentially a
Developmental
Learning
progression
• Krashen & Terrell’s
Natural Order
Hypothesis
Data-Based Decision Making
1. Assess
2. Analyze results
3. Set goals for student growthplan interventions to meet goals
4. Teach for growth toward goals
5. Reassess
6. Tweak plans
Repeat  Repeat  Repeat
Continuous Improvement Model
One model …
English Learner Progress Record (Grades 3-5) | Levels 34 | Speaking
Name:
Grade:
Progress Record
Start Date:
U.S. School
Start Date:
CVC Criteria
…
To get to Level
4, I need to
4 – Expanding
Complexity
Moderate discourse
Vocabulary
Specialized and some
technical vocabulary
Control
Language w/minimal
errors
Speaking
Date | Can-Do # | Topic | I need to work on …
4.1 Give reasons for an opinion.
4.2 Discuss stories, issues and
concepts.
4.3 Give oral reports.
4.4 Compare solutions to a
problem.
4.5 Compare and contrast
[ideas from a subject].
Date | Can-Do # | Topic | I need to work on …
3. 1 Answer questions about
At Level
3 I can …
3 – Developing
Complexity
Series of related
sentences
Vocabulary
General & some specific
vocabulary
Control
Meaning overrides
communication errors
CVC Criteria
[school subjects]
3.2 Re-tell stories/events.
3.3 Listen to stories/ explanations
and make predictions.
3.4 Listen to stories/ explanations
and guess why things
happened.
3.5 Offer solutions to social
conflicts.
3.6 Make presentations.
3.7 Solve problems.
Speaking
Date | Can-Do # | Topic | I need to work on …
Plus … a Class
ELD Progress
Monitoring Form
Period ______ ELD Monitoring Sheet | Speaking (Grs 3-5)
ESL
Tchr
Gr
Co-Tchr
/ Subject
Period
Week(s)
#
Question:
1
2
How often would
you do a focused
speaking progress
assessment like this?
Especially
considering that you
might also be
monitoring progress
in the other three
domains?
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Number of EL’s at WIDA Lvl
1
2
3
4
5
Topic | State Curriculum Standard
Last, First
WIDA
Lvl
Can-Do # |
Goals & Notes
C V C
May 2 | #4.2 Theme …
Another Method
• A CBM with WIDA prompts and rubrics!
Why Use a CBM
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
It is a “dipstick”
It is “down & dirty”
It is free
It is EASY to use
It focuses attention on growth
It can help us learn to look at data productively
Similar to mini-IRI’s and/or Running Records
It’s nationally normed
Keep in Mind…
•
•
•
•
•
•
F & P is BETTER (but also MUCH longer)
IDEL is a mini-check
IDEL is NOT a substitute, it is an extra
Again, it’s a quick “dipstick”
It is easy to document
It can be VERY motivating
How to Use a CBM
• www.easycbm.com
• https://dibels.uoregon.edu/measures/
• AIMS Web
• Choose a passage at the student’s actual
reading level (NOT grade level)
• Follow the directions and administer the 1
minute reading assessment
How to Use a CBM Continued
• Stop timing after one-minute and record correct
words per minute
• Allow student to finish the passage orally or
silently
• Ask student to retell the story, score her/his
speaking on the WIDA Speaking Rubric (also score
on the reading comprehension rubric if desired)
• Ask student to write about the story by
responding to one of the prompts, score the
writing sample on the WIDA Writing Rubric
Involving Students in Learning
Students must be INVOLVED to be motivated!
Teaching Students to Analyze Data
• Where do I want/need to be?
– Look at the Norms / Criteria
• Where am I now?
– Look at Current Data
• How can I get there?
– Students reflect on data
• What does the data tell me about my learning?
• How can I improve?
– Students set goals for growth
Name: ____________________________ Date: ________
_______________’s Goal Sheet
_____________________ Level: _____
_______________ by
I can work on
1. Looking at the _________________ example
2.
_____________________ Level: _____
_______________ by
I can work on
How can you use this in your
teaching?
1. Looking at the _________________ example
2.
Name: ____________________________ Date: ________
_______________’s Goal Sheet
_____________________ Level: _____
_______________ by
I can work on
1. Looking at the _________________ example
2.
_____________________ Level: _____
_______________ by
I can work on
1. Looking at the _________________ example
Why Share “Kid-Friendly” Can Do’s?
• Students and
teacher(s) have a
clear target
• Makes Can Do’s into
“I can…’s”
• Post them? Refer to
them? Give students
Can Do booklets?
Have level 2 and level
3 set goals?
Were the Questions Answered?
1. What is WIDA? How do all
those parts work?
2. How can teachers use WIDA
as a tool for monitoring
ELD progress?
(And why would you want to?)
3. How can students use WIDA
as a tool for monitoring their own ELD progress?
(And why would you want them to?)
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