2012 Chief 101 Presentation - North Carolina Department of Insurance

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Module 1
Now That You Are the Fire Chief
The Responsibilities Are Yours
Remember when you used to say,
“If I was the chief, I would….”
Chief 101 Class
●
This class consists of several
programs that together will satisfy the
9S inspection criteria as specified by
the North Carolina Administrative
Code. The primary objective of the
course is to inform current and future
chief officers of the various aspects
and complexities surrounding the
operations and organization of North
Carolina fire departments.
What is Gateway?
●
Annual meeting of the various fire and
emergency service associations and
agencies that is sponsored by the NC
State Fireman’s Association.
–
Discuss various areas of concern,
and develop methods to address
concerns that all the associations
agree to.
–
This is a group of your peers that
you elect to represent you in
various associations.
Who attends Gateway?
Now That You are the Fire
Chief Why Chief 101?
● People
in the position change.
“We are new at this and didn’t get any
help from the past chief on anything,
plus we are trying to correct a lot of
mistakes that have happened in the
past 30 years”
Excerpt from an email to the NCAFC
November 30, 2010
Now That You are the Fire
Chief Why Chief 101?
●Processes
change – in line of duty
death.
●Revisions in policies occur.
●To protect our members and their
families.
●To bring awareness to “the chiefs.”
●It may be in the Administrative
Secretary's job description, but it is “the
chiefs” responsibility.
●Why not?
Now That You are the Fire
Chief When asked how many feet were in a
mile, Einstein replied, "I do not know.”
“But you are recognized as the smartest
man in the world,” his questioner noted.
Einstein replied, "I do not keep things in
my head that I can find elsewhere. I only
need to know where to find it when I need
it.”
It’s not realistic to think you can know all
of this, but others are depending on you to
know how to access the resources
that are available to them.
Now That You are the Fire
Chief How was the determination made
to initiate this requirement?
●A
group of your peers, representing
you through various organizations, in
a forum referred to as “Gateway”
identified the need to develop this
class.
●This
is not an ‘OSFM thing’.
Typically, 15+ agencies are
represented at a “Gateway” meeting.
Now That You are the Fire
Chief How was the determination made
to initiate this requirement?
●The
organizations attending the
Gateway meeting submit ideas for
consideration and all organizations
agree on 3 to 5 issues to work on for
the coming year.
●Wide
range of topics including health
and safety and legislative actions.
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
When
●
“The Chief” is required to complete
the Chief 101 course in order to
maintain their 9S / NCRRS Rating.
●
Important to consider succession
planning.
●
Initially, no department will lose
their rating due to non-compliance.
Now That You are the Fire
Chief Questions
●
●
●
I’ve already had Chief 101, do I
have to take this course? Yes
Will our NCRRS rating be revoked
if the chief doesn’t take this
course? No, but before getting
your next inspection the chief will
have to complete the course.
I’ve been the chief for __ years,
why do I have to go through this?
It is now a requirement for
NCRRS rating.
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
Questions
●
I delegate these responsibilities to
others in the department? Great
idea, but “the chief” is still
responsible.
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
Points to Ponder
●
How many chiefs do we have in the
class?
–
Did anyone beg you to take the
position of Fire Chief?
–
Are you the Chief by default (no
one else wanted it)?
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
Points to Ponder
–
If the answer is “no,” then you
basically stood up before the whole
community and said through your
words or actions that you wanted to
be the Chief.
–
Do your words and actions still show
the community and those you serve
with that you want to be
the Chief?
Now That You are the Fire
Chief There is always one person held
accountable for the success or failure
of any organization.
●
U. S. Government: The President
●
Church: the Pastor
●
Law Enforcement: the Police Chief /
Sheriff
●
Local Governments: County/City
Manager
●
Fire Department: that’s You the Chief
How Many “want to be” Chiefs Do We
Have in the Class?
Points to Ponder
●
How many “want to be” Fire Chiefs
do we have in the class?
–
Do those you work with know that
you want to be the chief? Have
you publicly stated, “I want to be
the fire chief,” or do you just
assume that people know?
How Many “want to be” Chiefs Do
We Have in the Class?
Points to Ponder
●
How many “want to be” Fire Chiefs
do we have in the class?
–
Do your efforts and words
demonstrate that you want to be
the fire chief?
–
Do you have a passion for the
position?
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
What Characteristics Make a
Successful Chief
“A successful Fire Chief has to be…”
Honest
Unbiased – “Like Me”/Friends /Family (volunteer)
Motivator
Bold
Leader
Encourager
HUMBLE
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
What You Say is Critical
●
“I think” often becomes “like gospel”
to those with whom you are talking;
after all, you are the Chief.
●
“I don’t know” is sometimes a better
phrase; and when you’re not sure,
be bold enough to use it.
“When words are many, sin is not absent,
but he who holds his tongue is wise”
– Solomon, Proverbs 10:19
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
What are Your Primary
Responsibilities?
●
“To Save Lives and Protect Property”
– Personnel
– Citizens
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
What are Your Primary
Responsibilities?
●
Emergency Services Response
Triangle
– Staffing: adequate numbers to
start operations
– Equipment: well maintained /
operational
– Trained Personnel – trained, not
exposed
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
What are Your Primary
Responsibilities?
●
The Safety of Your Personnel
– Training
– Personal Protection
– Personal Accountability
– Enforcing Safety Standards
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
Truly evaluate your department’s
response and readiness capabilities
●
Is your membership protected?
●
Can you deliver what you say you can?
●
Are your responders trained properly
and do they follow the department’s
training standards?
●
Do you have written, updated Standard
Operating Guidelines?
●
Are your department records
current?
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
Remember – you are now responsible.
Delegating or assuming does not
relieve you of the responsibility of
knowing.
Is Your Membership
Protected?
●
Is your roster up to date?
●
Is there a process for updating your
roster as members are added or
deleted?
The roster is a living document and
should be updated as changes
occur, not tomorrow!
Is Your Membership
Protected?
Consequences of not having a
current roster:
●
In the event of a firefighter death,
family members would not be
eligible for NCSFA death benefits,
possibly resulting in the fire chief
and department facing civil action.
Can You Deliver?
Your local officials most likely assume
that you can provide all these services
because you are the fire department.
●Fire
Suppression
●Emergency Medical Services
●Vehicle Extrication
●Water Rescue
●Hazard Materials Response
●Other types of Emergencies
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
●
Identify what the hazards are in your
community and inform the local
officials of the department's
capabilities to respond to hazards in
your response area.
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
●
“The Routine Response”
–
Contrary to popular belief, “we can not
be all things in all situations.”
–
There are risks which fire departments
are not equipped to handle and we
should let local officials know before we
are faced with these incidents.
–
While this may not change frequently in
many areas, it should be an annual
review during the budget
process.
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
●
It is critical that you provide an
assessment of the department’s
readiness – especially successors.
(No better time than at the
beginning.)
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
– The reputation of the past chief can
be a positive with the community,
but a negative within the
organization or vice versa.
– “You can only rely on past success
until the next alarm.”
– Are you turning your head to any
weaknesses the department may
have or are you identifying them?
Now That You are the Fire
Chief
– The Story of the 3 Envelopes
“In a Crisis”
•
•
•
Blame it on your predecessor
Reorganize
Prepare 3 envelopes
Are Your Responders Ready?
●
Standard Training Requirements
–
Pension Fund and Death Benefit
Qualification – 36 Hours Minimum
Are Your Responders Ready?
●
Standard Training Requirements
–
●
●
●
●
NCRRS Requirements for
Maximum Credit/Person
Company Training – 240 Hours
Driver/Operator – 12 hours
New Driver – 40 hours
Officer – 12 Hours
Are Your Responders Ready?
●
Drill Sessions:
8 – 3 hour sessions (24 hours)


●
●
Multiple Company Engine Training:
4 – 3 hour sessions
Night Drills: 2 – 3 hour sessions
Recruit Training – 240 hours
Hazardous Materials – 3 Hours
Are Your Responders Ready?
What are your department’s
standards?
As the chief each of us need to go
back to the core question:
Are your responders ready?
Standard Training Requirements
vs. Application of Techniques
●
Meeting “Standard Hours” in reality
only has an administrative meaning.
It does nothing to show if a firefighter
really knows how to apply what
he/she has been exposed to.
●
“Pencil whipped” or “tried and tested”
Standard Training Requirements
vs. Application of Techniques
●
Classroom exposure is essential to
development, but it does not replace
the need to conduct hands on drills.
●
Adopt the state of Missouri’s slogan,
“Show Me.”
Standard Training Requirements
vs. Application of Techniques
●
The Chief and the department need
to identify minimum requirements
that the department will accept for
each position
Standard Training Requirements
vs. Application of Techniques
●
After identifying minimum
requirements there needs to be a
means to evaluate each persons
actual skills and abilities.
●
Question: should you accept “Yes”
to the question, “Do you know how
to….?”
F/F Deaths and Injuries
Primary Causes of Death
●
Heart Attacks
– Physical Fitness
– Stress
●
Traffic Accidents
– Seat Belts
– Rollovers
– Relative Speed
F/F Deaths and Injuries
Primary Causes of Death
Fire Ground
–Lack of Situational Awareness:
Collapses, etc.
–Burn Injuries
●
Line of Duty Deaths
●
LODD’s are tragedies that bring a
great deal of stress on “the Chief”,
the fire department, the organization
and the local community.
Line of Duty Deaths
●
Because these types of events are
so sudden and so devastating, it is
possible to overlook some very
important things that need to be
done early in the event to insure the
firefighters family has opportunity to
apply for all federal and state
benefits.
“Never make a major decision in the
middle of a crisis”
– Jerry Falwell
Line of Duty Deaths
(First Reactions)
●
●
Autopsy
Confine and Control all Protective
Clothing
Line of Duty Deaths
(First Reactions)
●
●
●
Have everyone who was on the
scene to write a description of the
event.
Begin collecting all relevant reports
about the incident (911 tapes,
weather reports, etc.)
Call OSFM to activate the Death
Benefit Assistance Team. (Critical
step)
OSFM Death Benefit
Assistance Program
●
Not designed to take over from any
AHJ, but insures that all federal and
state procedures are followed for the
protection of the firefighter’s family,
and provides support and assistance
to the local fire chief.
OSFM Death Benefit
Assistance Program
– Not a time to be territorial.
– These situations dictate the need
for outside resources that have
experience dealing with federal
and state paperwork and
procedures.
(Testimonial from someone who has
benefitted from the team.)
OSFM Death Benefit
Assistance Program
●
Activation of the team incorporates:
– Notification of State and Federal
Agencies
– Notification of the Fallen
Firefighters Foundation
● Firefighter Funeral Procedures
● Funeral service benefits
(see Dignity Memorial)
OSFM Death Benefit
Assistance Program
●
Activation of the team incorporates:
– Media assistance
– Report writing and review
– Compilation of documents
●
Allows you time to work with the
family and be with your personnel.
Federal and State Benefits
(Rated Fire Departments)
●
Federal Safety Officers Death
Benefit ($300,000+)
●
State In Line of Duty Death
Benefit ($50,000.00)
●
Eligible for Workers
Compensation Benefits
Federal and State Benefits
(Rated Fire Departments)
●
Eligible to be a Member of the NC
Firemen’s Pension Fund
Must be on the Department Roster
to be eligible for these benefits.
Resources
One of your most important resources
is other Chief Officers. (Makes sense
to use the knowledge and wisdom of
our peers.)
State and Local Resources
“Plans fail for lack of counsel, but with
many advisers they succeed”
– Solomon (Proverbs 15:22)
Associations
●
●
●
●
North Carolina Association of Fire
Chiefs
North Carolina State Firemen’s
Association
North Carolina Fire Marshals
Association
North Carolina Association of
Rescue and EMS
Associations
●
●
●
●
●
North Carolina Society of Fire and
Rescue Instructors
Fire and Life Safety Educators
Hazardous Materials
State Emergency Response
Commission
Regional Associations
(Eastern/Piedmont/Western)
State/County Agencies
●
●
●
●
●
●
Office of State Fire Marshal
North Carolina Community
Colleges
Office of Emergency Medical
Services
County Emergency Management
Officials
North Carolina Emergency
Management
North Carolina Fire and Rescue
Commission
Agencies to Notify When There is
a Change in the Chief’s Position
●
N.C. Office of State Fire Marshal
●
North Carolina State Firemen’s
Association
●
North Carolina Association of Fire
Chiefs
Agencies to Notify When There is
a Change in the Chief’s Position
Make notification on department
letterhead.
Include:
–Name of former chief.
–Name and contact information of new
chief.
National Fire Incident
Reporting System (NFIRS)
●
How many departments represented
here today are reporting?
– Why Not?
●
Why report?
– Provides a true picture of the fire
problem in N.C.
– Impacts grant funding
– Helps determine Training /
Response Needs
National Fire Incident
Reporting System (NFIRS)
– Prevention Programs
– Justification for legislative change
● Residential sprinklers
● Benefits
●
As of August 1, 2010 participation in
the NFIRS is a requirement of the
rating schedule.
Local Relief Fund Report(s)
●
Report is requested by October 31
and no later than January 1 of each
year.
●
Consequences for not reporting:
Loss of eligibility for future Relief
Funds.
●
Conflict of Interest Statement to
OSFM.
Information is sent to the chief on
record on file at the Office of State
Fire Marshal.
Module 2
Firefighter Life Safety Initiatives
Firefighter Maintenance
Program
●
Regular Medical Check-ups
– Yes, they can be a pain, but if
you don’t do it for you, do it for
those who need you.
●
Regular Exercise
– Even walking makes a BIG
difference!
– Walk a mile a day and watch the
changes.
Firefighter Maintenance
Program
●
Eat Healthy
– Think about what you are eating
and then, picture operating
interior at a working fire 30
minutes later.
– Now, what do you want to eat?
Firefighter Rehab Guidelines
●
Stop before you drop.
– Cool down when hot.
– Warm up when cold.
– Dry off when wet.
●
Stay hydrated with non-caffeinated
drinks.
●
Monitor vital signs.
Firefighter Response Plan
●
Get fully dressed in full PPE from
head to toe!
●
Get in!
●
Sit down!
●
Fasten your seatbelt!
●
Enjoy the ride with a driver who will
get you there in one piece!
Driver Response Plan
●
It’s not a race!
●
Safe is more important than fast!
●
Stop at red lights and stop signs!
● NO EXCUSES!!
●
If they don’t get out of your way –
don’t run them over!
●
THINK and REACT CAREFULLY!!
Interior Firefighting Plan
●
Work as a team!
●
Stay together!
●
Stay oriented!
●
Manage your air supply!
●
Get off the apparatus with tools and
a thermal imager for EVERY
interior operating team!
●
A radio for EVERY member!
●
Provide constant updates!
●
Constantly assess the
Risk/Benefit model!
You can make a
difference
Get back to the basics!
National Fallen Firefighters Foundation
Life Safety Initiatives
2004
Module 3
Line of Duty Deaths Assistance
Program Objectives
●
Describe the procedures to request
assistance in the event of a line-ofduty death.
●
Identify the initial actions that need
to be taken in the event of a line-ofduty death.
●
Describe the resources that are
available to assist departments in
dealing with a line-of-duty death.
GOAL:
●
To assist Fire Departments and
Rescue Squads in assuring that all
State and Federal Benefits are
pursued for the surviving spouse
and/or family and provide other
services, as requested by the
department, squad, or family.
Available Assistance
●
Aid in filing paperwork for benefits
●
Honor Guard Protocols (Drum &
Pipes)
●
Funeral Protocols / Reception
●
FD / Rescue Staff Assignments
●
Eulogy Guidelines
●
Chaplain List
On-Duty Fatality Defined?
●
On-duty fatalities include any
injury or illness sustained while
on-duty that proves fatal.
On-Duty Defined?
●
The term ‘on-duty’ refers to being
involved in operations at the scene
of an emergency, whether it is a fire
or non-fire incident; responding to
or returning from an incident;
performing other official duties such
as training, maintenance, public
education, inspection, and
investigations.
www.ncdoi/osfm.com
Possible Benefits
●
State Death Benefits $50,000.00
– $20,000 first year
– $10,000 for 3 years
●
North Carolina State Firemen’s
Association In-Line of Duty Death
$50,000.00
●
NC Society of Fire/Rescue
Instructors $10,000.00
●
National Volunteer Fire Counsel
$10,000 for current members
Possible Benefits
●
Federal Public Safety Officers
Death Benefits $318,111.64 (2010)
+ “COLA”
●
Workers Compensation
$201,000.00 - $301,000.00
Possible Benefits
●
Local Relief Fund
●
Pension Fund Reimbursement
(Monies paid into fund.)
●
Any department benefits such as:
VFIS, Brotherhood Term Life, etc.
●
Each year the chief should review all
benefits the department has with the
members!
What You Need to do…
●
Call for help! 1-800-634-7854
Monday through Friday, 8am - 5pm
●
After hours
– Tim Bradley
– Steve Sloan
– Larry Hughes
●
Start a Log
1-919-218-5311
1-336-813-0088
1-919-218-1319
What we will and will not do
●
Will not come if not requested.
●
No inaccurate information will be
given out.
●
Will not disseminate information
unless cleared by the chief and
family.
Assistance Team
●
A response team of two OSFM
personnel will arrive within 24 hours,
if needed.
●
They will need access to a
telephone, a fax machine, a table,
etc.
●
They will stay as long as you need
them.
Considerations
●
Communicate to the family the
need for an autopsy to be
performed and blood samples to be
taken.
Why? A cause of death must be
determined in order to avoid a delay
in receiving federal benefits.
Additional Considerations
●
Secure all PPE and anything that
could be a contributing factor to
the death.
●
Appoint someone to deal with the
press/media.
●
Have a press release prepared.
We will contact:
●
North Carolina Industrial
Commission (Worker’s Comp)
●
North Carolina Pension Fund
●
North Carolina Department of Labor
●
North Carolina Firemen’s
Association
●
North Carolina Fallen Firefighter’s
Foundation
●
North Carolina Association of
Rescue & EMS
We will contact:
●
Public Safety Officer’s Benefits
●
Volunteer Safety Workers
Compensation Fund
●
VFIS
●
United States Fire Administration
●
National Fire Academy
●
NFPA and NIOSH
NCFFF Services
●
Chaplaincy services in conjunction
with:
– NC State Firemen’s Association
– NC Association of Fire Chiefs
– NC Office of State Fire Marshal
●
Family Transport Van
●
Assist with Funeral Arrangements /
Protocol
●
Serve as a resource for your
department.
Module 4
Firefighter Safety NFPA and OSHA
Program Objectives
●
Identify the requirements set forth by
OSHA that pertain to volunteer,
career, and combination fire
departments.
●
Identify the requirements set forth by
NFPA that pertain to volunteer,
career, and combination fire
departments.
OSHA Duty Clause
●
SEC. 5 (a) Each employer
1) shall furnish to each of his
employees and a place of
employment which are free from
recognized hazards that are
causing or are likely to cause,
death or serious physical harm
to his employee;
OSHA Duty Clause
●
SEC. 5 (a) Each employer
2) shall comply with occupational
safety and health standards
promulgated under this act.
OSHA Duty Clause
●
SEC. 5 (b)
Each employee shall comply with
occupational safety and health
standards and all rules, regulations,
and orders issued pursuant to this
Act which are applicable to his own
actions and conduct.
N.C. OSHA Program
●
Neither the Office of State Fire
Marshal or the Department of
Insurance Administers the N.C.
OSHA program.
●
The N.C. Department of Labor is
responsible for administering this
program.
OSHA Law
●
Contained in N.C. General Statutes
G. S. 95-131
N.C. G.S.95-148
●
Safety and Health Programs of State
Agencies and Local Governments
– The North Carolina Fire and Rescue
Commission shall recommend
regulations and standards for fire
departments. (1973, c.295, s.23;
1983, c.164; 1985, c, 544; 1989,
c.750, s. 3; 1991 (Reg. Sess., 1992),
c.1020, s. 1.)
Standards Enforcement
●
Purpose:
“ … to insure so far as possible
every working man and woman
in the Nation safe and healthful
working conditions and to
preserve our human
resources…”
North Carolina is an
OSHA State
N.C. OSHA Regulations must meet or
exceed Federal OSHA Regulations
HISTORY
●
OSHA and the Fire Service
– 1983 - OSHA Reform Act put in
place affecting fire service.
– 1983 - HB 82 Ratified exempting
volunteer and certain municipal Fire
Departments from the OSHA Act.
– 1985 - OSHA Act amended to put
paid personnel of exempt municipal
fire departments under OSHA.
HISTORY
●
OSHA and the Fire Service
–
1992 -The AG released an opinion
stating volunteer departments were
in most cases not exempt, since an
employer/employee relationship
exists.
HISTORY
●
OSHA and the Fire Service
–
March 1993 - Fire & Rescue
Commission establishes OSHA
Committee.
–
May 1993 - OSHA Commission
suggests creation of parallel
standards/OSHA concurs.
HISTORY
●
OSHA and the Fire Service
– August 1993 - OSHA sends letter
to mayors informing them of AG’s
opinion.
– November 1993 - AG revises
previous opinion, stating
compensation now key for
determining coverage.
What determines due
compensation?
●
The link provided below provides
some guidance but NC OSHA looks
at each department on a case by
case basis due to the diversity in
departments.
http://www.nclabor.com/osha/compliance/
publicfom/volunteer.pdf
HISTORY
●
OSHA and the Fire Service
– January 1994 - OSHA sends
another letter to mayors advising
of change in ruling. OSHA
advises that combination
department’s paid members are
covered under act.
National Fire Protection
Association
●
What is NFPA?
– Non-Profit Corporation
– Develop consensus standards
through an intricate committee
process
National Fire Protection
Association
●
What is NFPA?
– Standards are not laws but can carry
the weight of laws if adopted by
enforcement agencies such as
OSHA.
– Many federal agencies have adopted
NFPA standards such as DHS.
– Website is www.nfpa.org
Parallel Standards
Letter From OSHA
April 2, 1996
“ the goals of our departments are
merged into making the workplaces of
the men and women in the fire and
rescue services as safe as practical
given their often dangerous duties…
For our part in the Department of Labor
(OSHA), we will use these documents
as a guide when inspecting or
providing consultation to fire and
rescue services.”
Standard of Care
Defined as the level of competency
anticipated or mandated during the
performance of a service or duty
Reasonable
Man
Standard
Standard of Care
●
Last fifty years have taught us:
– Potential impacts are limitless
– There are options in operational
approaches
– Initial responders need
competency
– Development of a Standard of
Care has occurred
Standard of Care
●
Influenced by:
– Laws
– Regulation
– Standards
– Guidance
– Knowledge
– Experience
Key Points
●
Currently, OSHA can inspect paid
departments to both NFPA and
OSHA. Does not increase
requirements.
●
Will not impact status of “voluntary”
standards for volunteer fire
departments or volunteer rescue
squads.
Key Points
●
Fulfills statutory responsibility.
●
Allows us to develop training
materials.
●
Allows Volunteer Fire Departments
and Volunteer Rescue Squads to
work toward compliance of same
standard.
Why Do It?

Statutory Responsibility.
(G.S. 95 - 148)

Increases Safety and Awareness.

Reduces Confusion.


Allows the Development of Classes
and Training Aids in Understanding
Complex Standards.
Brings About Better Coordination
With NFPA and OSHA.
Module 5
NFIRS
Program Objectives
122
●
Identify different sources of
information that pertain to NFIRS.
●
Describe the various parts of
NFIRS and how to obtain free
access.
●
Describe the requirements to use
NFIRS under NC Administrative
Code.
123
N.C. G.S. 58-79-45 (a)
●
(a) Whenever a fire department
responds to a fire, the chief of that
department shall complete or
cause to be completed a fire
incident report, which report shall
be on a form prescribed by the
Department of Insurance.
(continue)
N.C. G.S. 58-79-45 (b)
●
(b) The fire department shall forward a
copy of the completed form to the fire
marshal of the county in which the fire
occurred. If there is no fire marshal in
that county, the fire department shall
forward a copy of the report to the
county commissioners. The fire
department and the fire marshal or
county commissioners to whom
reports are sent shall retain the
reports for a period of five years.
(continue)
N.C. AC 05A.0507
●
OSFM has now implemented a
requirement for incident reporting for
rating purposes which requires a fire
department to report on the National
Fire Incident Reporting System
(NFIRS) to the N.C. OSFM.
History
●
In 1972, America Burning was
published and brought attention to
the nations fire problem and led to
the development of the U.S. Fire
Administration.
History
●
In 1974, the USFA was authorized
to gather and analyze data about
the nations fire problem and
●
An agreement was made between
USFA and National Fire
Information Council (NFIC) to
maintain the National Fire Incident
Reporting System.
NFIRS 5.0 All-Incident
Reporting System
NFIRS Handbook
●
A complete reference guide for the
system is available through the
NFIRS website, www.nfirs.fema.gov
●
Contains definitions, purpose, entry,
and examples for all fields.
NFIRS 5.0 Required Modules
Module Use Primarily Driven By Incident Type….
All Incidents
Module 1
FireIncidents
Modules
EMS
Module
HazMat
Module
Wildland
Module
Module 1 Basic (All Incidents)
REQ’D
LOCAL
Module 2 Fire
Module 3 Structure
Module 4 Civilian Casualty
Module 5 Fire Service Casualty
ARSON
Module
NFIRS 1 - Basic Module
Completed for every incident.
NFIRS 1 - Basic Module
For many incident types, the Basic
Module is the ONLY report that must
be completed. It meets the need for
an abbreviated form of incident
reporting for some fires.
NFIRS 2 - Fire Module
Required for all fires that
extend beyond container.
NFIRS 2 - Fire Module
●
The Fire Module is used for any fire that
extends beyond a non-combustible
container.
●
It is applicable for a vehicle fire, building
fire, or vegetation (grass) fire unless the
Wildland Fire Module is used.
NFIRS 3 - Structure Fire
Module
Used for fires involving buildings.
NFIRS 3 - Structure Fire
Module
●
The Structure Fire Module is used
along with the Fire Module to
gather detailed information about
larger fire incidents that involve
building or portable/mobile
structures.
NFIRS 4 - Civilian Casualty
Module
Captures data regarding civilian
casualties resulting from a fire.
NFIRS 4 - Civilian Casualty
Module
The Civilian Fire Casualty Module
captures the data regarding any civilian
(Non-fire service) casualty associated
with fire-related incidents.
NFIRS 5 - Fire Service
Casualty
Used to report injuries, deaths or
exposures to fire service
personnel.
NFIRS 5.0 Optional Modules
●
Module Use Primarily Driven By
Incident Type….
– Module 6 EMS
– Module 7 HazMat
– Module 8 Wildland
– Module 9 Apparatus Personnel
– Module 10 Arson
NFIRS 6 - EMS Module
Gathers data relating to
provision of emergency
medical care.
NFIRS 7 - HazMat Module
Used to document Reportable
Hazardous Materials Incidents.
NFIRS 8 - Wildland Fire
Module
Used to document reportable
wildland fires.
NFIRS 9Apparatus/Resources
Used as a local option to
identify the apparatus sent to an
incident.
NFIRS 10 - Personnel Module
Used as a local option to help
track and manage personnel
utilized on incidents.
NFIRS 11 - Arson &
Juvenile Firesetter
Used whenever the Cause of
Ignition is coded as “intentional”
or “under investigation.”
Codes
●
Header series codes
100
400
700
200
500
800
300
600
900
●
Be code specific
Module Rules
●
Use your Module Rules
– Errors
– Document in a narrative
150
151
152
153
154
155
NFIRS HELP
Kim Williams
1-800-634-7854 ext 321
[email protected]
www.nfirs.fema.gov
Module 6
Districts, Legal, and Inspections
Considerations
Program Objectives
●
Understand the basis of the
procedures that govern fire districts,
the type of districts, and ratings /
response inspection.
Program Objectives
●
Describe the various aspects of the
response rating system as adopted
in North Carolina.
●
Recognize various sources of
information that will assist
departments in preparing for an
inspection.
Ratings and Certification
●
Consequences of Non-compliance
– Insurance Premiums
– Potential Residential Development
– Potential Commercial Development
– Local Funding Tied To Property
Development
Ratings and Certification
●
Consequences of Non-compliance
– Pension Fund
– Fireman’s Relief Fund
– Fireman’s Death Benefit - N.C.
– Grants
Status of NC Fire Districts
2000
2009
Class 9S / 9E…….1066…………….423
Class 9E…………….0………………275
Class 9S……...……622…………….148
FDs below Class 9……479…………...1124
FDs with split grade......445…………….647
Status of NC Fire Districts
(Cont.)
2000
2009
Fire Departments…………………….1316……..1280
Fire Districts…………………………..1546……. 1547
Municipal Districts………………….352……... 368
Rural Districts……………………..1194……..1179
Non-Profit Corporations……………….964………911
Municipal Departments………………..351……...367
County Departments……………………..1……...….2
Fire Protection Definitions
Chief 101 – NC OSFM Ratings and
Inspections
Fire Protection Definitions
●
Fire Insurance District
(G.S. 153A-300)
An area outside corporate limits
with boundaries approved by the
County Board of Commissioners
for fire insurance purposes. An
“Insurance District” is NOT
supported by either a referendum
type fire tax (G.S. 69.25) or a
special service district tax (G.S.
153A-300).
Fire Protection Definitions
●
Rural Fire Protection District
(G.S. 153A.233)
An area outside corporate limits
with boundaries designated by
petition of 35% of the resident freeholders in which a fire tax not to
exceed $0.15 per $100.00
valuation has been authorized by
the resident qualified voters within
the district.
Fire Protection Definitions
●
Fire Service District
(G.S. 153A-300)
An area outside corporate limits with
boundaries approved by the County
Board of Commissioners in which a
fire tax is levied without referendum
for fire protection services. Such
district or districts may include
territory within corporate limits if
approved by resolution of the
municipal governing body.
Fire Insurance Districts
Chief 101 – NC OSFM Ratings and
Inspections
Fire Insurance Districts
●
Fire Insurance Districts must be
properly established and
documented.
– For NC 9S Inspection purposes,
only properly established Fire
Insurance Districts can receive
certification.
– Any Fire Insurance District, not
properly established, must have
corrections completed before
inspection results can be
issued.
Fire Insurance Districts
●
Rural Districts Extending into
Multiple Counties
– If a rural Fire Insurance District is
established in such a way that it
extends into more than 1 county;
then all Fire Insurance District
requirements and documentation
must be in place, for each county,
before that Fire Insurance District
can be recognized for certification.
Fire Insurance District
Verification
– Fire Insurance District, Rural Fire
Protection District, Fire Service
District and/or Fire Department
Response District lines may run
concurrently, in combination or
separately.
– NCDOI/OSFM requires written
verification of any Fire Insurance
District established by County
Commissioners.
Fire Department Ownership
Chief 101 – NC OSFM Ratings
and Inspections
Fire Department Ownership
●
Who actually “owns” the fire
department?
– Is it a part of a municipal
government?
– Is it a non-profit organization?
– Who / What is the governing
body of the fire department?
Fire Department Ownership
– Who pays the Fire Department
bills?
– Who carries the Workmen’s
Compensation Insurance on the
fire department personnel?
– Who signs the annual
Certification Roster for the
department?
– Is there a contract to provide fire
protection services?
Fire Department Ownership
– What is the organization’s legal
name?
– If a non-profit, what is the name of
the organization as it appears in
its Charter / Articles of
Incorporation?
– Is it the same name as on any
contracts and legal documents of
the organization
– Who is the legal ‘head’ of the fire
dept?
Fire Department Ownership
●
Does the organization’s legal name:
– match the name on the apparatus
titles?
– match the name displayed on the
apparatus and vehicles owned by
the organization?
Module 7
Firefighters’ Relief Fund
NC GS 58-84-1 through 58-84-60
Program Objectives
●
Describe administration of
Firefighters’ Relief Fund Program
●
List requirements for participation
●
Explain how money can be spent
●
Provide contact information
What is it?
●
Firefighters’ Relief Fund is:
– A benefit to financially assist a
firefighter that has been injured
or killed In-Line-Of-Duty.
– NCGS 58-84-35
● (2a) To provide assistance to
a destitute firefighter and
● (5) Supplemental retirement &
other benefits
How is it funded?
●
All NC licensed insurance companies
pay to the N.C. Dept. of Revenue a
portion of the Fire & Lightning
coverage of all property insurance (.5
of 1%)
●
All County Tax Administrators report to
the N.C. Dept. of Insurance the county
population and the property tax value
for each rated fire insurance district.
Rules for Participation
●
Must elect relief fund board of
trustees
–
Two are elected by the fire
department.
–
Two are appointed by the City or
County Commissioner’s.
–
One is appointed by the Insurance
Commissioner.
Rules for Participation
–
One of the five members will be
elected as the relief fund treasurer.
(all local relief fund treasurer’s are
covered by a One Million dollar
bond, which is paid from the
administrative fees)
Rules for Participation
●
Department must be a member of
the NC State Firemen’s Association.
–
Executive Director for information
(1-800-253-4377)
Rules for Participation
●
Financial report of local relief fund
–
Submitted to NC State Firemen’s
Association
–
Form is mailed from NCSFA to
dept. in June
–
Must be received at NCSFA by
October 31 annually
Rules for Participation
●
Report of Fire Condition
–
Filed with the N.C. Dept. of
Insurance
–
Filed by October 31 annually
–
N.C. Dept. of Insurance notifies
each city and / or county clerkfinance officer in August to file the
report
Rules for Participation
–
Required by NCGS 58-84-46 for
all rated fire districts
–
Provides the local relief fund board
of trustees names and identifies
the treasurer
How Funds Can Be Spent
●
In-Line-Of-Duty injury
–
This is the primary purpose of
Relief Fund.
–
The local relief fund board
determines amount based on the
earning capacity of the
firefighter.
How Funds Can Be Spent
●
Assistance to a destitute firefighter
with 5 years of service.
–
The local relief fund board will
determine the need and the amount of
financial assistance.
–
The relief fund board must obtain the
approval of the NCSFA before
disbursement of funds.
How Funds Can Be Spend
●
To provide for benefits of:
–
supplemental retirement
–
workers compensation
–
other insurance & pension
protection
–
The relief fund board must obtain
the approval of the NCSFA before
disbursement of funds.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Who has control of the relief fund
money?
–
The Local Relief Fund Board of
Trustees.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
My department is owned & operated
by municipal government, do they
control the relief fund?
–
●
No. The Local Relief Fund Board
of Trustee’s controls the funds.
Can equipment or other purchases
be made with relief fund money?
–
No. NC General Statute 58-84-35
defines how the fund can be
used.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Can the Local Relief Fund Board make
all disbursement decisions?
–
No.
–
Disbursements for destitute firefighter’s,
supplemental retirement, pension &
other insurance protection, educational
benefits MUST be approved by the
Local Board and the NCSFA.
–
This is to ensure the fund balance will
remain actuarially sound for its original
intent, to assist an injured
firefighter.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Who is responsible to file the
membership, financial statement and
the Report of Fire Condition?
–
The fire department files:
Annual NCSFA membership and
the Relief Fund financial statement
with the NC State Firemen’s
Association annually by
October 31.
Frequently Asked Questions
–
The city & / or county clerk finance officer files:
Report of Fire Condition with the Dept.
of Insurance annually by October 31.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Who appoints the Relief Fund Board of
Trustees?
–
–
–
–
–
Fire department elects two
representatives
City & / or county appoints two
representatives
Insurance Commissioner appoints one
appointee
One of the five board members will be
elected to serve as the relief fund
treasurer.
All appointees must reside in
the fire district
Frequently Asked Questions
●
How is the relief fund treasurer
bonded?
–
Each local relief fund treasurer is
bonded through the State, from the
administrative / bond fees.
–
Each treasurer is bonded up to
$1,000,000.00 (One Million).
Relief fund accounts exceeding
$1,000,000.00 have a $10,000.00
deductible.
Contact Information
●
NC Department of Insurance
Lauren Thompson
Relief Fund Administrator
1-800-634-7854 x316
●
NC State Firemen’s Association
Paul Miller
Executive Director
1-800-253-4733
Module 8
Volunteer Fire Department Fund
NC General Statutes 58-87-1
Chief 101 Class
●
This class consists of several
programs that together will satisfy
the 9s inspection criteria as specified
by the North Carolina Administrative
Code. The primary objective of the
course is to inform current and future
chief officers of the various aspects
and complexities surrounding the
operations and organization of North
Carolina fire departments.
Program Objectives
●
●
●
●
●
Explain Volunteer Fire Department
Fund Program
List requirements for participation
Describe process and timeline for
application
Answer frequently asked questions
Provide contact information
What is it?
●
Volunteer Fire Department Fund is a
dollar-for-dollar matching grant to:
– Assist fire departments in the most
need.
– Purchase equipment.
– Make capital improvements.
– Help departments improve
insurance class.
How is it funded?
●
All N.C. licensed insurance
companies pay to the N.C. Dept. of
Revenue a portion of the Fire &
Lightning coverage of all property
insurance.
How much can be provided?
●
NC Dept. of Insurance will match
dollar-for-dollar up to $30,000 for
the purchase of equipment and to
make capital improvements.
Is my organization eligible?
●
Fire departments must:
– Be rated or actively working with the
NCDOI Fire Rating & Inspection
section.
– Serve a population of 12,000 or less.
– Be all volunteer with no more than 6
paid.
Application Process
●



Applications submitted via web
interface:
www.ncdoi.com
select OSFM
then “Fire/Rescue Grants & Relief
Fund”
●
www.ncdoi.com/OSFM/FRGrants/FRG_
home.asp
●
Fire chiefs are provided login
credentials
Application Timeline
●
●
●
●
January - Fire chiefs are notified
that the application is available.
March 1 – Deadline to submit
application.
May15 – Grant recipients
announced.
September 30 – Invoices and forms
must be submitted to N.C.
Department of Insurance to receive
payment.
Recipient Selection
●
Applications scored by point system.
●
Funding from N.C. Dept. of Revenue
entered into database.
●
Computer selects applications with
the lowest score (greatest need) until
the available funding is exhausted.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
My fire department is owned and
operated by a municipality, can we
apply?
–
Yes. The department must serve a
population of 12,000 or less.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
My department provides fire
protection and rescue services, do
we provide only information
regarding the fire service?
–
No. Information for the entire entity
must be provided.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Does the fire department have to
request the full $30,000.00?
–
No. We will match dollar-for-dollar
up to the $30,000.00 maximum.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
What type of equipment can we
apply for?
–
Protective equipment (on the body)
–
Equipment to help department lower
insurance rating
–
Miscellaneous fire related equipment
–
Vehicles
–
Buildings
–
Computers
Frequently Asked Questions
● What
is typically not approved
through the Fire Grant?
–
Training aids
–
Physicals
–
Physical fitness equipment
–
Furniture
–
Rescue equipment
–
Uniforms
–
(call DOI if in doubt)
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Can the fire department purchase
used / refurbished / reconditioned
equipment?
–
No. Equipment purchases must
be for new equipment.
Exception: Used vehicles
with one year
service/maintenance
records
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Can the fire department order the
equipment prior to the May 15th
announcement date?
–
No. Equipment ordered prior to
May15th will not be honored.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Are extensions allowed?
–
No. The Fire Grant application must
be submitted no later than March 1.
–
The invoice/agreement forms must be
submitted no later than September 30.
–
Exceptions on invoices:
30 day extension for delivery of
turnout gear
5 month extension for
vehicles or buildings
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Is backordered equipment allowed?
–
No. Backordered equipment
received / invoiced after
September 30 will not be paid.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Does the rescue/EMS provider have
to wait until September 30 to submit
the invoices?
–
No. Upon delivery of all of the
approved equipment, you may
submit the invoices.
–
Check requests are made to the
Controller’s office each Friday.
Contact Information
NC Department of Insurance
Lauren Thompson
Relief Fund Administrator
1-800-634-7854 x316
Module 8
Volunteer Rescue/EMS Fund
NC General Statutes 58-87-5
Program Objectives
●
Explain Volunteer Rescue/EMS
Fund Program.
●
List requirements for participation.
●
Describe process and timeline for
application.
●
Answer frequently asked questions.
●
Provide contact information.
What is it?
●
Volunteer Rescue/EMS Fund is:
– A dollar-for-dollar matching grant
to assist Rescue/EMS providers
that are in the most need to
purchase equipment and to
make capital improvements.
How is it funded?
●
18 cents of each vehicle inspection
sticker fund the Volunteer
Rescue/EMS fund.
How much can be provided?
●
N.C. Dept. of Insurance will match
dollar-for-dollar up to $25,000 for
the purchase of equipment and to
make capital improvements.
Is my organization eligible?
●
Rescue/EMS organizations must:
– Meet the criteria of NC
Association of Rescue & EMS
– Be primarily volunteer with no
more than10 paid positions.
Application Process
●



Applications submitted via web
interface:
www.ncdoi.com
select OSFM
then, “Fire/Rescue Grants & Relief
Fund”
●
www.ncdoi.com/OSFM/FRGrants/FRG_
home.asp
●
Rescue/EMS chiefs are provided
login credentials
Application Timeline
●
Aug. 1 - Rescue/EMS chiefs are
notified that the application is
available.
●
Oct. 1 – Deadline to submit
application.
●
Dec. 15 – Grant recipients
announced.
●
April 30 – Invoices and forms must
be submitted to NCDOI to receive
payment.
Recipient Selection
●
Applications scored by point system.
●
Funding from DMV entered into
database.
●
Computer selects applications with
the lowest score (greatest need) until
the available funding is exhausted.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
My organization is owned and
operated by a municipality or
county, can we apply?
–
Yes
Frequently Asked Questions
●
My department provides fire
protection and rescue services, do
we provide only information
regarding the rescue service?
–
No. Information for the entire entity
must be provided.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Does the rescue/EMS provider have
to request the full $25,000.00?
–
No. We will match dollar-for-dollar
up to the $25,000.00 maximum.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
What type of equipment can we
apply for?
–
Protective equipment (on the
body)
–
Miscellaneous rescue & EMS
related equipment.
–
Vehicles
–
Buildings
Frequently Asked Questions
●
What is typically not approved
through the Rescue/EMS Grant?
–
Training aids
–
Physicals
–
Physical fitness equipment
–
Furniture
–
Uniforms
–
(call DOI if in doubt)
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Can the rescue / EMS provider
purchase used / refurbished /
reconditioned equipment?
–
No. Equipment purchases must
be new.
Exception: Used vehicles with
one year service/maintenance
records.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Can the rescue / EMS provider
order the equipment prior to the
December 15th announcement
date?
–
No. Equipment ordered prior to
December 15th will not be
honored.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Are extensions allowed?
–
No. The Rescue/EMS Grant application
must be submitted no later than
October 1.
●
The invoice/agreement forms must
be submitted no later than April 30.
●
Exceptions on invoices:
30 day extension for delivery of
turnout gear
5 month extension for
vehicles or buildings
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Is backordered equipment allowed?
–
No. Backordered equipment
received / invoiced after April 30
will not be paid.
Frequently Asked Questions
●
Does the rescue/EMS provider have
to wait until April 30 to submit the
invoices?
–
No. Upon delivery of all of the
approved equipment, you may
submit the invoices.
–
Check Requests are made to the
Controller’s office each Friday.
Contact Information
NC Department of Insurance
Lauren Thompson
Relief Fund Administrator
1-800-634-7854 x316
NC Association of Rescue & EMS
Gordon Joyner, Executive Director
1-800-262-7559
Module 9
Financial Issues
Program Objectives
●
Identify the different legal structures
fire departments use for
incorporation and implications
●
Describe the law regarding tax
exemption
●
Identify payroll issues for
departments
●
Identify principles for financial health for
fire departments and structures to
implement
Are you from a……
●
Municipal department?
●
Private corporation?
Municipal Department
●
Under town or city governance
●
No board of directors
●
Most accounting & bookkeeping
functions handled by municipality
Private corporation
●
Legal checkup
●
Are you really tax-exempt?
●
Which non-profit type to choose?
– 501(c)(3)
– 501(c)(4)
●
IRS filings
●
Sales / Fuel tax refunds
Payroll issues
●
The slippery slope of compliance:
– Who is an employee?
– IRS rules on compensating
volunteers
– Do I file W-2s?
– What in the world is FLSA?
– Working & volunteering for the
same department
Financial Structure
●
Independence of treasurer
●
Dual signatures
●
Fidelity bonds
●
Financial reporting
●
Relief funds
Financial Health
●
Budget
●
Long range plan
●
Building and equipment financing
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