Sustaining Institute with Steve Barkley

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Sustaining Redesign
How to Keep the Music Playing
Stephen G. Barkley
Executive Vice President
Performance Learning Systems
6227 Lower Mountain Road
New Hope, PA 18938
888.424.9700
[email protected]
www.plsweb.com
blogs.plsweb.com
Student Achievement
What is the definition of student
achievement that drives your work?
TOUGH CHOICES OR TOUGH
TIMES
Those countries that produce the most important
new products……………………….depend on a
deep vein of creativity that is constantly
renewing itself, and on a myriad of people who
can imagine how people can use things that
have never been available before, create
ingenious marketing and sales campaigns, write
books, build furniture, make movies and
imagine…………..
TOUGH CHOICES OR TOUGH
TIMES
This is a world in which a very high level of
preparation in reading, writing, speaking,
mathematics, science, literature, history, and the
arts will be an indispensable foundation …….
…comfort with ideas and abstractions is the
passport to the good life, in which high levels of
education—a very different kind of education
than most of us have had– are going to be the
only security there is.
Learning Criteria
STUDENT CHANGES
#1 WHAT ARE THE CHANGES IN STUDENT
BEHAVIOR,PERFORMANCE, CHOICES,
EFFORT, ETC. THAT YOU BELIEVE ARE
PRECURSORS TO THE IMPROVEMENT IN
STUDENT LEARNING THAT WE SEEK?
Perception/Induction
What do you see in students that you
place at each spot on this continuum?
Fear
Attention
Comfort
Bored
The Payoff of Redesign
What is your view of
ABILITY?
Fixed or Growth
The growth mindset is based on the belief
that your basic qualities are things you can
cultivate through your efforts. Although
people may differ in every which way--- in
their initial talents and aptitudes, interest
or temperaments--- everyone can change
and grow through application and
experience.
Mindset………The New Psychology of Success
Carol Dweck
2006
A TIME THAT YOU HAVE
BEEN SUCCESSFUL
•
•
•
•
ABILITY
EFFORT
DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY
LUCK
Teaching Effort
Time
Persistence---Practice
Patience
Repetition of Success
Differentiation to Create
Motivation
Students differ in their reasons to
work hard….. put in effort
•Survival
•Belonging
•Power
•Freedom
•Fun
Differentiate Through
Choice
• What ways can you build choice into
student assignments that empower
students and connect their effort to
a payoff? How can you combine
responsibility with choice?
Providing Pictures of Success
Future Plans
Updraft/Downdraft
Goal Setting
TEACHER CHANGES
#2 WHAT CHANGES MUST OCCUR IN
INDIVIDUAL STAFF/TEACHER
PRACTICES TO GENERATE THE
CHANGES WE SEEK IN STUDENTS?
Analysis
• Identify classrooms in • Describe in detail the
your school that are
closest to full
implementation of
your vision for
learning.
observable student
behaviors.
• Describe in detail the
observable teacher
behaviors.
Analysis
• Identify classrooms in • Describe in detail the
your school that must
change the most to
reach full
implementation of
your vision for
learning.
observable student
behaviors.
• Describe in detail the
observable teacher
behaviors.
Appraise
Rank your classrooms along this continuum.
1 2
3
Most
Change
Needed
4
5
6
7 8 9 10
11 12
Full
Implementation
STAFF RELATIONSHIPS
#3 ARE THERE CHANGES THAT NEED TO
OCCUR IN THE WAY THAT STAFF
MEMBERS WORK WITH EACH OTHER
(STAFF RELATIONSHIPS) IN ORDER FOR
THE DESIRED INDIVIDUAL STAFF
MEMBER CHANGES TO OCCUR?
IF SO, DESCRIBE.
Teacher Relationships
Parallel Play
Adversarial Relationships
Congenial Relationships
Collegial Relationships
Roland S. Barth
Relationships Within the Schoolhouse
ASCD 2006
Barth: By collegiality I mean four things.
One, teachers talking with one another
about the work they do -- talking in faculty
meetings, in hallways, in classrooms, at
the dinner table about practice.
Second, sharing that craft knowledge,
shouting it from the mountaintop, and
honoring it when someone else is sharing
it.
Third, making our practice mutually visible. That
is, you come into my classroom and watch me
teach seventh-grade biology and I come into your
classroom and watch you teach ninth-grade
geometry, and, afterward, we talk about what we
are doing and why, and what we can learn from
each other.
Above all, collegiality means rooting for the
success of one another. If every adult in the
school is rooting for you, when the alarm clock
rings at six a.m., you jump out of bed to go to that
school.
Conversations about PLCs
If you were observing an effective PLC meeting what might
you hear? See?
How are PLC meetings different from department or
committee meetings?
List possible outcomes from effective PLCs.
Conversations about PLCs
What resistance do staff have to
participating in PLCs?
What benefits from PLCs would staff find
most rewarding?
How willing are you to invest in making
PLCs happen? Why?
Conversations about PLCs
What ideas do you have for increasing PLC
participation?
What do we risk from implementing your
idea? What’s the risk of not trying?
Impact of
Small Learning Communities
•
•
•
Teachers work as a team focused on
individual student success
Teachers build stronger relationships
with students
Students find increasing connections among
courses and with the future
Developing as a TEAM
Individuals--------Franchise----------Team
KNOWING
Knowing is crucial to learning for staff,
students, parents and community.
How can we create structures to increase
knowing?
High School
Collectively focusing on individual
student success
Benefits of Advisories
Breaking Ranks II: Strategies for Leading High School Reform
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Improved academics
More students took college entrance exams
46% of teachers believed they influenced several
advisees to improve grades
Student attitude improved
Student-teacher relationships improved
Dropouts declined
Transition to high school was eased
Liaison for parents was provided
School Leaders
#4 WHAT ARE THE
BEHAVIORS/PRACTICES OF SCHOOL
LEADERSHIP THAT ARE NECESSARY
TO INITIATE, MOTIVATE, AND SUPPORT
THESE CHANGES?
Analysis
What is needed for the teachers at each
spot ?
Unwilling
Unaware
Getting Ready
Started
Developing
Gordon’s Skill
Development Ladder
The Art of Teaching
page 42
Unconsciously
Talented
Unconsciously
Unskilled
Consciously
Unskilled
Unconsciously
Skilled
Consciously
Skilled
•Gordon’s (1974) Skill Development Ladder
What’s Needed? Who Provides It?
EVALUATION
Outside Criteria
MENTORING
SUPERVISION
PEER COACHING
Teacher’s Choice
Key Elements
•KNOWLEDGE
•MODEL
•PRACTICE
•OBSERVATION WITH
FEEDBACK
•ONGOING
COACHING
Joyce and Showers
Trust in Schools: A Core Resource
in Improvement
Respect- Do we acknowledge one another's dignity and ideas? Do
we interact in a courteous way? Do we genuinely talk and listen to
each other?
Competence- Do we believe in each other's ability and willingness
to fulfill our responsibilities effectively? Incompetence left
unaddressed can corrode school wide trust at a devastating rate.
Personal regard- Do we care about each other both professionally
and personally? Are we willing to go beyond our formal roles and
responsibilities if needed to go the extra mile?
Integrity- Can we trust each other to put the interests of children
first, especially when tough decisions have to be made? Do we keep
our word?
Anthony Bryk and Barbara Schneider
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