Planning Land Treatment Practices - ABE

advertisement
Planning
Land Treatment Practices
CNMP Core Curriculum
Section 3 — Land Treatment Practices
CNMP Development
Core Training Curriculum
These course materials have been developed as a
cooperative effort between five land-grant universities
and The Natural Resources Conservation Service.
Copyright Information
Ames, Iowa 50011, (515) 294-4111.
Copyright © 1995-2006, Iowa State University
of Science and Technology. All rights reserved.
Objectives
• To have a basic and clear understanding of land treatment
practices (LTP)
• To lay out those preparations needed in a farm planning visit to
achieve the mutual satisfaction of the landowner/operator,
CNMP writer, and/or NRCS.
• To become knowledgeable about the FOTG Section IV, which is
the guidance with the minimum criteria for the conservation
practice to function as intended.
• To observe a MICROSOFT OUTLOOK version of a single
TOOLKIT slide of a planned conservation practice of the
sample dairy farm plan.
Required Course Materials
• National Planning Procedures Handbook – Part 600.5
• Comprehensive Nutrient Management Planning
Technical Guidance
• NRCS National Environmental Compliance Handbook
(http://policy.nrcs.usda.gov/scripts/lpsiis.dll/H/H_190_6
10_content.htm)
• USDA-NRCS FOTG Section IV found in manuals at
the Soil Conservation District office or on eFOTG –
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/technical/efotg/ .
• RUSLE2 Website –
http://fargo.nserl.purdue.edu/rusle2_dataweb/RUSLE2
_Index.htm
Supplemental Resources
• NRCS Field Office Technical Guide
Sections I – III
• NRCS National Range and Pasture
Handbook
• NRCS Core 4 Conservation Practices
Reference Material
• National Agronomy Manual
Land Treatment Practices
Conservation Plan Development
• Conservation Practices (CPs)
- Land Treatment Practices (LTPs)
• Combining all necessary land treatment practices
makes a conservation system.
• Resource Management System (RMS) criteria,
when met, will resolve all identified resource
concerns
– Protect resource base by meeting soil loss (“T”)
– Maintaining acceptable water quality standards
Land Treatment Practices
Conservation Plan Development
1) On-site field visit
2) Document land application areas
(spreadable acres) or fields
3) Identification of sensitive areas
(sinkholes, streams, springs,
lakes, ponds, wells, gullies, and
wetlands)
4) Locate all property boundaries,
especially adjacent to housing,
subdivisions, highways, and
other urban built-up land
Land Treatment Practices
Conservation Plan Development
5) Mark setbacks,
buffers, waterways,
and other
conservation
practices (existing
and/or planned)
6) Design Information
associated with
planned conservation
practices and systems
7) Soils information (features, limitations, and soil tests)
8) All conservation practices must comply with
federal, state, and local laws.
Conservation Planning Preparations
Begin By:
• Preparing a minimum of three sets of maps for
the planner, landowner, and NRCS
– FSA, state depts. of agriculture, and other
agencies may need finished copies for cost-share
programs and permitting problems such as stream
crossings with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
other water course regulatory agencies, etc.
Map Set Will Include
1. Aerial Map
2. Topographic Map
3. Soils Map
4. Wetland Map w/ Hydric
Soils Identification
5. County Highway Map
Land Treatment Practices
Conservation Plan Development
U.S. Department of Agriculture
CPA-52
Natural Resources Conservation Service
10/03
NRCS-
A. Client:
B. Plan ID No:
C. CMU/Fields:
D. Client’s Objective
E. Purpose and Need for Action
Environmental Evaluation Worksheet
F. Resource
Consideratio
ns
SOIL
Erosion
Condition
Deposition
WATER
Quantity
Quality
H. Alternatives and Effects (ATTACH ADDITIONAL PAGES AS NECESSARY)
Proposed Action
No Action
Alt 1
Alt 2
Land Treatment Practices
Conservation Plan Development
AIR
Quality
Condition
PLANT
Suitability
Condition
Management
ANIMAL
Habitat
Management
G. Economic and Social
Considerations
Land use
Capital
Labor
Management level
Profitability
Risk
I. Effects
Proposed Action
No Action
Alt 1
Alt 2
J. Special Environmental Concerns
(See “Evaluation Procedure Guide Sheets”)
Section 610.71 of National Environmental
Compliance Handbook
K. Effects
Proposed Action
No Action
Alt 1
Alt 2
Clean Water Act/Waters of the U.S
*Coastal Zone Management Areas
Coral Reefs
*Cultural Resources
*Endangered and Threatened Species
Environmental Justice
*Essential Fish Habitat
*Fish and Wildlife Coordination
Floodplain Management
Invasive Species
Migratory Birds
Natural Areas
Prime and Unique Farmlands
Riparian Area
Scenic Beauty
Wetlands
*Wild and Scenic Rivers
* These items may require consultation or coordination between the lead agency/RFO and another governmental unit.
L. Easements, permissions, or permits ______________________________________________________________________________________
M. Mitigation
N. The information recorded above is based on the best available information:
Signature
Title
Date
O. Agencies, persons, and references consulted
P. Findings. Indicate which of the alternatives from Section H is the preferred alternative.
I have considered the effects of this action and the alternatives on the Resource, Economic, and Social Considerations; the Special
Environmental Concerns; and the extraordinary circumstances criteria in the instructions for form NRCS-CPA-52. I find, for the reasons stated
in Section Q below, that the selected alternative:
is not a federal action. No additional analysis is required.
is categorically excluded from further environmental analysis and there are no extraordinary circumstances. No additional analysis is
required.
has been sufficiently analyzed in an existing NRCS environmental document. No additional analysis is required.
may require preparation of an EA or EIS. The action will be referred to the state office.
Q. Rationale supporting the finding
R.
District Conservationist Signature
Date
Conservation Planning
Preparations Begin By:
Preparation for the field visit:
– Planning is done in the field with
the landowner or decision-maker
– Field trip report
– Dress accordingly and
appropriately
– Tools of the trade
– Traveling conditions, physically
challenging
– Beware of aggressive animals
– Buried Utilities: Call Before You
Dig “One Call” for that state
– Local commodity knowledge
– Read up on potential conservation
practices
Conservation Planning Preparations Begin By:
Actual time used for the field visit
– Remember time is
money and landowners
are professionals too
– Don’t rush or lag around
– Perform routine
activities in the office
– Avoid controversial
topics
– Remain amiable
– Study the potential conservation
practice standards and observe
some on other farms
FOTG Conservation Practice
Standards – Section IV
Code
Conservation Practice Name
Unit
Life
Span
Years
For Water
or Wind
Erosion
328
Conservation Crop Rotation
Ac.
1
Both
329
Residue & Tillage Mgmt., No-Till &
Strip Till
Ac.
1
Both
344
Residue & Tillage Mgmt., Seasonal
Ac.
1
Both
345
Residue & Tillage Mgmt., Mulch Till
Ac.
1
Both
346
Residue & Tillage Mgmt., Ridge Till
Ac.
1
Both
340
Cover Crop
Ac.
1
Both
600
Terrace
Ft.
10
Both
362
Diversion
Ft.
10
Both
342
Critical Area Planting
Ac.
10
Both
512
Pasture and Hay Planting
Ac.
5
Both
FOTG Conservation Practice
Standards – Section IV
Code
Conservation Practice Name
Unit
Life
Span
Years
For Water
or Wind
Erosion
386
Field Border
Ft.
10
Both
332
Contour Buffer Strips
Ac.
10
Both
391
Riparian Forest Buffer
Ac.
15
Both
393
Filter Strip
Ac.
10
Both
412
Grassed Waterway
Ac.
10
Both
585
Stripcropping
Ac.
5
Both
528
Prescribed Grazing
Ac.
5
Water
561
Heavy Use Area Protection
Ac.
10
Water
575
Animal Trails and Walkways
Ft.
10
Water
FOTG Conservation Practice
Standards – Section IV
Code
Conservation Practice Name
Unit
Life
Span
Years
For Water
or Wind
Erosion
578
Stream Crossing
Num
10
Water
614
Watering Facility
Num
10
Water
516
Pipeline
Ft.
10
Water
382
Fence
Ft.
10
Water
589C
Cross Wind Trap Strips
Ac.
5
Wind
380
Windbreak/Shelterbelt Est.
Ft.
20
Wind
612
Tree/Shrub Est.
Ac.
20
Wind
422
Hedgerow Planting
Ft.
15
Wind
RUSLE2
http://fargo.nserl.purdue.edu/rusle2_dataweb/RUSLE2_Index.htm
Alternatives Offered
Field
Cropping Rotation
R
6B (worst
sloping
field) T=5
C=cont. corn silage w/
wheat silage, conventional
till
190
Loudon Co.
K
.265
Dewey
Soil
LS
C
1.85
.165
P
1
A
t/ac/yr
15.3
-Corn silage is an erosive crop with high nutrient removal
and creates conditions for high soil losses
- Loafing lots need periodic reestablishment and are
nutrient building and soil losses are also prevalent
- Options to reduce erosion
No-till
Strip cropping
Sod-based rotation
Cover crop
Pasture and hay planting
Contouring
Loafing lot management
Decisions Made
• To convert steep areas in field 6 to hay (6A-Crop,
6B-Grass).
• Continue to produce corn silage with winter cover
– not harvested.
• Consider sod based rotation of corn silage and
grass.
• Probably will not move loafing lots; treat as critical
areas to slow down soil erosion and nutrient
runoff; use watering facilities, fencing, pipelines,
and heavy use area protection.
Alternatives Selected
Conservation Crop Rotation
NT corn silage with winter cover killed in April and planted in October
OR
NT corn silage & wheat silage followed by 2 yrs orchard grass & red clover
Field
R
Loudon
Co
K
Dewey
Soil
LS
C
P
A
t/ac/yr
3
T=5
190
.303
.99
.069
1
3.9
4
T=5
190
.303
1.31
.069
1
5.2
5
T=5
190
.303
1.31
.069
1
5.2
6A
T=5
190
.265
1.52
.069
1
5.3
6A
T=5
190
.265
1.52
.069
.93
4.9
6B
T=5
190
.303
1.85
.006
1
0.6
7
T=5
190
.303
1.85
.043 80% cover 1
4.6
Land Treatment Practices
Sample Conservation Plan
With Land treatment Emphasis
Landowner
Planner
Phone #
Land Use
Code
Conservation Practice Name Field Number
Farm #
Community/ City
Tract #
County
Tract #
State
Applied
Planned
Month/
Units
Partial/Whole
Amount
Year
Amount
Date
Certified Date
Amount
Crop
328
Conservation Crop Rotation
3, 4, 5, 6A
113.8
Ac. May-03
Crop
329A
Residue Mgmt, No-Till/Strip Till
3, 4, 5, 6A
113.8
Ac. May-03
Crop
344
Residue Mgmt, Seasonal
3, 4, 5, 6A
113.8
Ac.
Apr-04
Crop
340
Cover Crop
3, 4, 5, 6A
113.8
Ac. Sep-03
Crop
412
Grassed Waterway
3
3.3
Ac.
Apr-03
3.3 Ac.
Apr-03
3.3 Ac. 4/2003
Crop
393
Filter Strip
4, 5
4.1
Ac. Sep-03
Crop
386
Field Border
4, 5
2000.0
Ft.
Sep-03
Crop
590
*Nutrient Management
3
34.8
Ac.
Apr-03
3.3 Ac.
Apr-03
Crop
590
*Nutrient Management
4, 5, 6A
82.3
Ac.
Apr-03
Crop
595
*Pest Management
3, 4, 5, 6A
121.2
Ac.
Apr-03
Hay
512
Pasture & Hay Planting
6B
32.5
Ac. Sep-04
Hay
511
Forage Harvest Management
1, 2
46.8
Ac.
Apr-03
46.8 Ac.
Apr-03
46.8 Ac. 4/2003
Hay
511
Forage Harvest Management
6B
32.5
Ac. May-03
Hay
590
*Nutrient Management
1, 2, 6B, 7
127.2
Ac.
Apr-03
Hay
595
*Pest Management
1, 2, 6B, 8
127.2
Ac.
Apr-03
46.8 Ac.
Apr-03
Pasture
512
Pasture & Hay Planting
7
47.9
Ac.
Jun-04
46.8 Ac.
Apr-03
Pasture
528
Prescribed Grazing
7
47.9
Ac.
Jun-04
Pasture
575
Animal Trails & Walkways
7
250'
Ft.
Mar-03
Pasture
382
Fence
7
8000'
Ft.
Jan-04
Pasture
516
Pipeline
7
2500'
Ft.
Jun-03
Pasture
614
Watering Facility
7
4
No.
Jul-03
Pasture
561
Heavy Use Area Protection
7
0.2
Ac.
Jul-03
Pasture
342
Critical Area Planting
7
0.1
Ac. Feb-04
Pasture
590
*Nutrient Management
7
47.9
Ac.
Jun-04
Pasture
595
*Pest Management
7
47.9
Ac. Aug-04
Headquarters
313
*Waste Storage Facility
8
1
No. Feb-03
1 No.
Feb-03
1 No. 2/2003
Headquarters
317
*Composting Facility
13
1
No. Feb-04
Headquarters
634
*Manure Transfer
3, 4, 5, 6A
113.8
Ac. Feb-03
113.8 Ac.
Feb-03
113.8 Ac. 2/2003
Headquarters
362
*Diversion
8
200'
Ft.
Feb-03
200' Ft.
Feb-03
200' 2/2003
Headquarters
558
*Roof Runoff Structure
8
1
No. Feb-03
1 No.
Mar-03
1 No. 3/2003
* These conservation practices are not considered for a Land Treatment Plan, but are included in this Sample Conservation Plan to only show how to keep up
with all the conservation practices, what fields, acreages match, and the correct planning month and year that's used. This info is also valuable to the TSP
and NRCS, and even more so to the landowner, as he can see at a glance all the conservation practices he/she is responsible for instead of looking throughout
the CNMP for these practices.
Code 328
Conservation Crop Rotation
Crop
Tract: 1
CONSERVATION CROP ROTATION
Crops will be grown in a recurring sequence to reduce sheet and rill erosion, maintain soil organic
matter, improve water use efficiency, manage pests, and provide food for domestic livestock.
The cropping sequence will consist of corn silage followed by a small grain cover crop.
Field
3A
4
5
6A
Total:
Planned
Amount
31.5
33.6
29.8
18.9
113.8
ac.
ac.
ac.
ac.
ac.
Month
4
4
4
4
Year
2003
2003
2003
2003
Applied
Amount
Date
CNMP Element
Land Treatment Practices
The Bottom Line
CONSERVATION
PLANNING IS DONE IN
THE FIELD WITH THE
LANDOWNER
Download