Volunteering

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Jarlath Burns
Volunteering
Exercise 1: Why I am involved in
my Club?
Why do people Volunteer?
• Because they were asked!
• They grew up with GAA in their family
• They moved into a new area and wanted to
get to know the community.
• They enjoy it
• It keeps them busy/occupied
• They make and keep friendships
• It helps their career
Why do people Volunteer?
• They got involved via their children
• They wanted to “give something back” after
their playing career.
• They want to be associated with something
positive and successful
• It was a family tradition
Why do people Volunteer?
• Because they came to a new member's night
and felt very welcome
• They became unemployed for a while and felt
their occupation had a lot to offer
• They had retired early and had an interest in
GAA and had now "time on their hands".
Club Maith
• Most volunteers across society generally
are women … but often our GAA Clubs
aren’t in a position to capitalise on that.
• Fewer older people tend to volunteer …
but those who do tend to deliver more
hours of input than anyone else!
Why Do People Remain
Volunteers?
• They feel valued; appreciated; and respected
• They’re part of a group and feel part of “the
team”
• It gives them a sense of pride … the GAA is a
“badge of honour”
• Their work is productive
and worthwhile.
Why do People Not Volunteer?
• They weren’t asked!
• They think they don’t have the skills required
• They think they’ll be over-burdened with work
… and will never “escape” from it
• They don’t have the confidence …or the time
… or the interest
Why do People Not Volunteer?
• They don’t know how to get involved
• Lack of interest/enthusiasm
• Clubs don’t sell themselves/lack of
marketing/communication
• They don’t know about the GAA or our Club
(much as we might think they do) … or, worse,
they have a poor image of them.
What are the main tasks in a club?
‘Warm Body’ Recruitment
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Distribution of brochures
Posters
Speaking to groups
Notices in appropriate media
Word of Mouth
Targeted Recruitment
• The targeted campaign requires a carefully
planned approach to a small audience.
• Use this method when you are trying to
recruit volunteers that need to have specific
skills or not commonly found characteristics.
• A targeted campaign requires, at the outset,
that you answer several questions:
Targeted Recruitment
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What do we need?
Who could provide this?
How can we communicate with them?
Working through such questions will help you
identify and locate the volunteers that you
need. Once you locate a source of such
volunteers, simply take your recruitment
message directly to them.
Examples of Targeted Recruitment
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Bus Driver
Child Protection Officer
Insurance Officer
Scór Officer
Drugs Awareness Officer
ICT Co-Ordinator
Team Doctor
How can we improve our
volunteer base?
• First, we need to let people know that our Club (and
the GAA) is:
• Open and welcoming to them and to everyone else: it should
be a ‘place of doors, not a place of walls”
• An energetic place, full of enthusiastic people.
• Making a major contribution (in all sorts of ways).
• A place where we don’t waste people’s time (i.e. we’re
punctual and well-organised).
• Safe (especially for children) and well run
• Part of a huge, vibrant and successful organisation.
Bringing the New
Volunteers
on Board
Identifying our volunteers
is only part of the task. Once
they’re willing to help, best practice tells us to:
• Bring them along and formally introduce them to the
Club
• Let them know “who’s-who-and what’s- what”
• Explain what it is you want them to do and make
sure it’s a specific, clear-cut piece of work
…bringing the New Volunteers
on Board
• Avoid, at all costs, over-loading them: don’t throw
anyone in at the deep end … and be clear about the
time commitment involved
• Provide them with support … maybe get an existing
volunteer to mentor them
• Child Protection and other issues mean we shouldn’t
just let people “turn up un-announced” and walk
into a role in our Club. We need to be sure we have
the right people in the right places.
• A GAA Club should not just be an “open house” for
people.
Keeping Our Volunteers On
Board
It’s all-too-easy to take volunteers for granted. To keep
everyone enthusiastic and refreshed we should:
• Check that we haven’t overloaded anyone and keep
feeding back to them.
• Give them variety: don’t leave anyone in the same
place/role for too long.
• Provide training: that’s what the Ulster Council’s CPD
programme is for!
• Constantly acknowledge our volunteers, formally and
informally.
area of Club
business
we need help
with…
administration
Web site
Grant forms
PR
coaching
Go games
Links with schools
culture/heritage
Scór
Club history
Language
facilities
Cleaning
Grass-cutting
Maintenance
fund-raising
Lotto Tickets
Gala Dinner
Sponsorship
teams
Transport
Gear
Referee Liaison
others
who could help
us?
who’ll ask them?
Getting out to Members
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Club Notes
Website
Word of Mouth
Text Message
E mail
Letter
Database of Members
Agnew
Kathleen
12 Carrive Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Agnew
Peter
12 Carrive Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Bellew
Brendan
Glassdrummmond
Silverbridge
Newry
Bellew
Laura
Glassdrummmond
Silverbridge
Newry
Boyle
Paudie
Newry Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Bradley
Jackie
12 Moylin Close
Silverbridge
Newry
Bradley
Martin
12 Moylin Close
Silverbridge
Newry
Burns
Coleman
21 East Cloghogue Road
Creggan
Newry
Burns
Rosemary
Longfield Road
Forkhill
Newry
Burns
Jerome
Longfield Road
Forkhill
Newry
Burns
Suzanne
Tullymacrieve
Mullaghban
Newry
Burns
Jarlath
Tullymacrieve
Mullaghban
Newry
Burns
Paudie
Glassdrummond Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Byrne
Brendan
127 Newry Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Byrne
Eugene
127 Newry Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Byrne
Marie
127 Newry Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Byrne
Kevin
127 Newry Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Callaghan
Jim
39 Silverbridge Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Callaghan
Brian
Ballsmill Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Campbell
Adrian
32 Carnally Road
Silverbridge
Newry
Using the Database
• Liam a chara
I am writing to all our members with a view to sharing out the tasks which have to be
carried out around the club every week. As you know, our club is always on the
lookout for new volunteers. As a valued member, we would appreciate a
volunteer commitment from you if you would be prepared to share an hour or two
each week to help us out. I have attached a list of tasks which need to be done
every week. None of these jobs last any more than one hour and will be reviewed
every three months, so the minimum commitment you can give is one hour per
week and for three months. If after this time you wish to end your involvement,
that is OK, but we would hope you would continue to help us out.
Please take a look at the attached sheet on which we have listed all tasks which take
about an hour to accomplish. I would be grateful if you could simply tick the task
that you can do and sign it. You can post it back, or leave it into the club.
I appreciate your help.
Le meas,
Cathaoirleach an Chlub
Registration Night
• Brand New Audience
• Fertile Ground for New Recruits
• Parents are usually keen to get involved, but
How can they become Involved?
• They think if they don’t have coaching skills or
a playing background, they cannot contribute.
• It’s up to us to give them tasks that can make
them feel valued!
Registration Form
• Volunteer Details:
• Are you available to help out with some club
activities: YES / NO (Please Delete As
Appropriate). If Yes circle what you are
interested in: Coaching / Admin / Food /
Hospitality / First Aid / IT / Public Relations /
Photography / Entertainment / Transport /
Fundraising / Match Days / Other?
Registration Form
• After the Registration Night, the information gathered is
placed on the Database of Members and you have a list of
people and their skills.
• These people are then contacted by a friend on the
committee and given times, procedures and other
information relevant to their volunteer commitment.
• If necessary, a rota is then drawn up to ensure that everyone
who has volunteered gets a chance to do what they have
volunteered for.
• Work on the basis of a small commitment at first which can
grow if the person wants to increase their involvement.
Sure Start Programme
• ABC’s of Athleticism i.e. Agility, Balance, Coordination and
Speed tasks suitable for this phase of the LTPD
• RJT of Athletics i.e. Tasks to include Running, Jumping and
Throwing
• These two areas will incorporate most of the warm up
material used at this stage of a child’s development
• CPKS i.e. Catching, Passing, Kicking and Striking balls of
various sizes and textures
• These tasks will make up the bulk of Part 2 of the session.
• Modified and Adapted games to suit all ability groups
• These activities will make up Part 3 of a session
Sure Start Programme
• To run this programme requires all parents to STAY!
• To enrol the child on the programme, you must give a
One Hour Commitment
• Course is One Hour per week over the Winter usually
on a Sunday
• It is a series of stations from which children move to
the next one.
• Parents encourage each child on the station.
• No ball/athletic/coaching skills required.
Go Raibh Maith Agaibh
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