Universal Design for Learning Introduction and

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Universal Design for Learning
Welcome
1. Pick up the UDL handout
2. Review handout contents
3. Complete the following now:
-UDL Pre-Survey
-UDL Techniques Worksheet
4. My email: [email protected]
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Universal Design for Learning
Introduction and Overview
Objectives:
• History of Universal Design (UD)
• Principles of Universal Design (UD)
• Application of UD Principles to Higher
Education
• Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
• UDL Application and Strategies
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History of Universal Design
• First developed in 1990’s for architectural
design (Ron Mace, North Carolina State
University’s Center for Universal Design).
• Accessibility features helped not only
disabled, but were beneficial to all.
• New conceptual framework – big picture
world view.
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Universal Design Definition
• Universal Design is the design of products
and environments to be usable by all
people, to the greatest extent possible,
without the need for adaptation or
specialized design.
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Principles of Universal Design
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Equitable Use
Flexibility in Use
Simple and Intuitive
Perceptible Information
Tolerance for Error
Low Physical Effort
Size and Space for Approach and Use
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Application of UD Principles to
Higher Education
• Application of UD to Higher Education
through:
– Design of environments (buildings,
classrooms)
– Design of tools (documents, websites)
– Design of learning (courses, activities,
assignments, assessments)
• Provide all students fair access to
information and opportunities to learn.
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Universal Design for Learning
(UDL) in Higher Education
• Design of classroom, materials and
instruction is usable by all students w/o
adaptation
• Includes physical layout, lecture, print,
web, and all testing
• Meets universal needs of all students:
mutual respect, trust, clear expectations
and outcomes
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Universal Design for Learning
(UDL) Key Principles
• Provide multiple representations of
information.
– Give learners multiple means of acquiring information
and knowledge.
• Provide multiple means of expression.
– Provide learners alternatives for demonstrating what
they know.
• Provide multiple means of engagement.
– Tap learner’s interests, offer appropriate challenges,
and increase motivation
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UDL Classroom Application and
Strategies
• Overview and Objectives
– Course Syllabi
– Handouts/e-text
– Textbook
– Student Organization
– Communication
– Lecture
– Questioning Techniques
– Methods of Assessment
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UDL Strategies
• Optimal Learning =
– Classroom with good seating, lighting, and
acoustics for listening
– Communication that is clear and
comprehensible in print or oral
– Monitor student learning via questioning
techniques, assignments, class activities,
and tests
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Course Syllabi
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Says “Syllabus
Linear Text
Comprehensible Language, No Jargon
Basics: Course Title, Instructor, Term, Days,
Times, Room, Phone, email, Office Hours
• Course Description, Objectives, SLOs, Textbook,
Materials, Grading
• College Policies/Student Responsibilities:
Attendance, Conduct, Plagiarism,
Accomodations, Academic Success Center
(Tutoring), Language Acquisition Lab
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Handouts/e-text
• Font: 12 or 14 in Arial or Tahoma
• No CAPITALS, Tabbing consistent
• Bobby Proof: Navigable by screen reader, linear,
picture captions
• Linear, Color coded
• Notes posted on web prior to lecture
• Context Embedded vs. Context Reduced:
comprehensible, context clues, student
experience, frame of reference, examples
• Scaffolds builds meaning in vocabulary &
concepts which leads to new V & C, etc.
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Textbook
• Tell Textbook representatives that you
must have:
– Available in e-text for assistive technology
– Logical order of chapters and information
– Bolded Key Vocabulary and Concepts
– User friendly Table of Contents, Glossary
and Index
– Supplemental CDs/Web is accessible
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Student Organization
• Textbook Pre-reading: Cover info, Publisher,
Edition, ISBN, Table of Contents, Glossary,
Index, Bolding, etc.
• Web/Blackboard/Webadvisor
• Note-taking: Model on board, Course, Date,
Categorize by topic, details, use of bullets,
underline, highlighting, confer with peer or
instructor
• Planner: Students take out and write in
homework, identify daily times to study
• Monitor Grades: Student identifies where they
will record grades, take out for each grade
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Communication
• Expectations: Collegiality, mutual respect,
diversity of learners/processing time, turn taking,
topic maintenance
• Send “I” messages (initially at least!)
• Repeat, paraphrase key points
• Preview and control vocabulary, define jargon
• Choral repetition of multisyllabic new terms
(weak readers/difficulty sequencing sounds)
• Less is more, use precise language
• Body language and tone of voice support
meaning
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• Increase self-insight
Lecture
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Provide class objectives, emphasize critical info
Visual Cues: use board, Tablet PC, PowerPoint
Give time for information processing
Linear/repetitive/paraphrase
Connect with experiences/frame of reference
Move around room, monitor notes and
participation, use clickers
• Vary with student exploration, activity
• During activity develop questions based on
student outcomes
• Post accessible notes on web
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UDL Questioning Techniques
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Ensures active learning environment
Monitors real-time learning
Keeps students ready to learn/participate
Confirms student comprehension
Tests quality of instruction
Allows for repetition, paraphrasing
Assesses working memory (critical skill)
Assesses critical thinking
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? Techniques
• Start with review questions to connect old learning to
new and overall objectives of class.
• Have student make the connections of old with new and
identify why this is important.
• Wait…give the gift of processing time
• Wrong answer? Praise attempt. Research shows that
best learning occurs from mistakes!
• Repetition = memory. Repetition (5X) of key points by
multiple students enhances memory, automaticity, and
enforces importance of information.
• Vary who answers:
1. “Raise your hand if you can tell me…”, then wait
2. Call on specific student. Incorrect answer? Call on
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another; return to first, so they can answer correctly
Traditional Methods of Assessment
Traditional:
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True and False
Multiple Choice
Fill in blank, short answer
Essay
Take home test
College Paper,
Project, portfolio
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UDL Methods of Assessment
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Student choice from multiple options
Test in same manner you teach
Untimed tests
Vary Test Format
Oral Exam
Test-Study-Retest
Assignment Instructions are Oral/Written
Clickers
Quick Surveys: electronic or print
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Writing Assignments
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Provide Consistent Grading Rubrics
Allow for Drafts and Revisions
Provide Work Examples: A, B, C, D, F
Reflection Papers
One Minutes Papers
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Testing Tips
Relaxation Techniques
• 4-5 deep cleansing breaths
• Positive mantra
• Body tapping
Weird Research
• Chew gum, sip water
Email me for electronic version of Workshop
[email protected]
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